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STOCK EXCHANGE WAR MEMORIAL

World War 1 - Detailed information
Compiled and Copyright © Martin Edwards - 2008
with additional information & photographs from Andy, Sue, John and Ralph from the Great War Forum

On 27th October 1922 the Stock Exchange War memorial was unveiled by The Earl of Balfour, K.G., O.M. The details here are taken from the Order of Service from that day. There are 408 names listed in the memorial booklet. There is also a further book entiled "THE STOCK EXCHANGE MEMORIAL OF THOSE WHO FELL IN THE GREAT WAR 1914-1918" published by Naval & Military Press, ISBN 1-84342-141-0; the names listed in this book do not necessarily agree with the dedication booklet names. Those listed in this second book are marked *, those not in the dedication booklet are marked †. Note: In 1914, The Great War, meant the Exchange market was closed from the end of July until the new year. The Stock Exchange Battalion of Royal Fusiliers was formed – 1,600 volunteered, 400 never returned.

 

Photographs Copyright © Martin Edwards 2008

27th October, 1922.
On the Occasion of the Unveiling
of the
Stock Exchange War Memorial
by
The Earl of Balfour, K.G., O.M.

Introduction of
THE EARL OF BALFOUR
By
SIR WILFRID ATLAY
Chairman of The Stock Exchange

UNVElLING ADDRESS.

HYMN.
"The Supreme Sacrifice.”
By JOHN S. ARKWRIGHT.

O VALIANT Hearts, who to your glory came
Through dust of conflict and through battle-flame;
Tranquil you lie, your knightly virtue proved,
Your memory hallowed in the Land you loved.

Proudly you gathered, rank on rank to War,
As who had heard God's message from afar;
All you had hoped for, all you had, you gave
To save Mankind—yourselves you scorned to save.

Splendid you passed, the great surrender made,
Into the light that nevermore shall fade;
Deep your contentment in that blest abode,
Who wait the last clear trumpet-call of God.

These were His servants, in His steps they trod
Following through death the martyr'd Son of God :
Victor He rose; victorious too shall rise
They who have drunk His cup of Sacrifice.

O0 risen Lord, 0 Shepherd of our Dead,
Whose Cross has bought them and whose Staff has led—
In glorious hope their proud and sorrowing Land
Commits her Children to Thy gracious hand.

AMEN.

Prayer

By the Rev. J. H. J. ELLISON, M.V.O.,

Rector of St. Michael's, Cornhill

GOD, with whom do live the Spirits of just men made perfect, we dedicate to Thee this Memorial in thankful remembrance of our brethren, who at the call of King and Country left all that was dear to them, endured hardness, faced danger, and finally passed out of the sight of man by the path of Duty and Self-sacrifice.

Grant, we beseech Thee, that as they gave their lives that we might live in freedom, so we, keeping their names in loving remembrance, may show ourselves worthy of a great example, and finally by Thy mercy obtain everlasting life; through Jesus Christ our Lord.

AMEN.

God Save the King

THE LAST POST.
REVEILLE.
(By the Trumpeters of the Honourable Artillery Company.)

NAMES OF THE FALLEN

ABBOTT

Arthur Leonard Victor

*Private G/9221, 6th Battalion, The Buffs (East Kent Regiment). Killed in action 3rd July 1916. Aged 26. Born Brockley, Kent, enlisted London, resident Herne Bay, Kent. Son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Abbott, of The Priory, Burbage Rd., Herne Hill, London; husband of Millicent Abbott, of "St. Margarets," Oxenden Square, Herne Bay, Kent. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 5 D. Clerk at the Exchange.

From de Ruvigny's ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-18 Part 2, page 1:

ABBOTT, ARTHUR LEONARD VICTOR, Private, No. 9221, 6th Battn. The Buffs (East Kent Regt.), s. of the late John Octavius Abbott, of The Priory, Breakspear Road, Brockley, S.E., Architect, A.R.I.B.A. and F.S.I., by his wife, Mary Jane, dau. of the Rev. James Francis Ellis, of Pocklington, Yorks, and brother to Private R. F. W. Abbott (q.v.); b. London, 29 July, 1897; educ. Freemason's School, Wood Green; served for five years in the 1st Surrey Rifles (21st London) (T.F.); was an Authorized Clerk on the London Stock Exchange; volunteered and enlisted in the Army Pay Corps, 6 Oct. 1914; transferred to The Buffs 25 Jan. 1916; went to France in April, and was killed in action 3 July following, in an engagement on the Somme front. His officer wrote : " He was seen dead just by the enemy wire; but your brother must have done well to get so far—only a few ever entered the trench, and the fewer still that returned have received distinctions." He m. at St. Margaret's, Herne Bay, 18 July, 1914, Millicent, dau. of John Hackett, of St. Margaret's, Herne Bay, and had a dau., Josephine Grace, b. 20 May, 1915.

ABBOTT

Joseph Octavius

*Second Lieutenant, 179 Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery. Killed in action 28th July 1917. Aged 28. Husband of M. O. Abbott, of Stamford House, Roehampton, London, S.W.15. Enlisted as Private 1994, Honourable Artillery Company. At front in France 14th February 1915. Commissioned in R.G.A. 8th November 1916. Buried in DICKEBUSCH NEW MILITARY CEMETERY EXTENSION, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot III. Row F. Grave 22. Clerk at the Exchange.

ABBOTT

Phillips Montague Edwin

*Private 7457, 2nd Battalion, Honourable Artillery Company (Infantry). Killed in action 3rd May 1917. Aged 19. Enlisted Armoury House, Finsbury, resident Chingford, Essex. Son of Percy E. and E. L. Abbott, of The Cottage, Sewardstonebury, Chingford, Essex. No known grave. Commemorated on ARRAS MEMORIAl, Pas de Calais, France. Bay 1. Clerk at the Exchange. Also listed on Chingford War Memorial

ABRAHAMS

Montague Nathan

[Spelt Montagu in dedication booklet] *Major, 16th Battalion, Rifle brigade (The Prince Consort's Own). Killed in action 3rd September 1916. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 16 B and 16 C. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

MAJOR MONTAGUE NATHAN ABRAHAMS, Rifle Brigade, was the son of Louis Abrahams of Northgate House, Regent's Park. Born in 1875, he was educated at University College School. He entered his father's business and in 1909 became a member of the Stock Exchange. He married in 1902 Annette, daughter of the late Sir Joseph Duveen.

On the outbreak of war he enlisted in the Old Boys' Corps and became a platoon-commander. In April 1915 he was granted a commission as Captain, and with Lieut.-Colonel H. F. Darrell was mainly responsible for raising the 16th Battalion, Rifle Brigade. After training at Winchester and Aldershot, he was promoted Major before the battalion went to France in March 1916, in time to take part in much of the heaviest fighting of the Somme battle.

He was killed while leading his men in the assault on Beaumont Hamel on 3 September 1916, being then forty-one years of age. His Commanding Officer (Lieut.-Colonel Darrell, D.S.O.) wrote: " Every day Monty became dearer to me as a friend and more valuable as an officer. . . . When I say that he was unequalled as a Company Commander in the New Armies, I am not using terms of exaggerated praise but stating an absolute fact that was recognized by all who came into contact with him, from generals downwards. His men absolutely adored him, as well they might, and not only the officers of this Regiment loved him but all the officers of the Brigade who had the honour of knowing him."

ADAMS

John H

No further information currently available

AITKENS

Albert Reginald Knight

*Second Lieutenant, 7th (City of London) Battalion, London Regiment. Died of wounds 31st May 1915. Aged 30. Son of Albert John and Ada Aitkens; husband of Phyllis Aitkens, of "Strouds," Horsted Keynes, Sussex. Buried in WIMEREUX COMMUNAL CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot III. Row P. Grave 1. Clerk at the Exchange.

From de Ruvigny's ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-18 Part 2, page 3:

AITKENS, ALBERT REGINALD KNIGHT, 2nd Lieut., 7th Battn. City of London Regt. (TS.), eldest s. of Albert John Aitkens, of Paddock Wood Kent formerly of Chislehurst [cadet of Aitken of Thornton, co. Fife], by his wife, Ada Louise, dau. of Alderman Sir Henry Knight, Lord Mayor of London (1883), and brother to 2nd Lieut. C. A. C. Aitkens (q.v.); b. Honor Oak, 12 Feb. 1885; educ. Haileybury College, and on leaving there, entered the firm of Frank T. Wilson, Stockbrokers, London; served for five years in the Queen's Westminsters; volunteered after the outbreak of war and obtained a commission as 2nd Lieut. in the 7th City of London Regt., 14 Oct. 1914; served with the Expeditionary Force in France from 16 March, 1915, and died in Wimereux Hospital, 31 May following, from wounds received in action. He m. at St. Peter's, Cranley Gardens, S.W., 30 Nov. 1912, Phyllis (The Den, Briscoe Road, Hoddesdon), dau. of Charles Kinder, of Grove Court, Drayton Gardens, South Kensington, S.W., and had a son, John Reginald, b. 3 Oct. 1913.

ALBU

Walter George

Second Lieutenant , 2nd Battalion, Royal Irish Fusiliers and Captain, Royal Flying Corps then Royal Air Force. Born Johannesburg 23rd July 1892. Resident Winchester House, Old Broad Street, London EC. Gained his flying certificate in a Maurice Farman Biplane at Military School, Birmingham 20th November 1915. *** No date of death listed on CWGC *** *** No record listed in civil deaths from 1914 through to 1990 ***

ALEXANDER

Gordon Reuben

*Second Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, Royal Sussex Regiment attached 13th Battalion, East Surrey Regiment. Killed in action 24th April 1917. Aged 31. Son of James and Florence Alexander, of 52, Redcliffe Square, South Kensington, London. Former Fencing Champion. Buried in FIFTEEN RAVINE BRITISH CEMETERY, VILLERS-PLOUICH, Nord, France. Plot IV. Row I. Grave 12. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

SECOND LIEUT. GORDON REUBEN ALEXANDER, Royal Sussex Regiment, attached 13th East Surreys, was born in 1885 and educated at Harrow. He became a member of the Stock Exchange, and of his father's firm, J. M. Alexander and Co. in 1908. A keen all-round sportsman, he was a member of the Corinthian Yacht Club, the Felixstowe and Coombe Golf Clubs, and the Sword Club. He won several trophies on the links, was Amateur Foils Champion of Great Britain, and took part in the Olympic Games.

Immediately on the outbreak of war he enlisted in the i oth (Stock Exchange) Battalion of the Royal Fusiliers, refused the commission that was offered to him in that Regiment, and went to France with them in 1915 as a N.C.O. In the following year he accepted a commission in the 10th East Surreys, was transferred to the Royal Sussex and afterwards attached to the 13th East Surreys.

He was killed on 24 April, 1917, in an attack on Villers Plouich, north of Peronne. His death is thus described by a sergeant in his Company: Everything went very well in the attack, and we captured the first machine gun and many prisoners. After the objective was gained and the men were digging in under his supervision, one was badly hit and Lieutenant Alexander told a man to go to his assistance, but went himself instead as there was a lot of shelling, and while bandaging the man they were both killed by a heavy shell."

The same sergeant relates how on one occasion when he went round the Company for volunteers for a risky enterprise, the men volunteered " too freely" on learning that Alexander was in charge. " He happened to overhear some of it and told me afterwards that it was the greatest satisfaction he got out of the war—it paid him for everything."

“He died the death of a hero," wrote a brother-officer, " and deserved the V.C. He was a man absolutely without fear and commanded the respect and affections of his Company to such an extent that I think every man would have cheerfully died for him."

The Padre of his battalion wrote to his father: “We all loved him, and the camaraderie that existed between him and the other officers was really extraordinary. It was just like him to give his life in looking after one of his men."

“He was a very gallant officer and liked by all," wrote his Commanding Officer.

Second Lieutenant Alexander was mentioned in Dispatches “for gallant and distinguished service in the Field."

ANDREW

George Jenner

*Private 200969, "D" Company, 1st/4th Battalion, Essex Regiment. Killed in action in Palestine 26th March 1917. Aged 25. Enlisted Ilford, Essex, resident Goodmayes, Ilford. Son of Joseph Frederick and Eva Andrew, of 68, Eastwood Rd., Goodmayes, Essex, now of 14, Hillview Crescent, Ilford. Born at Pitchcombe, Glos. His brother Ewart Leslie Andrew also fell. Formerly Private 3284, 4th, Essex Regiment. Buried in GAZA WAR CEMETERY, Israel. Plot XXVI. Row D. Grave 12. Clerk at the Exchange.

ARDLEY

Charles Harrington

*[Sergeant in book] Lance Sergeant 301160, 5th (City of London) Battalion (London Rifle Brigade), London Regiment. Died of wounds in the United Kingdom 9th June 1918. Enlisted London, resident East Barnet. Son of W. E. Ardley, of Sunny Gardens, Hendon; husband of Winifred Ardley, of "Athlone," East Barnet, Herts. Formerly 1875, 5th Battalion, London Regiment. Buried in HENDON CEMETERY AND CREMATORIUM, Middlesex. Grave reference D. 5. 24092. Clerk at the Exchange.

ARTHUR

Dumbreck

Private 2176, 6th Battalion, Seaforth Highlanders (Ross-shire Buffs, the Duke of Albany's). Died of wounds 15th June 1915. Aged 25. Enlisted London, Middlesex. Son of James and Margaret Arthur, of "Arbutus", Lennox Rd., Cardonald, Glasgow. No known grave. Commemorated on LE TOURET MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 38 and 39. Clerk at the Exchange.

ARTHUR

John

*Second Lieutenant, 8th Battalion, Gordon Highlanders. Killed in action 26th September 1915. Aged 33. Son of Mrs. Arthur, of 21, Dingwall Gardens, Golders Green, and the late Hugh Rose Arthur; husband of May Louise Mackenzie Arthur, of "Kinnoull", Hampstead Way, Golders Green, London. No known grave. Commemorated on LOOS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 115 to 119. Clerk at the Exchange.

ASHWORTH

George Bertram

*[Lieutenant in book] Second Lieutenant, 3rd Battalion attached 7th Battalion, Suffolk Regiment. Died of wounds 10th August 1916. Aged 23. Son of the late Thomas and Mary Matilda Ashworth. Buried in LA NEUVILLE BRITISH CEMETERY, CORBIE, Somme, France. Plot I. Row F. Grave 21. Clerk at the Exchange.

ATKIN

Frank Herbert

*Private TF/7332, 1st/4th Battalion, Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regiment). Died in United Kingdom 2nd February 1917. Born Tollington, Middlesex, enlisted Harringay, Middlesex, resident Strod Green, Middlesex. Formerly 2453, West Kent Yeomanry. Buried in EAST FINCHLEY CEMETERY AND ST. MARYLEBONE CREMATORIUM, Middlesex. Grave reference G. 4. 107. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

TROOPER FRANK HERBERT ATKIN, West Kent Yeomanry, the son of John Atkin, was born in 1881 and educated at Lady Owen's School. On leaving school in his seventeenth year he went into the offices of Miles and Co., of Throgmorton Street, and was for some time in the House as one of their unauthorized clerks. On the firm's dissolving partnership he joined W. A. Kolckmann and Co. of Austin Friars, being made authorized clerk after some time with this firm. In April 1911 he became a member of the Stock Exchange. When war broke out he was with R. Fletcher and Co. of Copthall Chambers.

He joined the West Kent Yeomanry in 1915, and at the end of the following year he was invalided home and sent to the Military Hospital, Edmonton, where he died of consumption on 4 February 1917, at the age of thirty-five.

AUSTIN

Ronald Grantham

*Lance Corporal STK/221, 10th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Killed in action 23rd April 1917. Aged 32. Born Romford, Essex, enlisted London, resident Addlestone. Son of George and Caroline Austin, of 13, Brighton Rd., Addlestone, Surrey. Buried in CHILI TRENCH CEMETERY, GAVRELLE, Pas de Calais, France. Commemorated on Special Memorial A. 5. Clerk at the Exchange.

Note: The cemetery contains 196 burials and commemorations of the First World War. 19 of the burials are unidentified and 86 graves destroyed by shell fire are now represented by special memorials.

BAGOT-CHESTER

Greville John Massey

*Captain and Brevet-Major, 2nd Battalion, Scots Guards. Killed in action 28th November 1917. Aged 52. Son of the late Col. Heneage Charles Bagot-Chester and Mrs. Bagot-Chester. Buried in ORIVAL WOOD CEMETERY, FLESQUIERES, Nord, France. Plot II. Row A. Grave 13. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

MAJOR JOHN GREVILLE MASSEY BAGOT-CHESTER, Scots Guards, was born in 1868, the eldest son of Colonel Heneage Bagot-Chester, at Henstead Hall, Suffolk. He was educated at Elstree and afterwards went to Brackenbury's, the Army coach at Wimbledon, from there entering the 2nd Battalion, Scots Guards.

He was a fine athlete and won many running and jumping competitions, and once for a £100 bet he rode, ran, and walked a mile in under twenty minutes. He was very well-known with the Belvoir and Quorn Foxhounds and hunted from Melton Mowbray for several seasons.

He was all through the South African War and was present at the following engagements: Belmont, Modder River, Graspan, and Magersfontein.

On the Stock Exchange, where he became a member in 1910, he was connected for some years with the firm of Linton Clarke and Co., and later on with Lionel Robinson, Clark and Co.

He was the senior Major in the Brigade of Guards, with over twenty years' service, when he retired. He rejoined the moment the war broke out.

His death took place in the course of the battle for Cambrai in November 1917, which opened with the famous surprise attack with tanks. He was hit by a shell and is buried near Flesqueires. A letter from a brother officer said: “Poor Bubbles has gone. His loss will be felt throughout the Brigade of Guards, for he was ever a brave, gallant, and very popular officer, and we shall one and all mourn his loss." Another officer wrote: "He was a gallant officer, true friend, and knew no fear."

BAKER

Cecil Douglas

*Captain, 1st Battalion, Grenadier Guards. Killed in action 29th July 1917. Aged 49. Third son of the late Arthur H. Baker, J.P., of Beckenham, and of Mrs. Baker of 68 Princes Gate; husband of Gwendoline Baker, of Walton-on-Thames. Buried in DUHALLOW A.D.S. CEMETERY, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot VIII. Row C. Grave 11. Member of the Exchange. See also Lord's Members World War 1 memorial

From de Ruvigny's ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-18 Part 3, page 13:

BAKER, CECIL DOUGLAS, Capt. (Special Reserve), Grenadier Guards, 3rd a. of Arthur Henry Baker, of Elderslie, Beckenham, co. Kent. J.P., by his wife, Clara (68, Prince's Gate, London, S.W.), dau. of Julius Try Mortimer; b. 6 Dec. 1870; educ. The Abbey School, Beckenham; Sherborne, and Merton College, Oxford, where he graduated in 1893; became a member of the London Stock Exchange in 1895; a commission as 2nd Lieut. in the R.N.V.R. Anti-Aircraft Corps in Sept. 1914; transferred to the Grenadier Guards in Sept. 1915, being promoted Lieut. Jan. 1916, and Acting Capt. Jan. 1917; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from 28 Oct. 1915; was wounded in April, 1916, and was killed in action at Le Bois des Crapouillots 29 July, 1917. He was a good all-round athlete; played in the Abbey School XI.. and in both the XI. and XV. at Sherborne, and while at Oxford played in the University XV. in 1891, 1892 and 1893, being captain in 1892. He m. at St. Paul's, Knightsbridge, 6 Oct. 1898, Gwendoline, dau. of the late Alexander Peyman.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN CECIL DOUGLAS BAKER, Grenadier Guards, was the third son of the late A. H. Baker, J.P., of Beckenham, and of Mrs. Baker of 68 Princes Gate.

Born in 1870, he was educated at the Abbey School, Beckenham, at Sherborne and Merton College, Oxford.

He played cricket and football for Sherborne, and won his Rugby "blue" at Oxford in 1891, being captain in 1893.

He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1895.

On the outbreak of war he was given a commission in the R.N.V.R., Anti-Aircraft Corps, but was transferred to the Grenadier Guards in September 1915.

He was killed in action on 29 July 1917, and left a widow.

BAKER

F

No further information currently available

BALCOMBE

Francis Cedric

*Temporary Lieutenant, 1st Royal Marine Battalion, Royal Naval Division, Royal Marine Light Infantry. Killed in action 26th October 1917. Born in Redhill 8th October 1893. Youngest son of Edward L. Balcombe (Member of Stock Exchange), of Fittleworth, Sussex. Educated at Tonbridge School. Ex-Canadian Contingent (at Ypres). No known grave. Commemorated on TYNE COT MEMORIAL, Zonnebeke, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Addenda Panel. Clerk at the Exchange.

Service history: Ex-No.7 Officer Cadet Battalion, Army; Commissioned as a Temporary 2nd Lieutenant Royal Marines 25th October 1916 then Temporary Lieutenant Royal Marines 25th October 1917; With the draft for British Eexpeditionary Force 9th December 1916, then joined 1st Royal Marine Battalion 14th December 1916 until 7th February 1917 when he was invalided out with VD (Syphilis), rejoined 1st Royal Marine Battalion 11th April 1917 until 26th June 1917 when he was again invalided out with Neurasthenia, rejoined 1st Royal Marine Battalion 27th August 1917 until his detah on 26th October 1917.

BALFOUR, DSO

Percy

*Major, Temporary Lieutenant-Colonel, 3rd Battalion, Bedfordshire Regiment, attached 2nd/7th Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment and Highland Light Infantry. Died 12th December 1917. Aged 42. Son of James Balfour; husband of Maude Edith Balfour, of 5, North Sq., Golders Green, London. Awarded the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.). Buried in FINS NEW BRITISH CEMETERY, SOREL-LE-GRAND, Somme, France. Plot III. Row B. Grave 4. Clerk at the Exchange.

From the VC and DSO Book Volume III

BALFOUR, P. (D.S.O. L.G. 4.6.17), Major (T/Lt.-Col.), Bedfordshire Rgt. (S.R.). He was killed in action while commanding a battalion of the Worcestershire Regt. on 12.12.17. A memorial service was held for him bat St. Jude's Church, Hampshire.

London Gazette, 4 June 1917.-" Admiralty, 4 June 1917. The King has been graciously pleased to give orders for the appointment of the undermentioned Officers to be Companions of the Distinguished Service Order, in recognition of their services in the prosecution of war."
....
BALFOUR, PERCY, Major (Temporary Lieut.-Colonel), Bedfordshire Regt., Special Reserve.

BALLANCE

Leslie Arthur

*Captain, 4th Battalion attached 2nd Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Killed in action 28th September 1916. Aged 27. Son of Arthur W. and Jane Peek Ballance, of The Manor House, Herringswell, Suffolk, and Blackheath Park, London. Enlisted in August 1914. Buried in BULLS ROAD CEMETERY, FLERS, Somme, France. Special Memorial 1. Member of the Exchange. See also Herringswell, Suffolk, Memorial

Note: There are now 776 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in this cemetery. 296 of the burials are unidentified but there are special memorials to 15 casualties known or believed to be buried among them.

From de Ruvigny's ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-18 Part 3, page 14:

BALLANCE, LESLIE ARTHUR, Capt., 2nd Battn. (60th Foot) The King's Royal Rifle Corps. a. of Arthur William Ballance. of Park Lodge. Blackheath Park, London, S.E.. and the Manor House, Herringswell. co. Suffolk. by his wife. Jane Peek, clau. of G. M. Frean : b. London. 9 Jan. 1881): educ. Eton. and Trinity College. Cambridge. In Aug. 1914. he obtained a commission in the 15th County of London Regt., but was transferred to the King's Royal Rifle Corps. March. 1915; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders : was present at the Second Battle of Ypres, and was invalided home 12 Sept. 1915 : rejoined his Regiment on recovery, and was killed iu action during the Battle of the Somme 27 Oct. 1916. Buried at Filers. His Colonel wrote : "It is with the deepest regret I write to tell you all about your son's death. At about 4 p.m. on 27 Sept., when a bombing attack on the Germans in the -- line was in progress, a report was received by me that the Germans were giving ground. It was essential that the battalion on our right should have the information at once, so as to co-operate and for greater chance of success I wanted to send an officer, but none was available. Your son Leslie, hearing this, volunteered, and ran across towards the battalion on our right. . . . After he had gone about 60 yards out of the 100 yards, I heard a bullet fired from a distance. Your son ran on, but almost at once a bullet struck him. . . . He fell on his face and never moved again. . . . He was fearless to a fault, and a very gallant officer. . . . He is most sorely missed by all." Unm.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN LESLIE ARTHUR BALLANCE, King's Royal Rifle Corps, was born in 1889, and educated at Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge.

He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1911 and a partner in his father's firm, Marnham and Co., in 1914.

On the outbreak of war he was given a commission in the 15th County of London Regiment, but transferred to the King's Royal Rifle Corps early in 1915.

He went to France in May, fought in the second battle of Ypres, and was invalided home in August.

Rejoining his Regiment in September 1916 as a Company Commander, he was killed on 27 September. He had volunteered for a dangerous duty and lost his life in its execution.

His Colonel wrote: “I at once fell under the same quiet charm which he exercised over all with whom he came in contact. He was fearless to a fault and a very gallant officer."

A brother officer wrote: "A better and finer character I never knew in all my life, and we always wanted to serve together out here. He simply was too wonderful in the show, never had a fear, and was so calm and splendid. The men just loved him and did anything for him . . . I can only say he was the finest man I ever knew."

BARNES

Walter James

*Private 10594, 2nd Battalion, Honourable Artillery Company (Infantry). Killed in action 9th October 1917. Aged 35. Born Holloway, enlisted Mill Hill, resident East Finchley. Son of Walter and Mary Barnes, of "Lynton," East End Road, East Finchley, London, N.2.; husband of Edith Alice Barnes, of 56, Palace Road, Crouch End, London. No known grave. Commemorated on TYNE COT MEMORIAL, Zonnebeke, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 7. Clerk at the Exchange.

BARNETT

Herbert William

*Captain. 13th (County of London) Battalion (Princess Louise's, Kensington), London Regiment. Killed in action 9th May 1915. Aged 36. Son of the late M. H. and Marie Barnett. No known grave. Commemorated on PLOEGSTEERT MEMORIAL, Comines-Warneton, Hainaut, Belgium. Panel 10. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN HERBERT WALTER BARNETT, 13th Battalion, London Regiment, was the son of Maurice H. Barnett, and was born in 1879. Educated at University College School, he joined the Stock Exchange at the age of twenty, and five years later became a member. For some years he was a junior partner in the firm of Bensinger and Co.

He was given a commission in 1907 in the 4th Middlesex Volunteer Rifle Corps, which, on the formation of the Territorial Force, was converted into the 13th (Kensington) Battalion, London Regiment. He was promoted Captain in 1912. From the time of joining the Regiment he devoted himself with the greatest keenness to the promotion of its well-being and efficiency and in so doing became a most efficient and popular officer.

