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Ministry of Defence

Lest We Forget
British Legion
The Royal British Legion

THE LEYS SCHOOL, CAMBRIDGE - WAR MEMORIAL 1939-1945

World War 2 - Detailed information
Compiled and Copyright © The Leys School and John Harding 2005

ACKERNLEY

Peter Rowland

Ackernley was born in 1921. He came to The Leys in 1934 at the age of 13 and went into North B House. He was a Prefect, an excellent marksman and a devout Christian.

On leaving school, Ackernley went up to Christ’s College, University of Cambridge to read Natural Sciences.

Upon graduation, Ackernley joined the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve and trained as a radio-engineer. He was killed on active service on 18 December 1942 at the age of 21, having reached the rank of Pilot Officer. He was on the same plane as Old Leysian William Pickles, who had gone through school, university and RAF service with Ackernley. He is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey, panel number 68.

ALDRIDGE

Robert Braxton Morring

Aldridge was born in 1915. He came to The Leys in 1927 at the age of 12 and went into School House. He was a noted scholar and a Cadet Sergeant.

On leaving school, Aldridge went up to Christ’s College, University of Cambridge, and read Law. In September 1941 he qualified as a Solicitor and joined his father’s firm in Hampshire.

In late 1941, Aldridge joined the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, serving with the Administrative and Special Duties Branch of Fighter Command, stationed in the north of Scotland. In June 1943, he was sent to North Africa, before joining the Headquarters Staff of Iraq and Persia at Habbaniya. He died after a long illness on 27 April 1946 at the age of 31, having reached the rank of Flight Lieutenant. He is buried at Poole Cemetery, Dorset, grave number 11. 9221.

ASHWORTH

Edward Robert Radford

Ashworth was born in 1913 in Cheshire. He came to The Leys in 1927 at the age of 13 and went into North A House. He was a Cadet Lance-Corporal.

On leaving school, Ashworth worked for several charitable causes including the Ardwick Lads’ Club, the Manchester Hospital for Consumption and Diseases of the Throat and Chest and for the Youth Hostels Association.

At the outbreak of war, Ashworth joined the Royal Artillery and was posted to the 81st Anti-Tank Regiment. He died of illness on 10 December 1941 at the age of 28, having reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He is commemorated at Golders Green Crematorium, Middlesex, panel number 1.

BLORE

Donald Plowman

Blore was born in 1921 in Worcestershire. He came to The Leys in 1935 at the age of 14 and went into School House. He was an NCO in the Junior Training Corps and won First Colours at Football.

On leaving school, Blore was apprenticed to the Austin Motor Works at Longbridge and joined the Royal Armoured Corps (Territorial Army).

At the outbreak of war, Blore was mobilised and in 1941 gained a commission in his father’s Regiment, the York and Lancaster Regiment. He served with distinction in North Africa, Sicily and Italy. He was killed in action during the Anzio landings on 13 October 1943 at the age of 22, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is buried at Bari War Cemetery, Italy, grave number X. C. 32.

BRAY

Basil Richard

Bray was born in 1914 in Sheffield. He came to The Leys in 1927 at the age of 13 and went into North A House. He was a Prefect, Cadet Sergeant, a noted scholar, a member of the Dramatic Society and won Second Colours at Football.

On leaving school, Hallett went up to St. John’s College, University of Cambridge to read Medicine, before completing his studies at the University of London.

At the outbreak of war, Hallett joined the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve and was sent to the Mediterranean with HMS Greyhound. He was killed in action during the Battle of Crete on 22 May 1941. He was aged 27 and had reached the rank of Surgeon Lieutenant. He is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial, panel number 60. 3.

BRIGGS

Eric Douglas

Briggs was born in 1915 in Nottinghamshire. He came to The Leys in 1929 at the age of 14 and went into School House. He was a noted scholar and a member of the Bisley VIII.

On leaving school, Briggs went up to Jesus College, University of Cambridge to read Law. He was subsequently articled to a firm of solicitors in Nottingham.

At the outbreak of war, Briggs gained a commission in the Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). After training in Britain, he was sent with his battalion to Tunisia. He was killed in action on 24 April 1943 at the age of 28, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is buried at Medjez-El-Bab Memorial, Tunisia, grave number 24.

BURALL

Douglas Charles

Burall was born in 1914. He came to The Leys in 1928 at the age of 14 and went into North B House. He was a Member of the Bisley VIII and a Cadet Corporal.

On leaving school, Burall worked for the Scout Movement and Wisbech Chamber of Commerce.

In 1944, Burall gained a commission in the Royal Norfolk Regiment and served with distinction during the final stages of the Burma campaign as part of the 14th Army. At the end of the war he was posted to India. He died as a result of an accident with a Jeep on 17 May 1946. He was aged 32 and had reached the rank of Captain. He is buried at Ranchi War Cemetery, grave number 3. B. 6.

CHAMPNESS

John Alec

Champness was born in 1908 in Surrey. He came to The Leys in 1925 at the age of 17 and went into North A House. He was a School Prefect and won First Colours at Cricket and Second Colours at Football.

On leaving school, Champness went up to St. John’s College, University of Cambridge, and subsequently trained as a Chartered Accountant.

In 1939, Champness joined the Royal Air Force (58 Squadron). He was killed in action over Germany on 14 November 1940 aged 32, having reached the rank of Flying Officer. He is buried at Becklingen War Cemetery, Niedersachsen, grave number 27. C. 14.

CLIFF

Pearse Griffin

Cliff was born in 1916. He came to The Leys in 1930 at the age of 14 and went into North B House. He was a House Prefect, A Cadet Sergeant, and won Swimming and Water Polo Colours and First Colours at Football and Hockey.

At the outbreak of war, Cliff joined the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve and was posted to the naval air station HMS Goshawk, in Trinidad. He died on active service on 13 June 1941 at the age of 25, having reached the rank of Sub-Lieutenant. He is commemorated on the Lee-On-Solent Memorial, Hampshire, panel number 2. 6.

CLOUSTON

Rudolf Haken Stewart

Clouston was born in 1913. He came to The Leys in 1926 at the age of 13 and went into North B House.

At the outbreak of war, Clouston enlisted in the Royal Army Service Corps and was sent to Nigeria. He died on active service on 4 April 1944 at the age of 31, having reached the rank of Corporal. He is buried at Yaba Cemetery, Lagos, grave number 4. E. 10.

COOKE

Kenneth Crossly

Cooke was born in 1910. He came to The Leys in 1923 at the age of 13 and went into North A House. He was a Member of the Bisley VIII and won First Colours at Football.

