Ministry of Defence
Ministry of Defence

Lest We Forget
British Legion
The Royal British Legion

CLIFTON COLLEGE SOUTH AFRICAN (BOER) WAR MEMORIAL

Compiled and copyright © Martin Edwards 2009

The Clifton College Boer War Memorial is located in the grounds of Clifton College. it takes the form of an Allegory memorial with a statue of St. George with sword and shield atop an ornately arched plinth on a six stepped base. The plaque with the inscriptions is inset into the face of the plinth. The memorial was unveiled on 25th June 1904. Clifton College is a major co-educational public school in Clifton, Bristol. It was founded in 1862. The school's motto is Spiritus Intus Alit ("The spirit nourishes within"). Of note is Horace Robert Martineau (1874 - 1916) who was at Clifton College 1888-1889 who won the Victoria Cross (VC). He was a 25 years old, and a Sergeant in the Protectorate Regiment (N.W. Cape Colony), South African Forces during the South African War (Boer War) when he won his VC; he later achieved the rank of Lieutenant. "On 26 December 1899 near Mafeking, South Africa, during the action at Game Tree, when the order to retire had been given, Sergeant Martineau rescued a corporal who had been struck down near the Boer trenches The sergeant managed to half-drag, half-carry the wounded man to a bush where he attended to his wounds. He was shot in the side himself, but took no notice and carried on helping the corporal until he was wounded a second time and was forced to give up."

Photograph from old postcards

Extract from "Clifton College Register 1862-1912 plust 1912 - 1922 Supplement "

THE war began in October, 1899, and continued till June, 1902. In the first expeditionary force there were about seventy Old Cliftonians, but after the disasters of December, 1899, the numbers were largely increased.

Mr. Pearson, with an " ingenuity of affection," like that of which he gave proof on the eve of the Battle of Omdurman, at frequent intervals issued lists of Old Cliftonians in Africa, and all were thus enabled to follow with lively interest the fortunes of their schoolfellows who were serving their country.

From the outset of the war a heavy toll was taken of the lives of Cliftonians. One of the first to fall was one who was well within the recollection of most of the School; there were others of all generations, some going back to the very earliest years of the School. The total number of Old Cliftonians known to be serving, not including those who left in the junior School and the Preparatory, was 347. The lists issued were probably correct so far as the names of officers in the Regular Army were concerned, but it was, of course, impossible to find out all who served in the Volunteer, Yeomanry, and Colonial Forces. Many were traced coming from all parts of England, from India, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and from South Africa itself; but the above total is necessarily below the number of Cliftonians who actually_ served their country. In all forty-three fell in the war.

Even before the full extent of our losses was known, it was felt that the memory of those we had lost should be perpetuated in some way, and in May, Tgo1, a meeting was held in London, presided over by the Bishop of Hereford, at which a resolution was passed: "That this meeting approves the proposal to raise a memorial to those Cliftonians who have fallen in the war," and a committee was formed to consider the shape that the memorial should take. Rowland Whitehead acted as Hon. Sec. of the committee throughout, and to his efforts much of the credit is due for successfully carrying out the scheme.

Ten distinct proposals were submitted to the committee, out of which they selected three. The next step was to issue a circular asking Old Cliftonians in all parts of the world to express their opinion upon the relative merits of the three following schemes:-

(1) A separate architectural monument on the Terrace overlooking the Close.
(2) A gate-house or gateway at the entrance in College Road.
(3) A monumental loggia or antechapel along the west front of the Chapel.

By the end of the year the result of the vote was known, showing a substantial majority in favour of a separate monument, and the Committee decided to invite all Old Cliftonian architects to send in competitive designs for a separate memorial on the Terrace, and they secured the help of Mr. R. Selden Wornum, F.R.I.B.A., as assessor and adviser. In due course Mr. Wornum recommended that the first premium should be awarded to Messrs. W. S. Paul and R. C. James. At another meeting held in London it was decided that the design selected by Mr. Wornum should be carried out. The Committee next approached the well-known sculptor, Mr. Alfred Drury, A.R.A., and he submitted to them two sketch models, one being of St. George, the other of a modern Soldier in Khaki, and at a further meeting of subscribers the choice finally fell on the statue of St. George.

The design of the architects included the erection of a new stone balustrade from the Chapel to the end of Big School, and the substitution of a semi-circular flight of steps for the old double flight leading from the Close. The memorial stands twenty feet high, the bronze figure being eight feet in height, and the pedestal of Portland stone twelve feet. On three of its four sides are bronze tablets bearing the names and ranks of the forty-three Old Cliftonians who lost their lives, and on the fourth side, facing the Closet are inscribed the lines of Henry Newbolt :-

Clifton
Remember these
Thy Sons who fell
fighting
far over sea
for they
in a dark hour
remembered well
their warfare
learned of thee.

Of the statue Mr. Drury writes: " The armour is of the period of the late fifteenth century; the shield is Gothic, with the cross of St. George on it ; the handle of the sword is surmounted by a figure emblematical of Love ; the figure of Christ is surmounted by a symbol of the Holy Ghost, intended to represent the descent of the Spirit of God or the Word of God ; the hilt takes the form of an anchor, representing the anchor of Hope. In the head of St. George I have tried to express his character of Fortitude and Virtue without effeminacy." And how well Mr. Drury has succeeded those who are familiar with the statue can judge.

The total cost of the memorial was £1,985; the sum raised by subscriptions, etc., was £2,103. The balance was devoted to the foundation of a prize as stated in Chapter XI.

The unveiling of the monument was an impressive ceremony. The date fixed upon was the second day of Commemoration, June 25th, 1904. To the great satisfaction of everyone General Lord Methuen kindly undertook the duty. On his arrival he was received with a general salute by a guard of honour composed of picked members of the Cadet Corps, while the rest of the Corps lined a large enclosure in the Close facing the memorial. Another enclosure on the Terrace was filled with a large number of Old Cliftonians in uniform. There was a large muster of members of the Council, headed by the Bishop of Hereford, and all round the enclosures was a great gathering of other Old Cliftonians, parents and friends of the School. The Bishop of Bristol read three Collects, two hymns were sung, and then the Bishop of Hereford, as Chairman of the Memorial Committee, handed over the memorial to the keeping of the Council, and invited Lord Methuen to perform the ceremony of unveiling it.