His Battalion went to France in November 1914, and he took part in its activities through those critical months in which little was left of the Old Army, and the New Armies were not yet in being. He was killed at the head of his men in the attack on Aubers Ridge of 9 May 1915, an historic engagement in which his battalion played a notable part.

“He died," wrote his Major, “leading his men in the true British way, and under the most exacting conditions that any troops could be called on to face." And his Colonel wrote: "His memory will remain with us as a keen and capable English gentleman, always ready to do his share."

The work of the Kensingtons on that day was described by General Sir Henry Rawlinson, then commanding the 4th Army Corps, as “a feat of arms surpassed by no battalion in this great war."

BARNETT

Victor Baron

*Lieutenant, 12th Battalion, Northumberland Fusiliers. Killed in action between 25th and 27th September 1915. No known grave. Commemorated on LOOS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France, Panel 20 to 22. Clerk at the Exchange.

BARSTOW

Maurice William

*[Listed in book as Private, King's Royal Rifle Corps.] Lance Corporal 2324, 11th (County of London) Battalion (Finsbury Rifles), London Regiment. Died of wounds received at Gallipoli 16th September 1915. Born Islington, enlisted London, resident Highbury. Buried in EAST MUDROS MILITARY CEMETERY, Lemnos, Greece. Plot II. Row O. Grave 259. Clerk at the Exchange.

BARTHOLOMEW, MC

Claude

*Captain, 1st Battalion, Scots Guards attached to Machine Gun Corps (Infantry). Killed in action 15th September 1916. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.) [according to the book but not SDGW or CWGC]. Buried in BERNAFAY WOOD BRITISH CEMETERY, MONTAUBAN, Somme, France. Plot/Row/Section E. Grave 6. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN CLAUDE BARTHOLOMEW, M.C., Scots Guards, was born in August 1883, the elder so of the late Henry Bartholomew. He married in 1907 the youngest daughter of G. W. Share, sister of the Lady Rothmere, and left one daughter. In 1911 he became a member of the Stock Exchange.

He joined his Regiment in February 1915, and went straight to the French front in the following month.

He was killed in September 1916, while in command of the Machine Machine Gun Company of the 2nd Guards Brigade.

BARTLETT

Richard [Louis Whittington]

*Lance Corporal G/51986, "A" Company, 22nd Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Killed in action 17th February 1917. Aged 37. Born Highgate, enlisted Harringay, resident Palmers Green. Son of James Levi and Eleanor Bilton Bartlett. Formerly 3120, Royal Fusiliers. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAl, Somme, France. Pier and Face 8 C 9 A and 16 A. Clerk at the Exchange.

BARTRAM

G E

*Private, London Regiment. Clerk at the Exchange. possibly either George BARTRAM 7017 and 633668, 20th Battalion, London Regiment or George Edward BARTRAM. Birth registered in Islington 1890.

BASSETT

Geoffrey Edward

*Lieutenant, Royal Army Service Corps attached 2/4th Battalion, oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry. Killed in action 21st March 1918 [SDGW states 1919]. Aged 24. Son of John Dollin Bassett and Victoria Edith Bassett, of 5, South Park Hill, South Croydon, Surrey. Buried in CHAPELLE BRITISH CEMETERY, HOLNON, Aisne, France. Plot IV. Row E. Grave 1. Clerk at the Exchange.

BATTSON

Reginald Alan

*Lieutenant, H.M.S. Waterfly, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. Died 12th October 1917. Aged 31. Born in Kensington, London. Son of B. G. and Frances Mary Battson, of The Chase, West Horsley, Surrey; husband of Olive Mary Battson. Buried in BAGHDAD (NORTH GATE) WAR CEMETERY, Iraq. Plot XX. Row K. Grave 10. Clerk at the Exchange.

BAYLESS

William Henry

*Lance Corporal SD/1952, 12th Battalion, Royal Sussex Regiment. Killed in action 30th June 1916. Born Hoxton, Middlesex, enlisted St. Paul's Churchyard, London. Clerk at the Exchange. Buried in ST. VAAST POST MILITARY CEMETERY, RICHEBOURG-L'AVOUE, Pas de Calais, France. Plot III. Row P. Grave 2.

BAYLEY

Edward Vincent

*Second Lieutenant, 6th Battalion (Territorial), South Staffordshire Regiment and Royal Flying Corps. Killed accidentally 24th February 1917. Aged 31. Son of James Bayley, of Willaston Hall, Nantwich, Cheshire; brother of Mes Carrick, c/o C.H. Rigg, Esq., 15 Copthall Avenue, London E.C.2. Buried in VENDOME TOWN CEMETERY, Loire-et-Cher, France. Plot/Row/Section A. Grave 2. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

SECOND LIEUT. EDWARD VINCENT BAYLEY, Royal Air Force, was the second son of James Bayley, of Willaston Hall, Nantwich. He was born in 1885, educated at Marlborough, and became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1909.

He was a good shot and keen rider to hounds.

An illness prevented him from joining the army until the second year of the war. He then joined the South Staffordshire Regiment, and shortly afterwards was transferred to the R.A.F.

He was killed at Vendôme in an accidental crash on 24 February 1917.

The record of his partner, Noel Keith, in the firm of Keith, Bayley and Reader, will be found on a later page.

BAZIN

Geoffrey Martyn

*Lieutenant, 2nd Company, 1st Battalion, Honourable Artillery Company. Killed in action 19th September 1915. Aged 24. Son of Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Bazin, of "Elmstead," Finchley, London. Buried in BRANDHOEK MILITARY CEMETERY, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot I. Row D. Grave 4. Clerk at the Exchange.

BEARD

Harold Clifford

*[Listed in book as Second Lieutenant] Lieutenant, 1/5th Battalion (London Rifle Brigade), London Regiment. Killed in action 8th October 1916. Son of Mr. and Mrs. Edgar J. Beard, late of 4, Geraldine Rd., Wandsworth, London, now of 94, Revelstoke Rd., Wandsworth. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 9 D. Clerk at the Exchange.

BENNETT

Frederick Barberry

*Major, "C" Battery, 84th Army Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Died of wounds 22nd October 1918. Aged 38. Husband of Ethel Violet Bennett, of "Deredene," Higher Drive, Purley, Surrey. Buried in BRONFAY FARM MILITARY CEMETERY, BRAY-SUR-SOMME, Somme, France. Plot II. Row G. Grave 25. Clerk at the Exchange.

BESSELL

Mowbray

*Captain, 10th Battalion, The Queen's (Royal West Surrey Regiment). Killed in action between 15th and 17th September 1916. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 5 D and 6 D. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN MOWBRAY BESSELL, The Queen's (Royal West Surrey) Regiment, was born on 23 September 1876. He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1902. A keen supporter of the Volunteer movement, he was for many years a captain in the 3rd Volunteer Battalion, Royal Fusiliers.

On the outbreak of war he applied for a commission and was gazetted Lieutenant in the East Surrey Regiment, being promoted Captain on 1 January 1915 and transferred to The Queen's Regiment.

He was one of the many victims of the battle of the Somme, being killed in Manion on 15 September 1916 at Flers.

His Colonel wrote: "You know how much we all loved him, and personally I feel I have lost a real and dear friend; never was there a more loyal and hardworking officer. I can't tell you what I and all the Regiment owe him. He loved his Company and was always working for them, and it was through him that they were able to do what they did last Friday, and go through everything with the greatest dash and in a manner unsurpassed by any Regiment in the British Army."

Captain Bessell was married, and resided at Indian Farm, Effingham, Surrey.

BIRD

Ernest J

*Private 254638, 4th Battalion (Royal Fusiliers), London Regiment. Died 9th August 1918. Aged 18. Son of William and Clara Ellen Bird, of 39, Chippenham Mews, Harrow Rd., Paddington, London. Buried in BEACON CEMETERY, SAILLY-LAURETTE, Somme, France. Plot II. Row G. Grave 8. Clerk at the Exchange.

BIRD

William Ryder

*Second Lieutenant, 8th Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Killed in action 8th October 1915. Aged 24. Son of George William Bird, of "The Manor House," West Wickham, Kent. Educated at Rottingdean (Mr. Mason's) and at Marlborough. No known grave. Commemmorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, belgium. Panel 51 and 53. Clerk at the Exchange.

BIRTLES

Roland Powell

*[Listed in book as Second Lieutenant] Captain, 1st Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment. Died 4th March 1917. Aged 25. Son of Mrs. Kate Powell Birtles, of Chichester House, Surbiton, Surrey. Buried in FINS NEW BRITISH CEMETERY, SOREL-LE-GRAND, Somme, France. Plot VII. Row B. Grave 28.Clerk at the Exchange.

BISHOP

S

*Private, London Regiment. Clerk at the Exchange.

possibly Sidney BISHOP, Rifleman 2838, 1st/9th (County of London) Battalion (Queen Victoria's Rifles), London Regiment. Killed in action 1st July 1916. Aged 25. Enlisted London, resident Hornsey Rise. Son of Abraham and Emily Bishop, of 72, Treen Avenue, Barnes, London. In the 1911 census he was aged 19, son of Abraham and Emily Bishop, a Railway Clerk, born Islington, resident 5 Lampton Road, Hornsey Rise, London N. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 9 C.

BLACKMAN

George Dullam

*Sergeant 1656, 21st (County of London) Battalion (1st Surrey Rifles), London Regiment. Killed in action 23rd May 1916. Aged 32. Born beverley, Yorkshire, enlisted Camberwell, resident Wallington. Husband of Beatrice Maud Blackman, of 43, Courtfield Gardens, South Kensington, London. No known grave. Commemorated on ARRAS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Bay 10. Clerk at the Exchange.

BLACKWELL

William Gordon

*Lieutenant, 8th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Killed in action 5th October 1916. Member of the Exchange. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 8 C 9 A and 16 A.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

LIEUTENANT WILLIAM GORDON BLACKWELL ("Don"), Royal Fusiliers, was the seventh son of Samuel John Blackwell, J.P., and of Elizabeth, his wife, and was born in 1885.

Educated at Mr. Herbert Bowden-Smith's Preparatory School at Bengeo and privately, he joined his brother Robert in the firm of Blackwell Brothers, and became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1908.

On the declaration of war he enlisted straightway in the Honourable Artillery Company and was sent to the French front in September 1914, obtaining a commission in the 4th Royal Fusiliers in 1915.

He fell at Flers, in the battle of the Somme, on 6 October 1916, being then attached to the 8th Royal Fusiliers.

One of his Commanding Officers wrote of him: “I saw a great deal of him and he naturally endeared himself to me by his kind nature and manliness of character. I deplore his loss; the nation has lost a gallant soldier and a great gentleman."

His Major wrote: “He was a grand soldier; he could get the utmost out of men and did so, but they all worshipped him."

Lieutenant Blackwell married in 1910 Nina Mary, daughter of the late Middleton Moore O'Malley and Mrs. O'Malley of Westport, co. Mayo, and leaves a widow and one son.

BLAKEWAY

Edwin Oswald

*[Listed as Lieutenant in book] Lance Sergeant 12525, 7th Battalion, Norfolk Regiment. Died in United Kingdom 24th October 1915. Aged 25. Born Wilesden, enlisted 32, St. Paul's Churchyard, Middlesex. Son of William and Clara Elizabeth Blakeway, of Willow Side, Sudbury, Harrow, Middx. Buried in WEMBLEY OLD BURIAL GROUND, Middlesex. Grave reference H. 1007. Clerk at the Exchange.

BORMAN

George Wilson

*Lieutenant, 12th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire & Derbyshire Regiment). Died of wounds 2nd January 1916. Aged 33. Son of Frank Tidswell Borman and Josephine Amelia Borman, of 97, Burnt Ash Rd., Lee, London. Buried in LEWISHAM (HITHER GREEN) CEMETERY, London. Grave reference: C. 434. Clerk at the Exchange.

BOULLY

Frederick Courtnay

*[Listed as Driver, Honourable Artillery Company, in book] Second Lieutenant, Royal Horse Artillery attached Royal Field Artillery. Killed in action 10th July 1917. No known grave. Commemorated on NIEUPORT MEMORIAL, Nieuwpoort, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Clerk at the Exchange.

BOYS

Richard Harvey

*Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion attached 4th Battalion, Bedfordshire Regiment. Killed in action 13th November 1916. Aged 27. Son of Dr. A. H. and Ada Mary Boys, of 95, St. Peter's St., St. Albans. Buried in KNIGHTSBRIDGE CEMETERY, MESNIL-MARTINSART, Somme, France. Plot/Row/Section B. Grave 35. Clerk at the Exchange. Also listed on St. Alban's World War 1 memorial.

BRADBERRY

Russel William

*[Listed in book as Gunner] Bombardier 70878, 301st Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery. Died of wounds 3rd December 1917. Aged 33. Born and resident Wealdstone, enlisted Harrow. Eldest son of Russel and Mary Rebecca Bradberry, of Wealdstone, Harrow, Middlesex; husband of Elsie Bradberry, of Wealdstone. Buried in BOIS GUILLAUME COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, . Seine-Maritime, France. Plot/Row/Section B. Grave 11A. Clerk at the Exchange. See also Wealdstone War Memorial.

BRADLEY

William Arthur

*Private STKS/40, "A" Company, 10th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Killed in action 6th September 1915. Aged 30. Born Buckingham, enlisted London, resident Dulwich. Son of the Rev. Charles and Mrs. H. A. Bradley. Buried in FONCQUEVILLERS MILITARY CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot II. Row D. Grave 2. Clerk at the Exchange.

BRAITHWAITE

Richard Wilfred

*Captain, 10th Battalion, Durham Light Infantry. Killed in action 31st July 1915. Aged 38. Son of John Masterman Braithwaite and Elizabeth Jane Braithwaite; husband of Sybil Deans (formerly Braithwaite), of 6, Basil Mansions, Knightsbridge, London. Served in the South African Campaign. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 36 and 38. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN RICHARD WILFRED BRAITHWAITE, Durham Light Infantry, was the son of the late Reverend J. M. Braithwaite, Vicar and Rural Dean of Croydon.

He was educated at Marlborough College and began his career as a planter in Ceylon. He fought and was wounded in the South African War as a trooper in the Ceylon Mounted Infantry. In 1910 he became a member of the Stock Exchange and a partner in the firm of Foster and Braithwaite.

On the outbreak of War he received a commission as Captain in the 10th Durham Light Infantry. He was wounded on 27 July 1915, but refused to leave the trenches, and was killed four days later.

Captain Braithwaite married, in 1907, a daughter of Mr. Brodhurst Hill.

BRANDER

J

No further information currently available

BROMLEY

Hugh Frederic G.

*Second Lieutenant, "B" Company, 2nd Battalion, Royal Sussex Regiment. Killed in action 25th September 1915. Aged 19. Son of Richard and Edith Maud Bromley, of Carnedd, Rhyl, Flintshire. No known grave. Commemorated on LOOS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 69 to 73. Clerk at the Exchange.

BRONSDON

Arthur Edwin

*[Spelt BRONSDEN in dedication booklet] Private 633030, 20th (County of London) Battalion (Blackheath and Woolwich), London Regiment. Died of wounds 2nd March 1917. Aged 26. Born and resident Blackheath, enlisted Woolwich. Son of Charles and Laura Bronsdon, of 8, Grotes Place, Blackheath, London. Buried in LIJSSENTHOEK MILITARY CEMETERY, Poperinge, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot XI. Row B. Grave 13A. Clerk at the Exchange.

From de Ruvigny's ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-18 Part 5, page 22:

BRONSDON, ARTHUR EDWIN, Private, The Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regt.). s. of the late Charles Bronsdon, Builder, by his wife, Laura, dau. of Alfred Postle; b. Blackheath, London, S.E., 11 Nov. 1890; educ. St. Michael's School there; was employed as a Clerk on the London Stock Exchange; enlisted 9 June, 1916; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders, and died 1 March, 1917, from wounds received in action the previous day; unm.

BROWN

Thomas 'Tom' Skilton

*Private STK/34, "A" Company, 10th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Died of wounds 10th July 1916. Aged 29. Born Harlow, enlisted London, resident Wimbledon. Son of Walter Skilton Brown and Amy Brown, of 12, Tabor Grove, Wimbledon, London. Buried in BECOURT MILITARY CEMETERY, BECORDEL-BECOURT, Somme, France. Plot I. Row T. Grave 26. Clerk at the Exchange.

BRUNSDEN

Edward James

*Second Lieutenant, 45th Company, Machine Gun Corps (Infantry). Died of wounds 25 April 1917. Aged 30. Son of Edward and Sarah Brunsden, of 21, King's Rd., Mortlake, London. Buried in DUISANS BRITISH CEMETERY, ETRUN, Pas de Calais, France. Plot IV. Row E. Grave 29. Clerk at the Exchange.

BUCKOKE

Oswald Lee

*Second Lieutenant, 11th Battalion, Suffolk Regiment. Killed in action 8th July 1917. Buried in JEANCOURT COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Aisne, France. Plot II. Row E. Grave 2. Clerk at the Exchange.

BURGESS, DCM

E C

*Sergeant 455, 9th Battalion (Queen Victoria's Rifles), London Regiment. Died 16th October 1915. Awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal (D.C.M.). Buried in CARNOY MILITARY CEMETERY, Somme, France. Plot/Row/Section L. Grave 4. Clerk at the Exchange.

BURMAN, DSO, MC, MiD

Robert Moyle

*[Listed as Border Regiment in Book] Captain,East Lancashire Regiment attached H.Q. 7th Infantry Brigade. Died 27th October 1918. Aged 32. Son of Robert and Leonora Kate Burmann, of 5, Bath Rd., Bedford Park, London; husband of Elma Kate Burmann (nee Southey). Awarded the Military cross (M.C.) and the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.) also Mentioned in Despatches. Buried in POMMEREUIL BRITISH CEMETERY, Nord, France. Plot/Row/Section C. Grave 1. Clerk at the Exchange.

From the VC and DSO Book Volume III

BURMANN, R.M. (D.S.O. L.G. 3.6.18), Capt., E. Lancs. R.; M.C. He was killed in action 27.10.18.

London Gazette, 3 June 1918.-" War Office, 3 June 1918. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased, on the occasion of His Majesty's Birthday, to approve of the undermentioned rewards for distinguished service in connection with military operations in Italy. Dated 3 June 1918......
Awarded the Distinguished Service Order:
BURMANN, ROBERT MOYLE, M.C., Capt., East Lancashire Regt."

BURWOOD

Philip

*Private 700714, 2/23rd (County of London) Battalion, London Regiment. Killed in action 24th August 1918. Aged 26. Born Bermondsey, enlisted Clapham Junction, resident Rotherhithe. Son of Philip and Catherine Burwood, of 3A, Bush Rd., Rotherhithe, London. Buried in GODEWAERSVELDE BRITISH CEMETERY, Nord, France. Plot II. Row D. Grave 13. Clerk at the Exchange.

BUTCHART

Alfred Stanley

*Lance Corporal STK/629, 10th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Killed in action 17th July 1916. Aged 26. Born Stratford, enlisted London, resident Leigh-on-Sea. Son of Kate Macaulay (formerly Butchart), of 51, Clifton Avenue, Wembley Hill, Wembley, Middlesex, and the late Alfred B. Butchart. Buried in HEILLY STATION CEMETERY, MERICOURT-L'ABBE, Somme, France. Plot II. Row D. Grave 22. Clerk at the Exchange.

CARPENTER

Herbert Momtagu Soame

*Captain, 10th Battalion, Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment). Killed in action 5th July 1916. Aged 31. Elder son of Mrs. and the late Major H. Carpenter, of "Fleurbaix," Elm Tree Avenue, Esher, Surrey. Buried in BECOURT MILITARY CEMETERY, BECORDEL-BECOURT, Somme, France. Plot I. Row R. Grave 25. Clerk at the Exchange.

CARTER

Henry Gordon

*[Listed in book as Second Lieutenant, Royal Fusiliers] Second Lieutenant, 8th Battalion, Northumberland Fusiliers. Killed in action 19th August 1915. No known grave. Commemorated on HELLES MEMORIAL, Turkey. Panel 33 to 35. Clerk at the Exchange.

From de Ruvigny's ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-18 Part 2, page 60:

CARTER, HENRY GORDON, 2nd Lieut. 8th (Service) Battn. The Northumberland Fusiliers, only s. of Edwin Carter, of 43, Park Road, Chiswick, by his wife, Emily, dau. of John Cruttenden; b. York, 13 Oct. 1889; educ. Leeds Grammar School, and was subsequently employed as a Clerk on the Stock Exchange; volunteered for foreign service on the outbreak of war, and joined the Royal Garrison Artillery 14 Aug. 1914; was gazetted 2nd Lieut. 8th Northumberland Fusiliers, 29 Dec. 1914; went to the Dardanelles, 1 July, 1915, and was killed in action at Chocolate Hill, Suvla Bay, 19 Aug. following. Colonel C. Fishbourne wrote : "May I offer you my respectful sympathy with you in the sad loss of your son, who was one of my most valued subaltern officers, and who met his death doing his duty gallantly to the end. I must presume that ample evidence is now to hand of his death. I was myself wounded on 7 Aug., and so I am unable to give you any particulars of his action, but I have heard he led his men splendidly in the action in which he lost his life. It will be some small consolation to you to know he was beloved and respected by all his brother officers and men." Unm.

CARTER

Sidney Herbert [Morris]

Private 7583/513505, 11st/4th (County of London) Battalion (London Scottish), London Regiment. Killed in action 28th March 1917. Aged 33. Enlisted Kingston, resident "Rosedeane", King's Drive, Thames Ditton. Occupation Clerk. Married his wife, Hild Maud, at St. Peter's, Pimlico and had a duaghter called Esme Jean. At home 5th October 1916 suffering from a wound to the hand and rejoined his battalion 9th October 1916. Buried in AGNY MILITARY CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot/Row/Section G. Grave 14.

CARTER

William James

*Second Lieutenant, 10th Battalion, Essex Regiment. Killed in action 21st September 1918. Buried in UNICORN CEMETERY, VEND'HUILE, Aisne, France. Listed on Lempire British Cemetery Memorial. Member of the Exchange.

Note: The cemetery now contains 1,008 burials and commemorations of the First World War. 409 of the burials are unidentified but there are special memorials to ten casualties known or believed to be buried among them. There are also special memorials to eight casualties buried in Lempire British Cemetery whose graves could not be found on concentration.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

SECOND LIEUTENANT WILLIAM JAMES CARTER, Essex Regiment, was the elder son of the late R. J. Carter of Ilford and the Stock Exchange. Born in April 1885, he was educated at Mercers' School and Chigwell School, Essex. He was in the cricket and football elevens, and a member of the Cadet Corps.

He joined his father's firm, Messrs. Henry T. Brice and Co., in 1903 and became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1914.

In December 1915 he attested under the Derby Scheme, and voluntarily enlisted in June 1916. He served as a lance-corporal in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, and qualified with distinction as a first-class Instructor in Bombing. After a period with an Officers Cadet Battalion he was gazetted to a commission in January 1918. For three months he remained in training at Felixstowe before joining the 3rd Battalion, Essex Regiment, later proceeding to France with the 1st Battalion.

He was killed at Ronssoy, during the final great advance on z September 1918.

His Commanding Officer wrote: "He was a very painstaking and keen officer and always looked after his men well."

CASE

Lionel Trevor [Elliott]

Temprary Captain, 7th Battalion, East Surrey Regiment. Killed in action 30th November 1917. No known grave. Commemorated on CAMBRAI MEMORIAL, LOUVERVAL, Nord, France. Panel 6.

CHAPPELL

Ernest Rowland

*[Listed as Lieutenant on CWGC] Second Lieutenant, "C" Anti-Aircraft Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery. Died of wounds 30th September 1918. Buried in HOUCHIN BRITISH CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot III. Row D. Grave 31. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

SECOND LIEUT. ERNEST ROWLAND CHAPPELL, Royal Garrison Artillery, became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1909 and was with the firm of Richardson and Co.

He met his death just before the Armistice while on duty with his battery outside Loos, being mortally wounded by a shell.

His Commanding Officer wrote to his widow: "Your splendid husband stuck to his guns and did his job when others less stout-hearted might have left them after the first salvo of shells came."

CHINNERY

Harry Brodrick

*[BRODRICK spelt BRODERICK on SDGW & CWGC] Lieutenant, 1st Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Killed in action 28th May 1916. Buried in BERLES-AU-BOIS CHURCHYARD EXTENSION, Pas de Calais, France. Special Memorial. Pas de Calais, France. Member of the Exchange. See also Lord's Cricket Ground Members Memorial World War 1

Note: There are now over 100, 1914-18 war casualties commemorated in this site. Of these, a small number are unidentified and one grave, destroyed by shell fire, is represented by a special memorial.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

LIEUTENANT HARRY BRODRICK CHINNERY, King's Royal Rifle Corps, second son of the late W. M. Chinnery of Hatchford Park, Cobham, Surrey, was born in 1876 and educated at Eton.

His name was long famous in the cricketing world. He played for Eton against Harrow in 1894 and 1895, and was afterwards a regular member first of the Surrey and then of the Middlesex Eleven. He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1898, and a partner in his late father's firm, Chinnery Bros.

As soon as war broke out he offered his services to the War Office and was given a commission in the r3th (Service) Battalion of the 60th (King's Royal Rifles).

He was killed in France on 28 May 1916, in circumstances that are thus described by his Company Commander: "He was in the middle of his men, encouraging them in a moment of danger. He was killed by the last shell fired at a night working party which was advancing our line nearer to the enemy. It was a trying night, and he did splendidly all the earlier part of it in keeping them at their work and keeping up their spirits."

His Colonel wrote: "He will be greatly missed by his brother-officers and the men of his Company, while by his death the Battalion has lost a valuable officer whom it would be difficult to replace."

Lieut. Chinnery's popularity with his men may be judged by the following extracts from a letter written by a rifleman "on behalf of the fellows in his Platoon and myself":

"Mr. Chinnery was loved and respected by all of us that he came in contact with. While in charge of the Machine Gun Section in England, and last Autumn out here, he was looked upon as something more than a good officer and a perfect gentleman; and although he had only been with No. 6 Platoon six weeks, yet no Officer was more respected and had their complete confidence.

"Many are the stories told by his men of his splendid courage and coolness on Sunday night (the night of his death); always first in his area to go to a wounded man, to assist and cheer with a kindly word."

CLARK

Charles Douglas (Jun.)

Lieutenant-Colonel, Officer-in-Charge 1/5th Battalion (Territorial Force), Queen's Own (Royal West kent Regiment). Died at Sea, off Plymouth, of Illness contracted on Active Service, 22nd January 1920. Aged 37. Buried north of the path, east of the church in ST. MARY CHURCHYARD, BROMLEY, HAYES, Middlesex.

Extract from From Tonbridge School and the Great War of 1914 - 1918:

Lieut.-Col. C.D. Clark, T.D., late of Achray, Scots Avenue, Shortlands, was the elder son of the late Mr. Charles Douglas Clark, of Eccleshill, Bromley, and the Stock Exchange, and was himself a partner in the firm of C. Douglas Clark & Sons, of the Stock Exchange. He married on July 19th, 1906, Maude Ethel, daughter of the late Mr J.E. Shaw, of Silvermead, Bromley, and his widow was left with two sons, aged respectively twelve and ten.