Before the outbreak of war, Cooke joined the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve and trained as a Pilot with 62 Squadron. In 1939, his squadron were sent to Singapore and flew Blenheim bombers on coastal patrols and training missions. Cooke was killed in action on the first day of the Japanese invasion of Malaya on 8 December 1941. He was aged 31 and had reached the rank of Flying Officer. He is buried at Taiping War Cemetery, grave number 2. G. 16.

CRAWFORD

William Arthur

Crawford was born in 1924 in Dublin. He came to The Leys in 1937 at the age of 13 and went into East House. He was Captain of Tennis and won First Colours at Hockey.

In 1942, Crawford joined the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve and trained as Flight Engineer. He then joined 199 Squadron and flew bombing missions over enemy territory in Wellington and Stirling bombers. He was killed in action over Germany on 1 September 1943 at the age of 19, having reached the rank of Sergeant. He is buried at Berlin 1939-1945 War Cemetery, Berlin, grave number 5. A. 32-37.

CROOK

David Moore

Crook was born in 1914 in Cambridgeshire. He came to The Leys in 1928 at the age of 14 and went into North A House. He was a House Prefect, a Cadet Corporal, and won Second Colours at Football.

On leaving school, Crook joined his father’s sporting equipment firm, becoming a director in 1937. He also learned to fly and in 1938 joined 609 Squadron of the Royal Auxiliary Air Force, flying Spitfires.

At the outbreak of war, Crook’s squadron was mobilised. He took part in the Battle of Britain and won the Distinguished Flying Cross. He subsequently wrote a famous book, ‘Spitfire Pilot’, about his experiences. In 1942, 609 Squadron was re-equipped with Typhoons for ground attack sorties. Crook was killed in action during one of these missions on 18 December 1944. He was aged 30 and had reached the rank of Flight Lieutenant. He is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey panel number 202.

CURRANT

Percy Norman

Currant was born in 1909. He came to The Leys in 1924 at the age of 13 and went into School House. He was a House Prefect, Cadet Quartermaster Sergeant and won First Colours at Hockey.

On leaving school, Currant spent two years in Germany before joining his father’s manufacturing business in Luton. He continued to play hockey and represented the Eastern Counties. He also gained a commission in the Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire Regiment (Territorial Army).

At the outbreak of war, Currant was mobilised and served with distinction in North Africa and Sicily. In 1944, he transferred to the Seaforth Highlanders. He was killed in action on 14 September 1944 at the age of 35, having reached the rank of Major. He is buried at Geel War Cemetery, Antwerpen, grave number II. B. 4.

DAVEY

Brian

Davey was born in 1919. He came to The Leys in 1932 at the age of 13 and went into East House. He won First Colours at Football and Hockey and captained the Second Cricket XI.

Before the outbreak of war, Davey joined the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. He died of injuries received on active service on 12 June 1941 aged 22, having reached the rank of Pilot Officer. He is buried at Rochford (St. Andrew) Churchyard, Essex, grave number 2.

DAVIDSON

John Tapscott

Davidson was born in 1915. He came to The Leys in 1928 at the age of 13 and went into West House.

At the outbreak of war, Davidson joined the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve and trained as a Pilot. He was posted to 137 Squadron and flew Hurricane and Typhoon fighter planes on sorties over enemy territory. He was killed on active service on 14 August 1943 at the age of 28, having reached the rank of Flying Officer. He is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey, panel number 124.

DEAKIN

Charles

Deakin was born in 1888. He came to The Leys in 1900 at the age of 12 and went into North A House. He was a Cadet Lance-Corporal.

On leaving school, Deakin gained a commission in the Worcestershire Regiment and by the outbreak of the First World War, was on the Brigade Staff. He was badly wounded during the First Battle of Ypres, but later served at Gallipoli. He was then sent on attachment to the War Office where he was awarded the Order of the British Empire and Brevet Majority. At this time, he was the President of the Old Leysian Union. After the war, he served in India, China and Palestine.

At the outbreak of the Second World War, Deakin was commanding a battalion in India. He returned to Britain to join South Western Command. He died of illness on 8 March 1944 at the age of 56, having reached the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel. He is buried at Bridstow (St. Bridget) Churchyard, Herefordshire.

DEAN

Alan

Dean was born in 1923 in Great Shelford. He came to The Leys in 1936 at the age of 13 and went into East House.

Immediately on leaving school, Dean enlisted in the Royal Navy as an Ordinary Seaman. He was killed in action on 31 January 1942, when his ship, HMS Culver was torpedoed in the North Atlantic. He was aged 19. He is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial, Hampshire, panel number 68. 2. See also Great Shelford and Great Shelford Village Hall.

DEAN

Philip Richard

Dean was born in 1922 in Buckinghamshire. He came to The Leys in 1935 at the age of 13 and went into West House. He was a Senior Prefect, Head of House, a member of the Classical Sixth, Captain of the Second Cricket XI, and won First Colours at Football.

On leaving school, Dean was awarded a Kitchener Scholarship to Oriel College, University of Oxford. However, he postponed his studies to join the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve and train as a pilot. He was killed in a flying accident on 26 September 1942 at the age of 20, having reached the rank of Pilot Officer. He is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey, panel number 69.

DIMALOW

Phillip Keith

Dimalow was born in 1915. He came to The Leys in 1928 at the age of 13 and went into North A House.

On leaving school, Dimalow went into business in South America.

At the outbreak of war, Dimalow gained a commission in the Durham Light Infantry. He served with distinction in North Africa, Sicily and Italy. He was killed in action during the Battle of Monte Cassino on 3 February 1944. He was aged 29 and had reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is commemorated on the Cassino Memorial, Frosinone, panel number 10.

DIXON

Peter Cory

Dixon was born in 1915. He came to The Leys in 1928 at the age of 13 and went into West House. He was a Cadet Lance-Corporal.

On leaving school, Dixon studied law and joined his father’s firm of solicitors, becoming a partner in 1939.

At the outbreak of war, Dixon enlisted in the Royal Artillery as a Private and served with distinction in France. On his return to Britain he gained a commission and served in North Africa with the 8th Army being severely wounded at Sidi-Rezegh. After recovering he became a training officer in Yorkshire before being attached to the Royal Marine Commandos as part of a bombing unit. He took part in the D-Day landings but was killed on 7 June 1944. He was aged 29 and had reached the rank of Captain. He is buried at La Delivrande War Cemetery, Calvados, grave number IX. A. 10.