General Lord Methuen then delivered an address, and after alluding to friends of his, Colonel Haig and Colonel Birdwood, who as Cliftonians might have claimed it as their birthright to stand in his place that day, he spoke of the urgent and all-important task of inculcating feelings of patriotism into the boys of Public Schools, to whom England looked for an example of what the youth, and later the manhood, of England should be. He ended with the words, “May this memorial be an encouragement to patriotism, not only to Cliftonians who hear me, but to those who are to come."

The memorial was then unveiled, and the General and Cadets saluted, while the buglers played “The Last Post."

The Head Master then expressed the gratitude of Cliftonians to Lord Methuen for his presence and his moving words, and the ceremony was brought to a close by those present singing a verse of the National Anthem.

An admirable enlarged photograph of the unveiling ceremony has been presented to the School by Mr. Moberly, and hangs in the Council Room.

It may here be recorded that of the whole number serving in the war, 105 were mentioned in despatches, one gained the Victoria Cross, 3 were appointed C.B., 4 C.M.G., 26 gained the D.S.O., 28 received brevet rank.

This chapter shall conclude with a list of the names which are inscribed on the memorial. They shall be given with more detail than is to be found either in Chapel or on the monument itself, where only names and rank appear.

Old Cliftonians
whose Names are Recorded on the Memorial.

ALT

W Brian L

Lieutenant, A Company, City of London Imperial Volunteers. Shot through the head and killed at Diamond Hill, near Pretoria, 12th June 1900. Aged 22. Son of Colonel W J Alt (22nd Middlesex Volunteers).

Extract from The Last Post - Roll of Officers who fell in South Africa 1899-1902 by Mildred G Dooner, published by Naval and Military Press

Alt-Lieut. W. Brian L. Alt, was killed in action at Diamond Hill, near Pretoria, on June 12th, 1900. He was the son of Col. W. J. Alt, commanding the 22nd Middlesex Volunteers, and one of the youngest officers in the C.I.V.'s, being only 22 years of age. He was educated at Clifton and New College, Oxford, and was an excellent athlete. Lieut. Alt went to South Africa Jan., 1900, and served in the north of Cape Colony, moving thence to Bloemfontein. He then took part in the advance on Pretoria, marching through Lindley, Heilbron, and Vredefort. The C.I.V.'s were afterwards present at the attack on Diamond Hill. Early in the day Lieut. Alt was wounded in the arm, but having got it dressed he returned to the firing line. Later on, when about to get his wound redressed, he was shot in the temple. He is buried at the foot of the kopje where he fell, near Kleinfontein Farm, not far from Van der Merwe Station on the Delagoa Railway. Lieut. Alt was the only officer of the C.I.V.'s who lost his life during the war.

ATTFIELD

H K

Lieutenant, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire & Derbyshire Regiment). Killed near Ventersburg Road Station, 14th October 1900.

BAILLIE

William Lyon Dennistoun

Captain, 2nd Battalion, Royal Scots Fusiliers. Killed leading a charge, having been wounded twice but staggered forward until killed by a third shot at Frederickstad, 25th October 1900. Aged 28.

Extract from The Last Post - Roll of Officers who fell in South Africa 1899-1902 by Mildred G Dooner, published by Naval and Military Press

Baillie. - Capt. William Lyon Dennistoun Baillie, 2nd Batt. Royal Scots Fusiliers, was killed in action at Frederickstad Oct. 25th, 1900. He was a son of Mrs. Baillie, Victoria House, Blair Athol, N.B., was born Aug. 11th, 1872, and educated at Clifton College. He entered the Royal Scots Fusiliers March, 1894, being promoted lieut. Oct., 1896, and capt. Feb., 1900. He fell while leading his company under a heavy fire to attack some Boers. He was wounded twice, but staggered on until a third bullet struck him down - six of his men were found lying beside him. In writing concerning this attack Sir A.Conan Doyle states: "There have been few finer infantry advances during the war, for the veldt was perfectly flat and the fire terrific."

BARROW

Stephen Douglas

Lieutenant, Royal Engineers. Died of enteric fever at Modder River, 9th March 1900. Aged 23. Born July 1876. Son of F.H. Barrow (late Bengal Civil Service), Clifton. Commemorated on Ritchie Road, Northern Cape Memorial and now at rest in KImberley West End Garden of Remembrance. Commemorated on 1899-1902 Memorial, Kimberley West End Cemetery and buried there. Also commemorated on Royal Engineers Memorial Chatham, Kent.

Extract from The Last Post - Roll of Officers who fell in South Africa 1899-1902 by Mildred G Dooner, published by Naval and Military Press

Barrow.-Lieut. Stephen Douglas Barrow, Royal Engineers, died of enteric at Modder River, March 9th, 1900. He was the son of F. H. Barrow, Esq., late Bengal Civil Service. Lieut. Barrow was born in July, 1876, educated at Clifton, and entered the Royal Engineers from the Royal Military Academy in March, 1896, being promoted lieut. in March, 1899. He embarked for South Africa, in Oct., 1899.

BLACKBURN

Leslie Dewing

Captain, Cameronians (Scottish Rifles); with Rhodesia Regiment. Died of wounds received in action near Fort Tuli at Crocodile's Poort, 22nd October 1899. Aged 24.

Extract from The Last Post - Roll of Officers who fell in South Africa 1899-1902 by Mildred G Dooner, published by Naval and Military Press

Blackburn.—Capt. Leslie Dewing Blackburn, p.s.c., Scottish Rifles, died of wounds received in action at Crocodile's Poort, Oct. 22nd, 1899. He was born on June 29th, 1865, and educated at Clifton. He entered the Scottish Rifles on Aug. 23rd, 1884; was adjutant from Nov. 1891 to Nov. 1895, and promoted Capt. April 16th, 1894. When scouting with six of his men on the northern frontier of the Transvaal, in thick bush, he found his small force in the presence of a considerable Boer commando. His party concealed themselves, but Capt. Blackburn's foot was noticed by the enemy, and a sudden volley was fired, wounding his mortally. His companions remained with him and succeeded in driving off the Boers. Capt. Blackburn had sufficient strength left to dictate his report of the action and then leant back and died.