Entering the School in May, 1897, from the Abbey School, Beckenham, he was in the Corps, then a Cadet Corps joined by considerably less than one-third of the School, and was in the Shooting VIII. of 1898. He left from Modern B. at Easter, 1899, and having taken a commission in 1900 in the 2nd Volunteer Battn. of the Queens Own Royal West Kent Regiment, before the Territoriak Force came into being, he had proved himself throughout a most energetic and able officer. He also took the greatest interest in the sport of his men and was himself a keen member of the Football team. He had been promoted Major, August 9th, 1912, and sailed for India on December 1st, 1914, as second in command of the 1/5th Battn. The Battalion went to Jhansi and served in India for nearly three years. Then on Decemeber 11th, 1917, they left for Mesopotamia, where they served for two years in the 54th Infantry Brigade in the 18th Division. He was in command of the Battalion with the Acting Rank of Lieut.-Col. from May 2nd to September 19th, 1918, and again from January 10th, 1919, till his death and was mentioned in Lieut.-General W.R. Marshall's Despatch dated February 7th, 1919.

His health had doubtless suffered as the result of hardships and illness in Mesopotamia, for whilst in that country he had an attack of influenza, followed almost immediately by sandfly fever. The brigade took part in the operations on the Tigris and the advance to Mosul and, though a big draft had left the Battalion in February 1919, its strength being made up by drafts of H.L.I., Royal West Kents and Welsh Pioneers, they remained with the Army of Occupation at Mosul until they received orders for home in November, 1919.

His younger brother, Lieut. Alfred Nowell William Clark, had resigned a commission in the 5th Battn. of the Royal West Kents in 1912, but was re-commissioned to the Battn. in January 1917, and going out to India was on the transport "Cameronia" when she was sunk by a submarine in the Mediterranean on April 5th, 1917. He went with the Battalion to Mesopotamia, but from January 3rd, 1918 to March 12th, 1919 was seconded as A.D.C. to the G.O.C. 18th Division, and then returned to England. He, too, like his brother was mentioned in the despatch dated February, 1919.

The Battalion left Mosul on November 27th, 1919, and after spending Christmas at Basra on their way to Bombay, embarked for home on the "Melita" on January 2nd, 1920. Severe influenza broke out before they reached Aden and various deaths occurred during the voyage, thogh some twent cases were transferred at Port Said. It was only after leaving Gibralter that Liet.-Col. Clark became a victim, but his condition became very serious and he died shortly after the boat was brought to anchor of Plymouth on January 22nd, 1920.

CLARKE

Charles Benjamin

*[Listed in book as Honourable Artillery Company] Private 15168, 3rd Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Killed in action 24th May 1915. Aged 20. Born and resident Chiswick, enlisted London. Son of Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Clarke, of 39, Annandale Rd., High Rd., Chiswick, London. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 6 and 8. Clerk at the Exchange.

CLARKE

Stewart Algernon

*Sergeant G/2659, "C" Company, 6th Battalion, The Buffs (East kent Regiment). Killed in action 13th October 1915. Aged 34. Born and resident Gouldhurst, Kent, enlisted Canterbury. Son of the late Rev. James Sanderson Clarke, Vicar of Goudhurst, Kent, and the late Mrs. Clarke. A Member of the London Stock Exchange. Enlisted, September 1914. No known grave. Commemorated on LOOS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, Frabce. Panel 15 to 19. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

SERGEANT STEWART ALGERNON CLARKE, The Buffs, was the sixth son of the late Rev. James S. Clarke, vicar of Goudhurst, Kent, and was born in 1881.

Educated at Cranbrook Grammar School and Tonbridge, he entered the office of Ricardo and Robertson in 1895 and became a member of the Stock Exchange nine years later.

Until he injured his knee he was manager of "B" team of Blackheath Football Club. He was an enthusiastic collector of antiques, a connoisseur in old table glass, and a member of the British Numismatic and of the Kent Numismatic Societies.

During August 1914 he served in Kent as a motor-cyclist patrol and despatch rider. In September he enlisted in the 6th Battalion The Buffs, and was trained with them at Purfleet, Sandling, and Aldershot before they were sent to France in June 1915.

Before that Stewart Clarke had qualified at Hythe in Machine Gun work, and had been appointed Machine Gun Sergeant-Instructor to the battalion.

He was killed in action on the night of 13 October 1915 near Hulluch, in the course of the operations following the battle of Loos. His Machine Gun Officer wrote thus of him: "We were attacking a portion of the German trenches, and he was in charge of one of the guns which had to advance to the captured trench. He died whilst leading his team in the most gallant fashion.

"Of all that he meant to me I can give no idea. I always looked upon him as a brother officer to whom I could go for advice, and whose advice was always worth taking. The men of the Machine Gun section absolutely worshipped him and, whatever hardships they had to go through, there was never any complaint because they knew they could trust their sergeant to get the best possible for them."

CLAYTON

Walter John

*Acting Sergeant 2267, 9th (County of London) Battalion (Queen Victoria's Rifles), London Regiment. Killed in action 21st April 1915. Enlisted London, resident Ditton Hill, Surrey. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 54. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

SERGEANT WALTER JOHN CLAYTON, 9th Battalion London Regiment, the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Clayton of Hillside, Ditton Hill, Surrey, was born in 1885. He was a fine athlete, and at Cheltenham College, where he was educated, he represented the school at both Cricket and Football.

In 1902 he entered his uncle's firm, Clayton and Aston, and later on became a member of the Stock Exchange and of the firm of Clayton and Sons.

At the outbreak of war he joined the Inns of Court O.T.C., but, in his anxiety to get to the Front, he enlisted in the 9th Battalion London Regiment (Queen Victoria's Rifles) and went to France in November. Soon after he was promoted to Sergeant and on several occasions was offered a commission, but said that he would prefer to stay with his men.

He served in the trenches all through that terrible first winter, and was killed at the battle of Hill 60 on 19 April, 1915.

One of his fellow sergeants wrote: "I had been with him since the start and there was no more popular man in the Regiment. He will never be forgotten by any of us."

Sergeant Clayton had a fine voice and did splendid work in organizing concerts and sports for his men.

COCKERELL

Samuel Pepys

*[Dedication booklet states Royal Air Force] Lieutenant, Royal Flying Corps. Died 20th march 1915. Aged 34. Son of the late William Acland Cockerell and Sidney Ada Cockerell. Member of the Cambridge University Boat Race Team of 1900. Former Commercial Attache to Spain and Portugal. Buried in ISMAILIA WAR MEMORIAL CEMETERY, Egypt. Section A. Grave 117. Clerk at the Exchange. See also Lord's Cricket Members World War 1 memorial

COLLIN

Sidney Franklin

*[Listed as Private in book] Rifleman 305530, 2nd/5th (City of London) Battalion (London Rifle Brigade), London Regiment. Killed in action 20th September 1917. Born Liverpool, enlisted London, resident Wanstead. Clerk at the Exchange. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 52 and 54.

COLLINGWOOD

Frank C

*Private 82821, 25th Battalion, King's (Liverpool Regiment). Died of wounds 3rd October 1918. Aged 38. Born Loughton, Essex, enlisted Leyton, London, resident Leytonstone. Son of Thomas William Collingwood, of Leytonstone; husband of Nora Mary Collingwood, of 101, Forest Drive West, Leytonstone, London. Buried in ST. VENANT COMMUNAL CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot IV. Row A. Grave 27. Clerk at the Exchange.

COLLINS

Arthur Alfred James

*Private 8055, 2nd/14th (County of London) Battalion (London Scottish), London Regiment.Killed in action 12th July 1916. Aged 27. Born Dalston, enlisted London, resident Leytonstone. Son of James John and Sophy Elizabeth Collins, of London. Formerly 9956, 5th Battalion, London Regiment. Buried in MAROEUIL BRITISH CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot III. Row A. Grave 13. Clerk at the Exchange.

COLLINS

Lionel Drummond [Kyrle]

*[Listed in book as Royal Scots Fusiliers] Second Lieutenant, 3rd Battalion attached 13th Battalion, Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment). Killed in action 11th May 1916. Aged 22. Son of Lallie Reed Collins and the late Lionel B. Kyrle Collins. Buried in VERMELLES BRITISH CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot IV. Row D. Grave 25. Clerk at the Exchange.

From de Ruvigny's ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-18 Part 3, page 60:

COLLINS, LIONEL DRUMMOND KYRLE, 2nd Lieut., 3rd (Reserve), attd. 13th (Service), Battn. The Royal Scots (Lothian Regt.), 2nd s. of the late Lionel Beale Kyrle Collins, Solicitor (d. Georgetown, Demerara, British Guiana, 28 May, 1894), by his wife, Lallie Reed. yst. dau. of the late Thomas Colclough Watson, of Cliff House, Dovercourt; b. Georgetown aforesaid, 21 Aug. 1893; educ. Framlingham College, co. Suffolk, where he was a Colour-Sergt. in the O.T.C.; entered the Stock Exchange as a Clerk in Messrs. Wilkinson's office in 1912; volunteered for foreign service, and joined the Old Public Schools and Universities Corps (18th Fusiliers) in Sept. 1914, after the outbreak of war, quickly attaining the rank of Sergt.-Instructor; was recommended by his Colonel for a commission in the 3rd Royal Scots, and gazetted 2nd Lieut. 12 May, 1915; went to France in the following Oct.; was offered the post of Bombing Instructor to the Brigade, but preferred to remain with his battalion as Battn. Bombing Officer; was reported missing after the German attack on the Hohenzollern Redoubt 12 May, 1916, when the Colonel and most of the senior officers were either killed or wounded, and a week afterwards his body was found at the entrance to a communication trench leading to a trench held by the enemy, his servant lying beside him. Buried at Vermelles. Lord Henry Scott, Colonel of the 18th Battalion Royal Fusiliers, wrote : "He was with my battalion for many months, and I had a very high opinion of him; in fact, I offered him a commission in the battalion. . . . He did his duty for his country and died a noble death. He secured the love of all those in the 18th Fusiliers who knew him, and from what I could hear he was equally beloved when with the Royal Scots. . .. I thought you might like to know the feeling we had for him in his old Regiment," and a brother officer in the Royal Scots : "Your son came out at the beginning of Oct. to the 13th Royal Scots (attached from the 3rd), with whom I then was, and continued to be till Nov. During that time I saw quite a lot of him, and found him a most charming fellow-officer. He was only with us six weeks, when I was invalided; but by then it was recognized on all hands that the battalion had had few so popular or conscientiously loyal officers." The senior partner in Messrs. Wilkinson's also wrote : "I am writing on behalf of us all... . We have felt great pride in your son's gallant conduct and excellent progress at the front, of which we have frequently heard. His work while with us was full of promise for a successful business career, and we have missed him sadly since he left this place to fight for his country. Later on, will you let us have a photo of him to hang in a place of honour in the office?" While at Framlingham College he was senior prefect; won his colours in cricket and football, and obtained medal and certificate for life-saving in swimming; unm.

COOKE

Edward Ralph

*Private 9281, 2nd Battalion, Honourable Artillery Company (Infantry). Killed in action 31st March 1917. Aged 38. Born Wimbledon, enlisted Reading, resident Tilehurst. Son of Alfred E. and Leila Cooke; husband of Kathleen Cooke, of High Barn, Middleton, Bognor, Sussex. Buried in H.A.C. CEMETERY, ECOUST-ST. MEIN, Pas de Calais, France. Plot I. Row A. Grave 28. Clerk at the Exchange.

From de Ruvigny's ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-18 Part 3, page 61:

COOKE, EDWARD RALPH, Private, No. 9281, 2nd Battn. Honourable Artillery Coy. (T.F.), only s. of Alfred Edward Cooke, Member of the London Stock Exchange, by his wife, Eliza (Lille), dau. of Thomas Watson; b. Wimbledon, S.W., 16 March, 1879; educ. Whitgift; was on the Stock Exchange; enlisted 30 Oct. 1916; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from 13 Jan. 1917, and was killed in action at Estcourt 31 March following. Buried there. He m. at Carshalton, 14 Feb. 1915, Kathleen, dau. of Andrew Twitchin, and had a son, Peter Frere, b. 18 Dec. 1915.

COOMBS

Leslie Howard

*Private STK/295, "A" Company, 10th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Died of wounds 12th July 1916. Aged 25. Born Dulwich, enlisted London, resident Chiswick. Son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles T. Coombs, of Dulwich, London. Buried in PUCHEVILLERS BRITISH CEMETERY, Somme, France. Plot I. Row F. Grave 37. Clerk at the Exchange.

CORMAC-WALSHE

Henry 'Harry'

*Captain, 125th Battery, 29th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Died of wounds 7th November 1917. Son of Edward Cormac Walshe, D.L. and May Cormac Walshe, of Castle Hill, Crossmolina, Co. Mayo. Buried in DOZINGHEM MILITARY CEMETERY, Poperinge, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot XIV. Row B. Grave 20. Clerk at the Exchange.

CORNFOOT

David Henry Harman

*Captain, 9th (County of London) Battalion (Queen Victoria's Rifles). Died in United Kingdom 2nd May 1916. Buried in ALL SOULS' CEMETERY, KENSAL GREEN, London. Grave reference 166.39253. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN DAVID HENRY HARMAN CORNFOOT, 9th Battalion London Regiment (Queen Victoria's Rifles), was the eldest son of the late David Cornfoot of Tonbridge, and was born in 1870. Educated at Tonbridge, he left school at the age of 17 and became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1895.

Always keen on soldiering, he joined the Artists Rifles as a private and rose to the rank of Sergeant. Later he took a commission in the Bloomsbury Rifles which, under the Territorial Scheme, became merged in the Queen Victoria's Rifles. He attained the rank of Captain in this battalion, and subsequently resigned his commission; but on the outbreak of war rejoined his old Regiment, being gazetted Lieutenant in September and promoted Captain in November 1914, in the second line battalion.

For many months he was engaged in training drafts at home for the 1st Battalion, but, despite his age, he urgently requested to go to the Front. In July 1915 he went to France and joined the 4th Entrenching Battalion of which, in February 1916, he took command.

Under the severe conditions of the winter of 1915-16 his health broke down, and eventually he contracted pleurisy and was invalided home in April. He died at Netley Red Cross Hospital on 2 May 1916.

A brother officer wrote of him thus: "In France one finds out a man's worth very quickly, and I can't say how much I admired him and the splendid way he stuck to his work. He was a sportsman in every way, and I feel I have lost a lifelong pal, though I only served with him for three months."

He married in 1900 Olive, the second daughter of the late Arthur Houston, K.C.

CORRIE

William Ronald

*Second Lieutenant, 1st Battalion attached 8th Battalion, East Yorkshire Regiment. Died of wounds 23rd April 1917. Aged 30. Son of Malcolm Stuart Corrie and Edith Elizabeth, his wife; husband of Gladys K. Corrie, of 19, Lyncroft Gardens, Ealing, London. Buried in ETAPLES MILITARY CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot XVII. Row D. Grave 9. Clerk at the Exchange.

From de Ruvigny's ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-18 Part 3, page 63:

CORRIE, WILLIAM RONALD, 2nd Lieut., 1/8th (Service) Battn. The East Yorkshire Regt., only s. of Malcolm Stuart Corrie, of Itchen Abbas, co. Hants, by his wife, Edith Elizabeth, yst. dau. of William David Jones Bridgman, D.C.L.; b. Beckenham. 12 April, 1887; educ. St. Edward's School, Oxford; was a Stockbroker's Clerk; joined the Artists' Rifles 3 Sept. 1914 : served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from Jan. 1915; obtained a commission 10 July, and returned to England in Nov. following, suffering from shell-shock and wounds in the thigh; on his recovery in May, 1916, he joined his Reserve Battn. at Withernsea, co. York : underwent a course of bombing at Otley, and obtained a "Special Certificate"; was Grenade Officer to the Reserve Battn. until he returned to France in March, 1917, and died at the Duchess of Westminster's Hospital, La Touquet, 23 April, 1917, of wounds received during the Battle of Arras on the 9th. Buried in the Military Cemetery, Etaples. His Commanding Officer wrote : "I had formed a very high opinion of him, and considered he was so good at instruction that I endeavoured, and I am sorry to say unsuccessfully, to prevent him going back to the front again. . . . He was so keen about returning that I was obliged to give in. On 28 March he returned to France and was attached to the 8th Battn. On Easter Monday the Regiment went into action near Arras. I was called upon to find a reliable man for duty with Brigade, as Officer Commanding Battle Police, and it was while fulfilling this duty he was mortally wounded. . . . He earned the confidence of his commanding officers." He m. at Ealing, 31 May. 1913, Gladys Kathleen, dau. of William Fiddian, M.A., Indian Civil Service.

COURTICE

Reginald Leyster

*Second Lieutenant, 8th Battalion, Lincolnshire Regiment. Killed in action 2nd July 1916. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 1 C. Clerk at the Exchange.

COURTNEY

Laurence Edward

*[Listed in book as Lance Corporal] Private 74978, 24th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Killed in action 11th September 1918. Aged 36. Born Chelmsford, enlisted London, resident Beckenham. Son of Stanley T. and Gertrude Courtney, of Beckenham, Kent. Formerly STK61, Royal Fusiliers. No known grave. Commemorated on VIS-EN-ARTOIS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 3. Clerk at the Exchange.

CRAFTER

Tom

*[Listed as CROFTER on SDGW] Private 2160, 1st/14th (County of Loondon) Battalion (London Scottish), London Regiment. Killed in action 12th November 1914. Born and resident Forest Hill, enlisted London. His brother James also fell. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 54. Clerk at the Exchange.

CRAIG

John William Archibald

*Lieutenant, Royal Horse Artillery. Died of wounds 26th August 1916.

probable CWGC entry J W J CRAIG, Captain, 1st/1st (Berkshire) Brigade, Royal Horse Artillery attached to "B" Battery, 300th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Died 26th July 1916. Buried in HAUTE-AVESNES BRITISH CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot/Row/Section A. Grave 8. Clerk at the Exchange.

CROSLEY, MiD

Cecil

*Second Lieutenant, 5th Battalion, Princess Victoria's (Royal Irish Fusiliers). Killed in action 16th August 1915. Aged 23. Son of John M. Crosley, of 5/6, Great Winchester St., London, E.C.2. Mentioned in Despatches (MiD). No known grave. Commemorated on HELLES MEMORIAL, Turkey. Panel 178 to 180. Clerk at the Exchange.

From de Ruvigny's ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-18 Part 1, page 101:

CROSLEY, CECIL, 2nd Lieut. and Acting Adjutant, 5th (Service) Battn. Royal Irish Fusiliers, formerly 5th Lancers, s. of John Mechi Crosley, of 5-6, Great Winchester Street, E.C., Stockbroker and member of the London Stock Exchange, by his wife, Mary May, dau. of E. Candler, of Bexhill; b. Purley, co. Surrey, 29 Oct. 1892; educ. Uppingham School, and then proceeded to the McGill University, Montreal, with the idea of taking up engineering. Abandoning this, he returned to England in 1913 and joined his father. He had joined the Reserve of Officers, 23 July, 1913, and on the outbreak of war was given a commission as 2nd Lieut. in the 5th Lancers. Aug. 1914 and trained with them at Dublin. Being anxious, however, to go to the Front, he transferred to the 5th Royal Irish Fusiliers in May, 1915, and went out to the Dardanelles with them. He took part in the historic landing at Suvla Bay, was appointed Acting Adjutant early in August, and was killed in action at Keretch Tepe on the 16th of that month; unm. Shortly before his death, Lieut.-Gen. B. Mahon wrote: “Your Commanding Officer and Brigade Commander have informed me that you have distinguished yourself by good conduct in the field. I have read their report with much pleasure and have forwarded it to higher authority for recognition;” and Capt E. H. Ilwaine wrote to his father: “From the moment we landed (at Suvla Bay) under shrapnel fire I was struck by your son's coolness. He volunteered to remain beside the barge in which we came ashore, organised a party and unloaded the ammunition and stores in it, although the Turkish gunners had got the range and were shelling it steadily. Whenever I saw him during the few rests we had I found him cheery and apparently quite happy in his work, and I noticed that he had quite obtained the confidence or the men of his platoon, who followed him willingly. Personally I soon learned to put absolute trust in his knowledge and judgment, and he took over the command of the company when I was wounded. Two of our officers who were wounded after I was, both made exactly the same remark to me while on the hospital ship, ‘Crosley is doing good work.’ ” And later (12 Feb. 1916) he wrote again: “ I have received a letter from one of our officers—Bennett—who was near your son when he was killed. With the exception of Bennett all the officers present were wounded, went to hospital in Alexandria or Malta, and rejoined the regt. in Serbia direct from hospital. I quote Bennett’s letter. The occasion he refers to is the one mentioned in Sir Ian Hamilton’s despatch, when he says that the 5th Battn. held on to the ridge until only one officer was left, and then retired when ordered to do so from the rear. I might mention that Cecil was appointed Adjutant—after Kelly, the Adjutant, was hit— some days previously. On Monday, 16 Aug., we advanced up a ridge overlooking the Bay of Saros. This ridge was Keritch Tepe Sert, and sloped down to the water’s edge. Our officers going into action were Johnson, Crosley, Bartley, Duggan. Fitzgerald, Blood, Figgis Kidd and myself. Kidd followed B Coy. with first half of D, and I followed with the remaining two platoons of D. I met Crosley when we got into position, and he instructed me to send D along to Kidd and take command of B, as both Duggan and Blood had been hit. B Coy. were lining a ridge and firing half left. The remainder were a little ahead and lining the ridge facing inland, also holding a small trench at right angles to the ridge and on the sea side of it. It was in this little trench that Crosley, Hartley, Sergt.-Major Mulligan and many others were killed. I was not actually in this place, but Fitzgerald and Kidd explained it clearly afterwards. Crosley, Hartley and Mulligan were all hit in the head. At about 8.30 p.m. we were instructed that we were to withdraw, and that two naval boats—which had helped us with their fire all day—would commence to shell the enemy at 8.45 p.m. The enemy were on a little knoll and entrenched about 20 or 15 yards in front of the trench we held. We withdrew in good order. Fitzgerald and Kidd were in the little trench all day, and, indeed, Fitzgerald got a bullet through his helmet at the same spot, for it was very closely sniped. Crosley was not up in this position for long, but was passing along the line and learning how matters stood. When I reached the position and was talking to Crosley two aeroplanes were overhead dropping bombs about, and he told us that the fumes from one bomb were all about him as he bandaged up Blood, who was hit in the shoulder. I chatted to him for a time, and he wanted me to take one of his famous automatic pistols, but as I had a rifle I refused. From where we were on to the ridge the ground sloped right to the sea, and this slope was covered with thick scrub, which scrub was fairly fell of snipers, so we had a fire on both sides and plenty of shells. Crosley was, of course, very cheery, and his last word to me was ‘Keep (town and don’t expose yourself. There are all sorts of things flying about here.’ I left him arranging about water and ammunition with Mulligan. I heard from Kelly, in Alexandria, something of how well Crosley had done, and from all he told me I am not surprised to see his name in the Despatch. He would seem to have merited that honour highly. This is the only first hand information I have been able to secure. If I obtain any more I shall forward it to you.” He was mentioned in Gen. Sir Jan Hamilton’s Despatch of 11 Dec. 1915 [London Gazette, 28 Jan. 1916]. At Montreal he was instrumental in introducing and organising Rugby rules for the University football matches and was prominent in boxing, winning the amateur middleweight championship of Canada. On his return to England he became a member of the London Rowing Club, and represented that club in eights at Henley and other Regattas.

CROSS

E J

No further information currently available

CUNDALL

Stanley

*Second Lieutenant, 9th Battalion, King's Own (Yorkshire Light Infantry). Killed in action 21st April 1918. Aged 26. Formerly Private SK/046, 10th Battalion, King's Own (Yorkshire Light Infantry). Son of Joseph Cundall, of Chingford, Essex; husband of Florence Beatrice Craig (formerly Cundall), of 28, Carlton Mansions, Park Rd., Crouch End, London. Buried in KLEIN-VIERSTRAAT BRITISH CEMETERY, Heuvelland, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot V. Row A. Grave 8. Clerk at the Exchange. Also listed on the Chingford War Memorial.

CUTHBERTSON

Edward Hedley (Jun.)

*Lieutenant, 9th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Died 24th July 1917. Aged 28. Son of Edward Hedley Cuthbertson and Alice Cuthbertson; husband of Mary Constance Follett (formerly Cuthbertson), of 72, Onslow Gardens, South Kensington, London. Buried in AMARA WAR CEMETERY, Iraq. Plot XIII. Row L. Grave 6. Member of the Exchange. See also Lord's Cricket Ground Members Memorial World War 1

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

LIEUTENANT EDWARD HEDLEY CUTHBERTSON, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was born in 1888, the son of Edward Hedley Cuthbertson, formerly a member of the Stock Exchange.

Educated at Malvern College and Clare College, Cambridge, he was given his Blue for Association football, and he also played cricket for his University several times.

He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1911.

Enlisting in the Public Schools Battalion of the Royal Fusiliers in August 1914, he was eventually given his commission in the Warwickshire Regiment.

He went to France in March 1915 and was wounded at Ypres a few weeks later. Returning to France, he was invalided home again in July 1916.

After a period of convalescence in England he was sent to Mesopotamia and died in hospital at Amara on 24 July 1917.

DANIELS

James Alfred

*Captain, 15th Battalion, Hampshire Regiment. Died of wounds 21st September 1917. Aged 21. Son of James Alfred and Minnie Kate Daniels, of 43, Main Avenue, Bush Hill Park, Enfield, Middx. An Enfield Grammarian. Buried in LIJSSENTHOEK MILITARY CEMETERY, Poperinge, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot XXIV. Row H. Grave 16. Clerk at the Exchange.

DAVIES

Claude J

*Private, London Regiment. Clerk at the Exchange. possibly Claude Humphrey DAVIES, 4105, london Regiment. Enlisted 17th February 1916, discharged sick 11th August 1916.

DAVIES

John Sewell

*Private 2065, 1st/9th (County of London) Battalion (queen Victoria's Rifles), London Regiment. Killed in action 24th April 1915. Enlisted and resident London. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 54. Clerk at the Exchange.

DAVIES

Robert fFindon

*[Listed as Major in book] Captain, 1st/9th (County of London) Battalion (Queen Victoria's Rifles). Killed in action 9th September 1916. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL Memorial, Somme, France. Pier and Face 9 C. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

MAJOR ROBERT FFINDON DAVIES, London Regiment, was the son of Frederick Herbert Davies, a member of the Stock Exchange. He was born in 1877 and educated at Marlborough College. On leaving school he joined that famous shooting corps, the 1st Middlesex V.R.C. and fought in the South African War, where his company was attached to a battalion of the King's Royal Rifle Corps. He was awarded the South African medal with four clasps.