DOWER

John Gordon

Dower was born in 1900. He came to The Leys in 1913 at the age of 13 and went into North A House. He was a Prefect, a noted scholar and a Cadet Corporal

On leaving school, Dower went up to St. John’s College, University of Cambridge to read History. He then trained as an Architect.

EASTMAN

Peter

Eastman was born in 1914. He came to The Leys in 1928 at the age of 14 and went into North A House. He won First Colours at Cricket and Second Colours at Hockey.

On leaving school, Eastman went up to Jesus College, University of Cambridge

At the outbreak of war, Davey joined the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve and served with distinction in the Middle East, flying Wellington bombers. He was killed in action in Libya on 26 November 1941 at the age of 27, having reached the rank of Pilot Officer. He is commemorated on the Alamein Memorial, Egypt, panel number 241.

FERNANDO

George Earl Derick

Fernando was born in 1919 in Ceylon. He came to The Leys in 1932 at the age of 13 and went into West House.

On leaving school, Fernando returned to Ceylon.

At the outbreak of war, Fernando gained a commission in the Ceylon Light Infantry. He died on 7 April 1943 at the age of 24, having reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He is buried at Colombo (Kanatte) General Cemetery, grave number 4A. R. 28.

FRANCE

Dennis Hudson

France was born in 1906. He came to The Leys in 1920 and went into North A House. He was Captain of the Bisley VIII.

On leaving school, France travelled extensively around Canada, before returning to Britain to enlist in the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve.

In June 1941, France was sent to the Middle East with 208 Squadron. He died of injuries sustained on active service on 5 April 1943 at the age of 37, having reached the rank of Leading Aircraftsman. He is buried at Habbaniya War Cemetery, Iraq, grave number 2. C. 3.

FRANCE

Gerald Leslie Ashburner

France was born in 1902 in Newcastle-Upon-Tyne. He came to The Leys in 1916 at the age of 14 and went into North A House. He was a Prefect, Cadet Company Sergeant-Major and won First Colours at Hockey.

On leaving school, France went up to Jesus College, University of Cambridge. He then embarked upon a career as a chemical manufacturer in his native city and joined the Royal Northumberland Fusiliers (Territorial Army).

By the outbreak of war, France was in command of a company, and was subsequently promoted to GSO Weapon Training, Northern Command. Ill-health forced him to relinquish this position in 1943, but he obtained an appointment, in a civilian capacity, in the War Office. He died on 1 July 1944 at the age of 42, having reached the rank of Major. He is commemorated at Newcastle-Upon-Tyne (West Road) Crematorium, Northumberland, panel number 3.

GAUNT

Geoffrey Norman

Gaunt came to The Leys in 1930 and went into School House. He was a Cadet Lance-Corporal and won Swimming Colours.

On leaving school, Gaunt embarked upon a business career in the tobacco industry and trained as a Pilot in the Auxiliary Air Force.

At the outbreak of war, Gaunt was a member of 609 Squadron and flew Spitfires over France and Britain. He was killed in action during the Battle of Britain on 15 September 1940, having reached the rank of Pilot Officer. He is buried at Salendine Nook Baptist Chapelyard, Huddersfield, grave number D. 337.

GEARY

Paul

Gearey was born in 1917 in Yorkshire. He came to The Leys in 1931 at the age of 14 and went into North A House.

On leaving school, Gearey joined the Royal Air Force and trained as a pilot with 31 Squadron.

At the outbreak of war, Gearey was stationed in India and with the Japanese invasion of Burma in December 1941 he began flying supply missions in support of the XIVth Army. He was killed in a flying accident in India when his Dakota crashed during a monsoon gale on 24 July 1942. He was aged 25 and had reached the rank of Flight Lieutenant. He is buried at Madras War Cemetery, Madras, grave number 1. F. 10.

GEEN

William Gerard

Geen was born in 1927. He came to The Leys in 1940 at the age of 13 and went into West House. He was a House Prefect, a Cadet Corporal, and won Tennis Colours.

On leaving school in 1944, Geen embarked upon military training in Belfast and subsequently gained a commission in the Royal Engineers. He was then sent to Egypt but was killed in a motor accident on 23 September 1946. He was aged 19 and had reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He is buried at Fayid War Cemetery, grave number 6. A. 7.

GOUGH

Ralph Bernard

Gough was born in 1912. He came to The Leys in 1924 at the age of 16 and went into West House.

On leaving school, Gough joined the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve as a Telegraphist.

At the outbreak of war, Gough joined HMS Exmouth. He was killed in action when the ship was torpedoed on 21 January 1940 off the coast of Northern Scotland, at the age of 28. He is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial, Hampshire, panel number 45. 1.

GUEST

John Cameron

Guest was born in 1922 in Gloucestershire. He came to The Leys in 1935 at the age of 13 and went into East House. He was a House Prefect.

On leaving school in 1940, Guest gained a commission in the Anti-Aircraft Regiment, Royal Artillery. He was killed on active service on 8 October 1941 at the age of 21, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is buried at Bournemouth North Cemetery, Hampshire, grave number E. 4. 90.

HALLETT

Anthony Frederick

Hallett was born in 1918 in Southgate. He came to The Leys in 1931 at the age of 13 and went into North A House. He was a House Prefect, a noted scholar, and won Second Colours at Hockey, Football and Swimming.

On leaving school, Hallett went up to Merton College, University of Oxford and captained the college Hockey team.

At the outbreak of war, Hallett joined the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. He was killed on active service on 30 June 1941 at the age of 23, having reached the rank of Sub-Lieutenant. He is commemorated on the Lee-On-Solent Memorial, Hampshire, panel number 2. 6.

HEAP

Charles Hubert Leathly

Heap was born in 1910 in Cheshire. He came to The Leys in 1924 at the age of 14 and went into North A House.

On leaving school, Heap studied at the Manchester School of Technology. He then joined his father’s business, becoming Work’s Manager and subsequently, Sales Director.

In 1940, Heap enlisted in the Royal Corps of Signals. He then gained a commission in the Lancashire Fusiliers and was Assistant Camp Commandant at a Divisional Headquarters in Northern Ireland. In June 1944, he went to France on attachment to the Royal Welch Fusiliers as a Pioneer Officer. He was killed attempting to disarm a German anti-tank mine on 19 August 1944. He was aged 34 and had reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is buried at Bayeux War Cemetery, Calvados, grave number XIX. E. 4.

HOCKEY

Frank Spenser

Hockey was born in 1914 in Cambridge. He came to The Leys in 1927 at the age of 13 and went into North A House. He was a House Prefect and a talented tennis player.