BLANDY

Robert Acton

Captain, Molteno District Mounted Troops, Colonial Defence Force. Killed in action Bamboo mountains, near Molteno, Cape Colony, 22nd November 1901. Aged 31. Aged 31. Born March 1870. Son of Adam Fettiplace Blandy, of Warren, Abingdon. Commemorated on a memorial at St. Nicholas Church, Abingdon, Oxon.

Extract from The Last Post - Roll of Officers who fell in South Africa 1899-1902 by Mildred G Dooner, published by Naval and Military Press

Blandy. - Capt. Robert Acton Blandy, Colonial Defence Force (Molteno section), was killed in action near Molteno, Nov. 22nd, 1901. He was the eldest son of the late Adam Fettiplace Blandy, Esq., of the Warren, Abingdon, was born in March, 1870, and educated at Clifton College. Capt. Blandy, who had been articled to Messrs. Foster and Browne, mining engineers, at Cardiff, went to Cape Colony in Dec. 1896, to take charge of collieries at Molteno, where he was very successful. On the outbreak of the war he joined the Frontier Mounted Rifles as lieut., and first served with Major-Gen. Sir W. F. Gatacre's column and afterwards with Major-Gen. Brabant, being present at many engagements in the N.E. of Cape Colony. He was killed while reconnoitring in the Bamboo mountains. Capt. Blandy had dismounted near some rocks where it was believed some Boers were concealed. He rushed forward calling on his men to "come on as they are sure to run." Lieut. King, who was with him, was wounded, and while going to assist him, Capt. Blandy was mortally wounded at about 15 to 20 yards range. Lieut.-Gen. Sir J. D. P. French telegraphed greatly regretting Capt. Blandy's death, and stating "he has done excellent service, we are much indebted to him." Capt. Blandy is buried at Molteno. His grave is in a corner of the cemetery there, near that of Capt. de Montmorency.

BOYLE

Cecil W

Lieutenant, 40th Company, 10th Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry, and Captain of the Banbury Troop of the Queen's Own Oxfordshire Hussars. Killed at Pietfontein, near Boshof, 5th April 1900.

Extract from The Last Post - Roll of Officers who fell in South Africa 1899-1902 by Mildred G Dooner, published by Naval and Military Press

Boyle.—Capt. Cecil W. Boyle, Oxfordshire Yeomanry Cavalry, killed in action near Boshof, April 5th, 1900, was the first officer of the I.Y. who fell in the war. He was educated at Clifton, where he was head of Brown's House. He went to South Africa in Dec., 1899, taking with him thirty of his own horses for active service. He was an enthusiastic officer, a keen sportsman, and well known with the Warwickshire Hounds. His death was much regretted in the Midlands. The loss of Capt. Boyle is referred to with regret by Lieut.-Gen. Lord Methuen in his despatch of April 6th, 1900, L.G., Feb. 8th, 1901.

BUDGETT

W F

Sergeant 8172, Volunteer Company 2nd Battalion, Gordon Highlanders. Died of wounds at Lyndberg 2nd October 1900, of wounds received 8th September 1900. Buried at Lyndberg.

CAMPBELL

George

Major, 1st Battalion, King's (Liverpool Regiment). Died of dysentry at Middelburg, Transvaal 4th March 1902. Aged 40. Born February 1861. Son of Sir George Campbell, MP.

Extract from The Last Post - Roll of Officers who fell in South Africa 1899-1902 by Mildred G Dooner, published by Naval and Military Press

Campbell.—Major George Campbell, 1st Batt. King's (Liverpool Regt.), died of dysentery, at Middelburg, Transvaal, on March 4th, 1902. The eldest son of the late Sir George Campbell, M.P., he was born in Feb., 1861, and educated at Clifton. He entered the 8th King's Regt., Jan., 1880, was promoted lieut. in Feb., 1881, capt. Nov., 1887, and major Nov., 1898. He was well known as a hunter of big game. Major Campbell was adjutant of volunteers from July, 1896, to July, 1901, when he proceeded to South Africa, being appointed commandant at Godwaan.

COE

Robert Harry Courtauld

Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, King's Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment). Killed in action at Onderbrook, near Pieters, Natal, 22nd February 1900. Aged 23. Born October 1876. Son of R.W. Coe, of Clifton, Bristol.

Extract from The Last Post - Roll of Officers who fell in South Africa 1899-1902 by Mildred G Dooner, published by Naval and Military Press

Coe.—Lieut. Robert Harry Courtauld Coe, 2nd Batt. Royal Lancaster Regt., was killed in action in the operations at Onderbrook Spruit, on the Tugela, Feb. 22nd, 1900. He was the son of R. W. Coe, Esq., of 7, Pembroke Road, Clifton, Bristol, was born in Oct., 1876, and educated at Clifton College. He entered the Royal Lancaster Regt. from the Royal Military College in Feb., 1897, and was promoted lieut. in March, 1898. He was a good football player, and while at the R.M.C. played for Sandhurst v. Woolwich. Lieut. Coe was present at the battle of Spion Kop, and the subsequent operations on the Tugela up to the date of his death, and was granted the medal and two clasps. He lies close to where he fell, Colour-Sergeant Whitehead and seven brave men of Lieut. Cod's Company having gone out to bury him at great risk while the fighting still continued. A marble cross has been erected over his grave by his brother officers. A handsome stained glass window has also been placed in the Chapel of the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, in memory of Lieut. Cod and other comrades who died, or were killed, during the war.

COWAN

Arthur Ernest Alphonsus

Second Lieutenant, 2nd (Queen's Bays) Dragoon Guards. Died of enteric at Elandsfontein, 11th April 1902. Born August 1880.