He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1898. Though he had already given great proof of his skill as a rifle shot, his victory in the King's Prize at Bisley in 1906 was a surprise to everyone except his friends. From that time onward he was recognized as one of the finest and most enthusiastic marksmen in the country. He did much to keep alive interest in rifle shooting before the opening of Lord Roberts' campaign, and he helped greatly to make the Bisley meeting an enjoyable social event.

He reached the final stages of the King's Prize on four occasions, shot for England in 1910 and 1911 at Bisley and represented his country at the Olympic games at Stockholm in 1912.

Major Davies had retired with an Honorary Captaincy in the regular army in 1908, but he rejoined at the outbreak of war, served for two years in England and went to the Front in 1916. He was killed at the head of his men on 9 September of that year.

DAVIES

Sidney Alfred

*[Listed as Private in book] Lance Corporal STK/65, "A" Company, 10th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Killed in action 23rd April 1917. Aged 36. Born St. Luke's, Middlesex, enlisted London, resident Friern Barnet. Son of Mrs. E. Davies, of Holloway, London; husband of Alice Ada Davies, of "Keston," The Crescent, Friern Barnet, Middx. Buried in CHILI TRENCH CEMETERY, GAVRELLE, Pas de Calais, France. Plot/Row/Section C. Grave 21. Clerk at the Exchange.

DAVIS

Cyril Vincente

*[Listed as DAVIES in book] Private 800651, 30th (City of London) Battalion (Royal Fusiliers). Killed in action 3rd June 1918. Aged 32. Enlisted Armoury House, resident Highgate. Husband of Kathie Davis, of 4, Bolton Rd., Eastbourne. Formerly 2966, Honourable Artillery Company posted to 2nd Battalion, Royal Fusiliers. No known grave. Commemorated on PLOEGSTEERT MEMORIAL, Comines-Warneton, Hainaut, Belgium. Panel 11. Clerk at the Exchange.

DAVIS

Norman D

*Private STK/68, 10th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Killed in action 26th May 1916. Aged 29. Born North Kensington, enlisted London, resident West Hampstead. Son of Sydney and Ray Davis, of 101, Queen's Rd., Richmond Surrey. Native of London. Buried in BERLES-AU-BOIS CHURCHYARD EXTENSION, Pas de Calais, France. Plot/Row/Section E. Grave 4. Clerk at the Exchange.

DAWKINS, MC

Frederick Clifton

*Lieutenant, "A" Battery, 8th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Died of wounds 2nd September 1917. Aged 27. Husband of Louise G. Dawkins, of 2, High St., Shoeburyness, Essex. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.) [London Gazette 14 September 1917, page 10]. Buried in LIJSSENTHOEK MILITARY CEMETERY, Poperinge, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot XVIII. Row F. Grave 11. Clerk at the Exchange.

DAWSON

Wilfred Leedham

*Second Lieutenant, 2nd/6th Battalion (Territorial), Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Killed in action 3rd December 1917. No known grave. Commemorated on CAMBRAI MEMORIAL, LOUVERVAL, Nord, France. Panel 3. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

SECOND LIEUTENANT WILFRED LEEDHAM DAWSON, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was born in 1882. He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1913.

A partner in the firm of Bragg, Stockdale, Hall and Co., he joined the Artists' Rifles and received his commission in the 7th Worcester Regiment in 1916.

Immediately on being gazetted, he went to France and was then attached to the 2/6th Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, being transferred to that Regiment in the following year.

He met his death in the operations following the repulse before Cambrai in November 1917, being killed in action while holding the line near La Vacquerie on 3 December.

De LANDRE-GROGAN, MC

Leon Victor St. Patrick

Lieutenant, 13th Battalion attached 1st/5th Battalion, York and Lancaster Regiment. Killed in action 13th October 1918. Aged 34. Son of Lt. Col. De Landre-Grogan; husband of Elizabeth E. De Landre-Grogan, of Midhurst, Northview Drive, Westcliff-on-Sea, Essex. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.) [For actions on 28th March 1917 London Gazette 14th June 1918, page 13]. No known grave. Commemmorated on PLOEGSTEERT MEMORIAL, Comines-Warneton, Hainaut, Belgium. Panel 8.

Extract from London Gazette 29th July 1919, page 55:

Lt.- Leon Victor St. Patrick de Landre- Grogan, York & Lane. R., Spec. Res., attd. 1/5th Bn., T.F. On the night of 'September 22/23rd, 1918, near Gaurelle (north of Arras) for conspicuous gallantry and good leadership during a successful minor operation. He led his platoon against an enemy trench and successfully cleared it and carried out consolidation. The following night the enemy counter-attacked in force but were driven off with loss. The success of the operation was greatly due to his able leadership and fine example to his men.

De LEVANTE

Frederick Robert

*Lance Sergeant 60, 21st (County of London) Battalion (1st Surrey Rifles), London Regiment. Killed in action 25th May 1915. Aged 60. Born and resident Camberwell. No known grave. Commemorated on LE TOURET MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 45. Clerk at the Exchange.

De RUTZEN

Alan Frederick James

*Lieutenant, 1st/1st Battalion, Pembroke Yeomanry attached 6th Company, Imperial Camel Corps. Killed in action 7th August 1916. Aged 40. Son of Sir Albert de Rutzen; husband of Eleanor E. de Rutzen. Buried in KANTARA WAR MEMORIAL CEMETERY, Egypt. Section E. Grave 53. Member of the Exchange. See also Imperial Camel Corps Memorial

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

LIEUTENANT ALAN FREDERICK JAMES, BARON DE RUTZEN, son of the late Sir Albert de Rutzen, the famous Metropolitan Magistrate at Bow Street, was born in 1876. He was educated at Eton and in 1904 became a member of the Stock Exchange.

He succeeded his uncle as Baron de Rutzen in 1915. At the outbreak of the war he joined the Pembroke Yeomanry, being gazetted in August 1914, and went with them to Egypt in March 1916. Whilst there, he volunteered for and became attached to the Imperial Camel Corps, with which he was serving at the time of his death. He fell leading a company of the Camel Corps against the Turks near Katia.

The following extract, testifying to his great ability as an officer and leader of men, is from a letter of an officer of the Camel Corps to the Colonel of the Pembroke Yeomanry: " You will probably have heard, before this reaches you, that Baron de Rutzen was killed yesterday. He was in command of this company and the amount of confidence he put into his men helped considerably towards holding a very tight corner.

"A brave man and a real topper in the field and out of it. His men simply adored him, as did all his brother officers."

Baron de Rutzen had travelled extensively. He was greatly interested in horses, hunting and agriculture, and was a keen fisherman.

He married, in 1908, Eleanor Etna Audley, the only child of Captain Pelham Thursby Pelham of Abermarlais Park, Carmarthen-shire, and Ridgeway, Pembrokeshire.

DENNISON

Harry Glanville

*Second Lieutenant, Royal Garrison Artillery. Died 24th February 1919. Buried in TEDDINGTON CEMETERY, Middlesex. Grave reference A. 230/231. Clerk at the Exchange.

DODDS

Robert William Lee

*Lieutenant, "B" Company, 13th Battalion, Northumberland Fusiliers. Killed in action 25th September 1915. Aged 21. Son of Robert and Constance Carr Dodds, of Orchard Cottage, Coombe Lane, Kingston Hill, Surrey. Commemorated on LOOS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 20 to 22. Clerk at the Exchange.

DODGSON

Francis

*[The dedication booklet lists him as Second Lieutenant] Temporary Captain, 8th Battalion, Alexandra, Princess of Wales's Own (Yorkshire Regiment). Killed in action 10th July 1916. Aged 27. Son of Henley F. Dodgson, of Bovingdon, Herts. Educated at Marlborough College and Trinity College, Cambridge. Buried in SERRE ROAD CEMETERY No. 2, Somme, France. Plot XXVIII. Row K. Grave 8. Clerk at the Exchange. Also commemorated in the Memorial Hall in Marlborough College, and at the parish church, Bovingdon, Herts

The church memorial is a brass plaque with Regimental crest, on the left of the nave, and reads:

TO THE GLORY OF GOD
AND IN LOVING MEMORY
FRANCIS DODGSON AGED 27
CAPTAIN 8TH YORKS REG.
WHO FELL IN THE TAKING OF
CONTAL MAISON. BATTLE OF SOMME
ON JULY 10TH 1916.

'YOURS THE PANG, BUT HIS
OH HIS, THE UNDIMINISHED
UNDERLAYING GLADNESS
UNDEPARTED DREAM......RLS

DODGSON

John Henley

Second Lieutenant, 5th Battalion (Territorial), Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regiment). Killed in action 7th June 1917. Aged 36. Son of William Henley Dodgson and Harriet Charlotte Dodgson, of Forest Lodge, Keston, Kent. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 45 and 47.

DONALD

Andrew Patrick

*[Arthur in dedication book] Lieutenant, Royal Engineers. Died of pleurisy 1st February 1918. Aged 41. Son of Dr. James Turner Donald and Mary Colligan Donald, of Paisley; husband of Valerie Donald, of "Glenwood," The Drive, Willenhall Park, New Barnet, Herts. Buried in WANDSWORTH (EARLSFIELD) CEMETERY, London. Grave reference G. 18. 242.. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

LIEUTENANT ANDREW PATRICK DONALD, Royal Engineers, was a son of the late Dr. James Turner Donald, and a native of Paisley. He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1910 and a partner in the firm of Durham Stokes and Co.

Though over forty years of age when war broke out, and though he had already served his country in the South African War, he would not rest content until he had once again been accepted for service. He was in South Africa twenty years ago with the C.I.V. Mounted Infantry and held the Queen's Medal with four clasps.

From 1914 onwards he made repeated attempts to rejoin, but was again and again rejected, on medical grounds, until finally in 1917 he was accepted for the Royal Defence Corps. Later he was transferred to the Royal Engineers and it was as a "sapper" lieutenant that he at length reached the Front. While on active service in France he contracted pleurisy and was invalided home. He died at Wandsworth Military Hospital on 1 February 1918, at the age of forty-four.

Lieut. Donald left a widow and four children.

DONOVAN

William Richard

*[Listed as Private in book] Rifleman 3126, "A" Company, 9th (County of London) Battalion (queen Victoria's Rifles), London Regiment. Died of wounds 6th June 1915. Aged 20. Enlisted London, resident Balham. Son of John Joseph and Elizabeth Ann Donovan, of London. Buried in BAILLEUL COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION (NORD), Nord, France. Plot I. Row E. Grave 141. Clerk at the Exchange.

DRIVER

Graham Dudley

*[Listed as George on CWGC] Lieutenant, Army Service Corps. Died 5th May 1915. Cremated at GOLDERS GREEN CREMATORIUM, Middlesex. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

LIEUTENANT GRAHAM DUDLEY DRIVER, Royal Army Service Corps, son of Sheldon Dudley Driver, a member of the Stock Exchange, was born in 1872 and educated at Dover College. He himself became a member in 1894.

An enthusiast in all sports he was especially keen on tennis, lawn tennis and squash racquets. He competed in and won many prizes at lawn tennis tournaments, and was a member of Hurling-ham and Queen's Clubs.

Though over forty when war broke out, he enlisted in September 1914, in the Sportsmen's Battalion, the 23rd Royal Fusiliers, and in March of the following year received his commission as a Lieutenant in the Army Service Corps.

He died of spotted fever at the age of forty-three, within a few weeks of obtaining his commission, on 5 May 1915.

He married Evelyn, youngest daughter of the late William Blencowe of Brackley, Northants, and left one daughter.

DUPE

Cyril Harry

*Second Lieutenant, "C" Battery, 149th Brigade attached to 30th Division Ammunition Column, Royal Field Artillery. Died of wounds 21st March 1918. Buried in HAM BRITISH CEMETERY, MUILLE-VILLETTE, Somme, France. Plot I. Row E. Grave 13. Clerk at the Exchange.

ECCLES

John Vivian William

*Lieutenant, King's Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment). Drowned 4th May 1917. No known grave. Commemorated on SAVONA MEMORIAL, Italy. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

LIEUTENANT JOHN VIVIAN WILLIAM ECCLES, King's Own (Royal Lancaster) Regiment, the eldest son of the late John Lamont Eccles of Trinidad, was born in 1879 and educated at St. John's College, Hurstpierpoint.

At the age of seventeen he joined the firm of Price Bros. and became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1904.

A member of Coombe Hill and Acton Golf Clubs, he was a keen golfer and won many prizes in competitions.

On the outbreak of war he immediately enlisted in the H.A.C. and obtained his commission in the 8th Battalion, King's Own Royal Lancasters in the December following. He went out to Egypt and Salonica in January 1916, being attached to the 9th Battalion of his Regiment. In November of that year he was transferred to G.H.Q, Salonica.

He came home on leave in April 1917, and on his return to Salonica in H.M. Transport Transylvania, the vessel was torpedoed on 2 May. Lieutenant Eccles was among those reported "Missing."

" Both I and my Staff are deeply shocked at the news," wrote his Chief at G.H.Q., Major-General Webb Gillman. " I miss him greatly, as he was so reliable. His work, though perhaps tedious, was one of great responsibility and he never betrayed the trust that was imposed on him."

An officer who served with him at home and in Egypt and Salonica wrote : " After he came down from the line (where his job, I know none of the easiest, was well done) he became a frequent and always welcome visitor. . . . We all feel his loss personally and keenly, and all are absolutely sure that he died gallantly and consistently with his quality, which, by some considerable experience, we have found to be of the finest."

EDMANDS

Francis Douglas

*Second Lieutenant, 952nd Mechanical Transport Company, Army Service Corps attached Royal Garrison Artillery. Died of wounds 1st December 1917. Aged 42. Son of Henry and Helen Edmands; husband of Hilda Barlow (formerly Edmands), of "Benhilton," Kingston Lane, Teddington, Middx. Buried in RAMLEH WAR CEMETERY, Israel. Section B. Grave 69. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

SECOND LIEUT. FRANCIS DOUGLAS EDMANDS, Royal Army Service Corps, was a son of Charles Henry Edmands and was born in 1876. He was educated privately. On becoming a member of the Stock Exchange in 1904 he joined the firm of James Smythwhite and Co. as a partner.

Lieutenant Edmands was very musical and was possessed of a beautiful voice. Before he joined the army he had organized a concert party for the entertainment of the wounded.

He joined the Army Service Corps as a cadet in 1917, received his commission in April and went to France in May. After serving there for two months he was appointed to the 952 M.T. Company in Egypt. He was killed by a shell in December.

His Commanding Officer wrote to his widow: "When he was hit he took it as a brave man should, joking with those who bore him to the ambulance. He was game to the last. How we all miss him now! If it had not been for his unfailing energy and endurance the company could never have done so well. The men have made a cross for his grave."

EVANS

Leslie Morier

*Second Lieutenant, 1st Division Train, Army Service Corps. Killed in action 12th November 1917. Aged 39. Son of Thomas Evans; husband of Nora Louise Evans, of Gresham House, Olney, Bucks. Native of Loughton, Essex. Buried in VLAMERTINGHE NEW MILITARY CEMETERY, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot XI. Row C. Grave 2. Member of the Exchange. Also listed on the Olney War Memorial, Buckinghamshire.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

SECOND LIEUTENANT LESLIE MORIER EVANS, Royal Army Service Corps, the son of Thomas Stephen Evans, was born in 1879 and educated privately. He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1904.

He served in the National Volunteers for a year, and then went to a Cadet school, till he took his commission in September 1917.

Two months later, on 12 November, he was killed by a shell.

One of his brother officers wrote: “Though he had only been with us a short time he had become the life and soul of the mess. His loss to us can never be made good. A mind so original and untrammelled is seldom met with and the world can ill spare such a man. I have lost a real friend and most charming companion. He made all our lives happier and was a most loyal and conscientious officer."

He married the daughter of Arthur Hipwell, J.P., by whom he had one daughter.

EVENNETT

Francis Cuthbert

*Sergeant 820672, 31st (County of London) Battalion, London Regiment. Died in United Kingdom 13th July 1917. Aged 47. Born Kensington, enlisted Chelsea, resident Chiswick. Son of Henry Evennett; husband of Agnes M. Evennett, of 14, Cromford Rd., West Hill, Wandsworth, London. Born at Bayswater, London. Buried in CLACTON CEMETERY, Essex. Plot/Row/Section C. Grave 253. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

SERGEANT FRANCIS CUTHBERT EVENNETT, London Regiment, was born on 22 April 1870. He was educated at St. Charles's College, Bayswater, and later studied at the English College, Lisbon. He became a Member of the Stock Exchange in 1899, and when the war broke out was a partner in the firm of Thomas Carmichael and Co.

He served for 15 years with the Queen Victoria's Rifles, retiring as a Sergeant with the Territorial Efficiency Medal in 1913. Concurrently he took an active interest in the Catholic Boys' Brigade and commanded the Kensal Company of the Westminster Battalion for many years. Later he became Captain and Adjutant of this Battalion.

It was in this capacity that, although 44 years of age at the time, he joined a Company (specially recruited from the Catholic Boys' Brigade) of the 2/18th Battalion, London Regiment (London Irish Rifles) and became a Sergeant. He met his death under tragic circumstances near Clacton-on-Sea on 13 July 1917.

His Company Commander in the London Irish Rifles wrote: "Francis Evennett showed a grand example of patriotism. He joined up despite his family ties, his business, his age and infirmity (for he was greatly handicapped with severe rheumatism although he carried on) in order to give a lead to the Catholic lads with whom he joined the ranks early in September 1914. I know that none of the attractions of military life swayed him, and of him can it literally be said 'He died for God and King.'"

FARNES

Henry C

*[Dedication booklet states Royal Air Force] Second Lieutenant, 48th Squadron, Royal Flying Corps. Died 6th July 1917. Son of Mr. H. D. Farnes, of 2, Copthall Buildings, Throgmorton St., London. Buried in VIS-EN-ARTOIS BRITISH CEMETERY, HAUCOURT, Pas de Calais, France. Plot VI. Row F. Grave 14. Clerk at the Exchange.

FIELDING

W

No further information currently available

FISHER-BROWN

Douglas Gordon

†[Listed as BROWN on on memorial] Second Lieutenant, 2/Army A A Section, Royal Garrison Artillery. Died of wounds 28th June 1918. Son of Frederick William and Emily Sophia Fisher-Brown, of Cambridge House, Cambridge Rd., East Twickenham, Middx. Buried in (PUTNEY VALE) CEMETERY AND CREMATORIUM, WANDSWORTH, London. Grave reference A. S. 59. Clerk at the Exchange.

FISHER-BROWN

Douglas Gordon

Second Lieutenant, 2/Army A.A. Section, Royal Garrison Artillery. Died of wounds 28th June 1918. Son of Frederick William and Emily Sophia Fisher-Brown, of Cambridge House, Cambridge Rd., East Twickenham, Middx. Buried in WANDSWORTH (PUTNEY VALE) CEMETERY AND CREMATORIUM, London. Plot A. Row S. Grave 59.

FITCH

Peter

*Private 1587, Honourable Artillery Company (Infantry). Killed in action 26th March 1915. Enlisted Armoury House, resident St. John's Wood. Buried in VOORMEZEELE ENCLOSURES No. 1 and No. 2, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot I. Row A. Grave 23. Clerk at the Exchange.

FORSYTH

Gordon Amhurst

*Second Lieutenant, 8th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Killed in action 27th August 1916. Aged 28. Son of David Cadenhead Forsyth and Thomasina Forsyth, of London; husband of Edith M. A. Forsyth, of 23, Pembury Rd., Lower Clapton, London. Member of the Stock Exchange, London. Buried in AGNY MILITARY CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot/Row/Section E. Grave 37. Member of the Exchange.

From de Ruvigny's ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-18 Part 5, page 61:

FORSYTH GORDON AMHURST, 2nd Lieut., 8th Battn. The Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regt.), s. of David Cadenhead Forsyth, of Rolyrood, St. Andrew’s Drive, Skegness, and Stamford Bill, London, N., formerly a member of the Stock Exchange, London, by his wife, Thomasina, dau. of Thomas Adamson: and brother to Private Douglas Chester Forsyth (q.v.); b. Amhurst Park, London, N., 29 Dec. 1887; educ. Crump's School, Woodford ureen, to. Essex, finishing at Konlgsfeld, Black Forest, Germany, and Nyon, near Lausanne, Switzerland; was a member of the London Stock Exchange; enlisted in Aug. 1914; served with the Expeditionary Force in France from 1 Sept. 1915, as a Sergt. in the 12th Royal Fusiliers; took part in the Battle of Loos on the 25th of that month, and the subsequent actIons until Aug. 1916, when he wss killed in action in the trenches near Agny by Arras, by a trench-mortar bomb. Buried in the Military Cemetery at Agny. Lieut. Royle (since killed) wrote: “I do not know if your son mentioned that we had not only met but were in the same company here; however, perhaps you will recall my staying at your house a Woodford Green some years ago. . . . Dan was very popular the short time he was with us, and we all very much mourn his loss. It was exceptionally hard luck, as during the six days we were in the trenches at this quiet spot we only had three casualties, and they were all caused by the same trench mortar.” Unm.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

SECOND LIEUT. GORDON AMHURST FORSYTH, Royal Fusiliers, was the son of David Cadenham Forsyth of the Stock Exchange and was born in London in December 1887. From Crump's Private School at Woodford Green he eventually proceeded to Konigsfeld in Baden and Nyon in Switzerland to complete his education. He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1911.

Enlisting as a private on the outbreak of war in the 12th Royal Fusiliers, he rose to the rank of Sergeant and after twelve months training at Shoreham Camp embarked with his Regiment on 1 September 1915 for France. He took part in the battle of Loos, and was in action almost continuously in different parts of France and Belgium until June 1916, when, having been recommended for a commission, he joined the 8th Royal Fusiliers as Second Lieutenant, taking part in July and August in the battle of the Somme.

On 21 August 1916 he was killed in the trenches by a mortar bomb and is buried in the Military Cemetery at Agny near Arras. During the few weeks he held his commission he endeared himself to his brother officers by his cheerful and happy manner.

He married his cousin Edith Mary Allshorn Forsyth, daughter of W. S. A. Forsyth of the Stock Exchange, but left no issue.

FRANKLIN, MSM

Ernest

*Bombardier 931403, "A" Battery, 291st Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Died of wounds 17th August 1918. Aged 36. Born Pimlico, enlisted London. Son of Silas Samuel and Sarah Franklin, of London. Awarded the Meritorious Service medal (M.S.M.). Buried in MONT HUON MILITARY CEMETERY, LE TREPORT, Seine-Maritime, France. Plot VII. Row B. Grave 7A. Clerk at the Exchange.

FRANKLYN

Henry Oscar

*Private 203265, 1st (City of London) Battalion (Royal Fusiliers), London Regiment. Killed in action 16th August 1917. Aged 32. Born Canonbury, enlisted Hampstead, resident Kilburn. Son of Edward and Lina Franklyn. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 52. Clerk at the Exchange.

FRASER

Alexander Evan

*Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion (Territorial), Monmouthshire Regiment (Territorial Force). Killed in action 2nd May 1915. Aged 34. Son of James C. and Emily Fraser, of Ingleside, Lynton, Devon. Buried in LA BRIQUE MILITARY CEMETERY No. 2, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot I. Row K. Grave 34. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

LIEUTENANT ALEXANDER EVAN FRASER, Monmouthshire Regiment, was the youngest son of James Campbell Fraser and was born in the year 1880. He was educated at St. Mark's, Windsor, and commenced his business career with the London and County Bank, Watford.

He joined Charles Kerr on the Stock Exchange and continued in the same position with Kerr, Ware and Co. until the year 1913 when he became a Member.

At the outbreak of the War he immediately enlisted, not waiting for the opportunity of obtaining a commission. Later he was offered a commission which he accepted in the 2nd Monmouthshire Regiment. He went to France with his Battalion 5 November 1914 and endured all the hard fighting and hardships of the first winter in Flanders.

He was Adjutant at the time he met his death, during a German gas attack in the battle of Ypres, on 2 May 1915. A shell burst a few yards from him as he stood talking to his Colonel and a fragment entered his head.

His Colonel (with whom he completed the whole of his short service) wrote: “He had been my Adjutant since January, and I can honestly say that never had anybody a better Adjutant. He was a magnificent soldier and, in the true sense of the word, he was a great friend and comrade to me. . . . He had all the best qualities of a soldier and a gentleman.

"All through he has been sound and undisturbed by any difficulties, thoughtful and unselfish, and adored by every soldier with whom he came in contact. I have had expressions of regret from every Battalion in the Brigade, for everybody who knew him liked him.

FRASER

The Hon. Simon

*[Book states Lieutenant] Second Lieutenant, 3rd Battalion attached 2nd Battalion, Gordon Highlanders. Killed in action 29th October 1914. Aged 26. Son of 18th Baron Saltoun and Lady Saltoun, of Philorth, Fraserburgh, Aberdeen. Member of the Exchange. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 38. See also Charterhouse School War Memorial

From de Ruvigny's ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-18 Part 2, page 126:

FRASER, THE HON. SIMON, 2nd Lieut., 3rd (Reserve), attd. 2nd (92nd Foot), Battn. The Gordon Highlanders. 3rd s. of Alexander William Frederick Fraser, the Lord Saltoun of Abernethy, J.P., D.L., by his wife, Mary Helena, only dau. of Thomas Arthur Grattan-Bellew, MY.; b. 7 Sept. 1888; educ. Winton House. Winchester, and Charterhouse; was gazetted 2nd Lieut. 3rd Gordon Highilanders 7 Sept. 1914; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders, attached to the 2nd Battn.. and was killed in action near Ypres 29 Oct. 1914.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

LIEUTENANT THE HON. SIMON FRASER, Gordon Highlanders, was born in 1888 and educated at Charterhouse, where he attained a considerable position in his House. From school he entered Greenwell and Co.'s office and, after learning the business, became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1912.

On the outbreak of war he applied for a commission, and in August was gazetted a lieutenant in the Gordon Highlanders. In October he was sent to conduct a draft to the 2nd Battalion at Lyndhurst. On arriving there he found that there was a vacancy in the battalion. He at once applied to the Commanding Officer and, obtaining permission to join that Battalion, went with it in the famous 7th Division in the same month to Belgium.

Finally they joined the British Army at Ypres and in the first battle of that name he was killed by a shell whilst talking to a brother officer.

In the few weeks he had been with his battalion he had won great popularity and he was greatly loved and respected by the men of his Company, who carried his body back the same evening to the headquarters of the Battalion, a distance of nearly three miles. He was buried the next morning in the garden of a neighbouring château by his younger brother, who was in the same Battalion.

FREEMAN

George Cyril

*Captain, 6th Battalion, Princess Charlotte of Wales's (Royal Berkshire Regiment). Killed in action 1st October 1916. Buried in BLIGHTY VALLEY CEMETERY, AUTHUILE WOOD, Somme, France. Plot V. Row E. Grave 30. Clerk at the Exchange.