On leaving school, Pickles went up to St. Catherine’s College, University of Cambridge to read Economics.

At the outbreak of war, Hockey gained a commission in the Cambridgeshire Regiment. He subsequently volunteered for hazardous duty with the Commandos. In December 1941, he was sent with the Cambridgeshires to Malaya to help defend the colony against the Japanese. He was killed in action on 14 February 1942 aged 28, having reached the rank of Captain. He is commemorated on the Singapore Memorial, panel number 55.

HOLLINGS

Frank Holdsworth

Hollings was born in 1912. He came to The Leys in 1926 at the age of 14 and went into North A House. He was a Prefect, a noted scholar, a Cadet Sergeant and Captain of the Swimming Team and a Swimming Champion for three years.

On leaving school, Hollings joined the Merchant Navy as a Radio Officer.

From the outbreak of war, Hollings served on board the “Napier Star”. He was killed in action when the ship was torpedoed on 18 December 1940 west of Ireland, at the age of 28. He is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, panel number 72.

HOLMAN

Alwyn Haswell

Holman was born in 1889. He came to The Leys in 1904 at the age of 14 and went into North A House. He was a Prefect, Captain of the Bisley VIII, a Cadet Sergeant, and won First Colours at Football and Second Colour at Lacrosse.

On leaving school, Holman went up to Jesus College, University of Cambridge, to read Law. He then qualified as a Barrister.

On 26 September 1940, Holman was killed in a German bombing raid on London, at the age of 51. He is buried in the Metropolitan Borough of of Kensington.

HOLMAN

Bruce William

Holman was born in 1918. He came to The Leys in 1931 at the age of 13 and went into School House.

On leaving school, Holman trained to be a Chartered Accountant.

At the outbreak of war, Holman joined the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve and served in the Mediterranean on board the minesweeper HMS Welshman. On 1 February 1943 the Welshman was torpedoed and the crew abandoned ship. Holman found himself on an overcrowded raft, so in order to alleviate the suffering of his crew-mates, he swam away and was not seen alive again. He was aged 25 and had reached the rank of Paymaster Lieutenant. He is buried at Alexandria (Hadra) War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt, grave number 4. L. 15.

HOSEGOOD

Graham Cowell

Hosegood was born in 1921. He came to The Leys in 1934 at the age of 13 and went into School House. He was a School Prefect and Head of House.

On leaving school, Hosegood joined a firm of ship-owners in Cardiff.

At the outbreak of war, Hosegood was conscripted in to the Army and the following year gained a commission in the South Wales Borderers. He was then seconded to the King’s Regiment (Liverpool) as Battalion intelligence Officer and sent to India. In 1942, he became the Intelligence Officer to the 77th Indian Infantry Brigade, the famous ‘Chindits’, under Brigadier-General Orde Wingate. During the first Chindit expedition to Burma in March 1943, he was captured by the Japanese. He died of illness on 9 April 1945 just weeks before his camp was liberated. He was aged 24 and had reached the rank of Captain. He is buried at Rangoon War Cemetery, grave number 6. J. 2.

JACKSON

Arthur Myles

Jackson was born in 1922. He came to The Leys in 1936 at the age of 14 and went into West House. He was a respected thespian and won First Colours at Hockey and Second Colours at Cricket.

On leaving school, Jackson went up to the University of Cambridge but left after a year to join the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. He trained as an Observer in the Fleet Air Arm and was stationed at HMS Shrike in Northern Ireland. He was killed in a flying accident on 23 July 1944 along with his wife who accompanied him on the flight. They are commemorated on Lee-on-Solent Memorial, Hampshire, panel numbers 5. 5.

LEE

John Muirhead

Lee was born in 1912 in South Africa. He came to The Leys in 1926 at the age of 14 and went into North A House. He was a Prefect, a Cadet Officer, and won First Colours at Football.

On leaving school, Lee went up to Gonville and Caius College, University of Cambridge, to read Law. He then returned to South Africa to practice law in Bloemfontein.

At the outbreak of war, Lee joined the South African Engineer Corps and served with distinction in North Africa, Sicily and Italy. He was killed in action on 29 August 1944 at the age of 32, having reached the rank of Lance Corporal. He is buried at Florence War Cemetery, grave number III. C. 8.

LEES

William Edward Sutton

Lees was born in 1917. He came to The Leys in 1930 at the age of 13 and went into East House. He was a House Sub-Prefect and won First Colours at Cricket and Second Colours at Hockey.

On leaving school, Lees completed his education with a 12 month tour of France. On his return to Britain in 1935, he entered the family business in Stockport, Cheshire.

In mid-1939, Lees joined the Cheshire Regiment (Territorial Army) and following training, was sent in 1942, to the Middle East. He served with distinction in all the major battles in North Africa, but was drowned trying to save one his men on 12 April 1943. He was aged 27 and had reached the rank of Captain. He is buried at Tripoli War Cemetery, Libya, grave number 10. C. 8.

LEIGH

Herbert Egerton Miller

Leigh was born in 1916 in Sussex. He came to The Leys in 1930 at the age of 14 and went into West House. He was a House Captain and School Captain of Cricket.

On leaving school, Leigh embarked on a business career which took him to the Far East.

At the outbreak of war, Leigh gained a commission in the Indian Army, in the Baluch Regiment. He was killed in action during the battle for Singapore on 14 February 1942 aged 26, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is commemorated on the Singapore Memorial, panel number 221.

LUMSDEN

Herbert

Lumsden was born in 1898. He came to The Leys in 1910 at the age of 12 and went into North B House.

During the First World War, Lumsden enlisted as a Private before gaining a commission in the Royal Artillery and winning the Military Cross. In 1925, he transferred to the Royal Lancers (Royal Armoured Corps), where he indulged in his passion for horse riding.

At the outbreak of war, Lumsden served with distinction as commander of his Regiment in France and North Africa, winning the Distinguished Service Order. He was subsequently awarded CB? and was sent to the Pacific as the Prime Minister’s Special Representative to General Douglas McArthur. He was killed in action on 6 January 1945 at the age of 47, having reached the rank of Lieutenant-General. He is commemorated on the Brookwood Memorial, Surrey, panel number 1. 1.

MALLALIEU

Benjamin

Mallalieu was born in 1914 in Harrogate. He came to The Leys in 1927 at the age of 13 and went into North B House. He won First Colours at Hockey and Second Colours at Football.

Mallalieu joined the Pioneer Corps in April 1940 and was subsequently sent to France at part of the British Expeditionary Force. He was killed in action on 26 May 1940 aged 26, having reached the rank of Sergeant. He is buried at Montreuil-Sur-Mer Cemetery, Pas de Calais, grave number 13.

MANGNALL

Alfred Tim

Mangnall came to The Leys in 1914 and went into School House.

On leaving school, Mangnall became a successful international horse-rider.

At the outbreak of war, Mangnall gained a commission and was sent to France as part of the British Expeditionary Force attached to the Royal Military Police. He was killed in action on 10 May 1940 having reached the rank of Captain. He is buried at Calais Southern Cemetry, Pas de Calais, grave number P. 1.

MATHIAS

Thomas Gwyn James

Mathias came to The Leys in 1927 and went into School House. He was a noted scholar, a gifted actor and won First Colours at Hockey.

On leaving school, Mathias gained a commission in the Royal Navy and represented Wales and the Navy at Hockey

From the outbreak of war, Mathias served on HMS President. He died on active service on 23 October 1940 having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is buried at Pembroke Dock (Llanion) Cemetery, Pembrokeshire, grave number 199.

McLEOD

Norman

McLeod was born in 1924 in Middlesex. He came to The Leys in 1937 at the age of 13 and went into North A House. He was a respected scholar.

On leaving school, McLeod gained a commission in the Lothians and Border Horse Yeomanry, Royal Armoured Corps. After training in Britain, he served with distinction in Sicily and Italy. He was killed in action on 14 May 1944 at the age of 20, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is buried at Cassino War Cemetery, Frosinone, grave number III. F. 23.

McNEILY

James Rogerson

McNeily was born in 1918 in Newfoundland. He came to The Leys in 1931 at the age of 13 and went into West House.

On leaving school, McNeily went up to the University of Toronto and at the outbreak of war, was considering a career in the Wesleyan Ministry.

At the outbreak of war, McNeily gained a commission in the Queen’s Own Rifles of Canada, Royal Canadian Infantry Corps. After training in Britain, his battalion took part in the D-Day landings on 6 June 1944. He was killed in action during the battle for Caen on 18 July 1944 at the age of 26, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is buried at Beny-sur-Mer Canadian War Cemetery, Calvados, grave number XII. D. 9.

MILLER

David Stephenson

Miller was born in 1918 in Lancashire. He came to The Leys in 1932 at the age of 14 and went into North B House.

At the outbreak of war, Miler gained a commission in the Royal Scots. After training in Britain, his battalion took part in the D-Day landings and the subsequent campaign in Northern Europe. He was killed in action on 19 February 1945 as his unit advanced into Nazi Germany. He was aged 27 and had reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is buried at Milsbeek War Cemetery, Limburg, grave number I. B. 7.

MITCHELL

Gordon Thomas Manners

Mitchell came to The Leys in 1924 and went into East House. He was a Prefect, noted scholar, a gifted actor and won First Colours at Hockey.

On leaving school, Mitchell went up to the University of Cambridge and read Law and Economics. He also played Hockey for the University and Scotland and trained as a Pilot in the Royal Auxiliary Air Force.

At the outbreak of war, Mitchell was a member of 609 Squadron and flew Spitfires over France and Britain. He was killed in action during the Battle of Britain on 11 July 1940, having reached the rank of Pilot Officer. He is buried at Willian (All Saints) Churchyard, Hertfordshire.

PICKLES

William Turner

Pickles was born in 1921 in West Yorkshire. He came to The Leys in 1934 at the age of 13 and went into East House. He was a Prefect, Head of House, and won First Colours at Cricket and Second Colours at Hockey.

On leaving school, Pickles went up to Christ’s College, University of Cambridge to read Natural Sciences.

Upon graduation, Pickles joined the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve and trained as a radio-engineer. He was killed on active service on 18 December 1942 at the age of 21, having reached the rank of Pilot Officer. He was on the same plane as Old Leysian Peter Ackernley, who had gone through school, university and RAF service with Pickles. He is buried at Batley Cemetery, West Yorkshire, grave number F. 141.

PLATTS

Anthony

Platts was born in 1919 in Yorkshire. He came to The Leys in 1933 at the age of 14 and went into East House. He was a Prefect and Head of House.

At the outbreak of war, Platts joined the East Riding Yeomanry, Royal Armoured Corps. He was killed in action during the battle for Caen on 8 July 1944. He was aged 25 and had reached the rank of Major. He is buried at La Delivrande War Cemetery, Calvados, grave number VIII. J. 7.

POTTER

Wilfrid Dennis

Potter was born in 1901 in Surrey. He came to The Leys in 1914 and went into North A House.

On leaving school, Potter went up to St. John’s College, University of Cambridge, and then joined the army. He was being trained as a machine gunner when the First World War ended.

In June 1940, Potter enlisted in the Royal Army Service Corps as a Driver. He served with distinction in the campaigns in Greece, Crete and Syria, before being transferred to a convalescent camp in 1942. He died of illness on 10 February 1943 at the age of 42. He is buried at Ramleh War Cemetery, Israel, grave number 3. D. 6.

POVEY

Derek John

Povey was born in 1913. He came to The Leys in 1927 at the age of 14 and went into North A House.

At the outbreak of war, Povey volunteered for the Ambulance Section of the Civil Defence in Leek. In September 1942, he joined the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve and was sent to Canada for training as a Navigator. He was killed in a flying accident on 20 November 1944 at the age of 31, having reached the rank of Flying Officer. He is buried at Hatfield (Woodhouse) Cemetery, Yorkshire, grave number DD. 22.

PRICE

Edward Oliver

Price was born in 1890. He came to The Leys in 1904 at the age of 14 and went into North B House.

He was killed during an enemy bombing raid on London on 17 April 1941 at the age of 51. He is buried in the Metropolitan Borough of Paddington.

PRIESTLEY

Geoffrey Douglas

Priestley was born in 1912 in Yorkshire. He came to The Leys in 1925 at the age of 13 and went into North A House. He was a House Prefect, a member of the Bisley VIII, a Cadet Sergeant, and won Swimming Colours and Second Colours at Football.

On leaving school, Priestley went up to Clare College, University of Cambridge to read Natural Sciences.

At the outbreak of war, Priestley joined the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve and trained as a Pilot. He then joined 50 Squadron and flew Lancaster bombers on raids over enemy territory. He was killed in action returning from a raid over Germany on 13 May 1943 at the age of 31, having reached the rank of Flight Lieutenant. He is buried at Amersfoort (Old Leusden) General Cemetery, Utrecht, grave number 13. 7. 135.

PYPER

Charles Frederick Buick

Pyper was born in 1917 in Leicester. He came to The Leys in 1931 at the age of 14 and went into North A House.

On leaving school, Pyper joined the 44th Anti-Aircraft Leicestershire Battalion, Royal Engineers (Territorial Army).

At the outbreak of war, Pyper was mobilised and sent to the Mediterranean. He served with distinction in the North African and Sicilian campaigns as a Staff Captain, being mentioned in despatches. Subsequently he was promoted to Major and posted to British Headquarters, Central Mediterranean Force. At his own request, he rejoined his men at the frontline in Italy and was killed in action on 23 September 1944, at the age of 27. He is buried at Coriano Ridge War Cemetery, Riccione, grave number XVII. C. 12.

RANDALL

Alan George Frederick

Randall was born in 1923. He came to The Leys in 1936 at the age of 13 and went into North B House.

On leaving school, Randall joined the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve and trained as a Pilot in Arizona. In 1943, he returned to Britain and joined 193 Squadron flying Typhoons. He completed 60 operational flights over enemy territory and took part in the battle against the V-bomb blitz on London. He was killed in action over Holland on 10 April 1945 at the age of 22, having reached the rank of Warrant Officer. He is buried at Arnhem Oosterbeek War Cemetery, Gelderland, grave number 4. A. 1.

REED

John Moorby

Reed was born in 1919. He came to The Leys in 1933 at the age of 14 and went into North B House.

At the outbreak of war, Reed joined the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. He served in 405 Squadron as an Air Gunner in Wellington Bombers and was killed in action over Germany on 2 August 1941. He was aged 22 and had reached the rank of Sergeant. He is commemorated on Runnymede Memorial, Surrey, panel number 51.

ROBERTS

Donald Michael

Roberts was born in 1922 in Yorkshire. He came to The Leys in 1935 at the age of 13 and went into North B House. He was a talented musician and dedicated member of the Orpheus Society.

On leaving school, Roberts gained an Open Choral Scholarship to St. John’s College, University of Cambridge.

Upon graduation, Roberts joined the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve and trained as a pilot. He was posted to 186 Squadron and flew Lancaster bombers on missions over Germany. He was killed in action on a raid on Kiel on 14 April 1945 at the age of 23, having reached the rank of Flying Officer. He is buried at Haverhill Cemetery, Suffolk, grave number U. 150. His 2 brothers, Gerald and Edward both Old Leysians, were also killed during the war.

ROBERTS

Edward Simpson

Roberts was born in 1913. He came to The Leys in 1926 at the age of 13 and went into North B House. He was a talented musician, a cadet Sergeant and House Prefect.

On leaving school, Roberts became a Wholesale Clothier in Leeds.

At the outbreak of war, Roberts gained a commission in The Green Howards, the Yorkshire Regiment. He served with distinction during the North African, Sicilian and Italian campaigns. He was killed in action during the Battle of Anzio on 1 June 1944 at the age of 31, having reached the rank of Captain. He is buried at Beachhead War Cemetery, Anzio, grave number XVIII. B. 6. His 2 brothers, Gerald and Donald both Old Leysians, were also killed during the war.

ROBERTS

Gerald Philip

Roberts was born in 1919. He came to The Leys in 1932 at the age of 13 and went into North B House.

At the outbreak of war, Roberts gained a commission in his father’s Regiment, The King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry. He took part in the D-Day landings but was killed in action during heavy fighting around Tilly-sur-Seulles on 25 June 1944. He was aged 25 and had reached the rank of Major. He is buried at Tilly-sur-Seulles War Cemetery, Calvados, grave number IV. C. 6. His 2 brothers, Edward and Donald both Old Leysians, were also killed during the war.

ROCYN-JONES

Huw Augustus

Rocyn-Jones was born in 1909. He came to The Leys in 1922 at the age of 13 and went into School House. He won Tri-Colours and was Captain of Cricket and Hockey.

On leaving school, Rocyn-Jones went up to Downing College, University of Cambridge and read Mechanical Sciences and captained the University hockey team. He also played hockey for Wales, cricket for Monmouthshire and football for the Old Leysians and London Welsh. In 1935, he went to South Africa to work in the Robinson Deep Mine in Johannesburg.

At the outbreak of war, Rocyn-Jones gained a commission in the South African Engineer Corps. He served with distinction in Somaliland, Abyssinia, North Africa and Italy winning the Order of the British Empire. He was killed in action on 29 April 1945 at the age of 36, having reached the rank of Major. He is buried at Castiglione South African Cemetery, Bologna, grave number VI. B. 3.

SADD

(Reverend) Alfred Lionel

Sadd was born in 1909 in Sussex. He came to The Leys in 1923 at the age of 14 and went into West House.

On leaving school, Sadd trained for the Wesleyan Ministry and subsequently went as a missionary to Rongorongo in the Gilbert Islands.

The Gilbert Islands were occupied by the Japanese in December 1941. Leigh refused to kow-tow to the invaders and was severely punished for kissing the Union Jack when ordered to walk over it. He was transferred to Tarawa where, along with the rest of the European population, he was forced to work as a slave. Following an artillery bombardment by Australian ships, Sadd and his fellow prisoners were executed on 15 October 1942. He was aged 33 and is commemorated in the Gilbert Islands section of the Civilian War Dead Register.

SANDERSON

Harry Keith

Sanderson was born in 1918 in Hull. He came to The Leys in 1931 at the age of 13 and went into School House. He was a Prefect.

On leaving school, Sanderson gained a commission in the Royal Artillery.

During the war, Sanderson was transferred to the Durham Light Infantry where served for sometime as the Battalion Intelligence Officer. After taking part in the D-Day landings, he was killed in action on 19 August 1944 at the age of 26, having reached the rank of Captain. He is buried at Banneville-la-Campagne War Cemetery, Calvados, grave number XV. E. 7.

SELL

Graham Ross

Sell was born in 1920. He came to The Leys in 1933 at the age of 13 and went into West House. He was a House Prefect and won Second Colours at Football and Hockey.

On leaving school, Sell went to the Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst and in 1939, was commissioned into the Jat Regiment, Indian Army.

In 1941, Sell, who by this time was Captain and Adjutant, was sent with his battalion to Malaya to bolster the colony’s defences. In February 1942, he made a daring escape from Singapore as the city surrendered to the Japanese, and was mentioned in despatches for his exploits. After distinguished service in North Africa and India, Sell was sent to the front in Burma. He was killed in action during the Battle of Imphal on 13 April 1944. He was aged 24 and had reached the rank of Major. He is buried at Imphal War Cemetery, India, grave number 9. C. 12.

SHIERS

John Lowe

Shiers was born in 1914 in Purley. He came to The Leys in 1928 at the age of 14 and went into North B House.

In early 1939, Shiers joined the Royal Corps of Signals as a Signalman. He was killed on active duty on 5 September 1939 in a motor-cycle accident, at the age of 25. He is buried at Cheadle and Gatley Cemetery, Cheshire, grave number A. 8.

SHUCKBURGH

Alan Doughty

Shuckburgh was born in 1918. He came to The Leys in 1931 at the age of 13 and went into North A House. He was a Prefect, a member of the Dramatic Society and a respected scholar.

On leaving school, Shuckburgh went up to the University of Cambridge.

At the outbreak of war, Shuckburgh joined the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve as a Sergeant Pilot and flew Spitfires in 603 Squadron. He was killed in action over France on 13 October 1941 at the age of 23. He is buried at Dunkirk Town Cemetery, Nord, grave number 2. 2. 38.

SINDALL

Hereward Robert

Sindall was born in 1924. He came to The Leys in 1937 at the age of 13 and went into North A House.

On leaving school, Sindall joined the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve and trained as a Bomb-Aimer. As a member of 635 Squadron, he flew missions in Lancaster bombers over enemy territory. He was murdered by civilians on 6 January 1945 after being shot down over Germany. He was aged 21 and had reached the rank of Flight Lieutenant. He is buried at Durnbach War Cemetery, Bayern, grave number 5. D. 8-12.

SLEIGHT

Kenneth Frederick

Sleight was born in 1914 in Cleethorpes. He came to The Leys in 1929 at the age of 15 and went into West House. He was a Prefect, a noted scholar, a Cadet Sergeant and won Second Colours at Hockey.

On leaving school, Sleight went up to Wadham College, University of Oxford

Before the outbreak of war, Sleight joined the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve and hoped to gain a transfer to Coastal Command. He was killed on active service on 25 November 1941 at the age of 27, having reached the rank of Pilot Officer. He is buried at Cleethorpes Cemetery, Lincolnshire, grave number AA. J. 12.

STAMP

Wilfred Carlyle

Stamp was born in 1905 at Tantallon Castle, Scotland, the son of Josiah Charles Stamp, the famous economist and financier. He came to The Leys and went into North A House. He was a Prefect and Cadet Corporal

On leaving school, Stamp went up to King’s College, University of Cambridge. Following the death of his father in 1941, he became the Second Baron Stamp of the Shortlands.

Stamp was killed during an enemy air-raid on London, on 16 April 1941 at the age of 36. He is buried in the Municipal Borough of Beckenham.

STEAD

Albert James Walker

Stead was born in 1905 in Ormskirk. He came to The Leys in 1919 at the age of 14 and went into North A House. He won Second Colours at Football.

On leaving school, Stead embarked upon a life of adventure in search of buried treasure. He often returned to The Leys to speak of his travels.

At the outbreak of war, Stead joined the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve and immediately volunteered for mine-sweeping duties in the North Sea. He was then sent to the Middle East where he was killed in action on 2 November 1941. He was aged 36 and had reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is buried at Kantara War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt, grave number C. 162. A.

STOKES

Robert Donald

Stokes was born in 1905 in Lincolnshire. He came to The Leys in 1918 at the age of 13 and went into West House. He was a talented football player who represented the East Midlands.

On leaving school, Stokes was Captain of Lincoln City Football Club before becoming a City Councillor in 1937.

Before the outbreak of war, Stokes gained a commission in the Royal Lincolnshire Regiment (Territorial Army). He served with distinction during the ill-fated Norwegian Campaign of 1940 and was mentioned in despatches. He was then sent to Iceland with his battalion for training in mountain warfare, and in 1942, he was awarded the Territorial Efficiency Decoration. He was killed in action on 13 August 1944 at the age of 39, having reached the rank of Major. He is buried at Ranville War Cemetery, Calvados, grave number IX. B. 28.

SUTTON

Charles Henry

Sutton was born in 1907. He came to The Leys in 1921 at the age of 14 and went into East House.

On leaving school, Sutton joined his father’s firm in Valparaiso, Chile, where he indulged his passion for cricket, returning to Britain in 1932 as a member of the South American cricket team.

In 1942, he left Chile as a volunteer and gained a commission in the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. He was then transferred to the Fleet Air Arm and stationed at H.M.S. Daedalus III, where he was involved in the training of new recruits. He died of illness on 29 July 1945 at the age of 38, having reached the rank of Sub-Lieutenant. He is buried at Haslar Royal Naval Cemetery, Hampshire, grave number G. 11. 10.

SYKES

Alfred Nigel Whitley

Sykes was born in 1919. He came to The Leys in 1933 at the age of 14 and went into North B House.

On leaving school, Sykes worked as a farmer and joined the Shropshire Yeomanry, Royal Artillery (Territorial Army), as a Trooper.

In 1940, Sykes was sent to France. He was evacuated from Dunkirk, but was killed when the ship he was on board, the “Arandora Star”, was sunk by enemy action, on 2 July 1940. He is commemorated on Brookwood Memorial, Surrey, panel number 4. 1.

WALKER

Edward Brian

Walker was born in 1911 in Lancashire. He came to The Leys in 1922 at the age of 12 and went into North A House. He won Swimming Colours and Second Colours at Football.

At the outbreak of war, Walker joined the 111 Field Regiment, Royal Artillery and served with distinction in North Africa. He was killed in action on 1 March 1943 at the age of 34, having reached the rank of Major. He is buried at Sfax War Cemetery, Tunisia, grave number II. D. 2.

WALKER

Godfrey Lewis

Walker was born in 1921. He came to The Leys in 1933 at the age of 12 and went into West House. He was a noted scholar

On leaving school, Walker went up to the University of Cambridge to read History.

After graduating in 1940, Walker gained a commission in the Suffolk Regiment. He then went to West Africa on attachment to the Gold Coast Regiment, the Royal West African Frontier Force. He died on active service on 21 May 1943 at the age of 22, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is buried at Lafenwa Military Cemetery, Nigeria, grave number G. 12.

WALLACE

Anthony John

Wallace was born in 1922 in Cambridgeshire. He came to The Leys in 1936 at the age of 14 and went into North B House.

On leaving school, Wallace pursued his interest in motor-racing.