Extract from The Last Post - Roll of Officers who fell in South Africa 1899-1902 by Mildred G Dooner, published by Naval and Military Press

Cowan.-2nd Lieut. Arthur Ernest Alphonsus Cowan, 2nd Dragoon Guards, died of enteric at Elandsfontein, April rah, 1902. He was born Aug., 188o, and educated at Clifton. He entered the Antrim Artillery in April, 1900, being promoted lieut. the following Sept., and while belonging to it, was specially selected for service in South Africa in 1901. He was granted a commission in the 2nd Dragoon Guards in Oct., 1901, and served with it till his death.

ELTON

E H

Private 2833, Thorneycroft's Mounted Infantry. Died of enteric at Newcastle, 10th June 1900. Aged 22. Buried in Newcastle, S.A.

ELWORTHY

Charles Kershaw

Captain, 6th (Carabiniers) Dragoon Guards. Killed in action at Zand River, 10th May 1900. Aged 35. Born September 1865. Son of Charles James Elsworthy, of Wellington, Somerset.

Extract from The Last Post - Roll of Officers who fell in South Africa 1899-1902 by Mildred G Dooner, published by Naval and Military Press

Elworthy.—Capt. Charles Kershaw Elworthy, 6th Dragoon Guards (Carabiniers), was killed in action at Zand River May 10th, 190o. He was the elder son of Charles James Elworthy, Esq., of Wellington, Somerset, was born Sept., 1865, and educated at Clifton College. He entered the Carabiniers Jan., 1889, being promoted capt. Sept., 1895, and at the time of his death was the senior of his rank in his Regiment. In the engagement at Zand River he was with a detached party of cavalry which was suddenly attacked by a strong force of the enemy, and in the severe fighting which ensued Capt. Elworthy was killed.

GOING

Alexander Charles

Captain, King's Own Scottish Borderers. Killed in action at Karee, near Bloemfontein, 29th March 1900. Aged 33. Born September 1866. Son of Alexander Going, of Cahir, Ireland.

Extract from The Last Post - Roll of Officers who fell in South Africa 1899-1902 by Mildred G Dooner, published by Naval and Military Press

Going.—Capt. Alexander Charles Going, King's Own Scottish Borderers, was killed in action near Brandfort March 29th, 1900. He was the third son of Alexander Going, Esq., of Altavilla, Cahir, Ireland, was born Sept., 1866, and educated at Clifton College. Capt. Going entered the King's Own Scottish Borderers from the 4th Batt. Royal Irish Regt., in May, 1880, being promoted lieut. Dec., 1889, and Capt. May, 1897. He was present at Paardeberg and in the advance on Bloemfontein. He is buried in Karee cemetery, by the side of his school friend Capt. Marten.

HAGGARD

A G A

Trooper 34, Scottish Horse. Killed in action at Naauwpoort, 4th April 1901. Buried at Krugersdorp. Nephew of Sir Henry Rider Haggard (the writer).

HINTON

Claude Harington

Lieutenant, East Surrey Regiment. Killed at Tugela, near Pieters, Natal, 23rd February 1900. Aged 26. Born April 1873.

Extract from The Last Post - Roll of Officers who fell in South Africa 1899-1902 by Mildred G Dooner, published by Naval and Military Press

Hinton.—Lieut. Claude Harington Hinton, East Surrey Regt., was killed in action in the operations on the Tugela, Feb. 23rd, 1900. He was born in April, 1873, educated at Clifton, and entered the East Surrey Regt., Feb., 1893, being promoted lieut. Nov., 1894. He embarked for South Africa in Oct., 1899, and served with the Natal Field Force, and was present at the battle of Colenso.

LONG

Lionel William

Second Lieutenant, King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry. Killed in action at Modder River, 28th November 1899. Aged 20. Born March 1879. Son of C. B. Long, Esq., of Southsea. Commemorated on 1899-1902 Memorial, Kimberley West End Cemetery and buried there.

Extract from The Last Post - Roll of Officers who fell in South Africa 1899-1902 by Mildred G Dooner, published by Naval and Military Press

Long. - 2nd Lieut. Lionel William Long, 2nd Batt. Yorkshire Light Infantry, was killed in action at the battle of Modder River Nov. 28th, 1899. He was the son of C. B. Long, Esq., of Southsea, was born March, 1879, and educated at Clifton. He was only appointed to his Regiment in Aug., 1899. In the action at Modder River, the company on the left of the line of the Yorkshire Light Infantry suffered severely, all its officers being killed or wounded. While in this state, and with its senior non­commissioned officer uncertain what to do, a major of the battalion took command of it, saying, “Come along, my orphans,” and the name stuck to it.

LUCAS

Edward

Captain, Natal Carbineers. Died of enteric at Durban, 7th August 1900. Aged 36. Son of Arthur Lucas, of Darlington.

Extract from The Last Post - Roll of Officers who fell in South Africa 1899-1902 by Mildred G Dooner, published by Naval and Military Press

Lucas. - Capt. Edward Lucas, Natal Carabiniers, of Richmond, Natal, died at Durban Aug. 7th, 1900. He was the second son of Arthur Lucas, Esq., of Darlington, was educated at Clifton, and was 36 years of age.

LUCE

Walter Cecil

Lieutenant, 2nd Volunteer Company, Wiltshire Regiment. Died of enteric at Springfontein, 11th February 1901. Aged 27. Born 27th November 1873. Son of Colonel C.R. Luce, of Halcombe, Malmesbury. Commemorated on a memorial in Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire.

Extract from The Last Post - Roll of Officers who fell in South Africa 1899-1902 by Mildred G Dooner, published by Naval and Military Press

Luce.—Lieut. Walter Cecil Luce, Volunteer Company Wiltshire Regt., died of enteric at Springfontein, Feb. nth, 1901. The youngest son of Col. C. R. Luce, of Halcombe, Malmesbury, he was born Nov., 1873, was educated at Clifton College, and entered the 2nd Volunteer Batt. of the Wiltshire Regt. May, 1896, being promoted lieut. 1899. Lieut. Luce went to South Africa, Jan., 1900, with the Volunteer Service Company to join the 2nd Batt. Wiltshire Regt., and saw much fighting in the O.R.C. and afterwards to the north of Pretoria. He received the rank of lieut. in the army in March, 1900.