FRENCH

Cecil Berkeley

*Private STK/87, 10th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Died of wounds 8th February 1916. Aged 29. Born Surbiton, enlisted London, resident Cranford. Son of William and Clara H. French, of Springfield, Cranford, Middx. Buried in DOULLENS COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION No. 1, Somme, France. Plot II. Row D. Grave 1. Clerk at the Exchange.

FRIEDBERGER

William Sigismund

*Captain, 5th Battalion attached 3rd Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Killed in action 24th May 1915. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 6 and 8. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN WILLIAM SIGISMUND FRIEDBERGER, Royal Fusiliers, was a partner in his father's firm, J. Friedberger and Co. He commanded a battalion of the Royal Fusiliers in the Boer War, and was mentioned in despatches.

He retired with the rank of Major. On the outbreak of the European War he rejoined his old Regiment with the rank of Captain.

He was killed in action at Hooge on 25 May 1915, in the second Battle of Ypres, while serving with the 3rd Battalion.

His Adjutant wrote to his widow: “He was deeply respected and loved by his company and brother officers. I never met a man who was better fitted to command men, in fact a born soldier."

Another brother officer wrote: "He did quite enough for his country during the South African War without risking his life again . . . He was a keen officer and good comrade; his kindness to me in South Africa and at home I can never forget."

A Colonel under whom he served wrote: "We soldiered in South Africa together and I knew what a good soldier he was... He was most popular with all ranks, both officers and men, and I feel I have lost a friend whom it is impossible to replace."

FRIEND

Philip Emlyn

*Second Lieutenant, Machine Gun Corps. Killed in action 7th July 1916. Son of Mr. and Mrs. Latton Friend; husband of Gertrude A. Francis (formerly Friend), of The White Cottage, Loughton, Essex. Buried in GORDON DUMP CEMETERY, OVILLERS-LA BOISSELLE, Somme, France. Special memorial B. 17. Member of the Exchange. Also listed on the Loughton War memorial, Essex.

Note: There are now 1,676 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in this cemetery. 1,053 of the burials are unidentified but there are special memorials to 34 casualties known or believed to be buried among them.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

SECOND LIEUTENANT PHILIP EMLYN FRIEND, East Lancashire Regiment, was the only surviving son of the late W. Latton Friend, of Beckenham, and Mrs. Friend, of 6, Lexham Gardens.

Before the war he was with his uncle, Dale Womersley, on the Stock Exchange, having become a member in 1904.

He had always been a keen rider and on the outbreak of war enlisted in the 11th Hussars. Shortly after he was transferred to the Royal Scots Greys, with whom he trained at Dunbar. In April 1915 he was gazetted to the 3rd East Lancashire Regiment.

He went out in August to the 2nd Battalion, and served with them till January 1916, when he was transferred to the Machine Gun Corps. He was killed on 7 July 1916.

His Colonel wrote to his widow: “I put special value on his courage and constancy. During the heavy fighting last September, after a great part of the defensive works had been demolished by shell fire, he retained such power of command that his platoon manned what remained of the parapet with great gallantry and opened an effective flank fire which drove back every attempt to counter-attack from that quarter. He was always cheerful, and a great favourite."

A brother officer wrote: “I wish you to know that both the officers and men of this Machine Gun Company feel his loss beyond words. I always thought him a soldier and a gentleman. I never wish to have a finer man under me."

FRYMANN

Gustave Albert

*[Spelt FRYMAN on SDGW] Sergeant 624817, 2nd Battery, Honourable Artillery Company (Artillery Section). Killed in action 4th October 1917. Aged 36. Enlisted London, E.C., resident Wargrave, Berkshire. Son of Henry and Laura Prudence Frymann. Buried in TRACK "X" CEMETERY, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot/Row/Section B. Grave 1. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

SERGEANT GUSTAV ALBERT FRYMANN, Honourable Artillery Company, was born and educated in London. He began his Stock Exchange career with T. J. lye and later joined the firm of Albert A. Bendon and Co., becoming a member in 1912.

On the outbreak of war he made several attempts to join up, but was each time rejected as unfit. He succeeded at last in joining the H.A.C. as a driver. He rose to the rank of sergeant, but refused a commission, though offered it several times.

After three years service at home he went to the front in June 1917, and was killed by a shell on 4 October, during an attack on the Passchendaele Ridge. He was Acting-Sergeant-Major at the time of his death.

His Captain wrote: “He was a splendid soldier and died a noble death. I could tell you countless incidents when he has shown the utmost contempt of danger. I cannot speak too highly of his courage and devotion to duty. He had earned a decoration many times over. He told the men who were dressing his wounds to leave him and attend to the other men who had more chance of life."

FURZE

Frederic (Jun.)

*Captain, 5th (City of London) Battalion (London Rifle Brigade), London Regiment.Killed in action 20th September 1917. Aged 36. Son of Frederic and Helen E. Furze, of 10, Chiswick Place, Eastbourne; husband of Alice Furze (nee Duthie). No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 52 and 54. Clerk at the Exchange. See also Charterhouse School War Memorial

From de Ruvigny's ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-18 Part 3, page 108:

FURZE, FREDERIC, Capt., 2nd battn. (London Rifle Brigade) The London Regt. (T. F.) elder s. of Frederic Furze, of 6, Wetbeck House, London, W., by his wife. Helen, dau. of W. A. Hubbuck; b. Beckenham, co. Kent. 29 April. 1881; educ. Charterhouse obtained a commission in the London Rifle Brigade in Aug. 1914; was Adjutant for two years, and in 1917 appointed Company Commander; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders, and was killed in action at the Menin Road Battle 20 Sept. 1917. Buried at Hubner Farm, between Poelcappelle and St. Julien. His Commanding Officer wrote “His behaviour during the attack was splendid. and it is due to his fine example and great gallantry that the attack was the great success it was. He was shot three times, but still carried on, and was finally killed by a sniper at the final objective. His loss to us is immense be was most popular with all ranks.” He m. at Beckenham. 27 Oct. 1908, Alice Duthie, dau. of J. Trimmer.

GALE

L A C

*Acting Paymaster, Army Pay Department. Clerk at the Exchange.

GANTSMAN

William C

Sergeant 90 later 224201, 5th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers. Passed fit 27th August 1914 and enlisted 29th August 1914, aged 24, in London. A Clerk. Resident 21 Rathcoole Avenuee, Hornsey. Born Hornsey. Suffered a gun shot wound to his left arm 14th November 1916. Silver War Badge Number. Disability VDH Aortic Papers, discharged from service as no longer physically fit 16th August 1917. Son of William Gantsman of 23, Wallace Road, Canonbury, London N. Height 5 feet 4½ inches, weight 130 lbs, girth 32½ inches, complexion healthy, eyes grey, hair brown; Church of England.

GARDOM

John Charles

*Lieutenant,. 12th Battalion attached 1st Battalion, Essex Regiment. Killed in action 6th August 1915. Aged 31. Son of Charles Henry and Annette Emily Gardom, of Longfield Cottage, Tadworth, Surrey. Buried in TWELVE TREE COPSE CEMETERY, Turkey. Commemorated on Special Memorial C. 117. Member of the Exchange.

Note: There are now 3,360 First World War servicemen buried or commemorated in the cemetery. 2,226 of the burials are unidentified but special memorials commemorate many casualties known or believed to be buried among them, including 142 officers and men of the 1st Essex who died on 6th August 1915, and 47 of the 1st/7th Scottish Rifles killed on 28 June.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

LIEUTENANT JOHN CHARLES GARDOM, Essex Regiment, was the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Gardom of Tadworth, Surrey.

He was born in 1884 and educated at Malvern College. After leaving school he joined his father's firm C. H. Gardom and Co., and became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1909.

Lieutenant Gardom was a magnificent skater, and won the gold medal of the National Skating Association in 1911.

On the outbreak of war he joined the Honourable Artillery Company, and went to France with them in September 1914.

He was given his commission in the 12th Battalion Essex Regiment in the following February; he was sent out to join the 1st Battalion of his Regiment at Gallipoli in May, and was killed at Achi Baba on 6th August, 1915.

GARLAND

George [Harry] Charles

*[Listed as Lieutenant in book] Second Lieutenant, 113th Battery, 25th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Died 4th March 1917. Buried in HEILLY STATION CEMETERY, MERICOURT-L'ABBE, Somme, France. Plot IV. Row A. Grave 16. Clerk at the Exchange.

GELIOT

William Henry

*Second Lieutenant, 4th Battalion (Territorial), Lincolnshire Regiment. Killed in action 1st July 1916. Aged 26. Son of William Peter and Florence Louisa Geliot, of 73, York Rd., Holloway, London. Buried in FONCQUEVILLERS MILITARY CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot I. Row G. Grave 1. Clerk at the Exchange.

GIBBS

Walter Leslie

*Acting Paymaster, Army Pay Department. Died of pneumonia 22nd December 1916. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

ACTING PAYMASTER WALTER LESLIE GIBBS, Army Pay Department, son of Clement Gibbs, was born in 1875 and educated privately.

He joined the firm of Beckhusen and Gibbs in 1891, and became a partner and a member of the Stock Exchange in 1899.

Soon after war broke out he was taken seriously ill and forced to take a year's rest.

In September 1915 he was appointed Acting-Paymaster and served in the Pay Office at Preston.

He died of pneumonia on 22 December 1916, and left a widow.

His Commanding Officer spoke of his keenness and loyalty to duty, and a brother officer wrote of his lovable nature which had endeared him to all those under him and to his colleagues who had the privilege of his friendship.

GIBSON

John H

*Private, The Buffs (East Kent Regiment). Clerk at the Exchange.

probably John Henry GIBSON, Private 723472, 24th (County of London) Battalion (The Queen's), London Regiment. Died of wounds 10th June 1917. Aged 36. Born, resident and enlisted Tottenham. Son of John and Eliza Gibson, of 145, Tower Gardens Rd., Tottenham, London. Native of King's Lynn, Norfolk. Formerly 3030, 2nd/5th Battalion, The Buffs (East Kent Regiment). Buried in LIJSSENTHOEK MILITARY CEMETERY, Poperinge, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot XIV. Row G. Grave 2A.

GILES

Geoffrey

*Second Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, Gordon Highlanders. Killed in action 1st July 1916. Aged 28. Son of Urban Phillip and Margaret Giles, of "Hillcrest," Arkley, Barnet. Native of Highbury, London. Buried in GORDON CEMETERY, Mametz, Somme, France. Plot/Row/Section A. Grave 3. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

SECOND LIEUTENANT GEOFFREY GILES, Gordon Highlanders, was born in 1888. He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1911.

He had been a member of the Artists Rifles before the war, and rejoined at the outbreak of war.

Early in 1915 he was given a commission in the 2nd Gordon Highlanders and was wounded in May of that year.

After recovering from his wounds he returned to the Front and was killed on 1 July 1916—the fiercest day in the history of the British army—in the attack on Mametz.

GILMOUR

Alastair Stuart

*Second Lieutenant, 11th Battalion, Princess Louise's (Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders). Killed in action 15th September 1916. Buried in FLATIRON COPSE CEMETERY, MAMETZ, Somme, France. Plot VII. Row H. Grave 10. Clerk at the Exchange.

GILSON

George

*Second Lieutenant, 1st/5th (City of London) Battalion (London Rifle Brigade), London Regiment. Killed in action 1st September 1918. No known grave. Commemorated on VIS-EN-ARTOIS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 10. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

SECOND LIEUTENANT GEORGE GILSON, 2/4th London Regiment, son of Joseph Gilson of Southend-on-Sea, was born in 1880 and educated at Christ's Hospital, where he was a keen Rugby footballer. He was connected for twenty years with the Stock Exchange and became a member in 1904, being a partner in the firm of Isaacs and Bray. An amateur aetor, he was for many years associated with the Southend Operatic and Dramatic Society.

He was twice medically rejected before being passed fit for general service in December 1916. He enlisted in the 3rd Bedfordshire Regiment and trained with them at Felixstowe. Having been made a N.C.O., he was recommended for a commission and sent to the O.T.C. at Oxford. He was gazetted to the London Rifle Brigade in January 1918 and left for France on 2 August, being transferred to the 2/4th London Regiment (Royal Fusiliers).

A month later he was killed at the head of his men, on his first day in action, near Beaucheresnes on the Bapaume-Peronne road.

"Everyone," wrote his Colonel to his widow, "speaks most highly of the gallant way in which he behaved during the attack. His platoon fought splendidly and gained their objective in a brilliant fashion."

GLOVER

Laurence Vivian

*[Also spelt Lawrence, listed as London Regiment in the book] Private S/20294, 10th Battalion, Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own). Died of wounds 21st February 1917. Born Camden Town, Middlesex, enlisted London, resident Westcliff-on-Sea, Essex. Buried in CAMBRAI EAST MILITARY CEMETERY, Nord, France. Commemorated on Special memorial 6. Clerk at the Exchange.

Note: The cemetery now contains 501 Commonwealth burials and commemorations of the First World War. 28 of the graves are unidentified but special memorials are erected to seven soldiers known to be buried among them. Another special memorial commemorates a soldier buried by the Germans in Cauroir Communal Cemetery, whose grave could not be found.

GODFREY

W E

possibly 12347, 2nd Battalion, Grenadier Guards. Awarded the Distinguished Conduct medal (D.C.M.) and Military Medal (M.M.). Citation for 12347 W E Godfrey MM 2nd Batt G.Gds attd 1st Gds Bde (Addleston) London Gazette issue 31052 3rd December 1918 page 11/34. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty as brigade orderly. He continually carried important messages through enemy barrage between brigade HQ and his battalion,and during the day, when his battalion HQ had been moved, he crossed some 500 yards of ground subjected to heavy machine-gun fire to deliver important orders. Throughout the operations he showed splendid courage and rendered valuable service.

GODIN

Ralph Edward

*Private 2681, "A" Company, 13th Battalion, Royal Sussex Regiment. Died of wounds 1st July 1916. Aged 26. Born Loughton, Essex, enlisted St. Paul's Churchyard. Son of Ralph and Florence Godin, of 20, Hurst Rd., Buckhurst Hill, Essex. Buried in CABARET-ROUGE BRITISH CEMETERY, SOUCHEZ, Pas de Calais, France. Plot VII. Row G. Grave 2. Clerk at the Exchange.

GORDON

Harold Eastly

*Second Lieutenant, 5th (City of London) Battalion (London Rifle Brigade), London Regiment attached 16th Battalion, Rifle Brigade. Died of wounds 23rd February 1917. Husband of Gwen Gordon, of Avenue House, North Camp, Aldershot. Buried in LIJSSENTHOEK MILITARY CEMETERY, Poperinge, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot X. Row A. Grave 7. Clerk at the Exchange.

GOSCHEN

Christopher Gerard

*Captain, 4th Battalion, Grenadier Guards attached Special Reserve. Killed in action 25th September 1916. Aged 35. Aged 35. Son of Henry and Augusta E. Goschen, of Knotley Hall, Lyghe, Tonbridge, Kent. Buried in GUARDS' CEMETERY, LESBOEUFS, Somme, France. Plot IX. Row A. Grave 3. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN CHRISTOPHER GERARD GOSCHEN, son of Henry Goschen of Addington, Surrey, was born in 1881 and educated at Eton and Balliol College, Oxford, where he graduated in 1903. He was called to the Bar in 1905, but relinquished his work there after a few years to enter the Stock Exchange, of which he became a Member in the Spring of 191o. He joined the firm of Cohen, Laming, Goschen and Co. in that year and remained with them until the outbreak of war, when he obtained a commission in the Grenadier Guards and went to the Front shortly before Christmas, 1914.

During the months that followed he took part in the fighting at Festubert and Neuve Chapelle and in some of the most arduous operations in the Ypres Salient and elsewhere. Soon after he was promoted to a captaincy in the 4th Battalion.

He was twice wounded. On the second occasion he was so anxious to get back to the Front that he refused the sick leave that was offered to him. He rejoined his Regiment on 24 September 1916 and was killed on the following day while leading his men in a very severe action during the battle of the Somme.

His Commanding Officer wrote: " Chris's loss to the Regiment is indeed a great one. He was loved by his brother officers and esteemed and respected by his men. He has done extremely well and I have rarely seen a man who took hold of the hearts of all with whom he was associated like he did. His place amongst us will not easily be filled."

A brother officer concludes a letter about him by saying " he was one of the best and truest of English gentlemen, was so straight and an example to the younger ones."

GRAHAM

Alexander Cecil

*Captain, 1st Battalion, Grenadier Guards attached Special Reserve. Killed in action 10th September 1916. Aged 36. Son of the late Mr. and Mrs. F. Graham, of 29, Palace Gate, Kensington, London; husband of Ethel Daisy Egerton (formerly Graham), of Hungerford House, nr. Fordingbridge, Hants. Adjutant "Hood" Battalion, Royal Naval Division September 1914 to December 1915. Buried in CITADEL NEW MILITARY CEMETERY, FRICOURT, Somme, France. Plot II. Row A. Grave 11. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN ALEXANDER CECIL GRAHAM, Grenadier Guards (S.R.), was the son of Mr. and Mrs. F. Graham of Palace Gate, and was educated at Eton and Christ Church, Oxford.

During the South African War, he acted first as a War Correspondent and later joined General French's Scouts, being wounded and captured at Lindley. On his return to England he went on the Stock Exchange and, joining the firm of H. K. Paxton, became a member in 1905.

In September 1914, he joined the Naval Division as Sub-Lieutenant in the " Hood " Battalion, and went with them to Antwerp. In October of the same year, he was promoted Lieutenant-Commander, and appointed Adjutant of his Battalion. He went to Gallipoli, where he was wounded on 2 May 1915.

In December Captain Graham received a commission in the Grenadier Guards as Captain, Special Reserve, and proceeded to the front in April. He was killed at Ginchy on 12 September 1916, when commanding his company during the battle of the Somme.

Captain-Graham married in 1904, Dollie, only daughter of the late H. K. Paxton of the Stock Exchange.

GRAHAM

Fenton Weiss

*Lieutenant, 4th Battalion, Durham Light Infantry attached 1st Battalion, King's Own (Yorkshire Light Infantry). Killed in action according to SDGW 4th October 1915 and CWGC 14th October 1915. Buried in CABARET-ROUGE BRITISH CEMETERY, SOUCHEZ, Pas de Calais, France. Plot XXXI. Row H. Grave 42. Clerk at the Exchange.

GRANSEE

Ernest Charles

*Private 230533, 1st/2nd (City of London) Battalion (Royal Fusiliers), London Regiment. Killed in action 16th August 1917. Aged 28. Enlisted Westminster, resident Leyton. Son of Julius Charles Ernest and Hedwig Augusta Louisa Gransee, of 2, The Market, Tadworth, Surrey. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 52. Clerk at the Exchange.

GRAY

Frederick Hodskinson

*Second Lieutenant, Honourable Artillery Company (Territorial Force). Killed in action 1st April 1917. Aged 33. Son of the late Frederick Hodskinson Gray and Elizabeth Noake Gray. Buried in H.A.C. CEMETERY, ECOUST-ST. MEIN, Pas de Calais, France. Plot I. Row A. Grave 16. Clerk at the Exchange.

GREGORY

Victor William

*Private 301591, 1st/5th (City of London) Battalion (London Rifle Brigade), London Regiment. Killed in action 1st July 1916. Aged 19. Enlisted London, resident Tottenham. Son of Thomas and Leonora Gregory. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAl, Somme, France. Pier and Face 9 D. Clerk at the Exchange.

GROGAN, MC

Victor St. Patrick de Lande

*[Listed as Second Lieutenant in book] Lieutenant, York and Lancaster Regiment. Died 13th October 1918. Husband of Mrs Grogan, Midhurst, 48 Northview Drive. Westcliffe, Essex. The 1901 census has the 18 year old Leon Victor Grogan - Stock Exchange Clerk - born Ireland living with his "widowed" mother Bertha De L Grogan (39) born Dover Kent living at 124 Upton Lane West Ham Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). Formerly Sergeant 8564, 28th Battalion, London Regiment. *** Cannot locate a CWGC or SDGW entry for him *** Clerk at the Exchange.

Note: Patrick de Landre-Grogan wrote on the Great War Forum: "The story is, my GGF was Francis St. Patrick Vernon de Landre-Grogan b. 1855 in Bansha Co. Tip.. He was court-marshal in 1908 with a dishonourable discharge. Nothing was heard of him after that. Family rumour has it that he was killed in WW1."

Citation for Leon Victor St Patrick De Lande Grogan Y and L Regt Spec Res attd 1/5th Bn T.F London Gazette issue 31480 29th July 1919 page 55. "On the night of Sept 22/23 1918 near Gaurelle (North of Arras) for conspicuous gallantry and good leadership during a successful minor operation. He led his platoon against an enemy trench and successfully cleared it and carried out consolidation. The following night the enemy counter-attacked in force but were driven off with loss. The success of the operation was greatly due to his able leadership and fine example to his men."

GROOME

Stanley George

*[Listed in book as Private] Corporal 207, 5th (City of London) Battalion (London Rifle Brigade), London Regiment. Died 3rd December 1915. Aged 27. Born and resident Bethnal Green, enlisted London. Son of William and Mary Ann Groome, of 317, Bethnal Green Rd., London. Buried in LIJSSENTHOEK MILITARY CEMETERY, Poperinge, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot II. Row C. Grave 15. Clerk at the Exchange.

From de Ruvigny's ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-18 Part 1, page 164:

GROOME, STANLEY GEORGE, Corpl., No. 207, 5th Battn. (London Rifle Brigade) The London Regt. (T.F.), 2nd s. of William Groome, of 317, Bethnal Green Road, E., Boot and Shoe Manufacturer, by his Wife, Mary Ann, dau. of George William Wilcox; b. London, 10 Feb. 1888; educ. Sir John Cass Foundation School, Minories; was on the Stock Exchange, but on the outbreak of war threw up his position and enlisted in the London Rifle Brigade, 31 Aug. 1914. He went to France on 13 Jan. 1915, and during the spring and summer of 1915 was with his company in the trenches at Plugsteert, St. Eloi, Ypres and Poperinghe. In the autumn of the same year he worked on the lines of communication and it was on returning to the trenches for the first time that he was accidentally shot at Poperinghe, 3 Dec. 1915. He was buried in the soldiers’ cemetery close to the main line between Hazebrouck and Poperinghe. An iron cross sent out from England, subscribed for by the men of his old platoon, and engraved “In memory of a good comrade,” marks the spot. Capt. C. W. Trevelyan, London Rifle Brigade, wrote: “I visited the grave, and when Sergt. Ford came back from leave he took out and placed on the grave a very nice iron cross as a small tribute of affection from some of the members of No. 4 Platoon. We all felt that we had lost one of our best and most trusted friends.” Groome was a good athlete, and was a member of the Leytonstone Rugby and the Albion Rowing Clubs. He was a great lover of Nature and all Nature’s gifts.

GROVER

Percy

*Corporal 2701, "D" Company, 1st/5th (City of London) Battalion (London Rifle Brigade), London Regiment. Killed in action 9th October 1916. Aged 21. Born Croydon, enlisted London, resident East Croydon. Son of Henry James and Laura Grover. buried in CATERPILLAR VALLEY CEMETERY, LONGUEVAL, Somme, France. Plot VI. Row C. Grave 4. Clerk at the Exchange.

GROVES

Leonard Alloway

*Lieutenant, 11th Battalion, Royal Sussex Regiment. Killed in action 3rd September 1915. Buried in SERRE ROAD CEMETERY No. 2, Somme, France. Plot XI. Row G. Grave 1. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

LIEUTENANT LEONARD ALLOWAY GROVES, Royal Sussex Regiment, was the son of Aubrey Groves of Ramsgate, and was born in 1878. He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1904, trading under his own name.

On the outbreak of war he joined the Inns of Court O.T.C. and eventually received his commission in the 11th Battalion Royal Sussex Regiment.

He went to France early in 1916 and was killed while leading his men to the attack on Beaumont Hamel on September 3rd. For a long time he was reported as missing, but it was finally ascertained that he was killed instantly.

HALE

William Webb

*Lieutenant, 2nd/6th Battalion, East Surrey Regiment attached to Royal Defence Corps. Died 12th April 1917. Aged 49. Son of Charles George and Mary Anne Hale (nee Webb); husband of Emily Hale (nee Rawlings), of Cranbourne, Cobham. Buried in COBHAM CEMETERY, ESHER, Surrey. Grave 357. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

LIEUTENANT WILLIAM WEBB HALE, Royal Defence Corps, was the youngest son of Charles George Hale of the Stock Exchange. He was born in 1868 and became a member of the Stock Exchange at the age of twenty-seven, but his activities were by no means confined to the House, for he devoted much of his time to the public affairs of the City of London. He was a Liveryman of the Armourers' and Braziers' Company and represented Broad Street Ward in the Court of Common Council. He took a keen interest, too, in the Orphan School, and at the outbreak of war was Chairman of the Committee. His residence was in Surrey, and he was for many years an enthusiastic member of the West Surrey Beagles, being for a time joint Master.

In November 1914 he joined the Surrey National Reserve, which was later attached to the 2/6th East Surrey Regiment and afterwards became the 61st Company of the Royal Defence Corps. During 1914-15 his Company was stationed in the "Royal Edward" off Southend, guarding German prisoners, until transferred to Dover for guard duty.

While at Dover he fell a victim to influenza, and cerebral haemorrhage intervening he died in April 1917, in his fiftieth year.

Lieut. Hale left a widow.

HALL

Bernard William [Hardy]

*[Listed as Trooper in book] Private D/9943, 6th Dragoons (Inniskilling). Died of wounds 19th June 1918. Born Forest Hill, Kent, enlisted St. Paul's Churchyard, resident Norbury, London S.W. Buried in MONTIGNY COMMUNAL CEMETERY, Somme, France. Clerk at the Exchange.

HALL

Geoffrey Evans

*Second Lieutenant, 1st Battalion attached 9th Battalion, Norfolk Regiment. Killed in action 25th April 1917. Aged 36. Son of Frederic Evans Hall and Helen Elizabeth Hall, of Cumberland Cottage, Redbourn, Herts. Buried in MAROC BRITISH CEMETERY, GRENAY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot II. Row P. Grave 11. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

SECOND LIEUTENANT GEOFFREY EVANS HALL, 1st Battalion, the Norfolk Regiment, was the eldest son of Frederick Evans Hall of Redbourn, Hertfordshire, and was born in 1880. He was educated at Temple Grove, East Sheen, at Winchester, where he distinguished himself at football, and at New College, Oxford, graduating in 1902. He became a member in 1907, and joined his father's firm, Bragg, Stockdale, Hall and Co.

Immediately on the outbreak of war he joined the Public Schools Battalion of the Royal Fusiliers, and went to France with this battalion in November 1915. Four months later he was gazetted to the Norfolk Regiment, and in July 1916, the first month of the Somme Battle, was severely wounded and sent home. He returned to the Front in April 1917, attached to the 10th Norfolks, and on the 26th of the same month was killed by a shell while taking his platoon into the trenches.

