Ministry of Defence
Ministry of Defence

Lest We Forget
British Legion
The Royal British Legion

COUTTS BANK WAR MEMORIAL &
ROBARTS, LUBBOCK & CO. WAR MEMORIAL

World War 1 & 2 - Roll of Honour with detailed information
Compiled and copyright © Martin Edwards 2011

Coutts Bank Book Front Page LogoThere are two memorials, one above the other, to form a memorial to the men of Coutts Bank, 440 The Strand, Holborn, London that died guring the two World Wars. The original building built in 1904 was demolished and in 1974 the memroials were moved to the new building of Coutts & Co., The Strand, Charing Cross, Greater London. These can be found in the main banking hall on the first floor facing the tellers' position. The memorial takes the form of an elaborate wall monument with recessed nowy head, flanked by two female figures, the one rightmost is helmeted and holding a sword, the leftmost is cloaked. An urn is set in recess in the nowy head. The World War 2 memorial, in the same stone, is fixed below. Between the two memorials is a board giving details of the dedication, and decorated with two medallions on a wooden board the leftmost depicting the cenotaph and the rightmost depicting the same two figures. The memorial was unveiled on 24th May 1921 by H.R.H. The Duke of York K.G. The original sculptor was Mr Stanley Nicholson Babb. There are 24 names listed for World War 1 and 20 for World War 2.

There was a further memorial and roll of honour in the buidling of Robarts, Lubbock & Co., 15 Lombard Street, London. This subsidary of Coutts listed the men from that office that gave their lives in World War 1 plus those who served from there - those who died on this memorial are marked . A Roll of Honour for Coutts Bank listing those who served also hung in the offices of Coutts Bank, 440 The Strand.

One name appears on the World War 2 memorial, A L Cook, that is not mentioned in the book published by Coutts, a strange omission.

Coutts & Co. War Memorial
Photographs from the two books published by Coutts Bank containing the Roll of Honour from the bank for each war
Coutts & Co. Roll of Honour WW1
Robarts, Lubbock & Co. Memorial

1914 - 1918
IN GRATEFUL REMEMBRANCE
OF THOSE WHO WENT FROM THIS
HOUSE TO FIGHT FOR THEIR COUNTRY
AND RETURNED NOT
1939 - 1945

ERECTED BY THE PARTNERS AND STAFF OF COUTTS & CO
440 STRAND LONDON

THIS MEMORIAL
WAS UNVEILED ON
24TH MAY 1921
BY HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS
THE DUKE OF YORK K.G.

MEMBERS OF THE STAFF OF COUTTS & CO
WHO FELL IN THE GREAT WAR

BOARD George William

George William BOARD, Lieutenant, East Surrey RegimentLieutenant, 7th Battalion, East Surrey Regiment formerly Royal Flying Corps. Killed in action 30 November 1917. Aged 20. Son of John Frederick and Janet Board, of 47, Onslow Gardens, Wallington, Surrey. No known grave. Commemorated on CAMBRAI MEMORIAL, LOUVERVAL, Nord, France. Panel 6. His British Army Pension Record still exists. He was 5 feet 10½ inches, weight 129lbs, girth 35 inches. Originally he enlisted as Private 5885, 9th battalion, Seaforth Highlanders, but was only 17 when he did so and was discharged.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1914-1918:

GEORGE WILLIAM BOARD

GEORGE WILLIAM BOARD entered the service of Coutts & Co. as a clerk at 440 Strand on 19th May 1915, and on the 7th October in the same year, being then 18 years old, he was gazetted a 2nd Lieutenant in the Special Reserve of Officers and joined the 4th Battalion of the East Surrey Regiment a week later. In November 1916 he was attached to the Royal Flying Corps and obtained a Flying Officer's Graduation Certificate on the 23rd of that month.

He served in France from June to November 1917, taking part in the fighting at Amiens and Arras and in the First Battle of Cambrai. He had had a bad "crash" at Gosport in November 1916, and in November 1917 was serving in the trenches with the 9th Battalion of the East Surrey Regiment at the First Battle of Cambrai. His last letter home spoke of the successful advance towards Cambrai at the beginning of the battle, and his family heard that he was the only officer alive and present with his Company when the successful German counter-attack began.

He was among those reported "missing" of whom no further news was ever received, and eventually his death had to be presumed.

BOWES Stanley Ward

Stanley Ward BOWES, 2nd Lieutenant, Dorsetshire RegimentSecond Lieutenant, 3rd Battalion, Dorsetshire Regiment attached 3rd Battalion, Royal Fusiliers. Killed in action 29 September 1915. Aged 25. Son of Mrs. Letitia Kate Bowes, of St. Margarets, Meadvale, Redhill, Surrey. No known grave. Commemorated on LOOS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 76.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1914-1918:

STANLEY WARD BOWES

STANLEY WARD BOWES entered the service of the Bank at 440 Strand on the 22nd November 1909, and in 1914 was employed as a ledger poster. In November 1914, aged 24 years and 6 months, and unmarried, he joined an Officer Training Corps and received a commission as Second Lieutenant in the 3rd (Reserve) Battalion of the Dorsetshire Regiment. He was attached for service to the 3rd Battalion Royal Fusiliers and went to France 30th May 1915. He took part in the defence of the Hohenzollern Redoubt near Vermelles and there was killed 29th September 1915.

His commanding officer wrote of him : " He fell in the Advance position in the Hohenzollern Redoubt surrounded by many other brave men. . . . The Regiment did magnificently, and it was due to the leading, self-sacrifice and bravery of officers like your son. . . . He met his death where I know he would have wished—at the head of his men and at the post of danger."

His Company Sergeant-Major also wrote to his mother : "Your son died a hero's death as he was leading his Platoon. I was next to him when he fell. He was one of the bravest officers in my Company—he was commanding it at the time of his death."