LUCE

William Scott

Second Lieutenant 82nd Battery, Royal Field Artillery. Killed in action at Diamond Hill, near Pretoria, 12th June 1900. Aged 20. Born March 1880. Commemorated on a memorial in Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire - "To the glory of God and in memory of William Scott Luce Second Lieutenant 82nd Battery R.F.A. who was killed in action at Diamond Hill on the 12th day of June 1900 aged 20." Also commemorated on Royal Artillery Memorial, London.

Extract from The Last Post - Roll of Officers who fell in South Africa 1899-1902 by Mildred G Dooner, published by Naval and Military Press

Luce.—2nd Lieut. William Scott Luce, Royal Field Artillery, was killed in action at Diamond Hill, near Pretoria, June nth, 1900. He was born in March, 1880, educated at Clifton College, and entered the Royal Artillery, June, 1899. He accompanied the 82nd Battery to South 'Africa in January, 1900, and was present at the battle of Paardeberg, and in the subsequent advance on Bloemfontein and Pretoria.

MacDOUGALL

John Patrick

Lieutenant, 28th Battery Royal Field Artillery. Killed in action near Vlakfontein, 29th May 1901. Aged 26. Born February 1875. Also commemorated on Royal Artillery Memorial, London.

Extract from The Last Post - Roll of Officers who fell in South Africa 1899-1902 by Mildred G Dooner, published by Naval and Military Press

MacDougall. - Lieut. John Patrick MacDougall, 20th Battery Royal Field Artillery, was killed in action near Vlakfontein, May 29th, 1901. He was born Feb., 1875, educated at Clifton College, and entered the Royal Artillery Nov., 1895, being promoted lieut.

MacDOUGALL

James Taylor

Lieutenant, 42nd Battery, Royal Field Artillery. Killed at Farquhar's Farm, near Ladysmith, 30th October 1899. Aged 28. Born July 1871. Son of Colonel I.W. MacDougall. Also commemorated on Royal Artillery Memorial, London.

Extract from The Last Post - Roll of Officers who fell in South Africa 1899-1902 by Mildred G Dooner, published by Naval and Military Press

MacDougall.—Lieut. James Taylor MacDougall, 42nd Battery Royal Field Artillery, was killed in action at Farquhar's Farm, near Ladysmith, Oct. 30th, 1899. He was a son of the late Colonel I. W. MacDougall, was born July, 1871, and educated at Clifton College. He entered the Royal Artillery from the Royal Military Academy July, 1891, and was promoted lieut. July, 1894. He was serving in Ladysmith with his battery when war was declared.

MARTER

William Maurice

Captain, 1st (King's) Dragoon Guards; Brigade Major, 14th Brigade. Wounded at Karee Siding, near Brandfort, 29th March 1900, and died at Bloemfontein of those wounds 3rd April 1900. Aged 32. Born January 1868. Son of Major-General Marter (King's Dragoon Guards). (Queen Victoria requested a photograph from his family after his death.).

Extract from The Last Post - Roll of Officers who fell in South Africa 1899-1902 by Mildred G Dooner, published by Naval and Military Press

Marter.—Capt. William Maurice Marter, p.s.c., 1st Dragoon Guards, Brigade Major, died April 3rd, 1900, of wounds received in action on March 29th, at Karee Siding, near Brandfort. He was the son of the late Major - General Marter, King's Dragoon Guards, of Walton, Epping, formerly A.D.C. to Her Late Majesty Queen Victoria. Capt. Marter was born Jan., 1868, and educated at Clifton College, whence he passed into the Royal Military College. In 1886 he passed out with honours, and entered the Royal Fusiliers in Feb., 1887, being promoted lieut. Feb., 1891. He was transferred to the 1st Dragoon Guards in April, 1892, and promoted capt. March, 1896. Capt. Marter had served in Egypt and India and passed the higher standard in Hindustani and Persian. He was appointed D.A.A.G., North-Eastern District, March, 1897, which post he held till Dec., 1899, when he proceeded to South Africa as Brigade Major, 14th Brigade. He took part in the advance on Bloemfontein, through Jacobsdal and Paardeberg, afterwards moving along the railway to Karree. He is buried in the cemetery there beside his school friend, Capt. Going. Capt. Marter married 1897, Mary Edith, third daughter of the late Col. Cuming, formerly of the Cameron Highlanders, of Crover, co. Cavan, who survives him. Her late Majesty Queen Victoria, sent a message of condolence on Capt. Marter's death being reported, and asked for his photograph.

MURRAY

Fergus

Captain, Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). Killed in action, wounded 5 times before he died, at Spion Kop, 24th January 1900. Aged 31. Son of Commander John Murray (Royal Navy), of Dumfriesshire.

Extract from The Last Post - Roll of Officers who fell in South Africa 1899-1902 by Mildred G Dooner, published by Naval and Military Press

Murray.—Capt. Fergus Murray, Scottish Rifles, was killed in action at Spion Kop, on the Upper Tugela, on Jan. 24th, 1900. He was the younger son of the late Commander John Murray, R.N., of Murraythwaite, Dumfriesshire, born Feb. 1868, and educated at Clifton College. He entered the Scottish Rifles in March, 188g, and was promoted lieut. March, 1892, and capt. Oct., 1897. At Spion Kop he was wounded in five places, but he still continued to command his company, staggering amongst his men till killed. Capt. Murray's name was brought to notice by his commanding officer for havingrendered special valuable assistance Jan. 24th, and he is mentioned in the despatch of Lieut.-Gen. Sir Charles Warren, of Feb. 1st, 1900, for initiating an advance in the face of a heavy fire.