Two days earlier his name had been brought to the notice of his Commanding Officer in the following report from his Company Commander : "2nd Lieutenant Hall has been very good both nights, having been in the front line during the whole of the strafe (which was very heavy), going from post to post talking to and encouraging the men."

His Commanding Officer wrote of him: "Although he had only recently been posted to this battalion, he had already proved what a fine, brave and capable soldier he was. His Company Commander had implicit confidence in him and had mentioned to me that he wished him to undertake the duties of 2nd in command."

HALL

Norman de Haviland

*Second Lieutenant, 1st Battalion, Suffolk Regiment. Died of wounds 7th October 1916. Aged 28. Son of Francis de Havilland Hall and Amy Margaret Hall, of 57, Waldegrave Park, Twickenham, Middx. Buried in SALONIKA (LEMBET ROAD) MILITARY CEMETERY, Greece. Section O. Grave 18. Clerk at the Exchange.

From de Ruvigny's ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-18 Part 3, page 125:

HALL, NORMAN DE HAVILLAND, 2nd Lieut., 1st Battn. (12th Foot) The Suffolk Regt., yr. s. of Dr. Francis de Havilland Hall, of 47, Wimpole Street, Landon, W., M.D., Consulting Physician, by his wife, Amy Margaret, dau. of Arley Smith; b. 47, Wimpole Street, London, W., 17 Nov. 1887; educ. Castlemount, Dover; Tonbridge School, and Ecole de Commerce, Neuchûtel, Switzer-bad; was employed with Messrs. Vivian, Gray & Co., of the Stock Exchange; volunteered for foreign service, and joined the Artists' Rifles in Aug. 1914, after the outbreak of war; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from Jan. to Oct. 1915; obtained a commission in the 1st Suffolk Regt in Oct. 1915; served in Salonika, and died in hospital there 7 Oct. 1918, from wounds received in action on the Bulgarian front on the 3rd. Buried in Salonika Cemetery. His Company Commander wrote: “His platoon, No. 4, was in the front line, and he advanced in the most gallant fashion for one and a half kilometres. I then went and gave him his orders to take up a position and consolidate it, our objective having been reached. He had been previously knocked over by a high explosive, but was all right. I left him in the best of spirits, digging in, but soon after this he was hit by a piece of shrapnel. . . . He has been a great loss to us, as he was always so cheerful In the hardest of times, and always doing things for others.” Unm.

HALLETT

Walter

*Private 353281, 7th (City of London) Battalion, London Regiment. Killed in action 26th March 1917. Born Southwark, enlisted Camberwell, resident Brixton. Buried in CHESTER FARM CEMETERY, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot III. Row D. Grave 7. Clerk at the Exchange.

HAMBRO

Bertram E

*Lieutenant. he died at Buenos Aires in April 1915. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

LIEUTENANT BERTRAM EMIL HAMBRO, was born in 1880 and educated at Eton. On leaving school he travelled and worked as a sheep-rancher in Australia and visited Africa and South America. He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1913 and joined the firm of Milton, Gibbes, and Smith.

In September 1914 he was given his commission as Lieutenant Interpreter and was sent at once to France, where he was attached to "A" Battery, R.H.A., with the 1st Indian Cavalry Division. He was never very strong, and the severity of the winter undermined his health and compelled him to resign his commission in February. He went on a voyage to the Argentine in the hope that it would benefit him, but he died at Buenos Aires in April.

Lieutenant Hambro was a man of peculiar charm of character, and devoted many hours of a busy life to philanthropic work. He married in 1912, Marjorie, daughter of the late Sir Nevile Lubbock, and left two daughters.

HAMPTON

John Latham

*Lance Corporal 199, 5th (City of London) Battalion (London Rifle Brigade), London Regiment. Killed in action 3rd May 1915. Aged 38. Born Brixton, enlisted London, resident Ewell. Brother of Mr. G. C. Hampton, of "Firs," College Rd., Epsom, Surrey. Served in the South African Campaign. No known grave. Coimmemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen. Belgium. Panel 52 and 54. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

LANCE-CORPORAL JOHN LATHAM HAMPTON, London Rifle Brigade, was the son of C. A. Hampton of Ewell, Surrey, and was born in 1877.

He was educated at Whitgift Grammar School, played cricket and football for his school, was prominent in boxing and athletics, and was a member of the Shooting Eight which won the Ashburton Shield at Bisley.

On leaving school he entered the office of Le Blanc Smith and Co., becoming a member of the Stock Exchange in 1901 and a partner in this firm in 1904. In 1912 he joined Durham Stokes and Co. in partnership.

Meanwhile, on the outbreak of the South African War, he had volunteered for service, and during the early months of 1900 fought with the C.I.V.'s until invalided home with enteric.

On the outbreak of war he offered his services to the London Rifle Brigade and, after being rejected once on account of his age, he was accepted in October and soon after left for France.

After serving all through the winter he was killed by a sniper on 3 May 1915, when just about to receive a commission in the East Surrey Regiment.

His Company Commander wrote: "There is no one whom we shall miss more than your son. The men have been absolutely magnificent all through, and it is to your son and B____ that I have put down the credit of most of it. They have always been so cheery and full of confidence, that they have infected the younger and less experienced men round them with something of their own spirit."

HARDING

Arthur William

*Private 3049, 1st/23rd (County of London) Battalion, London Regiment. Killed in action 26th May 1915. Aged 23. Enlisted Clapham Junction, resident Ilford. Son of John Henry and Jennie Sarah Harding, of 14, Cleveland Rd., Ilford, Essex. No known grave. Commemorated on LE TOURET MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panels 45 & 46. Clerk at the Exchange.

HARDING

Reginald William Fowler

*Captain, 18th (County of London) Battalion (London Irish Rifles), London Regiment. Killed in action 7th November 1917. Aged 30. Son of Richmond and Alice Harding, of "Cranmore," Osterley Rd., Isleworth, Middx.; husband of Agnes Dorothea Norman (formerly Harding), of Johannesburg, South Africa. No known grave. Commemorated on JERUSALEM MEMORIAL, Israel. Panel 51. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN REGINALD WILLIAM FOWLER HARDING, London Regiment, was the third son of Mr. and Mrs. Richmond Harding of Cranmore, Isleworth. He was born in 1887 and educated at St. Paul's, where he developed a very great athletic ability. He represented his school at Cricket and Football and was the champion Fives player.

In 1910 he became a member of the Stock Exchange. It was then that he became a first class Lawn Tennis player. He was the champion of the Chiswick Park Lawn Tennis Club and played in many open tournaments. In 1914 he was playing splendidly and reached the final for the Plate at Wimbledon.

He was given a commission in the 18th Battalion, London Regiment (London Irish Rifles) in August 1914, and was promoted to Captain in the May of the next year.

With the famous both Division he saw active service in France, Salonica, Egypt and Palestine, and was mentioned in despatches.

He was mortally wounded at Tel el Sheria on the morning of 7 November 1917.

His General wrote: "I knew him very well as, shortly before these operations commenced, his company won the prize for the smartest company in the Division. He was the very best type of a fearless and true leader."

His Colonel wrote: "He had done so splendidly all through the fighting and led his men in the assault with such gallantry and dash that, had he lived, I should certainly have recommended him for the Military Cross."

HARPER

Evelyn

*[Listed in book as Lance Corporal] Private 492503, 28th Battalion, London Regiment (Artists' Rifles) attached to 13th (County of London) Battalion (Princess Louise's Kensington Battalion), London Regiment. Died of wounds 28th Decmeber 1917. Enlisted London, resident Woodford Green. Son of the late Augustus Harper and of Augustine Harper, of "Ridgeway," Kings Rd., Westcliff-on-sea. Born at Woodford Green, Essex. Buried in CAIRO WAR MEMORIAL CEMETERY, Egypt. Section O. Grave 88. Formerly 3132, 12th Battalion, London Regiment. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

LANCE-CORPORAL EVELYN HARPER, 2/13th London Regiment, was born at Woodford, Essex, and educated at Bancroft's School, Woodford Wells. He lived all his life in Woodford, where he was well-known and very popular. In 1904 he became a member of the Stock Exchange.

He joined the Artists' Rifles in August 1914, and was afterwards attached to the "Kensingtons," going with them, in the famous 60th Division, first to France, then to Macedonia, and finally to Palestine.

In a dawn attack on the Turks on 7 December 1917, he was wounded and lay for half a day on the ground half frozen before he was picked up and taken by slow stages back to Cairo. Here he died on 28 December.

Writing just before his last action an old schoolfellow of his said: - "All the boys speak well of Harper, of his coolness and unselfishness; if he expects dirty work, he leads the way himself rather than run others into danger."

HARRIS

Ernest Edward

*[Listed as Lieutenant in book] Second Lieutenant, 6th Battalion attached 1st Battalion, Princess Victoria's (Royal Irish Fusiliers). Died 21st April 1917. Aged 39. Son of the Rev. Frederic William and Charlotte Harris, of 22, Carlton Rd., Putney, London. A Signal Instructor in Dublin in 1916-17; partner of Messrs. Harris and Co., Stockbrokers, 21, Birchin Lane, London, E.C. Native of Burton Latimer, Northants. Buried in COLOGNE SOUTHERN CEMETERY, Koln (Cologne), Nordrhein-Westfal, Germany. Plot VIII. Row G. Grave 17. Member of the Exchange.

From de Ruvigny's ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-18 Part 3, page 130:

HARRIS, ERNEST EDWARD, 2nd Lieut., 6th (Service) Battn. Princess Victoria's (Royal Irish Fusiliers), s. of the Rev. Frederic William Harris, of 22, Carlton Road, Putney, London, S.W., Clerk in Holy Orders, by his wife, Charlotte, dau. of Alfred Malim; and brother to Capt. H. A. Harris (q.r.); b. Burton Latimer, co. Northampton, 9 Oct. 1877; educ. Bedford Grammar School; was a partner in the firm of Harris & Co., Stockbrokers; served for seven years in the Middlesex Mounted Infantry; joined the O.T.C. in Sept. 1915: obtained a commission 8 Oct. 1915: underwent a course of signalling instruction, when he gained a First Class Certificate; was appointed Signalling Instructor to the 4th Battn. Royal Irish Fusiliers, stationed at Dublin; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from 7 March, 1917; was wounded and taken prisoner at Roeux 11 April following, and died in a German hospital at Julich on the 21st. Buried in the Julich Cemetery. One of hie men wrote : "On 11 April, 1917. at Roeux, at 12 noon, we made an attack, and 15 of us got to the German front line and had to retire quickly. Second Lieut. E. E. Harris was iii the. German trench attending to a brother officer who was wounded. He told us to go back, but refused to return with us. I saw the Germans going up to the trench, but nothing of Lieut. Harris after we left him, which would be about 1 p.m." Unm.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

LIEUTENANT ERNEST EDWARD HARRIS, Royal Irish Fusiliers, was the third son of the Rev. and Mrs. Frederic William Harris, having been born at Burton Latimer, Northants, in 1877.

Educated at the Bedford School, he left at the age of seventeen to enter a stockbroker's office. He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1900, and later a partner in the firm of Harris and Co., of 21 Birchin Lane.

As soon as war was declared, he offered his services as a special constable and acted in that capacity until September 1915, when he joined an Officers' Training Corps. On obtaining his commission in the following month in the 6th Royal Irish Fusiliers, he was sent to Belfast for further training.

Later he took a course of signalling and obtained a first-class certificate. He was appointed a Signalling Instructor at Dublin, remaining there until March 1917, when he proceeded to France to join the 1st Battalion of his Regiment.

On 11 April he went into action at Roeux, and when his company retreated he remained behind to attend to a wounded brother officer. In doing this he was severely wounded and taken prisoner.

He was conveyed to Zulich Hospital, where he died of septic poisoning on 21 April.

He was beloved and respected by all who knew him, being to many a generous and kind friend.

HARRIS

J

No further information currently available

HARTIN

Leonard G

*[Listed as Private in book] Rifleman Z/2698, 2nd Battalion, Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own). Killed in action 9th May 1915. Aged 22. Born Stoke Newington, Middlesex, enlisted Lambeth, Surrey, resident Seven Kings, Essex. Son of Walter and Susannah Hartin, of "Lenauber," Holland Rd., Little Holland, Essex. no known grave. Commemorated on PLOEGSTEERT MEMORIAL, Comines-Warneton, Hainaut, Belgium. Panel 10. Clerk at the Exchange.

HARTLEY

Frederick Lynn

*Second Lieutenant, 3rd Battalion attached 1st Battalion, East Surrey Regiment. Killed in action 23rd August 1918. Buried in ADANAC MILITARY CEMETERY, MIRAUMONT, Somme, France. lot IV. Row F. Grave 19. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

SECOND LIEUTENANT FREDERICK LYNN HARTLEY, East Surrey Regiment, was the son of Mrs. Hartley of Hampstead and a godson of the late Mrs. Lynn Linton. Born in 1885, he was educated at Merchant Taylors' School, where he distinguished himself in mathematics and won his football colours. He went on the Stock Exchange in 1903 and became a member in 1909.

He enlisted in September 1914, in the 19th (St. Pancras) Battalion, London Regiment, and declined a commission when it was offered him, on the plea that he had no experience and preferred to serve with the men. He was promoted Sergeant: before his battalion left England, first for France, early in 1916, and later for the Balkans.

In 1917 he came home to take a commission, and after a period with an O.T.C. at Berkhamsted, was gazetted in December to the 1st Battalion, Queen's (Royal West Surrey) Regiment. He served in France with that Regiment and was then transferred to the 3rd East Surreys.

It was at the end of the three days' battle for Bapaume, on 23 August 1918, that he was killed, leading his men on their final objective. "He had established a magnificent reputation," wrote his Colonel, "as a first-rate leader of men, and always showed the greatest cheerfulness under the most trying conditions." A brother-officer in the Queen's wrote: "No man could have wished for a more loyal and cheerful comrade. His courage and devotion to duty were proverbial, and he was loved by both officers and men, and none were more sorry to hear the news than the latter."

Lieutenant Hartley married in June 1916, the younger daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Daffam of Valewood, Haslemere.

HARVEY

Albert Leonard

*[Listed as Corporal in book] Sergeant S4/197461, G.H.Q., 3rd Echelon, Prisoner of War Section, Royal Army Service Corps. Died 18th October 1918. Born Hoxton, Milldesex, enlisted London, resident Hornsey, London N. Buried in STE. MARIE CEMETERY, LE HAVRE, Seine-Maritime, France. Division 62. Plot V. Row K. Grave 4. Clerk at the Exchange.

HEDDERWICK

Ronald Young

*Private 1113, Honourable Artillery Company (Infantry). Killed in action 16th May 1915. Aged 27. Born and resident Eltham, enlisted Armoury House. Son of Robert Munter Hedderwick and Isabel Corbet Hedderwick, of Woodlands, Chislehurst, Kent. Buried in VOORMEZEELE ENCLOSURE No. 3, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot XIV. Row H. Grave 5. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

PRIVATE RONALD YOUNG HEDDERWICK, Honourable Artillery Company, was the son of Robert Hunter Hedderwick of the Stock Exchange. He was born in 1888, and educated at Haileybury College and London University. He played for his school at cricket and was a keen Rugby half-back.

A member of the Blackheath Amateur Dramatic Society he wrote several plays in which he himself took part.

He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1914.

On the outbreak of war he joined the H.A.C. and went to France with them in November 1914.

He was killed 16 May 1915, the day before he was to have gone back to be trained for his commission.

Through getting up concerts and entertainments in which he himself took a leading part, "Bunny," as he was called, was well known in his own and other Regiments. His genial and cheerful disposition made him a very general favourite.

His platoon officer wrote: “Every man in the Regiment knew him, and those who were privileged to come directly in touch with him loved him."

One of his comrades wrote: "Popular and admired more than any man in the Regiment; it was the privilege of his chosen friend to understand his heroism and unselfishness. We have lost one of the most lovable and unselfish men in the world. I shall never forget how in the winter's appalling times it was always he who volunteered to lead parties to the trenches."

HEMMANS

William John Weatherall

*Private STK/114, 10th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Died of wounds 5th May 1916. Born Tunbridge Wells, enlisted London, resident Croydon. Son of Ethel Phillis and the late Capt. S. E. W. Hemmans (Royal Marine Light Inf.), of Croydon, Surrey. Buried in DOULLENS COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION No. 1, Somme, France. Plot I. Row D. Grave 3.Clerk at the Exchange.

HEMSLEY

Franklyn Thomas

*[Listed in book as Lance Corporal] Corporal 50216, 7th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Killed in action 27th March 1918. Born Wandsworth, enlisted Lewisham, resident Sydenham. Formerly STRS/2646, 31st (R.) Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). No known grave. Commemorated on ARRAS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Bay 3. Clerk at the Exchange.

HERBAGE

Sydney Harold Wilfred

*Private 9648, 5th (City of London) Battalion (London Rifle Brigade), London Regiment. Killed in action 20th January 1915. Aged 18. Born Sidcup, enlisted Surbiton. Son of Sidney Frank and Clara Mary Herbage, of "Clattern Elms", 12, St. James Rd., Kingston-on-Thames. Buried in LONDON RIFLE BRIGADE CEMETERY, Comines-Warneton, Hainaut, Belgium. Plot III. Row A. Grave 4. Clerk at the Exchange.

HERBERT

Robert Bingley

*Captain, Territorial, Royal Engineers. Killed in action 30th September 1915. Aged 32. Son of Edward and Helen Frances Mather Herbert, of Croydon, Surrey; husband of Margery Herbert, of 36, Beechwood Rd., Sanderstead, Surrey. A Member of the Stock Exchange, London, and Partner in the Firm of Messrs. G. S. Herbert & Sons. Buried in MAROC BRITISH CEMETERY, GRENAY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot III. Row B. Grave 13. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN ROBERT BINGLEY HERBERT, London Regiment, was the fourth son of Edward Herbert, a member of the Stock Exchange.

Born at Croydon in 1882, he was educated at Bradfield College. He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1907, and joined the firm founded by his grandfather, G. S. Herbert and Sons.

For some years before the war he had held a commission in the 13th London Regiment (Kensingtons). He had specialized in signalling, and soon after the outbreak of war was seconded to the Royal Engineers, and placed in command of a section of the 47th Divisional Signal Company.

He was killed at the battle of Loos on 30 September 1915.

His Divisional General wrote: "He has proved himself throughout regardless of danger and only anxious to perform his duties to the utmost of his power. He was certain, had he lived, of advancement and distinction."

His Brigadier wrote: “He gained the devotion of his men as well as the love and admiration of his colleagues. We shall always think of him as a fine type of British officer."

The men of his section have placed an In Memoriam notice in the "Times" every year on the anniversary of his death in these terms: "In loyal and loving memory of our gallant officer, Captain R. B. Herbert. His Boys."

Captain Herbert married in 1913 Margery, daughter of Richard Joseph Grant of Croydon, and left two children, a girl and a boy.

HICHENS

James Bryan

*Lieutenant, 16th Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Killed in action 16th July 1916. Aged 43. Son of the late John Knill Jope Hichens and Mary Helen Hichens. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 13 A and 13 B. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

LIEUTENANT JAMES BYRN HICHENS, 6th Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps, was the son of the late J. K. J. Hichens of Sunninghill, a former chairman of the Stock Exchange Committee. While at Winchester he lost the sight of one eye playing football. He went to Magdalen College, Oxford, in 1891, took a First in Moderations and a Second in "Greats" and graduated in 1895. He became a member in 1900 and joined his father's firm (Hichens, Harrison and Co.).

He always took a keen and active interest in local affairs and in 1900 helped to found the Sunninghill Church Lads' Brigade, to which he never ceased to devote a good deal of his time, becoming Captain of the company. Though over forty-one when war was declared, he at once offered himself for the Army. He was three times rejected but persisted in his efforts, until he at length obtained his commission in a K.R.R. Battalion that was mainly recruited from the Church Lads' Brigade.

In the autumn of 1915 he went to France. He took part in various engagements before the Battle of the Somme opened, and was injured in a German gas attack. Speedily recovering, he rejoined his Battalion. He was killed in action near High Wood on 15 July 1916. Earlier in the day he had been wounded but refused to retire and went on with his men.

“He was one of the pluckiest of men I ever met," wrote his Major, "and was most popular with both officers and men."

HICKMAN

Arthur Kendrick

*[Listed on SDGW as Welsh Regiment] Lieutenant, 3rd Battalion attached 8th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Killed in acrion 5th April 1916. Aged 23. Son of Arthur and Mary Hickman, of "L'Ancresse", Egmont Rd., Sutton, Surrey. No known grave. Commemorated on BASRA MEMORIAL, Iraq. Panel 15. Clerk at the Exchange.

HIGGS

William Frederick John

*[Listed as F HIGGS and Private in book] Rifleman R/22879, 2nd Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Killed in action 27th September 1916. Born Hackney, Middlesex, enlisted Leyton, Essex. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 13 A and 13 B. Clerk at the Exchange.

HILDER

Harold Salton

*Second Lieutenant, 7th Battalion, The Buffs (East Kent Regiment). Killed in action 3rd May 1917. Aged 31. Son of George and Harriett Ellen Hilder, of Rolvenden, Kent. No known grave. Commemorated on ARRAS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Bay 2. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

SECOND LIEUTENANT HAROLD SALTON HILDER, The Buffs, was born in 1885 and educated at Ardingly and King's College, Cambridge. He represented his school at cricket.

He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1914.

On the outbreak of war he joined the 10th Battalion of the Royal Fusiliers and afterwards was given his commission in the 7th Battalion, East Kent Regiment (The Buffs).

He was reported wounded and missing at Cherisy on 3 May 1917, and it is presumed he was killed on that day.

HOARE

Wilfrid Gurney

*Captain, 3rd Battalion, Durham Light Infantry attached 2nd Battalion, Wiltshire Regiment. Killed in action 10th March 1915. Aged 39. Brother of Basil Hoare, of Sutton Veny, Wilts. No known grave. Commemorated on LE TOURET MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 35. Clerk at the Exchange.

HOARE, DSO

Walter John Gerald

*Captain, 11th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Killed in action 25th October 1916. Husband of Alix V. C. Hoare, of 33, Belgrave Square, London, S.W.1. Awarded the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.). Buried in COURCELETTE BRITISH CEMETERY, Somme, France. Plot I. Row C. Grave 16. Member of the Exchange.

From the VC and DSO Book Volume III

HOARE, W.J.G. (D.S.O. L.G. 20.10.16). T/Capt., 11th Battn. R.Fusiliers. His D.S.O. was awarded for gallantry on 18.7.16, south of Trônes Wood. He was killed in action on 25.10.16.

London Gazette 20 Oct. 1916.-"War Office, 20 Oct 1916. His Majesty the king has been graciously pleased to approve of the undermentioned Officers to be Companions of the Distinguished Service Order, in recognition of their gallantry and devotion to duty in the field."

HOARE, WALTER JOHN GERALD, Temporary Capt., Royal Fusiliers. For conspicuous gallantry during operations. Wiht two serjants, one of whom was wounded by the intense shell-fire, he dug out a buried serjeant and rescued him alive. He has done fine work throughout the operations.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN WALTER JOHN GERALD HOARE, D.S.O., Royal Fusiliers, was the only son of the late Rev. John Hoare, Vicar of St. John's, Keswick. He was educated privately.

He joined his uncle's firm, Hichens, Harrison and Co., and became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1912.

Soon after the outbreak of war he obtained a commission in the Royal Fusiliers, and went to the front in July 1915 as a Captain.

Captain Hoare had a distinguished military record. He was three times mentioned in despatches, and was awarded the D.S.O. for conspicuous gallantry when “with two sergeants, one of whom was wounded by the intense shell-fire, he dug out a buried sergeant and rescued him alive. He has done fine work throughout the operations."

He was killed on 25 October 1916.

A brother officer wrote: “There never could be a man more respected and loved in the Regiment. He was the soul of kindness to the subalterns; we should never want to be under anyone else."

Captain Hoare married in 1915 Alix, daughter of Maurice Ruffer, by whom he had one son.

HORNBY

Richard Arthur

Captain, 21st Battalion, Duke of Cambridge's Own (Middlesex Regiment). Killed in action 9th April 1918. No known grave. Commemorated on PLOEGSTEERT MEMORIAL, Comines-Warneton, Hainaut, Belgium. Panel 8.

HOSE

Robert Henry

*[Listed as Lieutenant in book] Second Lieutenant, 5th Battalion (Territorial), Bedfordshire Regiment. Killed in action 18th March 1917. Aged 29. Son of Robert John and Victoria Rosina Hose; husband of G. F. Nicholls (formelly Hose), of 18, Severn Rd., Weston-super-Mare. Buried in AGNY MILITARY CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Section G. Grave 9. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

LIEUTENANT ROBERT HENRY HOSE, Bedfordshire Regiment, was the son of Robert John Hose of Bromley, Kent, and was born in 1887.

He was educated at Forest School.

On leaving school he joined the firm of John Gibbs, Son and Smith, and became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1910.

Early in 1915 Lieutenant Hose joined the Royal Naval Anti-Aircraft Corps as a despatch-rider. In October he transferred to the 3/5 Bedfordshire Regiment in which he was given a commission. He was appointed Adjutant in the following March.

He remained with this battalion, which was on East Coast Defence duty, till January 1917, when he volunteered for foreign service and joined the 2nd Battalion in France in the following month.

Lieutenant Hose was killed at Arras on 18 March 1917. He left a widow and one son.

HOSKINS

George C

probably George Chandos HOSKINS, Second Lieutenant, 2nd Squadron, 1st Wing, Royal Flying Corps and General List. Killed in action 11th March 1917. Aged 24. Son of George T. and Fanny I. Hoskins, of 11, Wellfield Avenue, Muswell Hill, London. Born at Winchmore Hill, London. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). Buried in VERMELLES BRITISH CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot V. Row A. Grave 25.

HOW

Aubrey Finch

*Private 35797, 11th Battalion, Essex Regiment. Died of wounds 29th May 1918. Aged 34. Born Snarebrook, Essex, enlisted and resident Ilford, Essex. Son of Joseph William and Ruth Beatrice How, of Snaresbrook, Essex; husband of Edith How, of 27, Hickling Rd., Ilford Lane, Ilford, Essex. Buried in ESQUELBECQ MILITARY CEMETERY, Nord, France. Plot I. Row E. Grave 14. Clerk at the Exchange.

HOWCROFT

Laurence Walter

*[Listed as Second Lieutenant in book] Temporary Lieutenant, 1st/2nd Battalion, Hampshire Regiment. Killed in action 20th November 1917. Aged 24. Son of the late Fred and Mary Howcroft, of Catford, London. Buried in FLESQUIERES HILL BRITISH CEMETERY, Nord, France. Plot IV. Row A. Grave 17. Clerk at the Exchange.

HUBBARD

J H

No further information currently available

HUGHES

Lestocq

*Second Lieutenant, 5th Battalion attached 12th Battalion, Duke of Cambridge's Own (Middlesex Regiment). Killed in action 26th September 1916. Aged 26. Youngest son of Mary E. Hughes, of "Foundry", Linden Avenue, Maidenhead, and the late Charles H. Hughes, C.A. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 12 D and 13 B. Clerk at the Exchange.

HUGHES

Stanley Beavan

*Sergeant STK/125, 10th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Killed in action 15th July 1916. Aged 40. Born Hackney, enlisted London, resident Clapham. Son of Annie Marie Hughes, of 5, Braxted Park, Streatham Common, London, and the late Charles Hughes. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 8 C 9 A and 16 A. Clerk at the Exchange.

HUMMERSTONE

Lawrence George

Lieutenant, 5th (City of London) Battalion (London Rifle Brigade), London Regiment attached 12th Squadron, Royal Air Force. Killed in action 21st August 1918. Buried in BAC-DU-SUD BRITISH CEMETERY, BAILLEULVAL, Pas de Calais, France. Plot III. Row A. Grave 19.

HUNTLEY

Edward

*[Listed in book as Private] Lance Corporal 225, 23rd Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Killed in action 27th July 1916. Aged 38. Born Jarrow-on-Tyne, enlisted London, resident Harrow. Son of R. E. Huntley, M.D., JP., and Mary Huntley. Buried in QUARRY CEMETERY, MONTAUBAN, Somme, France. Commemorated on a Special Memorial. Clerk at the Exchange.

Note: Quarry Cemetery now contains 740 Commonwealth burials and commemorations of the First World War. 157 of the burials are unidentified but there are special memorials to seven casualties known or believed to be buried among them. Other special memorials commemorate 19 soldiers buried in Quarry Scottish Cemetery, Green Dump Cemetery and Caterpillar Wood Cemetery No. 2, whose graves could not be found on concentration.

HURLSTONE

John Richards

*Corporal 21123, 5th Battalion, Wiltshire Regiment. Died 16th January 1917. Aged 28. Son of William and Elizabeth Hurlstone, of 48, Sherrard Rd., Forest Gate, Essex. Native of Warminster, Wilts. Buried in AMARA WAR CEMETERY, Iraq. Plot XVII. Row A. Grave 7. Clerk at the Exchange.

HYSLOP, MC, MM

James

*Lieutenant, 14th (County of London) Battalion (London Scottish), London Regiment. Killed in action 5th November 1918. Aged 32. Son of John and Grace Hyslop, of 99, Rosebery Rd., Muswell Hill, London. Brother of Thomas (below). Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.) and Military Medal (M.M.). Buried in VALENCIENNES (ST. ROCH) COMMUNAL CEMETERY, Nord, France. Plot III. Row A. Grave 18. Clerk at the Exchange.

HYSLOP, MC

Thomas [Anderson]

*[Listed as Lieutenant in book] Second Lieutenant, 10th Battalion attached 4th Battalion, Alexandra, Princess of Wales's Own (Yorkshire Regiment). Killed in action 22nd March 1918. Aged 29. Son of John and Grace Hyslop, of 99, Rosebery Rd., Muswell Hill, London. Brother of James (above). Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). No known grave. Commemorated on POZIERES MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Panel 31 and 32. Clerk at the Exchange.

INGRAM

Arthur Herbert

*Lieutenant, 8th Battalion, Gloucestershire Regiment. Killed in action 6th September 1918. Aged 41. Husband of the late Dorothy Annette Ingram. No known grave. Commemmorated on LOOS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 60 to 64. Clerk at the Exchange.

INMAN

Leslie Yardley

*Second Lieutenant, 3rd Battalion, Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment) attached Wiltshire Regiment. Died of wounds 6th April 1916. Aged 27. Son of George Talfourd Inman and Amy Hope Inman, of 1, The Close, Hatfield, Herts. No known grave. Commemorated on BASRA MEMORIAL, Iraq. Panel 6. Member of the Exchange. See also Lord's Cricket Members War memorial

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

SECOND LIEUTENANT LESLIE YARDLEY INMAN, Royal Scots, attached 5th Wiltshire Regiment, was the younger son of G. Talfourd Inman, of Highmoor Hall, Oxon, and the Stock Exchange, and was born in 1888. Educated at Radley, where he was in the football eleven and captain of cricket, he proceeded to Hertford College, Oxford.

He became a member of the Stock Exchange, and a partner in the firm of Inman and Co. in 1914.

On the outbreak of war he enlisted in the Public Schools and University Corps, and obtained a commission in the Royal Scots in May Igus. In October he took out a draft of the 5th Wilts to Gallipoli, to which Regiment he was attached, and was present at the evacuation of Suvla and Helles.

Thence he went with the 5th Wilts to Mesopotamia. He was fatally wounded, being then in command of his company, in the attempt to relieve Kut, 6 April 1916.

“One of the gallant 13th Division."

IONIDES

Ambrose Constantine

*Lieutenant, 15th Battalion attached 9th Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Killed in action 16th October 1915. Aged 37. Son of Alexander A. and Isabella Ionides (nee Sechiari), of 1, Holland Park, London, and "The Homewood," Esher, Surrey; husband of Euphrosyne (Effie) Ionides (nee Spartali), of The Cottage, Carlisle Rd., Eastbourne. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 51 and 53. Member of the Exchange.

From de Ruvigny's ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-18 Part 2, page 178:

IONIDES, AMBROSE CONSTANTINE, of Rowbarns Grange, East Horsley, Surrey, Lieut., 15th (Service), attd. 9th (Service), Battn. The Ring's Royal Rifle Corps, 2nd of Alexander lonides, Consul-General for Greece, by his wife, Isabella, dau. of P. Sechiari; b. 1, Holland Park, W., 9 April, 1878; educ. Dunchurch, and Eton; was a member of the Stock Exchange; joined the Inns of Court O.T.C. on the outbreak of war; was gazetted Temp. Lieut. 5 Jan. 1915; went to France 5 Aug. following, being there attached to the 9th Battn., and was killed in action 16 Oct. 1915, between Ypres and Hooge. He had volunteered to go with a party to erect wire in front of the trench in the early morning. There was a thick mist at the time, which later lifted suddenly. He at once ordered his men to lie down, but before he could do so himself, be was seen and shot by the enemy. Buried behind the trenches where he fell. A comrade wrote that he was exceedingly liked by his brother officers and his men, who would have followed him anywhere. His bright, cheery disposition as well as his thoughtfulness for others endeared him to all who knew him. He m. at the Greek Church, London, W., 29 July, 1911, Euphrosyne (Effie), dau. of the late Demetrius Michael Spartali, and had two children : Denis, b. 23 May, 1912, and Irene, b. 6 Sept. 1914.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

LIEUTENANT AMBROS CONSTANTINE IONIDES, King's Royal Rifle Corps, was the second son of the late Alexander Ionides, Consul-General for Greece. He was born in 1878 and educated at Eton.

After leaving school he became a member of the Stock Exchange In 1900.

On the outbreak of war he joined the Inns of Court O.T.C. and obtained his commission in the following January in the 15th Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps.

He went to the Front in August 1915 and was drafted to the 9th Battalion of his Regiment.

He was killed on 16 0ctober, whilst out with a wiring party in front of the trenches. The mist, under cover of which they had been working, suddenly lifted. Lieutenant Ionides ordered his men to lie down, but remained standing himself till all his men had got the order. In so doing he himself was seen by the Germans.

His colonel wrote: “Although he had only been with us for a few months he was extremely popular, and had proved himself an excellent soldier. We all liked him and are proud to have had him as a brother officer."

The sergeant of his platoon wrote: “He was loved by his men for his kindness, his bravery and his many soldierly qualities. He set us a good example of coolness under fire, and his platoon was willing and ready to follow him anywhere."

Lieutenant Ionides married in 1911, Effie, daughter of the late D. M. Spartali, and left a son and a daughter.

IRVING

Thomas Robinson

*Private 19607, 26th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Killed in action 10th October 1916. Aged 26. Born and resident Carlisle, enlisted St. Paul's Churchyard. Son of James and Frances Isabella Irving, of 34, Fisher St., Carlisle. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 8 C 9 A and 16 A. Clerk at the Exchange.

JACKMAN

Gerald Radcliffe

*Second Lieutenant, 17th Battalion, Welsh Regiment. Killed in action 21st April 1917. Aged 34. Son of E. R. and Emmie Jackman. Buried in FINS NEW BRITISH CEMETERY, SOREL-LE-GRAND, Somme, France. Plot Iv. Row L. Grave 1. Clerk at the Exchange.

JACKSON

Charles George

*Lieutenant, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve and Royal Naval Air Service. Died 6th February 1917. Aged 46. Son of Mary Bland (formerly Jackson), of 33, Rosary Gardens, South Kensington, London, and the late James William Jackson. Commemorated in GOLDERS GREEN CREMATORIUM, London. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

LIEUTENANT CHARLES GEORGE JACKSON, R.N.V.R., (known to his friends on the Stock Exchange as “Peter") was born in 1872 and educated at private schools and the Independent College, Taunton. He joined the firm of Vivian, Gray, and Co. during the South African boom and became a member of the Stock Exchange in the year 1901. Later, he joined in partnership with E. W. Bose and Co. as a jobber.

At the outbreak of war, being then forty-two years of age, he acted for some time as a Special Constable before receiving his commission as a lieutenant in the R.N.V.R. He rendered valuable service until he contracted pneumonia, following influenza brought on by exposure in the discharge of his duties during the Zeppelin raids.

Lieutenant Jackson was very popular among his brother officers and a favourite with his men, who on his death bore eloquent testimony to the esteem in which they held him and the loss they had sustained.

JAMES

Ernest Edward

*Lieutenant, North Somerset Yeomanry assigned post of Censor of Foreign Cables, Central Telegraph Office. Died 9th January 1918. Member of the Exchange. See also Charterhouse School Memorial

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

LIEUTENANT ERNEST EDWARD JAMES was the eldest son of the Rev. Canon Edward James. He was educated at Charterhouse and St. John's College, Oxford, and in 1901 became a member of the Stock Exchange.

He was for some years in the North Somerset Yeomanry, but when war broke out he was unfit for active service.

In October 1914 he was given the post of Censor of Foreign Cables at the Central Telegraph Office, which carried with it the honorary rank of lieutenant.

Owing to a serious breakdown in health he was forced to resign this post, and he died on 9th January 1918.

JAMES

Richard Arthur Brodie

*Captain, 9th Battalion, East Lancashire Regiment. Killed in action 13th September 1916. No known grave. Commemorated on DOIRAN MEMORIAL, Greece. Clerk at the Exchange.

JENKINSON

Reginald Robert

*Sergeant 368062, 7th (City of London) Battalion, London Regiment. Killed in action 8th August 1918. Aged 34. Born Clapton, enlisted Bunhill Row, resident Forest Hill. Husband of Anne Alice Jenkinson, of Brockley, London. Formerly 305434, 5th Battalion, London Regiment. Buried in HEATH CEMETERY, HARBONNIERES, Somme, France. Plot VI. Row F. Grave 8. Clerk at the Exchange.

JEPHSON

Charles Mitchell Warren

*Lieutenant, 5th Battalion (Territorial), Queen's (Royal West Surrey Regiment). Killed in action 27th December 1917. Aged 30. Son of Charles Frederic Joseph and Martha Helene Jephson, of 11, Gardnor Mansions, Church Row, Hampstead, London. Born at St. Germain-en-Laye, Seine et Oise, France. Buried in JERUSALEM WAR CEMETERY, Israel. Section Q. grave 25. Clerk at the Exchange.

JOHNSON, DSO

Thomas Henry Fielder

*Major, 6th Battalion, Dorsetshire Regiment. Died 9th March 1919. Aged 39. Son of Henry Fielder Johnson and Priscilla Jane Johnson; husband of Emily Frances Mary Johnson, of 6, Bungalow, Mundesley. Awarded the Distinguished Service order (D.S.O.). Buried in the north-west corner of ALL SAINTS CHURCHYARD, MUNDESLEY, Norfolk. Clerk at the Exchange.

JOHNSTONE

David Harry

*Second Lieutenant, Hertfordshire Regiment. Died of influenza 2nd August 1916. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

SECOND LIEUTENANT DAVID HARRY JOHNSTONE, Hertfordshire Regiment, was the son of D. Y. Johnstone. He was born in 1881, and educated at Marlborough College.

Lieutenant Johnstone was an accomplished musician. After leaving school he studied at the Royal College of Music. He was one of the first violins in the Royal Amateur Orchestral Society, and he was also a brilliant pianist. Several of his compositions were published in the Stock Exchange Annual.

He was in partnership with his father on the Stock Exchange, having become a member in 1904.

On the outbreak of war he enlisted in the Anti-Aircraft Corps, and later was given a commission in the Hertfordshire Regiment. He had only just joined his Regiment when he developed influenza, from which he died on 2 August 1916.

JONES

J E

No further information currently available

JOPLING

Stanley

*Bombardier 201631, 505th Battery, 65th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Died 15th July 1918. Aged 26. Born Croydon, Surrey, enlisted Stratford. Son of Thomas and Rose Harriet Jopling, of Thornton Heath, Surrey. Buried in PERNES BRITISH CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot V. Row E. Grave 37. Clerk at the Exchange.

KAY

Ralph Bradbury

*Private 030241, Royal Army Ordnance Corps. Killed in action 9th January 1918. Aged 42. Born West Drayton, Middlesex, enlisted Lewisham, Kent. Son of William and Elizabeth Kay; husband of Bertha Alice Kay, of 177, Stanstead Rd., Forest Hill, London. Buried in DUHALLOW A.D.S. CEMETERY, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot III. Row E. Grave 13. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

PRIVATE RALPH BRADBURY KAY, Army Ordnance Corps, was the youngest son of William Kay.

He was born in 1875 and educated at St. Francis Xavier's College, Bruges, and became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1903.

Joining the Army Ordnance Corps in May 1917, he went to France directly afterwards.

He was killed during an air raid near Ypres on 9 January 1918 and lies buried in Duhallow Cemetery, Ypres.

One of his comrades wrote to his widow: “It is the opinion of all who knew your husband that he was one of the most popular men in the Regiment, and well liked for his cheery disposition and splendid straightforward ways."

KEEPING

Claude Jeffery

*Captain, 8th Battalion (Territorial), Duke of Cambridge's Own (Middlesex Regiment). Killed in action 24th August 1918. Aged 34. Son of Tom Jeffery and Eveline Elizabeth Keeping, of Staines; husband of Marjorie Gladys Cobbold Keeping, of Fairfield Lodge, Staines, Middx. Buried in DOUCHY-LES-AYETTE BRITISH CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot I. Row B. Grave 13. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN CLAUDE JEFFERY KEEPING, Middlesex Regiment, the elder son of T. J. Keeping of 32 Nicholas Lane, E.C, was born in 1884 and educated at Tonbridge, which he represented for three years at Bisley.

He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1913, and was a partner in the firm of Pain Bros.

On the outbreak of war he enlisted in the Artists' Rifles, and in December was given a commission in the 8th Battalion (Territorial) Middlesex Regiment.

After being some time at Gibraltar he took part in the Senussi campaign, during which he served as Assistant Provost-Marshal on General Peyton's Staff.

In the following May he came back from the East and went to France with the 12th Battalion of his Regiment. While acting as Trench Mortar officer he was wounded at Courcelette in October.

He returned to the front in November 1917 as a Company Commander, and after taking part in much heavy fighting was killed near Croiselles in the victorious British counter-offensive on 24 August 1918. Shortly before he had greatly distinguished himself by his courage and presence of mind, when out on patrol.

One of his commanding officers wrote: “He was one of my best officers, and was always reliable and conscientious in the performance of his duty. Everyone liked and trusted him."

Another wrote: “We shall miss him very much. He was a universal favourite. He was always considerate to everyone and untiring in his efforts for the good of his men."

Captain Keeping married Marjorie, third daughter of Dr. Peter De la Motte of Staines.

KEITH

Noel

*[Listed as Captain in book] Lieutenant, 8th (Irish) Battalion (Territorial), King's (Liverpool Regiment). Killed in action 22nd May 1917. Aged 33. Son of Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Keith, of London. A member of the Stock Exchange. Buried in CITE BONJEAN MILITARY CEMETERY, ARMENTIERES, Nord, France. Plot VIII. Row D. Grave 1. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN NOEL KEITH, Army Cyclist Corps, attached King's (Liverpool) Regiment, was the second surviving son of the late Herbert and Mrs. Keith and was born in 1884. He was educated at Aldenham, where he won a scholarship. When war broke out he was a partner in the firm of Keith, Bayley and Reader, having been a member of the Stock Exchange since 1906. The record of his partner Edward Vincent Bayley, who also lost his life in the war, appears on an earlier page.

Noel Keith joined the Inns of Court O.T.C. and obtained a a commission in the York and Lancaster Regiment. Transferring from that Regiment to the Army Cyclist Corps, he went to the French Front in July 1915 but was invalided home after a few months. He served at the training centre for several months and was promoted Captain in July 1916. Again transferred to the Machine Gun Corps (Heavy Branch), at the beginning of 1917, he became an instructor at the Cadet Battalion Headquarters. Hearing that a battalion of the King's Regiment which was leaving for the Front was short of officers, he resigned his position and rank as Captain in order to go with them.

He was killed at Armentieres on 22 May 1917, at the age of thirty-three.

KELLY

B R

No further information currently available

KENT

Lionel Victor

*Lieutenant, 3rd Battalion, South Wales Borderers. Died of wounds 31st July 1917. Aged 33. Son of Thomas and Emily Selina Kent, of Holywell Lodge, St. Albans. Formerly London Regiment (Artists' Rifles). Buried in YPRES RESERVOIR CEMETERY, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot V. Row C. Grave 4. Clerk at the Exchange. Also list on St Albans WW1 Memorial and St Albans Holywell Hill memorial.

KER

Frederick Roxburghe

*Second Lieutenant, 6th (City of London) Battalion (Rifles), London Regiment. Killed in action 20th September 1917. Aged 33. Son of the late David Ker, of Highgate, London; husband of the late Marjorie Agnes Ker (nee Hill). No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 54. Clerk at the Exchange.

KILLBY

Chester Winterbon

*Lieutenant, "C" Battery, 207th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Killed in action 21st March 1918. Aged 35. Son of the late Thomas Killby, of Highbury New Park, London; husband of Gladys Cressy Spear (formerly Killby), of Brewhurst, Loxwood, Billinghurst, Sussex. No known grave. Commemorated on POZIERES MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Panel 7 to 10. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

LIEUTENANT CHESTER WINTERBON KILLBY R.F.A., was the son of the late Thomas Kiliby, of Highbury New Park.

He was born in 1883 and educated at Malvern College. On leaving school he started City life with Arthur Brampton, becoming a member of the "House" in 1905. Later he joined C. Newton Taylor and Co., jobbers in the American market.

On the outbreak of war he joined the Royal Field Artillery and went to France with his Battery in May 1916. His first engagement was at Aubers Ridge, and during the next two years he took part in the Somme campaign, the battles before St. Quentin, the attack in front of Arras in the summer of 1917, and the Passchendaele Ridge advance of the autumn.

On 20 March 1918, the eve of the opening of the German "push," he took command of an anti-Tank gun in front of Holnon Wood, near St. Quentin, and was killed in action, defending his gun, on the very next day, his whole detachment being killed or taken prisoner. For three months his fate remained uncertain, and it was not until news came through from one of the gunners who had been taken prisoner that doubts were set at rest.

KILLIK

Cecil Molyneux

*[Spelt KILLICK on SDGW] Private M1/06899, 2nd Bus Company, Mechanical Transport, Royal Army Service Corps. Died 20th February 1917. Aged 24. Born Fulham, enlisted October 1914 in London, resident West Kensington. Son of Stephen Henry Molyneux Killik, J.P., and Emily Seymour Killik, of 80, Palace Gardens Terrace, London. Buried in BOULOGNE EASTERN CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot VIII. Row B. Grave 182. Clerk at the Exchange.

KING

George Montague

*[Listed as Gunner in book] Bombardier 116084, 247th Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery. Died of wounds 23rd October 1917. Aged 39. Born Tottenham, Middlesex, enlisted Southend, Essex, resident Leigh-on-Sea, Essex. Son of the late Henry William Montague King; husband of Ethel Annie King, of 10, Queen's Rd., Leigh-on-Sea, Essex. Buried in GODEWAERSVELDE BRITISH CEMETERY, Nord, France. Plot I. Row K. Grave 20. Clerk at the Exchange.

KITCHIN

Ernest Harold

*Captain, 15th Battalion attached 17th Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Killed in action between 21st and 22nd October 1916. Aged 36. Son of George Kitchin, of 70, Sonnenbergstrasse, Zurich, Switzerland. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 13 A and 13 B. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN ERNEST HAROLD KITCHIN, King's Royal Rifle Corps, was born in 1881 and educated at Bradfield College. He became a Member of the Stock Exchange in 1904, and was a partner in the firm of George Kitchin and Co. A writer in the "Morning Post" described him as "one of the most popular dealers in the Miscellaneous Markets. Brimful of good nature and ever ready to do a good turn to his fellow-members."

At the outbreak of war he gave his services as a motor driver and his car to the military authorities. Early in 1915 he was given a commission in the K.R.R.C. and was gazetted Captain in the following December.

He had only been at the Front a few months, when he was killed at the Schwaben Redoubt on 23 October 1916. At the time he was heroically organizing what proved to be a successful defence against very heavy German counter-attacks.

His colonel wrote: “During the short time he was out here he had endeared himself to all ranks. I have lost a very valuable and reliable Company Commander who could be relied on to carry out any work given him. I believe that one reason we were able to beat off the enemy was that every man of Captain Kitchin's company was determined to avenge his death."

One of his men wrote: “Our captain was the heart and soul of the company. Personally he was the finest man I ever met, and having met a good few of the old 17th Battalion down here they share the same opinion."

LAKE

John Stephen Raymond

*Captain, 3rd Battalion attached 1st Battalion, South Wales Borderers. Killed in action 16 June 1916. Aged 34. Son of Reginald J. and M. Beatrice Lake, of "St. Edmunds," Langley Rd., Watford. Served in the South African Campaign. Buried in LOOS BRITISH CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot XVIII. Row E. grave 10. Clerk at the Exchange.

LAMAISON, MiD

Wilfrid Lawrence

*Lieutenant, 16th (County of London) Battalion (Queen's Westminster Rifles), London Regiment attached 1st/6th Battalion, North Staffordshire Regiment. Died of wounds 23rd August 1918. Aged 36. Son of William E. and Marian W. Lamaison, of Kenley, Surrey; husband of Dorothy Isabel Lamaison, of Kingsbarns, Tadworth, Surrey. Mentioned in Despatches (MiD). Buried in PERNES BRITISH CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot IV. Row B. Grave 12. Member of the Exchange. See also Charterhouse School War Memorial

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

LIEUTENANT WILFRID LAURENCE LAMAISON, Queen's Westminster Rifles, attached 6th North Stafford-shires, was born in 1882, the son of the late William E. Lamaison, barrister-at-law. He was educated at Charterhouse, and became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1906 and a partner in the firm of Horne and Co.

He enlisted in the Queen's Westminsters in March 1916, and after training as a cadet at Oxford obtained his commission in November in that Regiment. in the following February he went out to France, attached to the 2/6th South Staffs. He served for several months as Lewis Gun Officer and for nine months as Intelligence Officer to the 176th Brigade, being with them during the retreat in March 1918.

His conduct during the retreat earned him a mention in dispatches “for gallant and distinguished service in the Field."

Later he was attached to the 1/6th North Staffs, and was with them when he was fatally wounded near La Bassée on the night of 22 August 1918. He died a few hours later on 23 August in a Casualty Clearing Station.

The Major-General commanding his Division wrote: “He was regarded as a very valuable officer, and the duty which he was carrying out, necessitating coolness and courage, had been specially entrusted to him."

“I was much struck by his grand spirit," wrote his Lieutenant-Colonel, and his Colonel wrote: “He was so thorough, and always insisted on being in everything."

He married, in June 1910, the daughter of Henry Kerr Rutherford, by whom he had three sons and a daughter.

LANE

Sidney John

*Private 54806, 7th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Killed in action 23rd April 1917. Born Reading, enlisted London, resident Tottenham. Formerly STK/146, 10th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers. No known grave. Commemorated on ARRAS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Bay 3. Clerk at the Exchange.

LANG-GIEVE

Pelham [Louis]

*Sergeant 265086, 3rd County of London Yeomanry (Sharpshooters). Killed in action in Egypt 21st November 1917. Aged 25. Born Hornsey, enlisted London, resident Hove. Only son of Florence Mary Lang-Gieve, of 56, Brunswick Place, Hove, Brighton, and the late Alfred Lang-Gieve. Educated Merchant Taylor's School. Buried in JERUSALEM WAR CEMETERY, Israel. Section D. Grave 70. Clerk at the Exchange.

LAST

Basil Herbert

*Lieutenant, 17th Battalion, Duke of Cambridge's Own (Middlesex Regiment). Killed in action 23rd April 1917. Aged 28. Son of the late Joseph Antoine Last and May E. Last of 37, Gwendwr Rd., West Kensington, London. Born at Gunnersbury, London. Enlisted in the Queen's Westminsters, 1914. Buried in HIGHLAND CEMETERY, ROCLINCOURT, Pas de Calais, France. Plot I. Row C. Grave 53. Clerk at the Exchange.

LAVARACK

Adolph Keith

*Lieutenant, 10th Battalion, Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment). Killed in action 5th July 1916. Aged 24. Son of Hamlet and Fanny Lavarack, of London. Buried in BECOURT MILITARY CEMETERY, BECORDEL-BECOURT, Somme, France. Plot I. Row R. Grave 22. Clerk at the Exchange.

LAZARUS

Arthur C

*Private 5240, Honourable Artiillery Company (Infantry). Died 17th April 1917. Enlisted Armoury House, resident Hampstead. Commemorated on HOLLYBROOK MEMORIAL, SOUTHAMPTON, Hampshire. Clerk at the Exchange.

LE BLANC SMITH

Charles Ralph

*[Listed as SMITH on memorial] Lieutenant, 8th Battalion, Rifle Brigade. Wounded at Hooge on 30th July 1915, spent time in hospital in Versailles until 11th August 1915, then at base at Etaples until 16th August 1915, home leave until 23rd August 1915 when he returned to the front and was killed in action 27th November 1915. Born in Paddington in 3rd March 1890. Resident The Lordship, Standon, Hertfordshire. Son of Herbert Le Blanc Smith. Spent 5 years at Eton Eton 1903-9 (in Rev. R.C. Radcliffe's and C.H.K. Martin's House). Rowed and played football. Rowed in the Eton Eight (at 6 in 1908, and at 7 in 1909). Won House Fours 1907. School pulling (record) 1909. Second Captain of Boats 1908-9, and a member of "Pop" in 1909. Went up to Trinity College, Cambridge, October 1909. Rowed 4 in winning Trial Eight 1909, and 8 in Cambridge boat v Oxford 1910, 1911 and 1912. Did not row in 1913 through illness. Rowed in Third Trinity May boat in 1910, 1911 and 1912, and in Leander boat for the Grand Challenge at Henley in 1910. Rowed in the C.U.B.C. winning Light Four for the Visitor's Cup at Henley in 1911. Secretary of C.U.B.C. 1911-12 and President 1912-13. Won Colquhoun Sculls in 1912, and Magdalene Pairs 1913. He was in the O.T.C. at both Eton and Cambridge University. Buried in ESSEX FARM CEMETERY, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot I. Row R. Grave 9. Clerk at the Exchange.
Photographs Courtesy & Copyright © Andy Pay 2008
Eton 1908 Rowing VIII, he is top left standing
1909 Eton VIII, he is 2nd from right sitting

LEATHLEY

William Reginald

*[Listed as Private in book] Corporal STK/455, 10th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Killed in action 10th April 1917. Born leyton, enlisted London, resident Walthamstow. No known grave. Commemorated on ARRAS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Bay 3. Clerk at the Exchange.

LEGG

Horace Gordon

*Lieutenant, "C" Company, 22nd Battalion, Durham Light Infantry. Killed in action 24th March 1918. Aged 37. Son of the late Edwin and Amy Legg, of Hurstlea, St. Albans, Herts; husband of Frances Waterfield Legg, of The High Wood, Selborne, Hants. No known grave. Commemorated on POZIERES MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Panel 68 to 72. Member of the Exchange. Also commemorated on Selborne, War Memorial, Hampshire and the Newton Valance memorial

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

LIEUTENANT HORACE GORDON LEGG, Durham Light Infantry, was the only surviving son of Edwin Woodward Legg of Hurstlea, St. Albans.

He was born in 1881 and educated at Berkhamsted School, and King's College, Cambridge.

After graduating in 1903 he joined his father's firm in which he became a partner, his membership of the Stock Exchange dating from 1912.

He was a member of the Honourable Artillery Company before the War, went to France with that unit in December 1914, and was seriously wounded in March 1915.

While in England he was given a commission in the Durham Light Infantry, and he joined the 22nd battalion in France, in April 1917, being again wounded in the same month.

He was killed on the Somme on 25 March 1918, having been reported “missing" on that date.

Lieut. Legg left a widow and one son.

LITTEN

Raymond

*Captain, 6th Battalion, Princess Charlotte of Wales's (Royal Berkshire Regiment). Killed in action 1st July 1916. Aged 32. Son of Frances Litten, of 21, Pembridge Villas, Notting Hill, London, and the late Tobias Raphael Litten. Buried in CARNOY MILITARY CEMETERY, Somme, France. Section Q. Grave 19. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN RAYMOND LITTEN, Royal Berkshire Regiment, was the son of the late Tobias Raphael Litten and of Mrs. Frances Litten. He was born in 1883 and educated at the City of London School and in Germany.

He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1912.

On the outbreak of war he joined the Inns of Court O.T.C., and soon after he received a commission in the Royal Berkshire Regiment. He went to France with his battalion in the following July and was gazetted Captain in September.

He was killed on the first day of the Battle of the Somme, July 1916, at the head of his company.

One of his brother officers wrote: “I have lost in him a great personal friend, and the company has lost a commander who never spared himself in his efforts to look after them. His company achieved its object in the attack—a fat which was greatly due to the energy and care which he displayed in his preparations."

Another wrote: “His influence on his friends was very wide and lasting. That sense of duty in life that sent him cheerfully to his heroic end, was always making him a staff for the weak to lean on, an example to the timid."

Captain Litten was made a Freeman of the City of London in 1915. He took an enthusiastic interest in the welfare of the poorer classes and was ever ready to help them.

LOWE, DCM

Norman McGregor

*Second Lieutenant, 14th (County of London) Battalion (London Scottish), London Regiment. Killed in action 19th January 1916. Aged 31. Son of Charles Lowe, M.A., and Blanche Fitzhardinge Lye, his wife, of 4, Oxford Rd., Chiswick, London. 1st Bde. Chief Scout Officer. Born at Berlin. Awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal (D.C.M.). Buried in VERMELLES BRITISH CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot III. Row A. Grave 16. Clerk at the Exchange.

From de Ruvigny's ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-18 Part 2, page 206:

LOWE, NORMAN McGREGOR, D.C.M., 2nd Lieut., 14th (County of London) Battn. The London Regt. (London Scottish) (T.F.), yr. s. of Charles Lowe, of 4, Oxford Road, Chiswick, W., M.A., Author and Journalist, formerly Berlin Correspondent of "The Times" (1878-91), by his wife, Blanche Fitzhardinge, dau. of John Gaunt Lye; 5. Berlin, 3 Jan. 1885; educ. Cranleigh School, Surrey; was a fine athlete and a member of the many successful Marathon teams put into the field by the London Scottish; joined the ranks of the battalion in 1906; went with it to France 15 Sept. 1914; whilst holding the rank of Sergt., and acting as Chief Battalion Scout, was awarded the D.C.M. in June. 1915, "for conspicuous gallantry and marked ability and resource consistently shown throughout the campaign, when he constantly acted as a scout in front of the entrenchments, often under a heavy fire from snipers and machine-guns. He supplied sketches and much invaluable information in connection with the enemy's trenches and wire-entanglements." He was gazetted 2nd Lieut. London Scottish 21 Aug. 1915; shortly afterwards appointed Scout Officer to the 1st Brigade, and whilst acting in that capacity was killed in action by the bullet of a German sniper at Vermelles, near Bethune, France, 10 Jan. 1916. Buried there. Colonel B. C. Green, London Scottish, wrote to his father: “Norman was one of the few old members of the corps remaining, and personally I feel his death more than I can say. He was a very gallant officer, and his loss will be deeply felt by the Battalion and the Brigade. His funeral took place amid the roar of guns, and was a most impressive ceremony?” Unm.

LOWRY, MC

Sidney Henry

*Captain, Hertfordshire Regiment. Died 31st July 1917. Aged 29. Son of Henry and Alice Lowry, of Stevenage, Herts. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 54 and 56. Member of the Exchange. See also Charterhouse School War Memorial

Extract from London Gazette 27th October 1914, page 29.

Private Sidney Henry Lowry, from the Inns of Court Officers Training Corps, to be Captain (temporary). Dated 28th October, 1914.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN SIDNEY HENRY LOWRY, M.C., Hertfordshire Regiment, was the son of Henry Lowry and was born in 1888. He was educated at Charterhouse and Pembroke College, Cambridge. He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1913 and a partner in his father's firm, Lowry Bros., about the same time.

He had been a member of his school Cadet Corps and the Cambridge O.T.C. and on the outbreak of war went into training with the Inns of Court O.T.C. He was given his captaincy in the Hertfordshire Regiment in November 1914 and went to the Front in the following January. For some time his Regiment was brigaded with the Brigade of Guards. He served with his Regiment in France for over two years, during which time he saw much heavy fighting and gained the Military Cross. During the spring of 1917 he went through a training course at Aldershot and was recommended for the post of Second in Command of a battalion.

Returning to the front soon afterwards, he was killed at the Battle of St. Julien on 31 July 1917, an action in which the Hertfordshire Regiment gained great distinction.

His Commanding Officer wrote: “Your son was killed in action, whilst gallantly leading his company against the final objective. I don't think a better officer or more gallant man is serving in the army. It is not only as a splendid officer but as a friend that we, who had the privilege of knowing him intimately, will always remember him."

LUND

William Bullen

*Lieutenant, 18th Labour Company, Royal Army Service Corps. Drowned 13th August 1915. No known grave. Commemorated on HELLES MEMORIAL, Turkey. Panel 199 or 233 to 236 and 331. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

LIEUTENANT WILLIAM BULLEN LUND, Army Service Corps, became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1890 and was a jobber in the American market.

Though he had been for twenty-five years in the “House” and was father of a son serving in the army, he was not content to remain inactive at home, and obtained his commission in June 1915.

On the completion of his training at Aldershot he left for the Dardanelles in command of the 18th Labour Company on the transport Royal Edward.

The Royal Edward was torpedoed in the Aegean Sea on 14 August, 1915. A description of Lieut. Bullen Lund's end is given by a private in his Company:

"About ten minutes after the ship went down I was clinging to a raft and all at once I saw someone appear above water. I got on the raft and caught hold of Lieutenant Lund by the shirt and pulled him on to the raft as well as I could. . . . I kept him on the raft with just his legs hanging in the water for more than an hour, but I'm sorry to say he never spoke after. . . A wicked sea capsized the raft and I lost him altogether. I've heard since that his body was picked up and taken to Lemnos Island and buried there. . . ."

"I might say that Lieutenant Lund was well liked by the whole of the Company and it seems a pity, even a shame, that such an example as he was to us all should be taken from us."

MacBETH

William David

*Second Lieutenant, Worcestershire Regiment. Died 18th February 1919. Husband of H. S. MacBeth, of 73, Balham Park Rd., Balham, London. Buried in EARLSFIELD CEMETERY, WANDSWORTH, London. Plot F. Grave 5098. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

SECOND LIEUTENANT WILLIAM DAVID MACBETH, Worcestershire Regiment, was the son of the late Alexander Macbeth of Dunfermline, Fife. He was born in 1876 and educated at George Watson's College. He was a good golfer and cricketer.

Coming to London at the age of seventeen, he eventually became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1904.

Lieutenant Macbeth enlisted under the Derby Scheme and obtained a commission in the Worcestershire Regiment.

He was sent to Egypt and attached to the Warwickshire Regiment. Soon after he was given command of an armoured car. He was invalided home with malaria in January 1918, and had returned to business apparently cured, when he had a violent relapse and died on 18 February 1919.

MacLAGAN

Gilchrist Stanley

*Lieutenant, 3rd Battalion attached 1st Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Killed in action 25th April 1915. Aged 35. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 8. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

LIEUTENANT GILCHRIST STANLEY MACLAGAN, Royal Warwicks, was the youngest son of the late Dr. T. J. Maclagan and was born in London in 1879. He was educated at Eton and Magdalen College, Oxford, and became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1904.

He steered the second eight at Eton, but his great ability as a coxswain was not recognized until he went to the 'Varsity. There he got his blue as a freshman, and steered the Oxford boat in the years 1899, 1900-1-2. He also steered the Magdalen crew Head of the River in 1900; Leander in the Grand Challenge Cup at Henley from 1899 to 1908, winning six times, and the English Olympic Crew which won at the Olympic regatta at Henley in 1908. He was Honorary Secretary of the Amateur Rowing Association at the outbreak of war.

He was gazetted to the 3rd Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment in September 1914. In December of that year he went out with a draft of officers to make up casualties in the 1st Battalion, and served continuously in the front line till April 1915. On the 25th of that month he was killed in the first gas attack of the war during the second battle of Ypres.

MacLEOD

James Herbert Nengoe

*[SDGW states Temporary Lieutenant] Second Lieutenant, 7th/8th Battalion, King's Own Scottish Borderers. Killed in action 29th June 1916. Aged 29. Husband of Cicely A. H. MacLeod, of 17, Alexandra Rd., Walmer, Kent. Buried in VERMELLES BRITISH CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot IV. Row A. Grave 25. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

SECOND LIEUTENANT JAMES HERBERT NEYNOE MACLEOD, King's Own Scottish Borderers, was the son of Norman Neville Macleod, J.P., and was born in 1887. He was educated at Dover College, and played for his school and for Richmond at Rugby football.

After spending some time in Canada, he returned to England and started work on the Stock Exchange with his cousin's firm, Kennedy and Robertson, after which he joined Robert Mackintosh and Co. as a junior partner and became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1912.

At the outbreak of war he joined the 18th Battalion, London Regiment. He served with that battalion till the following January when he was gazetted to the 8th Battalion King's Own Scottish Borderers. He acted for some time as adjutant of his battalion and later was on the Brigade Staff.

He was killed in action on 29th June 1916.

His colonel wrote: “His name with others was forwarded to higher authority for recognition of his gallant work on May 14th. For some months he had been recommended for promotion, and it was hoped he would have been selected for employment on the Staff, having shown such promise while attached to the Brigade Staff. I need not say how officers and men appreciated him for himself and his worth; he was very popular with all ranks and is sadly missed by us all."

Lieut. Macleod left a widow and one child.

MACRAE

Frank Laing

*[Listed as Lieutenant in book] Second Lieutenant, 8th Battalion, Seaforth Highlanders (Ross-shire Buffs, the Duke of Albany's). Killed in action 25th September 1915. Aged 34. Son of Cecilia Macrae, of Ravenshall, Bournemouth, and the late C. C. Macrae; husband of Irene Macrae. No known grave. Commemorated on LOOS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 112 to 115. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

LIEUTENANT FRANK LAING MACRAE, Seaforth I Highlanders, was the son of Charles Colin Macrae, J.P., Deputy Chairman of the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway. He was born in 1881 and educated at Stubbington, Cheltenham College, and University College, Oxford.

He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1904 and a partner in the firm of Laing and Cruickshank in 1910.

On the outbreak of war he enlisted in the Public Schools Battalion, with whom he trained till early in 1915, when he was given a commission in the 8th Battalion, Seaforth Highlanders, one of the battalions in the famous i 5th Division, which went to the Front in the summer of 1915.

He was killed at the battle of Loos after leading the remnant of his men to the furthest point ever gained in that action. They carried Hill 70 and were in the outskirts of Lens, when they were overwhelmed and cut off. Lieutenant Macrae was reported missing and his death was only ascertained long after.

All the senior officers of the battalion were killed that day, 25 September 1915.

One of the surviving officers wrote: " He was a very great favourite with all ‘C' Company officers, and the men would have done anything for him."

Lieut. Macrae left a widow.

MANNERS

Henry Fairholm

*Second Lieutenant, 7th Battalion, Norfolk Regiment. Killed in action 28th April 1917. No known grave. Commemorated on ARRAS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Bay 3. Clerk at the Exchange.

MAPP

George Hewlett

*Sergeant 1783, City of London Yeomanry (Rough Riders). Killed in action at Gallipoli 21st August 1915. Aged 23. Born Notting Hill, Middlesex, enlisted London, resident Ealing, London W. Son of George and Ellen S. Mapp, of 35, Ranelagh Rd., Ealing, London. Of North Kensington, London. Buried in GREEN HILL CEMETERY, Turkey. Special Memorial F. 2. Clerk at the Exchange.

Note: There are now 2,971 servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in this cemetery. 2,472 of the burials are unidentified but special memorials commemorate a number of casualties known or believed to be buried among them.

MARCHANT

Charles Silverlock

*[Listed as Charles G Marchgant on SDGW] Captain, 20th (County of London) Battalion (Blackheath and Woolwich), London Regiment. Killed 3rd May 1915. Aged 43. Son of Thomas William and Margaretta Marchant, of Deptford, London. Buried in GORRE BRITISH AND INDIAN CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot I. Row B. Grave 13. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN CHARLES SILVERLOCK MARCHANT, 10th Battalion, London Regiment, was the second son of the late T. W. Marchant, solicitor of College Street, E.C. and of Deptford,and was born in 1871. Privately educated, he became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1896.

Always keenly interested in the Volunteer movement, he succeeded his father and his elder brother in the command of the Deptford Company of the 2nd V.B., Queen's Own (Royal West Kent) Regiment, afterwards the 10th (Blackheath and Woolwich) Battalion, London Regiment. He served for a year during the South African War in the Volunteer Company of the Royal West Kents.

Having retired to the Territorial Reserve with the rank of Major, he rejoined at the beginning of the war, being gazetted captain in the 10th London Regiment. He went to France with his battalion on 9 March 1915.

Two months later, on 3 May, he was accidentally killed at the Front.

MARSH

William

*Private 1987, 6th Battalion, Seaforth Highlanders (Ross-shire Buffs, the Duke of Albany's). Killed in action 28th April 1916. Aged 25. Enlisted London. Son of Edwin Alfred and Hannah Maria Marsh, of 111, Arcadian Gardens, Wood Green, London. No known grave. Commemorated on ARRAS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Bay 8. Clerk at the Exchange.

MARTIN

Cyril B.

*[Listed as Second Lieutenant in book] Lieutenant, 21st (County of London) Battalion (First Surrey Rifles), London Regiment. Killed in action 30th March 1918. Aged 30. Son of Martin James and Emily Hannah Martin, of Lee; husband of the late Violet Lucy Martin, of 79, Micheldever Rd., Lee, London. Buried in DAMASCUS COMMONWEALTH WAR CEMETERY, Syria. Section C. Grave 111. Clerk at the Exchange.

MARTIN

Henry Lloyd

*Captain, 7th Battalion, Queen's (Royal West Surrey Regiment). Killed in action 28th September 1916. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 5 D and 6 D. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN HENRY LLOYD MARTIN, The Queen's (Royal West Surrey) Regiment, was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. James Martin of Hunton, Limpsfield, Surrey. He was born in 188o and educated at Tonbridge School.

Entering the Stock Exchange in 1895 as a member of his father's firm, Martin and Hilder, he later became a partner in the firm of A. Brampton and Co.

He was given a commission in a service battalion of The Queen's Regiment at the end of September 1914, and was promoted to Captain in the following March. He went to the front with his battalion in July 1915, acting first as Intelligence Officer and then as Company Commander.

He was twice slightly wounded. On 28 September 1916, he was leading his men in a highly successful attack on an important German position when he was instantly killed by a shell.

His Colonel wrote: “Henry was a very fine character and one of the soundest officers that a C.O. was ever blessed with. He was wonderfully cool and gallant under fire, and I always knew that anything I asked him to do would be done in the best way possible, and that he would never fail me, however tight the corner."

Captain Martin was an enthusiastic supporter of the Boy Scout movement, to which he gave all his spare time. He acted as District Scoutmaster of the East Surrey Association.

The Chief Scout, Lieut.-General Sir R. Baden-Powell, wrote: “To the Scouts his memory and the message which he left for them will be a real inspiration.

Another wrote: “He found nothing too much to do for the boys, though he never spoilt them. It was just typical of him that, when on leave, he spent at least one whole day in seeing boys and parents. He was so absolutely sincere and with such high ideals that his life told on these boys in a wonderful way."

MARTIN

Leonard Burnett

*Private, Royal Irish Regiment. Died 19th August 1918. Aged 32. Son of Allan Hadden Martin and Gertrude Alice Martin, of 101, Upper Thames St., London. Buried in SUTTON ROAD CEMETERY, SOUTHEND-ON-SEA, Essex. Clerk at the Exchange.

MARTIN

Lionel Norman John

*Private 2014, 13th (County of London) Battalion (Princess Louise's Kensington Battalion), London Regiment. Died of wounds 17th March 1915. Enlisted Kensington, resident Upper Norwood. Buried in ESTAIRES COMMUNAL CEMETERY AND EXTENSION, Nord, France. Plot III. Row H. Grave 11. Clerk at the Exchange.

MARTIN

Walter Percival

*Second Lieutenant, 7th Battalion, Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry. Killed in action 24th August 1916. Buried in BERNAFAY WOOD BRITISH CEMETERY, MONTAUBAN, Somme, France. Section O. Grave 55. Clerk at the Exchange.

MATTHEWS

H

*Corporal, Royal Fusiliers. Clerk at the Exchange.

MAY

Peter Langton

*[Listed as Lieutenantin book] Second Lieutenant, 2nd Dragoons (Royal Scots Greys) attached to Special Reserve. Killed in action 13th February 1916. No known grave. Commemorated on LOOS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 1. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

LIEUTENANT PETER LANGTON MAY, Royal Scots Greys, was the eldest son of Peter Wilson May, J.P., and of Mrs. May of St. Margaret's, Hampstead. He was born in 1876 and educated at Harrow and St. John's College, Cambridge, where he rowed in his College boat and in the University Trials.

He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1901 and a partner in the firm of Francis Moore and Co.

Immediately on the outbreak of war, though then already thirty-eight years of age, he joined the 2nd Dragoons (Royal Scots Greys) and received his training at the Cavalry Barracks, York. He proceeded with his Regiment to France in April 1915.

He was killed on 13 February 1916, when acting as Bombing Officer, in a mine explosion at the Quarries, Hulluch.

His Second-in-Command wrote of him: "Lieutenant May organized and concluded a bombing attack the night before he was killed, for which he was recommended for the Military Cross. He was the bravest man I ever met, as he knew his danger, which most of these boys do not. I actually had to forbid the men going out into the open to look for him, as it meant certain death.''

He married in 1902 Ida Maud, daughter of William Sturdy of Pax Hill Park, Lindfield, Sussex, by whom he had two sons and a daughter.

MAYS

Cecil Clarence

*Second Lieutenant, 1st Battalion, Grenadier Guards. Killed in action 30th March 1918. Aged 23. Son of George and Clara Julia Marriott Mays. Buried in BOISLEUX-AU-MONT COMMUNAL CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Grave 4. Clerk at the Exchange.

McAFEE

Archibald David

*Sergeant 2158, 4th Battalion, Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders. Killed in action 17th May 1915. Aged 32. Enlisted London, resident East Finchley. Son of Mrs. E.M. McAfee, of 5, Elm Rd., Barnet, Herts, and the late David McAfee. No known grave. Commemorated on LE TOURET MEMORIAL , Pas de Calais, France. Panel 41 and 42. Clerk at the Exchange.

McALLISTER

Richard James [Watson]

*Corporal S/37281, 2nd Battalion, Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own). Killed in action 21st August 1918. Aged 38. Born belfast, enlisted Nortrh Finchley, resident Finchley. Son of Robert and Susan McAllister, of Belfast; husband of Edith Frances McAllister, of "Holford," Friern Park, North Finchley, London. Formerly M/225400, Royal Army Service Corps. Buried in LA TARGETTE BRITISH CEMETERY, NEUVILLE-ST. VAAST, Pas de Calais, France. Plot III. Row B. Grave 6. Clerk at the Exchange.

McBEAN

George

*[Spelt MacBean on CWGC & SDGW] Private Z/2699, 2nd Battalion, Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own). Killed in action 9th May 1915. Born and resident Wimbledon, enlisted Lambeth, Surrey. No known grave. Commemorated on PLOEGSTEERT MEMORIAL, Comines-Warneton, Hainaut, Belgium. Panel 10. Clerk at the Exchange.

MELDRUM

Ronald

*Second Lieutenant, Honourable Artillery Company (Territorial Force) (Infantry). Killed in action 9th Ocotber 1917. Aged 28. Son of the late J. W. Meldrum, of North Finchley, and of Mrs. Meldrum, of "Ardoch", Farnborough, Kent; husband of Vivienne Meldrum, of North Finchley, London. No known grave. Commemorated on TYNE COT MEMORIAL, Zonnebeke, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 7. Clerk at the Exchange.

MILLER

James Hillman

*[Listed as HILLMAN-MILLER on CWGC and SDGW] Lieutenant, 4th Battalion, South Wales Borderers. Died of wounds 10th August 1915. Son T C Millar of, 48 Woodville Gardens, Ealing, London W5. No known grave. Commemorated on HELLES MEMORIAL, Turkey. Panel 80 to 84 or 219 and 220. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

LIEUTENANT JAMES HILLMAN MILLER, South Wales Borderers, was educated at Christ's Hospital. His membership of the Stock Exchange dated from 1904.

On the outbreak of war he applied for a commission and was gazetted to the 4th Battalion of the South Wales Borderers.

After a few months' training at home, he went with his battalion to Gallipoli in June 1915.

He was killed on the morning of 9 August within a few weeks of coming under fire.

He was married in 1899 to Phoebe, the youngest daughter of William Maclachan, by whom he had one son.

MITCHELL

C H

*Private, Royal Fusiliers. Clerk at the Exchange.

MITCHELL

Walter Victor

*Second Lieutenant, 3rd Battalion, Bedfordshire Regiment attached Trench Mortar Battery. Killed in action 27th November 1915. Aged 28. Son of Mrs. M. A. Mitchell, of 59, Danecroft Rd., Herne Hill, London, and the late E. C. Mitchell. No known grave. Commemorated on LOOS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 41. Clerk at the Exchange.

MITCHISON

Malcolm

*Lieutenant, 13th (County of London) (Princess Louise's, Kensington Battalion), London Regiment. Died 4th November 1918. Aged 24. Son of Gordon Cameron Mitchison and Isabelle Adelaide Mitchison, of Glebe Cottage, Churchstow, Kingsbridge, Devon. Buried in LADYWELL CEMETERY, LEWISHAM, London. Plot/Row/Section G. Grave 87. Clerk at the Exchange.

MOORE

Maurice

*Private STK/181, 10th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Killed in action 15th July 1916. Aged 36. Born Canonbury, enlisted London, resident West Hampstead. Youngest son of the late George and Sarah Moore. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 8 C 9 A and 16 A. Clerk at the Exchange.

MORISON

Alfred James

*Captain, 3rd Battalion attached 1st Battalion, Essex Regiment. Killed in action 20th November 1917. Aged 34. Son of James Robertson Morison and Catherine Morison, of Members Mansions, 38, Victoria St., London. Buried in FLESQUIERES HILL BRITISH CEMETERY, Nord, France. Plot III. Row D. Grave 34. Clerk at the Exchange.

From de Ruvigny's ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-18 Part 3, page 198:

MORISON, ALFRED JAMES, Capt., 1st. Battn. (44th Foot) The Essex Regt., yst. s. of James Robertson Morison, of The White House, Cannon Road, South gate, N., formerly of Carnoustie, co. Forfar, Company Secretary, by his wife. Catherine McLerret, of Carnoustie; b. Walthamstow, co. Essex, 13 March, 1583 educ. Clifton Bank, St. Andrews, and was subsequently in the service of an old-established house on the London Stock Exchange; volunteered for foreign service, and joined the Royal Fusiliers as a Private in Aug. 1914; was gazetted 2nd Lieut. The Essex Regt. in April, 1915, being promoted Lieut. and Capt.; served with the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force at Gallipoli from early in 1915; took part in the evacuation of the peninsula in Jan. 1916, when lie was one of the last to leave : was for a short time in Egypt; then proceeded with his Regiment to France; was wounded at Beaumont Hamel 1 July, 1916, and invalided home; rejoined Ins Regiment in France, where he remained until the end of Dec.. when lie had an attack of trench fever, but returned to the firing line in July, 1917, and was killed in action near Cambrai 20 Nov. following. Buried at Messinieres, about four miles south of Cambrai. Lieut.-Col. G. W. H. Stirling wrote: “Owing to continuous fighting I have been unable to write to you before to tell you how deeply I deplore your gallant son's death. I feel it the more as, besides being a countryman of my own, he was quite my m best Company Commander and a personal friend. He fell, as you know, on 20 Nov. in a most gallant attempt to force the passage of a canal under heavy fire from machine guns and rifles; and in the same circumstances both his subalterns and a number of his men were killed or wounded. He was being carried back wounded, to cover, when he was killed by another shot, and, I believe, instantaneously. I am unable to sufficiently express my high opinion of your son, or my deep sense of less, and can only assure you of my profound sympathy”.; Unm.

MUDIE

Harold Bolingbroke

*Captain, Royal Army Service Corps. Died 6th January 1916. