Ministry of Defence
Ministry of Defence

Lest We Forget
British Legion
The Royal British Legion

TUNBRIDGE WELLS WAR MEMORIAL

WORLD WAR 1 - SURNAMES 'G'

World War 1 & 2 - Detailed information
Compiled and copyright ©
Edward James Gilbert 2012

Return to Tunbridge Wells Name Index

GAINSFORD Albert Victor
Albert was a Sapper (#343481) with the Royal Engineers Railway Operating Division who at the age of 31 was killed in France July 18, 1918. He is recorded on the Ligny-St. Flochel British Cemetery (I. F. 8). He was the husband of Laura Gainsford of 75 Auckland Rd., Tunbridge Wells. Albert was born in Tonbridge but enlisted for service in Tunbridge Wells. He had formerly been L/7412 with the Royal West Kent Regiment (47th BGO Coy). He is also recorded on the Southborough Memorial.
GALE Robert
Robert was a Private (#G/3982) with the 8th Battalion, Queens Royal West Kent Regiment who died May 23, 1917 in Belgium. He is recorded at the Railway Dugouts Buriel Ground in Belgium (Sp. Mem. C. 30).
GAMMON Frederick Thomas
No further information currently available. He is also recorded on the Southborough Memorial. He is listed on the plaque at St James Church as Frederick F. Gammon. He is listed on the High Brooms Memorial Plaque as Serjeant F. T. Gammon.
GANDER Charles William
Plaque inscription of initials is incorrect. Charles William Gander was a Driver (#2090) with the 1st/3rd Kent Field Coy Royal Engineers who was a soldier that died at sea October 28, 1915 during the Hythe disaster. He is recorded at the Helles Memorial (panel 23 to 25 or 325 to 328).
GANDER John Henry
John was a Private (#820) with the 22nd Battalion,, Australian Infantry who died July 27, 1916, age 32. John had been a general labourer before enlisting for service and had originally lived at 37 Upper Street, Rusthall. On July 23 his Battalion, was involved in a big push along the allied front and were to hold Pozieres until March 1918 when it was lost in the German spring offensive. It was during this campaign that John was killed in action. He was buried at the Pozieres British Cemetery Ovillers-La-Boisselle (grave III. H. 28). He is also recorded on the Rusthall War Memorial.
GANDER Reginald William Joseph
Reginald was a Serjeant (#201175) with the 3rd/4th Battalion, Queens Own Royal West Kent Regiment who at age 23 died in France December 30, 1917. He is recorded at the Flesquieres Hill British Cemetery (VII. E. 2). He was the son of Alfred William and Martha Maria Gander of 8 Thomas St., Tunbridge Wells. He was born in Tunbridge Wells and enlisted at Tonbridge.
GASSON Charles Alfred
Charles was a Private (#G/893) with the 8th Battalion, Royal Sussex Regiment who at age 19 died in France July 1, 1916. He is recorded at the Thiepval Memorial (pier and face 7c). He was the son of Sarah Annie Gasson of 58 High St., Rusthall, Tunbridge Wells. He is also recorded on the Rusthall War Memorial.
GASSON Thomas
Thomas was a Private (#1048) with the 1st Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers who died in France December 4, 1917. He is recorded at the Tincourt New British Cemetery in France at the Somme (III. C. 14). Thomas was born in Tunbridge Wells and a resident of the town but enlisted at London.
GATES Thomas
Thomas was a Private (#32249) with the 8th Battalion, East Surrey Regiment who died in France at age 19 on Mary 3, 1917. He is recorded at the Arras Memorial (Bay 6). He was the son of Frederick and Ella Rose Gates of 33 Wood St., Tunbridge Wells. Thomas was born at St Peters, Tunbridge Wells and enlisted for service at Maidstone. He is listed on the plaque at St James Church as Thomas Gates.
GEARING Frederick
Frederick was a Private (#G/9222) with the Queens Own Royal West Kent Regiment who died in France August 4, 1916. He is recorded at the Ovillers Military Cemetery (XVI. G. 2) in the Somme. He was born at St Barnabas, Tunbridge Wells and enlisted for service in Tunbridge Wells.
GEOGHEGAN Sydney
Sydney was a Rifleman (#5/5017) with the 2nd Battalion, Kings Royal Rifle Corp who died in France January 12, 1915. He is recorded at the Le Touret Memorial (panel 32 and 33) Pas De Calais. Sydney was born in Tunbridge Wells but was living at Central Street East, Middlesex before the war and enlisted for service at Stratford, Essex.
GIBBS Harry
Harry was a Private (#L/8545) with the 2nd Battalion, Royal Sussex Regiment who died at age 42 in France September 25, 1915. He is recorded at the Loos Memorial (Panel 69 to 73). He was the son of William Gibbs of 24 Aulkand Rd., Tunbridge Wells.
GIBSON T B
No further information currently available. There is a Thomas Gibson listed on the plaque at St James Church.
GILBERT E
Possibly Edwin Gilbert a Private (#117929) with the Royal Engineers transferred to (894510) 776th Area Employment Coy Labour Corp who at age 45 died in France October 26, 1918 and who is recorded at the St Lever Cemetery Extension, Roues, France and who was the son of William and Dulcie Gilbert of Paddock Wood, Kent and the husband of Kate Catherine Gilbert of 9 Privry St, Tonbridge.
GILBERT Edgar Allan
Edgar Allan Gilbert was the youngest son of Robert and Elizabeth Gilbert (my great grandparents) and like so many other young men he went to war, did his duty and never came home. Edgar was born 1888 in Tunbridge Wells into the Gilbert family, a family with parents, sons and daughters who lived most of their lives in Tunbridge Wells. Edgar was the youngest son of Robert Charles Gilbert and Elizabeth Gilbert/Blencowe/Mannell. Edgar was one of 3 sons and three daughters in the family. In the period of 1888-1890 Edgar and his family resided at 1 Murray road. By 1891 they were living at 5 Grove Hill Cottage and in 1901 they are recorded as living at 9 Little Mount Sion Road in Tunbridge Wells. Edgar and his brothers enjoyed sports of which lawn bowling, cricket and football were the most often mentioned in stories relayed to me by my grandfather.

Skipping ahead in time Edgars brief military career began with him enlisting on September 7, 1914 in the 7th Battalion Queens (Royal West Surrey) Regiment at Croydon, Surrey. From the recruitment register (QRWS/1/3/3) he is recorded as Edgar Gilbert; No. G/1442;age 25 with terms of enlistment given as "3 years or until the war is over". The 7th Battalion was formed at Guilford September 1914. The battalions official music was the quick march Braganza and the slow march Scipio. One of the mementos I have is Edgars Military Band badge from his membership in the 7th Battalion Military Band. Edgar no doubt inherited his musical talents from his parents who during their early lives in Tunbridge Wells were musicians. Edgar like many other recruits received their military training at various locations in the south of England, most notably at Aldershot, the same place my father received his training during WWII.

Edgar was just a private, one of hundreds of thousands, but he was a son of Tunbridge Wells, a young man proud of where he was from and willing to do his bit for the war effort. On July 1, 1916, the first day of the Battle of the Somme his battalion at 7:30a .m. assaulted the German trenches. Among those going over the wall was private Edgar Gilbert. The record of the battle that day reads "The battalion assaulted the German trenches to the front left half of A 1 Sub Sector on a front of about 400 yards. After 12 hours of fighting the final objective west of Montauban was reached and consolidated on a front of about 260 yards. During the assault 174 men were killed, 284 wounded and 56 missing. The battalion held their objective gained during the night, establishing touch with the 8th E. Surrey Regiment on the right and the 8th Norfolk Regiment on its left". It was during this engagement that the life of Edgar Allan Gilbert came to an end when he was caught in a hail of bullets from a machine gun. The news of his loss was relayed to his parents by way of a card which reads;

Edgar Allan Gilbert

B Company, 7th "Queen’s (West Surrey Regiment)

In Expeditionary Force. France

youngest son of Robert Charles and Elizabeth Gilbert

Fell in Action, July 1 st 1916

Age 28

"A glorious death is his who for his country falls"

When Edgar was killed he and his comrades in arms were attempting to push the Germans from a position they held in and around the village of Mametz in the Somme. Although they had succeeded in taking Mametz it was not without great loss of life. Mametz is located in the North of France 20 miles north east of Amiens not too far east of the town of Albert. To the east of Mametz Wood is Flatiron Copse, a name given by the army to a small plantation. The ground was taken by the 3rd and 7th divisions on July 14, 1916. Edgar is buried in the Dantzig Alley British Cemetery at Mametz. Mametz is located in a valley which was originally known to the troops as Happy Valley and was used as a main supply route during the attempts to advance the line at High Wood. The valley was protected from direct observation from the German lines by the topography of the land and thousands of men and large quantities of supplies passed up this valley. In order to disrupt the supply lines the Germans heavily pounded it with artillery shells and after a while it became known as Death Valley. The Dantzig Alley Cemetery was started in late July 1916 and it remained in use until April 1917. After the armistice more than 1, 100 graves were brought in from smaller cemeteries and from the neighbouring battlefields. Although there are several thousand unidentified graves in the cemetery the presence of Edgar in it is commemorated by a marble headstone bearing the regimental insignia at the top, his name, rank, number, date of death, a large cross in the middle with the words "Till The Day Break" carved into the stone at the bottom. The cemetery now is very peaceful and well maintained and from time to time relatives of the fallen come to pay their respects. I hope one day that I will get to go to France and say goodbye to Edgar as I dout that any of his relatives have ever been there. The cemetery was designed by Sir Herbert Baker and is named after the German trench. The cemetery covers an area of 5, 722 square meters and is enclosed by a red brick wall.... a fitting place for my ancestor to rest for eternity.

The Queens Regimental War Memorial located in the north wall of Holy Trinity Church in Guildford was completed in 1921 and dedicated June 4, 1921 and within the memorial is a niche containing a bronze and glass casket in which is contained the Book of Remembrance. Edgar's name is given in this book as well as on the plaque of the Tunbridge Wells War Memorial. A photograph of this soldier can be seen on the Gilbert family tree on Ancestry UK.
GILBERT John Robert
John was a Driver (#2240) with the 1st/3rd Kent Field Coy Royal Engineers who was a soldier that died at sea, age 21, during the Hythe disaster of October 28, 1915. He is recorded at the Helles Memorial (panel 23 to 25 or 325 to 328). He was the son of John William and Annie Gilbert of 6 Cemetery Rd., Tunbridge Wells. His name is also recorded on the plaque at St Marks Church, Tunbridge Wells.
GILBERT William Henry
William was a Private (#203106) with the 7th Battalion, East Surrey Regiment who died of wounds at age 10 on December 3, 1917. He is recorded at the Le Cateau Military Cemetery in France (V. E. 8). He was the son of Mr and Mrs Gilbert of Farnborough Lodge, Calverley Park, Tunbridge Wells.
GILES John Thomas
John was a Private (#7642) with the Royal Sussex Regiment, who died at home from injuries, age 36, October 24, 1918. He is recorded at the Tunbridge Wells Cemetery (C12. grave 239). He was the husband of M. A. Maylor (formerly Giles) of 34 Standen St., Tunbridge Wells.
GILES Lawrence
Middle name likely Percival. He was a Private (#52654) with the Royal Medical Corp who at age 29 died in Greece August 24, 1915. He is recorded at the East Mudros Militrary Cemetery at Mudros (II. H. 133). He was the son of Charles and Annie Giles of of Dunorlan, Tunbridge Wells.
GILES Victor George Robert
Given in the military records as V. G. R. Giles. He was a Private (#47707) with the 16th Lavour Coy The Queens Own Royal West Surrey Regiment who was transferred to (74167) 124th Coy. Victor died in Belgium August 19, 1917 at age 28. He is recorded at the Brandhoek New Military Cemetery No. 3 (I. B. 6). He was the husband of Mabel Giles of 23 Stone st., Tunbridge Wells.
GODDARD Arthur Percy
Arthur was a Private (#9321) serving with the Canadian Infantry 3rd Battalion, who at the age of 31 was killed in France February 11, 1918. He is recorded at the Barlin Cimmand Cemetery (III. E. 15). He was the son of George William and Ellen Jane Goddard. He was born in Tunbridge Wells.
GODDARD Sidney Bernard
Sidney was a Private (#6314) with the 14th Battalion, London Regiment (London Scottish) who at age 19 died of injuries at home February 12, 1916. He is recorded at the Tunbridge Wells Cemetery (C. 14. 151 'C'). He was the son of Thomas Charles Goddard of 13 Calverley St., Tunbridge Wells.
GODFREY Herbert Thorndyke
Herbert was a Private (#225168) serving with the London Regiment (Royal Fusiliers) 1st Battalion, who at the age of 19 was killed in France October 11. 1917. He is recorded at the Etaples Military Cemetery (XXX. B. 16). He was the son of Mr and Mrs Godfrey of 6 Grove Hill Rd., Tunbridge Wellls. Herbert was formerly #1243 with the Kent Cyclist Battalion.
GOLDSMITH Arthur Ralph
Arthur was one of four brothers who served in the Great War. The eldest son in the family Jesse John Goldsmith (1883-1925) survived but his two other brothers Frederick William and George Arthur/Albert did not. Arthur was the son of John Alfred Goldsmith (1863-1895) and Alice Mary Goldsmith (nee Walker), both of whom died while the brothers were still boys. Arthur was born about 1893 at Tonbridge and in 1901 he and his brothers were living with the Moon family at Southborough, St Mathew, Tunbridge Wells. Arthur enlisted for service at Reading, Berkshire. He was a L/Serjeant (L/15034) with the Duke of Cambridge Own (Middlesex Regiment) 4th Battalion, who at age 21 was killed in action in France at the Somme July 1, 1916. He is recorded at the Gordon Dump Cemetery Ovillers-La-Boisselle (IV. N. 8). He is identified in military records as the brother of Jesse John Goldsmith of 2 Council Houses, St Dennis St Austell, Cornwall, who was the eldest surviving member of the Goldsmith family and his next of kin.
GOLDSMITH Frederick William
Frederick was the younger brother (born about 1887 at Whitfield, Kent) of Arthur Ralph Goldsmith (see above) and the son of John Alfred and Alice Mary Goldsmith. In 1901 he and his brothers were living with the Moon family in Southborough after his parents had passed away. Frederick was most likely a Lance Corporal (#S/23007) with the Machine Gun Corp (Infantry) 9th Coy who died in France October 1, 1918 and is recorded at the Tyne Cot Memorial (panel 154 to 159 and 163A).
GOLDSMITH George A
George was the brother of Arthur Ralph and Frederick William Goldsmith who were also killed in the war. George was born about 1889 at Whitfield Kent and was the son of John Alfred and Alice Mary Goldsmith, both of whom had passed away before 1901. In 1901 he was living with his brothers with the Moon family in Southborough. George was most likely Private (#2334) with the 2nd Battalion, Royal Sussex Regiment who died in France September 26, 1916 and is recorded at the Millencourt Communal Cemetery (D. 26).
GOLDSMITH Harold Edward
Harold was a Private (#TF/2328) with the 1st/5th Battalion, Royal Sussex Regiment who died age 18 May 9, 1915. He is recorded at the Le Touret Memorial (panel 20 and 21) in France. He was the son of Benjamin and Almena A. Goldsmith of 2 Fiar View Salisborg Rd., Langton Green, Tunbridge Wells.
GOLDSMITH James
James was a Sapper (#358064) with the Royal Engineers, 3rd Field Survey Coy who at the age of 20 was killed in France September 14, 1918. He is recorded at Rocquigny-Equancourt Road (1. A. 4). He was the son of Rose Eliza Roberts (formerly Goldsmith) of 2 Grecian Rd., Tunbridge Wells and the late Alfred Goldsmith. He was a native of Crowborough, Sussex. He is also listed on the Crowborough War Memorial. He is also listed on the plaque of St James Church as James Goldsmith.
GOLDSMITH Sydney Nevill (Jim)
Sydney was a Private (#633460) with the London Regiment 20th Battalion, who died at the age of 19 on May 13, 1917. He is buried in the Tunbridge Wells Cemetery (C. 14. grave 237). He had been injured and sent home where he later died from his injuries. He was the son of Albert Charles Goldsmith of 6 Albion Rd., Tunbridge Wells and the late Emily Caroline Goldsmith. He is also listed on the plaque of St James Church as Sidney Goldsmith.
GOODMAN Herbert John
Herbert was a Lance Corporal (C/41) with the 16th Battalion Kings Royal Rifle Corps who died in Belgium April 13, 1918. He is recorded at the Ploegsteert Memorial (Panel 8). Herbert was born at Brighton, Sussex but a resident of Tunbridge Wells before the war and enlisted at Maidstone, Kent. He is listed on the plaque of St James Church as Herbert Goodman.
GOODMAN Thomas
No further information currently available
GOODWIN Edward
Edward was born in Tunbridge Wells and was a resident of the town (High Brooms) before enlisting for service. He enlisted for service at London and was a L/Corp (#10953) with the Worcestershire Regiment, 1st Battalion, who died in France November 18, 1914. He is recorded at the Le Touret Memorial (Panel 17 and 18).
GORDON Robert Norman
Robert Norman Gordon was a Captain with the 2nd Battalion, Border Regiment who died in Belgium October 28, 1914 and who is recorded at the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial (panel 35). He is also recorded on the plaque at St Marks Church, Tunbridge Wells.

Extract from the Irish Newspaper Western People, 28 November 1914 [kindly supplied by Tom Burnell].

The story of the death of Captain Gordon as related by the same soldier, is tragic and touching in the extreme. Captain Gordon’s company after several days hard fighting succeeded in getting possession of a small village. Here they were ordered to billet and make themselves as comfortable as they could for a few days much needed rest, while a company which had been held in reserve were ordered to the firing line. Captain Gordon, anticipating that their quarters would be shelled during the night, sent the sergeant to find a comfortable cellar, where they might rest in safety. This done, they made settle downs on beds of straw, Captain Gordon taking a corner directly under a grating in the cellar, so that, he might the sooner hear any noise created by the enemy. His expectation proved well founded, for the Germans turned their artillery on the village in the middle of the night, but only a few shells were actually fired. One landed fairly on the grating under which the captain lay, blowing his two legs and one arm Robertaway, and otherwise so mangling his body that he lived only for a few hours. His comrades naturally at once began preparation to alleviate his pain, but evidently realising the near approach of his end, Captain Gordon feebly waved hi9m aside, and spoke the last words he ever uttered;- “Go and have a good sleep; you will be useful to-morrow; I will never be useful again.”

Extract from Bond of Sacrifice: Officers Died in the Great War 1914-1916:

CAPTAIN ROBERT NORMAN GORDON. 1st BATTN. BORDER REGIMENT, son of John and Harriet Gordon, now residing at Dimarton, Tunbridge Wells, was horn at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, South America, on the 18th June, 1875, and was educated at the Preparatory School of Captain Lewin, Frant, Sussex, afterwards going to Repton.

Ile was gazetted to the Border Regiment in September, 1895, becoming Lieutenant in April, 1898, and obtaining his company in April, 1904. He served with his regiment in India, Burma, and the Cape.

He was killed by the explosion of a shell at Ypres, on the 26th October, 1914, when leaving the trenches.

Captain Gordon married Miss Rhoda Jefferson, and left one boy, born the 5th May, 1912.

Extract from De Ruvigny's Roll of Honour, 1914-1919:

GORDON, ROBERT NORMAN, Capt.. 1st Battn. (34th Foot) The Border Regt.. s. of John Gordon. of Didmarton, Tunbridge Wells; b. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. South America. 18 June, 1875; educ. Preparatory School, Frant, co. Sussex. and Repton : gazetted 2nd Lieut. Border Rent. 28 Sept. 1895; promoted Lieut. 23 April. 1898. and Capt. 1 April. 1904; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders. and was killed in action at Ypres 26 Oct. 1914 ; m.