NEWNHAM

Percival Forbes

Lieutenant, Indian Staff Corps attached Thorneycroft's Mounted Infantry. Killed in action at Spion Kop, 24th January 1900. Aged 29. See also Lancashire Fusiliers Memorial

Extract from The Last Post - Roll of Officers who fell in South Africa 1899-1902 by Mildred G Dooner, published by Naval and Military Press

Newnham. - Lieut. Percival Forbes Newnham, Indian Staff Corps, attached to Thorneycroft's M.I., was killed in action at Spion Kop, Jan. 24th, 1900. He was born in June, 1870, educated at Malvern and Clifton Colleges, and entered the Lancashire Fusiliers Jan., 1892, being transferred to the Indian Staff Corps July, 1895. At Spion Kop he was hit in two places, and was bleeding to death, but he propped himself upon a rock and continued to fire till a third bullet killed him.

OGLE

Thomas Frederick Garth

Lieutenant, 3rd Battalion, Royal Munster Fusiliers. Accidentally drowned at Pretoria, 30th October 1901. Aged 24.

Extract from The Last Post - Roll of Officers who fell in South Africa 1899-1902 by Mildred G Dooner, published by Naval and Military Press

Ogle.—Lieut. Thomas Frederick Garth Ogle, M.I., 3rd Batt. Royal Fusiliers, was accidentally drowned at Pretoria, Oct. 30th, 1901, while crossing a swollen drift, after a heavy storm. He was the only son of Maj.-Gen. Frederick Amelius Ogle, C.B., late Colonel Commandant of the Royal Marines, and grandson of the late Admiral T. Ogle. He was born July, 1877, educated at Clifton College, and entered the Royal Fusiliers, from the 5th Batt. Rifle Brigade in May, 1898, being promoted lieut. April, 1899.

OGSTON

F H

Trooper 1491, 1st Battalion, Imperial Light Horse. Killed at Riet Kuil, near Klerksdorp, 17th April 1901. Buried at Klreksdorp.

PACK-BERESFORD

Arthur William

Brevet-Major, Royal Artillery attached South African Constabulary. Died of enteric, at Bloemfontein, 5th March 1902. Aged 33. Second son of Denis W. Pack-Beresford, of Fenagh House, Bagnalstown. Previously seriously wounded at Sannas Post 31 March 1900 when with Robert's Horse attached to the Royal Artillery. Also commemorated on Royal Artillery Memorial, London.

Extract from The Last Post - Roll of Officers who fell in South Africa 1899-1902 by Mildred G Dooner, published by Naval and Military Press

Pack - Beresford. - Major Arthur William Pack-Beresford, Royal Artillery, died from enteric at Bloemfontein, March 5th, 1902. He was the second son of the late Dennis W. Pack-Beresford, Esq., of Fenagh House, Bagnalstown, was born April, 1868, and educated at Clifton College. He entered the Royal Artillery Feb., 1887, being promoted lieut. Feb., 1890, capt. Sept., 1897, and brevet-major Nov., 1900. He went out early in the war as a special service officer, serving successively with the South African Light Horse, and in command of Roberts' Horse, and was severely wounded at Sanna's Post, March 31st, 1900, where his gallant conduct is stated to have been very conspicuous. Major Pack-Beresford was afterwards employed with the South African Constabulary, mentioned in despatches, L.G., Feb. 8th, 1900, and was promoted to a brevet-majority.

PILE

Lionel Lewis

Major, 1st Battalion, East Lancashire Regiment. Died of enteric at Heilbron, 4th December 1901. Aged 42.

Extract from The Last Post - Roll of Officers who fell in South Africa 1899-1902 by Mildred G Dooner, published by Naval and Military Press

Pile. — Major Lionel Lewis Pile, 1st Batt. East Lancashire Regt., died of enteric at Heilbron, Dec. 4th, 1901. He was born in Nov., 1859, and educated at Clifton. He entered the 59th Foot (now the 2nd Batt. East Lancashire Regt.) in Jan. 1880, being promoted lieut. July, 1881, was attached to the Army Service Corps, August 1889 to August 1894, became capt. Nov. 1890, and major Sept., 1901. Major Pile had served in South Africa from the commencement of the war, and had been employed as brigade-major in 1900.

PRICHARD

Gordon Fairfax R

Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, Lincolnshire Regiment. Killed in action at Nitral's Nek, 11th July 1900. Aged 27. Son of J.C. Collins Prichard, of Cowbridge, Glamorganshire. Also commemorated on Lincoln Cathedral Lincolnshire Regiment South African Memorial.

Extract from The Last Post - Roll of Officers who fell in South Africa 1899-1902 by Mildred G Dooner, published by Naval and Military Press

Prichard.—Lieut. Gordon Fairfax Prichard, 2nd Batt. Lincolnshire Regt., was killed in action at Nitral's Nek, July, 11th, 1900. He was the fourth son of J. C. Collins Prichard, Esq., of Pwllywrack, Cowbridge, Glamorgan-shire, was born Nov., 1872, and educated at Clifton College. He entered the Lincolnshire Regt. from the Royal Military College, in March, 1894, being promoted lieut. Feb., 1896. He sailed for South Africa with his battalion in Jan., 1900, and was present at the battle of Paardeberg, and the advance on Bloemfontein and Johannesburg, being awarded the medal with three clasps.

RHODES

C A

Sergeant 785, British South African Police. Killed in action at Klip Drift, Great Harts River, 7th March 1902. Buried at Ottosdal.

ROBERTSON

Edgar Quartus

Captain, King's Own Scottish Borderers. Killed in action near Stephanusdrai, 29th July 1900. Aged 32. Son of John Robertson, of Colac, Victoria, Australia. Last Post to be checked

ROBERTSON

[James] Stuart

[Also Stuart spelt Stewart] Captain, 3rd Battalion, Black Watch (Royal Highlanders) attached to the 14th Hussars. Died of enteric at Kroonstadt, 1st June 1900. Aged 44. Born January 1865. Son of James Robertson, of Perthshire. Buried at Kroonstadt. Also commemorated on Edinburgh, Black Watch, Boer War Memorial

Extract from The Last Post - Roll of Officers who fell in South Africa 1899-1902 by Mildred G Dooner, published by Naval and Military Press

Robertson. — Capt. Stuart Robertson, 3rd Batt. the Black Watch (Royal Highlanders), attached to the 14th Hussars, died of enteric at Kroonstadt, June 1st, 1900. He was born in Jan., 1865, and joined the 14th Hussars as lieut., Aug. 1885, being promoted Capt., Dec., 1889. He retired in 1898, and joined the 3rd Batt. the Black Watch as a capt. in July of the same year. On war being declared, Capt. Robertson volunteered for active service; and was seconded in March, 1900, to join his old corps, the 14th Hussars, in South Africa, and served with that Regiment until his death. He is buried at Kroonstadt.

ROGERS

Henry Paton

[Listed elsewhere as Lieutenant] Captain, 2nd Battalion, Wiltshire Regiment. Died of enteric at Bloemfontein, 13th May 1900. Aged 26.

Extract from The Last Post - Roll of Officers who fell in South Africa 1899-1902 by Mildred G Dooner, published by Naval and Military Press

Rogers.—Lieut. Henry Paton Rogers, 2nd Batt. Wiltshire Regt., died of enteric at Bloemfontein, May 13th, 1900. He was born in April, 1874, educated at Clifton, and entered the Wiltshire Regt. Oct., 1894, being promoted lieut. July, 1896.

SCOTT TURNER

Henry

Brevet-Major (Captain), Black Watch (Royal Highlanders); Special Service Officer. Killed in a sortie from Kimberley, 28th November 1899. Also listed on Edinburgh, Black Watch, Boer War Memorial.

Extract from The Last Post - Roll of Officers who fell in South Africa 1899-1902 by Mildred G Dooner, published by Naval and Military Press

Turner.—Capt. and Brevet-Major Henry Scott Turner, Royal Highlanders, was killed in action at Carter's Ridge, Kimberley, Nov„ 28th. 1899. He was the son of Major Scott Turner, formerly of the 69th Regt. ; was born in May, 1867, and educated at Clifton College. He entered the Royal Highlanders as 2nd lieut. in Dec., 1887, and was promoted lieut. May, 1890, capt. May 24th, 1898, and brevet-major on the following day. He served in Matabeleland, 1893-94, and also in 1896, when he was adjutant and paymaster of the Matabeleland Relief Force. Major Turner was mentioned in despatches March 9th, 1897, and granted a brevet majority for his services. Previous to the South African War Major Turner was serving under the British South African Co., but in Oct., 1899, was seconded for special service, and proceeded to Kimberley and took part in the defence of the town. He had been wounded three days before he was killed while leading a sortie, which was most successful, thirty-three Boers being captured. Recovering, he again commanded a second sortie, and fell while directing his men. Col. Kekewich in his despatch of Feb. 15th, 1900, mentions Major Scott Turner's brilliant services, his energy, and courage; and adds, "in him the army has lost a most valuable officer." The De Beers Co. have erected, on Carter's Ridge, a monument consisting of a cairn 20 feet high with a slab in the centre, in memory of Major Scott Turner and others who fell in the sortie on Nov. 26th, 1899. On the slab are engraved the names of all who were killed.

SEAGRIM

Dudley Gillum

Captain, Royal Garrison Artillery. Died of abcess of the liver at Cape Town, 15th May 1900. Aged 32. Born July 1867. Served in Burma 1885-89 (medal and 2 bars), Zhob Valley 1890, Waziristan 1894 (bar). Buried at Woodstock Cemetery, Cape Town - Capt. Seagrim R.A. 15th June 1900. Also commemorated on Royal Artillery Memorial, London.

Extract from The Last Post - Roll of Officers who fell in South Africa 1899-1902 by Mildred G Dooner, published by Naval and Military Press

Seagrim.—Capt. Dudley Gillum Seagrim, p.s.c., Royal Garrison Artillery, died of abscess of the liver at Cape-town, May 15th, 1900. He was born July, 1867, educated at Clifton College, and entered the Royal Artillery in July, 1886, being promoted capt. July, 1897. He had qualified as an interpreter in French. He served with the Burmese Expedition, 1885-89, receiving the medal with two clasps; with the Zhob Valley Expedition in 1890; and with the Isazai Field Force, 1892. He also served with the Waziristan Expedition under the late Sir William Lockhart, 1894-95, including the delimitation escort and attack on camp at Wano, for which he received a clasp. He was appointed March 3oth, 1899, A.D.C. to the Lieut.-Gen. commanding in the Punjab, but volunteering for active service was selected for special duty in South Africa in Jan., 1900, and served there until his death.

STARK

Arthur Cowell

Civil Surgeon. Died from injuries received by a Boer shell while standing in the doorway of the Royal Hotel, Ladysmith. The shell took off one leg and injured the other, and Dr. Stark succumbed in an hour, 18th November 1899.

Extract from The Last Post - Roll of Officers who fell in South Africa 1899-1902 by Mildred G Dooner, published by Naval and Military Press

Stark.—Dr. Arthur Cowell Stark, M.B., died from injuries received by a Boer shell while standing in the doorway of the Royal Hotel, Ladysmith. The shell took off one leg and injured the other, and Dr. Stark succumbed in an hour. He was the eldest son of the late J. Cowell Stark, Esq., of Torquay, and was educated at Blundell's School, Tiverton, and Clifton College. He afterwards matriculated at Edinburgh University, and was an accomplished naturalist, a great traveller, and one of the first ornithologists of the day. In Sept., 1899, he was in Durban, and war being declared he offered his services, which were accepted. He left Durban for Ladysmith with the last batch of officers who succeeded in entering that town, and rendered good service during the siege.

TAYLOR

Herbert Wodehouse

Captain, 'M' Battery, Royal Horse Artillery. Killed in action at Geluk, between Machadorp and Heidelberg, 13th October 1900. Aged 32. Born June 1868. Also commemorated on Royal Artillery Memorial, London.

Extract from The Last Post - Roll of Officers who fell in South Africa 1899-1902 by Mildred G Dooner, published by Naval and Military Press

Taylor.—Capt. Herbert Wodehouse Taylor, M Battery, Royal Horse Artillery, was killed in action at Geluk, between Machadodorp and Heidelberg, Oct. 13th, 1900. He was born in June, 1868, and educated at Clifton and Wellington, where he was in the Hopetoun and a Prefect. He entered the Royal Artillery from the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, in Feb., 1887, was promoted lieut. Feb., 1890, capt. Oct., 1897, and proceeded to South Africa in Jan., 1900.

THURBURN

Walter Levinge

Captain, 2nd Battalion, Royal Fusiliers. Killed in operations on the Tugela, at Hlangwane Hill, near Chieveley, 19th February 1900. Aged 29. Born June 1870. Son of Charles Thurburn, of Alexandria, Egypt. Buried on Bloys Farm, Llangwane Hill, near where he fell.

Extract from The Last Post - Roll of Officers who fell in South Africa 1899-1902 by Mildred G Dooner, published by Naval and Military Press

Thurburn.—Capt. Walter Levinge Thurburn, 2nd Batt. Royal Fusiliers, was killed in action in the operations on the Tugela, near Colenso, Feb. 19th, 1900. He was the youngest son of the late Charles Thurburn, Esq., formerly of Alexandria, Egypt, and of Mrs. Thurburn, of Hales Hall, Market Drayton. Capt. Thurburn was born in June, 1870, and educated at Clifton College. He entered the Royal Fusiliers, from the 3rd Batt. Northumberland Fusiliers, in Sept., 1891, being promoted lieut. March, 1893, and capt. Jan., 1899. He was fond of hunting and shooting, and was a member of the Heythorp Hunt. He went to South Africa with his battalion in Oct., 1899, and was present at the battle of Colenso and all the fighting up to Llangwane Hill, where he fell leading his men against the Boer position. After he received his mortal wound, "his life slowly ebbing away," he continued to direct his men until he fell back exhausted from loss of blood. Capt. Thurburn is buried on Bloys Farm, on the western slope of Llangwane, close to where he died. A carved oak reredos has been erected to his memory in Kiddington Church, near W00dstock, and a stained glass window in the Episcopal Church at Keith, N.B.

VERTUE

Naunton Henry

Captain, 2nd Battalion, East Kent Regiment (The Buffs); Brigade Major, 11th Brigade. Killed in action at Spion Kop, 24th January 1900. Aged 37. Also commemorated on Canterbury Boer War Memorial

Extract from The Last Post - Roll of Officers who fell in South Africa 1899-1902 by Mildred G Dooner, published by Naval and Military Press

Vertue. - Capt. Naunton Henry Vertue, p.s.c., East Kent Regt., was killed in action at Spion Kop, in the operations on the Upper Tugela, on Jan. 24th, 1900. He was born in Jan., 1863, educated at Clifton and entered the East Kent Regt. Feb., 1884, being promoted lieut. May, 1890, and capt. March, 1893. He was adjutant of his battalion from May, 1890, to May, 1894, and served as A.D.C. to the Brigadier-Gen. commanding in Ceylon from March, 1897, to Jan., 1899. At the time of his death, Capt. Vertue held the appointment of Brigade-Major to the 11th Infantry Brigade in South Africa, commanded by Major-Gen. Woodgate. Capt. Vertue was mentioned in despatches, L.G., Feb. 8th, 1901.

WEAVER

O J

Trooper 326, Canadian Mounted Rifles. Killed at Nooitgedacht, 22nd October 1900. Son of Mrs. Weaver, of 9 Manilla Road, Clifton, Bristol. National Archives of Canada Reference: RG 9, II-A-5, volume 14. Medals Registers. Microfilm reel number: C-1863

WHITE

F K

The Electrical Engineers. Died of disease at Klerksdorp, 23rd October 1901.

WILLIAMS, D.S.O.

William Arthur Glanmor

Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, South Wales Borderers. Killed in action near Bothaville, 5th November 1900. Aged 27. Born 18th September 1873. Son of Hugh Williams, of Ferry Side, Carmarthenshire. Awarded the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.) Posted to Royal Niger Company and served in Niger 1898 (medal and clasp, MID, DSO and wounded). Also commemorated on Carmathen Boer War Memorial.

Extract from The Last Post - Roll of Officers who fell in South Africa 1899-1902 by Mildred G Dooner, published by Naval and Military Press

Williams.—Lieut. William Arthur Glanmor Williams, D.S.O., 2nd Batt. South Wales Borderers, was killed in action near Bothaville Nov. 6th, 1900. He was the second son of the late Hugh Williams, Esq., of Ferry Side, Carmarthenshire, was born in Sept., 1873, and educated at Clifton College. He was fond of games and a good cricketer. He entered the South Wales Borderers in May, 1893, being promoted lieut. Oct., 1895. He served in the operations in the Niger Territories in 1898, including the Benin Hinterland and Siama Expeditions (wounded), being mentioned in despatches and receiving the medal with clasp and the D.S.O. For his services in the South African War he was mentioned in despatches, L.G., Sept. loth, 1901. In the despatch of Gen. Lord Kitchener of May 8th, 1901, the death of Lieut. Williams is mentioned.

Extract from Distinguished Service Order 1886-1915, published by Naval and Military Press

WILLIAMS, WILLIAM ARTHUR GLANMOR, Lieut., was born 18 Sept. 1873. He was gazetted to the South Wales Borderers 20 May, 1893, and became Lieutenant 9 Oct. 1895. From 10 Sept. 1898, to 17 Nov. 1899, he was on Special Extra Regimental Employment, and served under the Royal Niger Company in the operations in the Niger Territories, including the Benin Hinterland and Siama Expeditions. He was wounded; mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 30 May, 1899], and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 30 June, 1899]: "William Arthur Glanmor Williams, Lieut., South Wales Borderers. In recognition of services during the recent operations in West Africa." The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes were forwarded to the Royal Niger Company, and the D.S.O. was presented at Likoja 20 Oct. 1899. Lieut. Williams died 6 Nov. 1900.

Last updated 4 March, 2014

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