BURNHAM Henry Edward
Henry Edward BURNHAM, Rifleman, London RegimentRifleman 302040, 1st/5th (City of London) Battalion (London Rifle Brigade), London Regiment. Killed in action 15 August 1917 (September 1917 in book). Aged 29. Born Buxton, enlisted London, resident Dulwich. Son of the late Richard Henry and Clara Burnham. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 52 and 54.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1914-1918:

HENRY EDWARD BURNHAM

HENRY EDWARD BURNHAM entered the service of the Bank as a clerk at 440 Strand 18th November 1908. Before joining the Army he was employed in the Securities Department. On the 17th November 1915, being then aged 27 years and 10 months, and unmarried, he joined the 5th London Regiment (London Rifle Brigade) as a Private, later becoming 1st Gunner, Lewis Gun Section. He served in France and Belgium 1916-17, and took part in the Third Battle of Ypres and the Battles of Arras and Combles. He was reported missing on the 15th August 1917, and his death was presumed by the War Office a year later.

COLDWELLS Charles Albert

Second Lieutenant, 108th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Killed in action 28 September 1915 (October 1915 in book). Son of J G Coldwells, of Glenalmond, Egmont Road, Sutton. Buried in DUD CORNER CEMETERY, LOOS, France. Plot VII. Row F. Grave 16.

Charles Albert COLDWELLS, 2nd Lieutenant, Royal Field Artillery.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1914-1918:

CHARLES ALBERT COLDWELLS

CHARLES ALBERT COLDWELLS entered the Bank at 440 Strand on the 3rd November 1913. He joined the Surrey Yeomanry 13th January 1914, and was therefore mobilised on the 4th August, being then aged 19 years and 1 month. On the 10th November 1914 he was granted a commission in the Royal Field Artillery and proceeded to France, where he was killed in action at Loos, October 1915.

He was one of four brothers, three of whom were killed in the war.

CROASDELL John Maddocks

John Maddocks CROASDELL, Lance Corporal, Royal West Kent RegimentLance Corporal G/19125, 8th Battalion, Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regiment). Died of wounds 31 August 1917. Born Leytonstone, Essex, enlisted London E.C., resident South Woodford, Essex. Formerly 2588, West Kent Yeomanry. Buried in RENINGHELST NEW MILITARY CEMETERY, Poperinge, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. plot IV. Row G. Grave 1.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1914-1918:

JOHN MADDOCKS CROASDELL

JOHN MADDOCKS CROASDELL entered the service of Messrs. Robarts, Lubbock & Co. as a clerk on 1st December 1904. Previous to the war he had had no military training, and when he enlisted as a Trooper in the 3/1 West Kent Yeomanry he had reached the age of 29 years and 3 months, was married but with no children. This Regiment was eventually converted into the 8th Battalion Royal West Kent Regiment, and he served with them in France from 19th December 1916 to 31st August 1917. He fought both in the Ypres and Arras sectors, passed the examination for Gas Instructor, and was acting as Lance-Corporal when on 29th August 1917, as he was returning to his post after rescuing a wounded " chum " and putting him in a place of safety, he was wounded in the abdomen. Two days later he died and was buried in Reninghelst New Military Cemetery near Poperinghe.

DANIELS Russell John

Russel John DANIELS, [Spelt Russel in book] Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, Scots Guards. Died 29 August 1918. Son of J J Daniels, of 49 Drayton Gardens, South Kensington, London S.W. Formerly Captain, 17th Battalion, London Regiment. Buried in ABNEY PARK CEMETERY, London. Grave M.9. 93265.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1914-1918:

RUSSEL JOHN DANIELS

RUSSEL JOHN DANIELS entered the service of the Bank at 440 Strand upon the 10th March 1914. At the outbreak of war he was employed as a junior clerk in the Front Office. From 1911 he had held a commission in the 17th Battalion London Regiment, and later became Captain and Adjutant. Before going to France with his battalion in the 47th Division on 8th March 1915, being then aged 20 years and 10 months, he had had a great deal to do with the establishment of the School of Instruction for Officers at St. Albans, the first institution of its kind. In the spring of 1916 he was transferred to the Scots Guards, being posted to the 3rd Battalion with the rank of 2nd Lieutenant. He had again received his second star, when he was severely wounded at Houthulst Forest 9th October 1917. From his injuries he contracted consumption, and on 29th August 1918 died in Mundesley Sanatorium, having been notified of his promotion to the rank of Captain only two days previously.

GURNEY Frederick Arthur

Frederick Arthur GURNEY, 2nd Lieutenant, Northamptonshire Regiment[Listed as Lieutenant, 7th Battalion, in book] Second Lieutenant, 5th Battalion, Northamptonshire Regiment. Died of syncope 23 March 1916. Aged 28. Son of Walter George and Mary Gurney, of "Selhurst," Ascot, Berks. Started as a Private with the 15th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers. Buried in ETAPLES MILITARY CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot I. Row A. Grave 23.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1914-1918:

FREDERICK ARTHUR GURNEY

FREDERICK ARTHUR GURNEY entered the service of the Bank at 44o Strand on the 4th July 191o, and previous to the outbreak of war was employed as a clerk in the Front Office. He was a Private in the Civil Service Rifles and was mobilised with that Regiment on the 4th August 1914, being then aged 25 years and 11 months.

He was later granted a commission as 2nd Lieutenant in the 7th Battalion Northants Regiment, and subsequently transferred to the 5th Battalion.

He served in France from March 1915 till he contracted blood-poisoning, and died of syncope on the 23rd March 1916.

HADDOCK William Funston

William Functon HADDOCK, Private, London RegimentPrivate 533254, 15th (County of London) Battalion (Prince of Wales' Own Civil Service Rifles), London Regiment. Killed in action 15 September 1916. Aged 26. Born Wandsworth, enlisted Sutton, resident Eastbourne. Son of Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Haddock, of 9, Quarry Rd., Wandsworth, London; husband of Kate Haddock, of 6, Bedford Well Rd., Eastbourne. Formerly 6471, 15th Battalion, London Regiment. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 13 C. Also listed on the Eastbourne War Memorial.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1914-1918:

WILLIAM FUNSTON HADDOCK

WILLIAM FUNSTON HADDOCK entered the Bank as a clerk at 440 Strand on the 14th July 1909, and previous to joining the Army was employed in the Income Tax Department.

On the 8th April 1916, being then aged 25 years and 9 months and married, he enlisted as a Private in the 15th Battalion County of London Regiment (Civil Service Rifles) and three months later proceeded to France with that Battalion and completed his training at Albert.

He left Albert on the 14th September 1916 for the front-line trenches for the first time, and went over the top at 6 a.m. the following morning at High Wood, after which engagement he was listed as " missing " and subsequently reported as "presumed killed."

HEWETT Leonard Percy

Leonard Percy HEWETT, Private, London RegimentPrivate 1310, 1st/14th (County of London) Battalion (London Scottish), London Regiment. Killed in action 1 November 1914. Aged 20. Born Paddington, enlisted London, resident Hanwell. Son of Mr. L. W. Hewett, of 10, Milton Rd., Hanwell, London. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 54.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1914-1918:

LEONARD PERCY HEWETT

LEONARD PERCY HEWETT entered the service of the Bank at 44o Strand upon the 14th October 1912, and in 1914 was employed in the Securities Department. He joined the London Scottish in 1910 at the age of 16 years 6 months, and at the outbreak of war was mobilised with that Battalion. A short time after, he proceeded to France with them and took part in the First Battle of Messines in October, after which engagement he was reported missing on the 1st November 1914. No further tidings being received, the War Office in due course presumed his death.

HILLEBRANDT Frederick Edmund

Frederick Edmund HILLEBRANDT, 2nd Lieutenant, Royal Flying Corps[Listed as HILLEBRANT on CWGC] Second Lieutenant, 5th Wing, Royal Flying Corps and General List. Accidentally killed 22 March 1917. Next of kin Miss V M Lawrence, 15a Montpelier Vale, Blackheath, London S.E. Buried in ILFORD CEMETERY, Essex. Plot/Row/Section C. Grave 2055.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1914-1918:

FREDERICK EDMUND HILLEBRANDT

FREDERICK EDMUND HILLEBRANDT entered the service of the Bank as a clerk at 44o Strand on the 1st September 1913, and prior to the war was a member of the Office Manager's reserve staff.

In August 1914 he joined the University of London Officers' Training Corps. He was gazetted in March 1915 to the Suffolk Regiment, and with his Battalion proceeded to Egypt in January 1916, taking part in the campaign against the Senussi.

In April of that year he transferred to the Royal Flying Corps, and served with the Salonica Force.

Later he was recalled to England to take part in repelling hostile air raids, and on 15th March 1917 his machine crashed at Wye Aerodrome in Kent.

The Albert Medal for gallantry was conferred on Captain Bryson, the pilot, who after disentangling himself from the burning fallen aeroplane, went back into the flames and extricated his passenger, Lieutenant Hillebrandt, who, however, succumbed a few days later.

INNES George Alexander

Private 514236, 1st/14th (County of London) Battalion (London Scottish), London Regiment. Killed in action 29 August 1918. Aged 39. Born at Glass, Huntley, enlisted London 13 December 1916, resident Westminster. Husband of Lucy Annie Innes, of 95, Ranelagh Rd., Pimlico, London. Formerly 8444, 14th Battalion, London Regiment. Buried in QUEANT ROAD CEMETERY, BUISSY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot I. Row C. Grave 32. Some of his British Army WW1 Service Records still exist. In the early part of 1918 (25 January 1918) he had been in hospital suffering from rheumatism and had been dishscharged 9 February 1918.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1914-1918:

GEORGE ALEXANDER INNES

GEORGE ALEXANDER INNES was engaged on the 21st August 1898 at 59 Strand as a waiter on the luncheon-room staff and on the 23rd March 1908 he transferred to the messenger staff. On the 3rd September 1916, being then 37 years of age and married, with four children, he enlisted in the 14th Battalion London Regiment (London Scottish Rifles) and after six months' training proceeded to France.

He was a first-class shot and in consequence did a considerable amount of sniping.

He was present at several minor engagements and was killed whilst fighting at Bullecourt on the 29th August 1918.

LANCASTER Howard Vincent

Second Lieutenant, 3rd Battalion attached 1st Battalion, Leicestershire Regiment. Died of wounds 21 November 1917. Aged 24. Son of Edith Eliza Read (formerly Lancaster), of "Glendene," 77, Curzon St., Derby, and the late Frederick William Lancaster. Formerly Lance Corporal 3612, Honourable Artillery Company. First entered the arena 13 May 1917. Buried in ROCQUIGNY-EQUANCOURT ROAD BRITISH CEMETERY, MANANCOURT, Somme, France. Plot II. Row B. Grave 5.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1914-1918:

HOWARD VINCENT LANCASTER

HOWARD VINCENT LANCASTER entered the service of the Bank at 440 Strand upon the 27th July 1914, and was employed as a ledger poster.

He enlisted in the Honourable Artillery Company on 28th May 1915, being then aged 21 years 9 months, and in December 1917 was granted a commission in the 1st Battalion Leicestershire Regiment. He served in France with that Battalion from April 1917 until 21st November 1917.

In his first fight at the First Battle of Cambrai he was severely wounded in several places and died without regaining consciousness.

LUBBOCK The Hon Harold Fox Pitt

Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, Grenadier Guards. Killed in action 4 April 1918. Aged 29. Son of the late John Lubbock, 1st Baron Avebury and Alice his wife, of Kingsgate Castle, Kent; husband of Dorothy C. Lubbock, of High Elms, Farnborough, Kent, resident The Old Hall, Oakham, Rutland. Joined his unit in France 3 February 1918. Also served in Gallipoli and Palestine as Capt. in West Kent Yeomanry. His brother, Capt. Eric F.P. Lubbock also fell. Buried in BOISLEUX-AU-MONT COMMUNAL CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Grave 3.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1914-1918:

THE HONBLE HAROLD FOX PITT LUBBOCK

THE HONBLE HAROLD FOX PITT LUBBOCK had become a partner in the firm of Robarts, Lubbock & Co. in 1913, and after the amalgamation in September 1914 with Coutts & Co. he became an additional Managing Partner.

For some years before the outbreak of the war he had held a commission in the Queen's Own Royal West Kent Yeomanry, which Regiment included several members of the staff of Robarts, Lubbock & Co. who had joined to serve with him.

After the outbreak of war, when he was just over 26 years old and recently married, he served with his Regiment in Kent till it was sent to Egypt and from there as a dismounted force to Gallipoli. He was in Gallipoli with the Helles force till the evacuation, when the Regiment was sent to Palestine. He acted as Adjutant during most of the time when abroad and was promoted Captain in January 1917.

Being anxious to serve in France, he obtained a transfer to the Grenadier Guards in July 1917, and after some months with the Regiment in England served in France from January 1918 till he met his death in action near Arras on April 4th. He had been slightly gassed, but had not previously been wounded.

His wife, daughter of Lord Forster, also lost both her brothers in the war.

MADDOCK Owen Loftus

Second Lieutenant, 9th (County of London) Battalion (Queen Victoria's Rifles), London Regiment. Killed in action 7 October 1916. Aged 19. Son of Richard and Elizabeth Jane Maddock, of "Tremadoc," Egmont Rd., Sutton, Surrey. Buried in GUARDS' CEMETERY, LESBOEUFS, Somme, France. Special memorial 26.

Note: There are special memorials to 83 soldiers known or believed to be buried in the cemetery without known graves. Special memorials record the names of five casualties buried in Ginchy A.D.S. Cemetery, whose graves were destroyed by shell fire, and three officers of the 2nd Bn. Coldstream Guards, killed in action on 26 September 1916 and known to have been buried together by the roadside near Lesboefs, whose grave could not later be located.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1914-1918:

OWEN LOFTUS MADDOCK

OWEN LOFTUS MADDOCK entered Coutts & Co.'s service at 440 Strand 8th March 1915, and in the following November, after six months' employment as a junior, when 18 years and 7 months old, he enlisted in the Artists Rifles O.T.C. and was in due course gazetted to the 9th Battalion County of London Regiment (Queen Victoria's Rifles).

After training at home he took part in the Somme Battle—his Battalion had to attack the German position near Les Boeufs—from September l0th 1916 till he was killed on October 7th.

During his training he had specialised and become an expert at machine gunnery and at bombing. Though he fell in his first battle he had had time to give proofs of courage and coolness under fire, and both brother officers and men under his command wrote to his father to tell him so.

MATHEWS Joseph Henry

Second Lieutenant [SDGW] or Captain [CWGC], 5th Battalion, Princess Charlotte of Wales's (Royal Berkshire Regiment). Killed in action 27 March 1918. Aged 21. Son of James and Mary Agnes Mathews, of 16, Geraldine Rd., Wandsworth Common, London. No known grave. Commemorated on POZIERES MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Panel 56 and 57.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1914-1918:

JOSEPH HENRY MATHEWS

JOSEPH HENRY MATHEWS became a clerk at 440 Strand 7th June 1915, and on 24th December following, aged 18 years and 3 months, enlisted in the Artists Rifles ; he was promoted Corporal just before going to France after about three months' training. He was gazetted 2nd Lieutenant in the Royal Berkshire Regiment on 18th June 1917 and posted to the 5th Battalion.

He was killed in action near Albert on 27th March 1918, just after his 21st birthday, while taking part, in his Colonel's words, "in a most gallant counter-attack." The adjutant wrote to his father that he "had won the hearts of both officers and men," and the letter goes on to say "Your son, during his year with the Battalion, set a noble example of self-sacrifice at all times, and cheerfulness in time of difficulty. He led his men with great bravery and I know that the Commanding Officer had marked him down for rapid promotion."

The promise of his schooldays—he had done well both in work and play —was thus fulfilled in his short military career.

OXLEY Herman Grant

Lieutenant, 4th Battalion attached 2nd Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Killed in action 4 November 1918. Aged 25. Son of George E. and Alice D. Oxley, of 11, Selborne Rd., Hove, Sussex. Native of Bexleyheath, Kent. Buried in HIGHLAND CEMETERY, LE CATEAU, Nord, France. Plot VI. Row E. Grave 6.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1914-1918:

HERMAN GRANT OXLEY

HERMAN GRANT OXLEY came as a clerk to 44o Strand 3rd November 1913. In May 1915, aged 2 months under 24 years and single, he joined the Inns of Court O.T.C. and in August was commissioned in the 16th Battalion, K.R.R.C.

In France he was severely wounded at High Wood l0th July 1916, and eventually, on discharge from hospital, was invalided out of the Army, but by some error a Board reported him fit for service immediately afterwards. Thereupon he took steps to rejoin and was sent to the 6th Battalion K.R.R. and went through a Lewis-gun course at Woolwich.

He was in France again for the final great advance and fell in the fighting on the Sambre Canal, south of Catillon, on November 4th—a week before the Armistice.

PINN Tyrrell Steventon

Second Lieutenant, 8th Battalion, East Yorkshire Regiment. Died of wounds 12 October 1915. Buried in ST. SEVER CEMETERY, ROUEN, Seine-Maritime, France. Officers, Plot A. Row 2. Grave 3.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1914-1918:

TYRRELL STEVENTON PINN

TYRRELL STEVENTON PINN entered the Bank as a clerk at 59 Strand on the 16th May 1904 and previous to the outbreak of war was employed as a ledger poster.

On the 4th August 1914, being then aged 30 years and 10 months, he was mobilised with the Civil Service Rifles (which Battalion he had joined on the 23rd November 1908) and on the 26th December 1914 he was granted a commission in the 8th Battalion East Yorkshire Regiment.

He died in hospital at Rouen on the 12th October 1915, from wounds received at the Battle of Loos.

It has not been found possible to learn further details of his service.

RAWBONE Charles Robert

Second Lieutenant, Royal Flying Corps and General List. Killed in a flying accident 18 December 1917. Aged 20. Son of Charles Thomas and Kate Gascoigne Rawbone, of 4, Templar St., Myatt's Park, Camberwell, London. Buried in LAMBETH CEMETERY, london. Grave reference E.1. 179.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1914-1918:

CHARLES ROBERT RAWBONE

CHARLES ROBERT RAWBONE came to 440 Strand as a clerk 12th April 1915, and on the following 6th November, aged 18 years and 3 months, he joined the Artists Rifles. Illness, however, prevented him from going to France at the time, and in the autumn of 1916 he was transferred to the R.F.C. as a Cadet at Denham, and proceeded to Exeter College, Oxford. He eventually graduated in flying in June 1917, at the Central Flying School, Upavon, and was attached to the 75th Squadron. When his unit, however, proceeded to France, he was recalled to Upavon and retained as an instructor at home. He died 40f injuries received in an accident at Lisbourne Aerodrome, near Rugby, 18th December 1917.

RIDGE Everard Vaughan

Lieutenant, 153rd Company, Machine Gun Corps (Infantry). Killed in action 10 April 1917. Aged 21. Son of the late Edward H. Ridge, of 15, Bedford Row, High Holborn, London W.C.1. Entered France 3 August 1916. No known grave. Commemorated on ARRAS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Bay 10.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1914-1918:

EVERARD VAUGHAN RIDGE

EVERARD VAUGHAN RIDGE entered the service of the Bank at 440 Strand on the 15th April 1914. He joined the 3rd London Brigade R.F.A. (T.F.) in April 1913 at the age of 17 years 8 months.

In July 1915 he was granted a commission in the Worcester Regiment and subsequently transferred to the Machine Gun Corps.

He proceeded to France in August 1916 and served there continuously until he was killed in action during the attack on Vimy Ridge upon the 9th April 1917.

It is regretted that more particulars of his services cannot be obtained.

RUSSELL John

Rifleman 301174, 1st/5th (City of London) Battalion (London Rifle Brigade), London Regiment. Killed in action 1 July 1916, confirmed September 1916. Aged 22. Enlisted London, resident Streatham. Entered France 2 September 1915. Son of Millicent Russell, of 7, Rydal Rd., Streatham, London, and the late Oliver Lambert Russell. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 9 D.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1914-1918:

JOHN RUSSELL

JOHN RUSSELL entered the service of the Bank as a clerk at 440 Strand on the 13th July 1914, and enlisted in the 5th Battalion the London Regiment (the London Rifle Brigade) on the 31st March 1915, being then aged 21 years.

In August 1915 he went to France 40n active service, and never returned.

He was due for leave about the end of July 1916 and intended then to apply for a commission, but on the first of the m40nth he was reported “missing” in the fight at Gommecourt, and in due course of time his death had to be presumed.

Though no further information ever reached his home about his death, his pocket-book was returned to his mother through the Graves Commission in 1920.

SCUTCHINGS William Thomas Joseph

[Listed as SCRUTCHINGS on Coutts Memorial but SCUTCHINGS on Robart memorial, CWGC & SDGW] Rileman 304559, 2nd/5th (City of London) Battalion (London Rifle Brigade), London Regiment. Killed in action 20 September 1917. Born and resident Hampstead, enlisted London. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 52 and 54.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1914-1918:

WILLIAM THOMAS JOSEPH SCRUTCHINGS

WILLIAM THOMAS JOSEPH SCRUTCHINGS entered the service of Messrs. Coutts & Co. as a clerk at 15 Lombard Street 1st September 1914, and on l0th January 1917, being 18 years and 8 months old and single, he enlisted as a Rifleman in the London Rifle Brigade (5th City of London), 2/5th Battalion the London Regiment.

After training with the 2/5th, the Reserve Battalion, he went overseas and served with the active-service Battalion in Belgium in the following August, and on l0th September 1917 fell in action in the attack on the Ypres sector (N.E. of St. Julien.)

SETON Sidney James

Assistant Paymaster, H.M.S. "Formidable", Royal Naval Reserve. Died 1 January 1915. Aged 22. Eldest son of Alice Seton, of 5, Upland Rd., Eastbourne, and the late James Henry Seton. Native of Clapham, London. No known grave. Commemorated on CHATHAM NAVAL MEMORIAL, Kent. Panel 13.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1914-1918:

SIDNEY JAMES SETON

SIDNEY JAMES SETON entered the service of the Bank at 44o Strand upon the 3rd June 1912, and before the war was employed as a clerk in the India Department.

In the spring of 1914, being then 21 years of age, he joined the Civil Service Rifles, and was mobilised with this Battalion in August; for a time he served upon the Staff of the Third Army at Luton Hoo, and later was granted a commission as Assistant Paymaster in the Royal Naval Reserve.

He was on board H.M.S. Formidable when she was torpedoed in the English Channel upon the 1st January 1915, and was amongst those who lost their lives.

SQUIRES, MC Edward Constable

Temporary Captain, 12th Battalion, Prince of Wales's Own (West Yorkshire Regiment). Killed in action 18 August 1916. Aged 27. Son of Edward Constable Squires and Ann Eliza Squires, of 25, Cliff Parade, Leigh-on-Sea, Essex; husband of Gertrude Squires (although his medal card states his widow to be Mrs E C Squires, Villino Vergerio, Grandola, Val Honaggio, Lago di Como, Italy. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). Buried in FLATIRON COPSE CEMETERY, MAMETZ, Somme, France. Plot III. Row I. Grave 5.

London Gazette Citation for Military Cross 20 October 1916, page 23:

Temp. Lt. Edward Constable Squires, W York. R.
For conspicuous gallantry in action. As signalling officer he repeatedly repaired wires under fire. Later, he volunteered for work in the firing line, and successfully constructed a strong point in the most advanced part of the line. He has done other fine work.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1914-1918:

EDWARD CONSTABLE SQUIRES

EDWARD CONSTABLE SQUIRES came as a clerk to Coutts & Co. at 440 Strand on 10th September 1909, and on 27th January 1913 had enlisted in the 15th County of London (Civil Service Rifles). When mobilised on 4th August 1914, he was 25 years and 6 months of age, and was working in the Securities Department.

He was almost immediately selected for a commission, and on 3rd December 1914 was gazetted to the West Yorkshire Regiment and posted to the 14th Battalion at Penzance.

He was promoted Lieutenant on the 24th February 1915, and on the 8th April 1916 joined the 12th Battalion at Meteren in France. He was at first appointed Intelligence Officer, but he only retained the position a short time as he preferred duty as a Platoon Commander.

The Battalion served in the line in the Locre sector from the 30th April 1916 to the 24th May, when they returned to billets at Bailleul. On the 6th June they again entered the line in the Ypres sector, and returned to billets on the 16th. The Battalion was then sent to La Panne to train for the coming offensive.

On the 23rd June, during this period of training, he was promoted Captain and given command of his Company. On the 1st July the Battalion moved forward to the Somme area, and after many strenuous days launched an attack at Bazentin ridge. The morning of the 22nd saw them attacking near Longueval and the fighting lasted several days.

On the 16th August the Battalion were again heavily engaged taking part in an attack near Guillemont, and on the 18th they made repeated fierce attacks at Maltz Horn Ridge, south of Trones Wood. About 4 a.m. on this day, whilst leading his men, he was fatally hit in the right side and arm. He was found by his commanding officer about 7 a.m. unconscious, and died at 9 a.m. He was buried on the west side of Maltz Horn Ridge, but his body was later removed to the British Cemetery at Bazentin, N.E. Albert.

For his conduct on the 23rd and 24th July he was recommended by his commanding officer for the Military Cross. The following is the official record from the London Gazette, 12th October:

“For conspicuous gallantry in action. As Signalling Officer he repeatedly repaired wires under fire. Later he volunteered for work in the firing line and successfully constructed a strong point in the most advanced part of the line. He has done other fine work."

STANDRICK, MC John Harold

Captain, 2nd/18th (County of London) Battalion (London Irish Rifiles), London Regiment. Died of wounds 21 February 1918. Aged 25. Son of Alfred and Naomi Jane Standrick, of 8A, Oxford Avenue, Merton Park, Merton, London. Native of Shepton Mallet, Somerset. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). Went to France 11 January 1916. Buried in JERUSALEM WAR CEMETERY, Israel. Section S. Grave 76.

London Gazette Citation for Military Cross 16 July 1918, page 37:

Lt. (A./Capt.) John Harold, Standrick, Lond. R.
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. It was due to his skill and ability as a leader that the success of the operations against the main enemy defence line was so marked. His task was one of great responsibility, as his company was the directing pivot of the movement forward for the final assault. Throughout the day he showed exceptional skill in handling his company and a complete indifference to danger.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1914-1918:

JOHN HAROLD STANDRICK

JOHN HAROLD STANDRICK came to Coutts & Co. at 440 Strand on the 28th May 1912, and in August 1914 was employed in the “Warrants" Section of the Securities Department.

He had no previous Territorial service, but was an enthusiastic scoutmaster at Beckenham. On the 27th May 1915 he joined the Inns of Court (O.C.B.) at the age of 22 years and 7 months, and unmarried. He was commissioned in the “London Irish Rifles” (18th Battalion County of London), and served in France in 1916, taking part in the Battle of Vimy Ridge. Subsequently he proceeded to Salonica and Macedonia, and to Egypt and Palestine, where he took part in the Battle of Beersheba, the Second Battle of Gaza, and the Battle of Jericho.

In France he had served for a time as Sharpshooting Officer to the 141st Infantry Brigade, and he was an Acting Captain at the time of his death, which was caused by wounds received close to Jerusalem on the 20th February 1918, to which he succumbed two days later. He was buried on the Mount of Olives.

He had received the M.C. for "conspicuous gallantry and capable leadership " on the field of Beersheba on the recommendation of General Shea, who also gave Military Medals to two of the men in his Company on that day. In the fight he had received injuries to his knees which turned septic, but he refused to go to hospital as long as he could stand. His Colonel wrote of him: " His death came as a cruel blow to me and to the Battalion as a whole: he was immensely popular with both officers and men, and deservedly so, for no officer had their interests more at heart. Always cheerful, he was the life and soul of the Battalion, whether it was at work or play-he was equally at home with either. ... He had been commanding a Company for some months previous to his death, and I had every confidence in him. He was a born leader . . . and did not know what fear was, and it was his fearlessness in exposing himself that led to his death. I cannot tell you how much we miss him both as a soldier and a friend. His M.C., one of the first (if not the first) earned in the Battalion, was thoroughly well deserved and most popular. I mourn the loss of a gallant English gentleman."

STEWART Edward John

Second Lieutenant 140th Company, Machine Gun Corps (Infantry). Killed in action 30 November 1917. Aged 24. Son of Edward Stewart, of Beech Cote, Alton, Hants. Went to France 17 March 1915. Formerly Private 1832 and 530248, 15th Battalion, London Regiment. Buried in MOEUVRES COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Nord, France. Plot V. Row D. Grave 24.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1914-1918:

EDWARD JOHN STEWART

EDWARD JOHN STEWART came as a clerk to 44o Strand 6th October 1913, and joined the Civil Service Rifles, 15th Battalion County of London. When mobilised on the 4th August 1914, he was two months under 21 years old, and unmarried, and had been employed in the "shop" or Front Office.

He went to France with his Battalion, but afterwards was transferred to the Machine Guns of the 48th Infantry Brigade, and he received a commission in the Machine Gun Corps.

He was present at the battles of Festubert, La Bassée, Loos, Hulluch, and the Somme, and fell in action 30th November 1917. It is regretted that more details of his services cannot be given.

THOMPSON Cecil Frederick Johnstone

Lieutenant, 45th Training Depot Squadron, Royal Air Force. Killed in a flying accident 6 September 1918. Aged 21. Son of Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Thompson, of 80 Clancarty Rd., Hurlingham, London. Buried in NORTH SHEEN CEMETERY, Surrey. Plot/Row/Section AC. Grave 522.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1914-1918:

CECIL FREDERICK JOHNSTONE THOMPSON

CECIL FREDERICK JOHNSTONE THOMPSON became a clerk to Messrs. Robarts, Lubbock & Company on the 1st January 1914.

On the 4th August 1914, aged 18, single, and with no previous military training, he enlisted in the Queen's Own West Kent Yeomanry when that Regiment was mobilised. When it went to Gallipoli, he was left behind, being under the age for foreign service, and he was subsequently transferred to the 10th Battalion Buffs (East Kent Regiment) and reached the rank of Corporal. He served abroad at Salonica from 1915 to 1916, and then passed into the Royal Flying Corps and became a Lieutenant.

He was killed while flying at home on the 6th September 1918.

TONGUE Claude Leslie

Second Lieutenant, 1st (Reserve) Garrison Battalion attached L.C.B. Depot, Worcestershire Regiment. Died 26 October 1918. Buried in TERLINCTHUN BRITISH CEMETERY, WIMILLE, Pas de Calais, France. Plot VI. Row C. Grave 33.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1914-1918:

CLAUDE LESLIE TONGUE

CLAUDE LESLIE TONGUE became a clerk to Coutts & Co. at 440 Strand 22nd March 1904. On the 24th June 1917, when he enlisted as a Cadet in the Inns of Court O.C.B., he was two months under 33 years old, a widower, with one child.

At this time he was employed in the Bank as chief “in-clearer."

In due course he received a commission in the Worcestershire Regiment. He proceeded to France in October 1918 and, within a few days of landing, contracted influenza, from which he died in the Red Cross Hospital at Rouen on 26th October 1918.

YEOMANS Stuart Coulthard

Rifleman 300819, 1st/5th (City of London) Battalion (London Rifle Brigade), London Regiment. Killed in action 1 July 1917. Aged 31. Enlisted London, resident Strand. Son of the late Montague and Phoebe Yeomans. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 9 D.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1914-1918:

STUART COULTHARD YEOMANS

STUART COULTHARD YEOMANS was 29 years and 3 months old and single when he was mobilised 0n the 4th August 1914 as a Private in the London Rifle Brigade. He had been a clerk at 440 Strand since March 1906, and at the time he was mobilised was employed as a ledger poster.

His Battalion of the London Rifle Brigade (the 5th County of London) first trained at Hayward's Heath and went to France in August 1915 (one of the earlier Territorial battalions to go). In October they went up to the line in Flanders and in March 1916 he passed a machine-gun course near Calais. His letters give very few particulars of his doings—though he once mentions that he was a "bomber"—but give a vivid picture of the man himself. The following, written when he was billeted in a mill, is highly characteristic:

"The man who had the mill is a rare egg, he starts it off and then goes and sits in a Café all day. He wears a white hat and I think he is a real Miller. First one I've ever seen. I often wonder what he puts into the Mill and what the Mill does with it, but it is evidently one of his rare secrets. I believe he loves creeping round it when it is dark and listening to it creaking and groaning and I can imagine him on a very, very dark night stroking and patting it and saying Ah ' ! to himself—but I am wandering a little. It is good to wander a little as the army is so mechanical."

In June 1917 he was sent home to apply for a commission (his only home leave since he went abroad). He told one of the men in the Bank that he had to go out again just for a few weeks while his papers were going through and was told jokingly not to get hit in that interval, but in those few weeks he met his death.

On the first day of the Somme offensive, 1st July 1917, the L.R.B., starting from Hébuterne, north of Albert, about 7.30 a.m., attacked the German position at Gommecourt. They penetrated as far as the third line of trenches, but owing to a heavy barrage of shell-fire were apparently unable to get into communication with their support line or to get up reserve supplies of ammunition. The enemy attacked in force and the order to retire was given about 5 p.m. The retirement was not completed until 7 p.m.

Nothing whatever was learnt as to his death. He was returned as “missing," and his death presumed in due course.

"Their glory shall not be blotted out
Their bodies are buried in peace;
But their name liveth for evermore."
MEMBERS OF THE STAFF OF COUTTS & CO
WHO FELL IN THE WAR 1939-1945
ATKINSON Dennis Knox

Pilot Officer 83500, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Died 17 May 1941. Aged 26. Son of James and A.F. Atkinson; husband of Dorothy Atkinson. Buried in ISMAILIA WAR MEMORIAL CEMETERY, Egypt. Plot 4. Row A. Grave 3.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1939-1945:

DENNIS KNOX ATKINSON

DENNIS KNOX ATKINSON left the Bank in August 1940 at the age of twenty-five years on being granted a direct commission in the Royal Air Force with the rank of Acting Pilot Officer.

After a period of three months training in this country he was drafted to Ismalia and in November 1940 he was promoted Pilot Officer. He was employed on Ground Staff duties and served at Ismalia until his tragic death on the 17th May 1941.

BATTERSHILL Peter Luntley

Lieutenant EC/4634, 3rd Battalion, 8th Punjab Regiment, Indian Army. Died 18 November 1943. Aged 29. Son of William Harry and Annie Margaret Battershill, of Ingatestone, Essex. Buried in SANGRO RIVER WAR CEMETERY, Italy. Plot XI. Row B. Grave 16.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1939-1945:

PETER LUNTLEY BATTERSHILL

PETER LUNTLEY BATTERSHILL left the "Shop" at the Strand at the age of twenty-five on the embodiment of the Territorial Army at the outbreak of war to join the 2nd Battalion of the London Rifle Brigade, in which he commenced service in the ranks, achieving a commission in November 1941. During this period his regiment was stationed in this country.

July 1941 saw him in Bangalore and four months later in Lahore. His battalion joined "Paiforce" in February 1943, by which time he had been promoted to the rank of Captain. By June they were in M.E.F. Command and remained there until they joined the Central Mediterranean Forces in September 1943. During this period they had seen service in such diverse countries as Iraq, Syria, Tripoli, Egypt, Palestine and Italy.

Italy was, unfortunately, the end of his wartime travels, for this gallant officer met his death at the Battle of the Sangro River whilst going to the aid of one of his men who had been wounded.

His Colonel wrote of him:-

"Peter got the reputation in the acid test of action of being a cool headed chap—no soldier could secure a better reputation. I tell you this with the certainty that his life was given gallantly. . . . I picked him as one of those to go to Italy with the battalion, and not to follow on as a reinforcement and in doing so I knew that I picked a good officer."

BLACK Clifford Robertson
Pilot Officer (Pilot) 130309, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Died 3 February 1943. Aged 33. Son of Ernest and Kezia Black; husband of Vera Florence Black, of Orpington. Buried in ALL SAINTS CHURCHYARD, ORPINGTON, Kent. Block A. Row K. Grave 5.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1939-1945:

BLOOMFIELD Clarence Herbert
Signalman P/JX 235556, H.M.S. Birmingham, Royal Navy. Died 28 November 1943. Aged 37. Son of Constance Bloomfield, of Florida, Transvaal, South Africa. No known grave. Commemorated on PORTSMOUTH NAVAL MEMORIAL, Hampshire. Panel 76, Column 3.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1939-1945:

BULGIN Anthony Frederick
Sergeant (Pilot) 1176968, 94 Squadron, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Died 14 December 1941. Aged 19. Son of Frederick and Augusta Bulgin, of Chiswick, Middlesex. Buried in EL ALAMEIN WAR CEMETERY, Egypt. Plot XXXI. Row F. Grave 6.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1939-1945:

COOK A L
No detailed in the book - may possibilities.
FRECKER Peter Farrow
Captain, Royal Artillery attached to 9 Field Regiment, Royal Indian Artillery. Died 9 December 1944. Aged 28. Son of Albert Charles and Silvia Frecker, of Ewell, Surrey. Buried in DELHI WAR CEMETERY, India. Plot 2. Row E. Grave 8.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1939-1945:

HARRE, MC Arthur Dunstan Beverley
Lieutenant 102327, 47th (Oldham), Royal Tank Regiment, Royal Armoured Corps. Died 27 October 1942. Aged 29. Son of the Revd. Alfred Thomas Harre, A.K.C. and Louise Harre; step-son of Marjorie C. V. Harre, of Purley, Surrey. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). Buried in EL ALAMEIN WAR CEMETERY, Egypt. Plot XVIII. Row G. Grave 9.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1939-1945:

HEATHFIELD Richard
Trooper 14414855, 15th/19th The King's Royal Hussars, Royal Armoured Corps. Died 14 September 1944. Aged 19. Buried in LEOPOLDSBURG WAR CEMETERY, Leopoldsburg, Limburg, Belgium. Plot IV. Row C. Grave 20.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1939-1945:

KIRBY Peter Burrows
Second Lieutenant 249556, 2 Parachute Squadron, Royal Engineers. Died 25 January 1943. Aged 19. Son of Bernard Burrows Kirby and Sylvia Pranz Kirby, of Palmer's Green, Middlesex. Buried in NEW SOUTHGATE CEMETERY, Hertfordshire. Section I. Grave 104.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1939-1945:

LINTON Albert Edward
Leading Aircraftman 1222596, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Died 3 April 1943. Aged 37. Son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Edward Linton; husband of Florence Gladys Linton, of Barking, Essex. Buried in KARACHI WAR CEMETERY, pakistan. Plot 9. Row A. Grave 10.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1939-1945:

MESSENGER John Arthur
Lieutenant (S), H.M.S. Galatea, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. Died 15 December 1941. Aged 31. Son of Philip and Annie Messenger, of Ruislip, Middlesex. No known grave. Commemorated on PLYMOUTH NAVAL MEMORIAL, Devon. Panel 61, Column 3.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1939-1945:

MILNER Michael Nicholson
Flying Officer 173331, 207 Squadron, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Died 8 July 1944. Buried in NEAUFLES-ST. MARTIN CHURCHYARD, Eure, France. Collective grave.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1939-1945:

PHILLIPS Dudley Aston
Lieutenant (S), H.M.S. Barham, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. Died 25 November 1941. Aged 31. Husband of Felicity Gwyn Phillips. No known grave. Commemorated on PORTSMOUTH NAVAL MEMORIAL, Hampshire. Panel 60, Column 3.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1939-1945:

REDBOURN Derrick Redvers
Flying Officer (Navigator) 117644, 107 Squadron, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Died 6 December 1942. Aged 20. Son of Jack Redvers Redbourn and Margaret Elizabeth Redbourn, of Brighton, Sussex. Buried in FLUSHING (VLISSINGEN) NORTHERN CEMETERY, Zeeland, Netherlands. Row D. Grave 27.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1939-1945:

SHAW Ronald Trevor
Lieutenant 164384, 1/6th Battalion, The Queen's Royal Regiment (West Surrey). Died 19 December 1942. Aged 24. Son of Norman and Dora Kathleen Shaw, of Bexhill-on-Sea, Sussex. Buried in FAYID WAR CEMETERY, Egypt. Plot 1. Row C. Grave 16.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1939-1945:

WORRINGHAM-STEVENS Sidney George
Lieutenant 99115, 9th (The Queen's Own Yorkshire Dragoons) Battalion, King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry. Died 26 April 1943. Aged 26. Born Surrey, resident London S.W. Son of Henry Thomas Worringham-Stevens and Annie Louise Worringham-Stevens, of Norbury, Surrey. Buried in BONE WAR CEMETERY, ANNABA, Algeria. Plot III. Row C. Grave 12.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1939-1945:

SIDNEY GEORGE WORRINGHAM STEVENS

Having had previous military training in the Whitgift School O.T.C. from 1930 to 1934, SIDNEY GEORGE WORRINGHAM STEVENS joined the Inns of Court Regiment in November 1936, remaining with it until 1939. He was commissioned in October of that year as a 2nd Lieutenant in the Queen's Own Yorkshire Dragoons and promoted Lieutenant in April 1941. In December the Battalion went to Palestine, and amongst other countries, saw service in Syria.

From the Battle of Alamein it fought its way to victory with the 8th Army under Field Marshal Viscount Montgomery, but unfortunately Lieutenant Stevens died in an engagement with the enemy on April 26th 1943.

His Commanding Officer writing to his parents had this to say of him:--" He was my best Troop Leader. In this battle he was commanding ten Carriers and had put up a very good show all through, and it was typical of him to be in the leading Carrier instead of sending one forward in front of him."

No man giving his life for his country could require a better epitaph than this.

SULMAN John Edward
Flying Officer (Pilot) 81344, 238 Squadron, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Died 23 November 1941, officially listed as dead March 1942. Aged 25. Son of Lt.-Col. Arthur Edward Sulman, M.C., and Muriel Winifred Sulman. of Totteridge, Hertfordshire. Buried in KNIGHTSBRIDGE WAR CEMETERY, ACROMA, Libya. plot 4. Row G. Grave 21.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1939-1945:

TREDINNICK Francis Gerald
Sergeant (Observer) 934007, 76 Squadron, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Died 20 December 1942. Aged 21. Son of Francis Septimus and Edith Emily Tredinnick, of Purley, Surrey. Buried in REICHSWALD FOREST WAR CEMETERY, Kleve, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany. Plot 21. Row B. Grave 8.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1939-1945:

WHITCOMB John Holmstead
Lieutenant, H.M. Trawler Cap D'Antifer, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. Died 13 February 1944, offically posted as dead July 1944. Son of James Henry and Edith Cripps Whitcomb; husband of Joan Whitcomb, of Haslemere, Surrey. No known grave. Commemorated on LOWESTOFT NAVAL MEMORIAL, Suffolk. Panel 13, Column 3.

Extract from War Service of the Staff of Coutts & Co. 1939-1945:

Last updated: 20 March, 2011

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