During the war, Wallace joined the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve and trained as a Navigator. Towards the end of his training he was killed in a flying accident on 22 November 1944. He was aged 22 and had reached the rank of Sergeant. He is buried at Willian (All Saints) Churchyard, Hertfordshire.

WHEATLEY

Claud Mervyn

Wheatley was born in 1914 in Worthing. He came to The Leys in 1927 at the age of 13 and went into North B House.

On leaving school, Wheatley embarked upon a career as a draper before training as a Pilot in the Royal Air Force.

Wheatley was killed in action over Germany on 22 March 1940 aged 26, having reached the rank of Flying Officer. He is buried at Reichswald Forest War Cemetery, Nordrhein-Westfalen, grave number 3. F. 14.

WILCOCK-HOLGATE

Donald

Wilcock-Holgate was born in 1914 in Blackburn. He came to The Leys in 1928 at the age of 14 and went into North B House. He was Captain of the Bisley VIII and a Cadet Corporal.

On leaving school, Wilcock-Holgate went up to Christ’s College, University of Cambridge

At the outbreak of war, Wilcock-Holgate joined the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, and was posted to the minesweeper HMS Spanker. He was killed in action on 5 October 1943 at the age of 29, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is buried at Mellor Methodist Chapelyard, Lancashire, grave number 91-92.

WILLIAMS

Neville Glyn

Williams was born in 1915. He came to The Leys in 1928 at the age of 13 and went into West House. He was a Prefect, Head of House and won First Colours at Football and Cricket and Second Colours at Hockey.

On leaving school, Williams entered the Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst, where he was an Under Officer and had a distinguished athletic record. After a year’s attachment to the Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry, he was posted to his father’s Regiment, the Punjab Regiment (Indian Army), with whom he saw action during the Wazirstan campaign of 1937. In January 1939, he was selected for the Frontier Corps and served with distinction on the North West Frontier, winning the Military Cross in May 1941. In January 1944 he rejoined his Regiment at the Burma front and was killed in action on 23 March 1945 at the age of 30, having reached the rank of Major. He is commemorated on the Rangoon Memorial, Burma, panel number 45.

WILSON

Norman

Wilson was born in 1917. He came to The Leys in 1930 at the age of 13 and went into School House. He was a Prefect, a Corporal in the Officer Training Corps and won First Colours at Football.

On leaving school, Wilson trained as a Chartered Accountant and was subsequently articled to a firm in Newcastle. He also joined the Heavy Battery, Royal Artillery (Territorial Army).

At the outbreak of war, Wilson was mobilised and sent to Singapore. With the fall of the colony to the Japanese in February 1942, he became a prisoner of war. He was killed when the ship carrying him to Japan was torpedoed by an American submarine. He was aged 25 and had reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is commemorated on the Singapore Memorial, Singapore, panel number 3.

WILSON

Robert Baker

Wilson was born in 1915. He came to The Leys in 1930 and went into West House.

At the outbreak of war, Wilson gained a commission in the 125th Anti-Tank Regiment, Royal Artillery, and was sent to Malaya to defend the colony against the Japanese. He was killed on 5 February 1942 at the age of 27, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is commemorated on the Singapore Memorial, Kranji War Cemetery, panel number 3.

WILSON

Thomas Herbert Howarth

Wilson was born in 1914. He came to The Leys in 1927 at the age of 13 and went into West House.

On leaving school, Wilson went up to the University of Leeds and read Dentistry, qualifying in 1935. In 1938, he accepted a short service commission in the Royal Army Dental Corps.

At the outbreak of war, Wilson now a Captain, was selected for advanced training in the dental aspect of maxillo-facial injuries and served in France until the evacuation from Dunkirk. After further training in Britain, he was sent to the Middle East in 1942, and served with distinction in the North African, Sicilian and Italian campaigns, winning the African Star with 1st Army Clasp. He died of illness on 14 February 1945 at the age of 31, having reached the rank of Major. He is buried at Naples War Cemetery, grave number IV. E. 9.

WITHERINGTON

Arthur John

Witherington was born in 1921 in Yorkshire. He came to The Leys in 1934 at the age of 13 and went into West House. He won First Colours at Cricket.

Immediately on leaving school, Witherington joined the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve and trained as a pilot with 57 Squadron. He was killed on active service on 16 September 1941, when he guided his Wellington Bomber back to his base after a raid over Germany. His self sacrifice allowed all but one of his crew to escape unscathed. He was aged 20 and had reached the rank of Sergeant-Pilot. He is buried at Sunderland (Ryhope Road) Cemetery, County Durham, grave number 16. B. B. 15536. His brother Denys, an Old Leysian, was also killed during the war.

WITHERINGTON

Denys March

Witherington was born in 1920 in Yorkshire. He came to The Leys in 1933 at the age of 13 and went into West House. He won First Colours at Cricket.

On leaving school, Witherington went up to the University of Cambridge.

After graduation, Witherington enlisted as a Private in The Loyal Regiment (North Lancashire). After training in Britain, he served with distinction in North Africa and Sicily. He was killed in action during the Battle of Anzio on 16 February 1944 at the age of 24. He is buried at the Anzio War Cemetery, grave number II. S. 4. His brother John, an Old Leysian, was also killed during the war.

WYNNE

Ruskin Edwards

Wynne was born in 1915 in Lancashire. He came to The Leys in 1928 at the age of 13 and went into School House. He was a Cadet Quarter-Master Sergeant and a Prefect.

On leaving school, Wynne studied law and was articled to a firm of solicitors in Liverpool in 1939.

At the outbreak of war, Wynne gained a commission in the Lancashire Fusiliers and served with distinction in France. After Dunkirk, he was sent with his battalion to the Far East and fought with the 14th Army in the campaign against the Japanese. He was killed during the Battle of Kohima on 28 April 1944 at the age of 29, having reached the rank of Captain. He is buried at Kohima War Cemetery, India, grave number 1. A. 22.

YARDLEY

Georges Emile

Yardley was born in 1909. He came to The Leys in 1923 at the age of 14 and went into North B House. He was a noted orator and accomplished Hockey player.

On leaving school, Yardley went up to St. John’s College, University of Cambridge and read Law and English, before switching to a career in Medicine.

At the outbreak of war, Yardley gained a commission in the Royal Army Medical Corps. After distinguished service with the 8th Army in North Africa and Sicily, he took part in the campaign in Italy. He died of wounds on May 1944 at the age of 35, having reached the rank of Captain. He is buried at Naples War Cemetery, grave number II. B. 4.

20 June 2005

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