GOWER William Henry
William was a Sapper (#1225) with the 1st/3rd Kent Field Coy Royal Engineers who was a soldier that died at sea, age 41, October 28, 1915 during the Hythe disaster. He is recorded at the Helles Memorial (panel 23 to 25 or 325 to 328). He was the son of William and Alice Gower and the husband of Sarah Gower of 118 Silverdale Rd., Tunbridge Wells. Also given is William Gower a Private (#68531) with the 7th Battalion, Queens Royal West Kent Regiment who at age 19 died in France August 8, 1918. He is recorded at the Beacon Cemetery Sailly-Laurette France, Somme. He was the foster son of Mrs F. Whitehorn of 2 Willow Bank Oakfield, Tunbridge Wells. He was born in London and enlisted at Southborough. He was a father of four children and had worked before enlisting with the Tunbridge Wells Gas Company.
GRABER Dyson Harold
Dyson H. Graber unfortunately had a short life. He was born 1898 in Tunbridge Wells and was the youngest son of Ellis and Alice Graber of 8 Beulah Rd., Tunbridge Wells. He had been an old King Charles school boy, and before joining up for military service he was a a senior clerk to the local branch of the Union Assurance Company. When only 18 he signed up for three years of military duty with the British Army in 1916 having enlisted at Maidstone, Kent, He was a private (official number G/12942) with The Queens (Royal West Surrey Regiment) and was assigned to the 2nd Battalion and sent to fight in France. He was killed in action in the Western European theatre of war on March 14, 1917 when Bucquoy was taken by the 7th Division in March. Bucquoy was partly lost to the Germans in April 1918 but after a prolonged and gallant defence by three divisions of the army it was cleared the following August. Initially his recovered body was buried with others from his regiment in a little fenced in cemetery by the roadside where Dyson fell, with the spot marked by a large wooden cross. This spot subsequently became the Queens Cemetery, Bucquoy. Dyson's obituary was published, along with his photograph, in the Advertiser dated March 30, 1917 and reads in part "The deceased soldier, who was only 19 years of age, joined the Army last October, and went to the Front just before Christmas. Soon after his arrival he was taken ill, and was in hospital for some time, and so far as can be gathered. he was in about his first engagement when he was killed". A 2nd Lieut. J. C How said "He was a good soldier, and I only wish he might have been spared, as he was one of my most promising men". A Rev. Bazil Churchwood went on to offer his condolences and a friend of Dyson's remarked that "He was one of the choicest spirits I have known, most sensitive to his duty to God and most conscientious to the high calling of Christian discipleship. His thoughtfulness for the well-being of others always transcended any thought for himself, and his amiable disposition was ever a tonic to all who knew him".

Dyson Grabers sacrafice to the war effort is memorialized by a grey headstone at the Bucquoy cemetary (II. A. 20). At the top of his headstone appears the insignia of his regiment and below it the name D. H. Graber, rank, date of death; name of regiment. At the bottom 1/3 of the headstone is the Star of David denoting his Jewish heritage. His name is also recorded in the Book of Remembrance at the Queens Regimental War Memorial at the Holy Trinity Church in Guilford. This memorial was dedicated June 4, 1921. Dysons name also appears on one of the bronze plaques forming part of the Tunbridge Wells War Memorial which was unveiled at a large ceremony on February 11, 1923. Dysons parents were among a large crowd who tearfully attended the ceremony to pay a final tribute to their loved ones who fell in the Great War. It is indeed ironic that Harold Camburn would commemorate the ceremony by producing two known postcard views of the war memorial using the very same machines he purchased from Ellis Graber (. Ellis Graber was a Tunbridge Wells inventor and manufacturer of photographic printing machines and Harold Camburn was a well known Tunbridge Wells photographer, printer and publisher of postcards). Dyson Grabers older brother Ellis Alexander Graber also served in the war but was sent home after losing a leg.
GRANT P H
No further information currently available
GREEN Albert Edward
Albert was a Private (#G/4944) with the 1st Battalion, Queens Own Royal West Kent Regiment who died in Belgium April 3, 1915. He is recorded at the Tuileries British Cemetery (Sp. Mem. C. 7). Albert was born at Folkestone, Kent but a resident of Tunbridge Wells before the war and enlisted at Tonbridge.
GREEN Charles Edward
Charles was a Corporal (#7477) with the 6th Battalion, Queens Own Royal West Kent Regiment who at 38 died April 11, 1917. He is recorded at the Dussans British Cemetery, Etrun. He was the husband of Annie Green of 71 Southwood Rd. Rusthall, Tunbridge Wells. He is also recorded on the Rusthall War Memorial.
GREEN Herbert Walter or possibly Herbert William
Herbert was a Brevet Lieut. Colonel serving with The Buffs (East Kent Regiment). He died at the age of 40 in France December 31, 1918 and was awarded the DSO. He is recorded at St Sever Cemetery Extension (S. V. L. 13). He was the son of Maria Jane Green of 13 Queens Rd., Tunbridge Wells and the late Walter James Green. He was born at Watford.
GREENWOOD Percy John
Private 3115A, 32nd Battalion (Infatry), Australian Army. Missing presumed killed in action at Fromelles 20 July 1916. Aged 24 years 2 months. Born in Tunbridge Wells. Lived in Hill Street. Son of Henry and Kezia Greenwood. Moved, aged 21, to Fremantle in Western Australia with his mother, Mrs Kezia Greenwood. Enlisted with the AIF 32nd battalion. Printer by trade. Believed to be one of those buried near Pheasant Wood. Commemorated in VC Corner Australian Cemetery and Memorial, Fromelles, France. Panel 5.
GRIFFITHS Harry James
Harry was a 2nd Lieut with the 1st Battalion, Somerset Light Infantry who was killed in action at age 22 in Belgium on August 9, 1916. He is recorded at the Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery (IX. A. 18). He was the son of Henry Thomas and Lillie Griffiths of Calverley Mount, Tunbridge Wells.
GRINTER Frederick Charles
Frederick was a Private (#G/24699) with the Queens Royal West Kent Regiment, 7th Battalion, who at the age of 20 died in Belgium July 21, 1917. He is recorded at the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial (Panel 45 and 47). He was the son of William and Hannah Grinter of 30 Erskine Park Rd., Rusthall, Tunbridge Wells. He also served with the 2nd. 4th Battalion at Gallipoli. Frederick had been a resident of Rusthall, Tunbridge Wells but enlisted for service at Maidstone. He is also recorded on the Rusthall War Memorial.
GROOMBRIDGE Arthur John
Arthur was a Private (L/10104) with the 2nd Battalion, Royal Sussex Regiment who died in France May 10, 1915. He is recorded at the Le Touret Memorial (panel 20 and 21). He was one of three sons of Mr and Mrs H. Groombridge of Albion Square, Tunbridge Wells who died in the war.
GROOMBRIDGE Henry
Henry was a Private (#L/9967) with the Queens Royal West Kent Regiment, 1st Battalion, who at the age of 20 was killed in Belgium April 18, 1915. He is recorded at the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial (Panel 45 and 47). He was the son of William and Jane L. Groombridge of 27 South View Rd., Tunbridge Wells. Henry was born in Tunbridge Wells and enlisted for service at Tonbridge. Other records suggest he was one of three sons of Mr and Mrs H. Groombridge of Albion Square, Tunbridge Wells who died in the war.
GROVES F
No further information currently available
GUEST Frank or Francis
No further information currently available
GUEST Frederic Victor
No further information currently available
GUY Alfred John
Alfred was born in Brighton but enlisted for service in Tunbridge Wells. He was a Sapper (#22549) with the 2nd Field Sqdn Royal Engineers who at age 22 died in France September 25, 1916. He is recorded at the Loos Memorial in France (panel 4 or 5). He was the son of the late Joseph Guy and H. guy (stepmother0 of 47 Stanley Rd., Tunbridge Wells.

Return to Tunbridge Wells Name Index

Last updated 30 November, 2015

Friends of the War Memorials
War Memorials Trust
Main page
Commonweath War Graves Commission
Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Copyright © Roll-of-Honour.com 2002-
Email: rollofhonour@ntlworld.com

See our on-line bookstore
Visit our bookstore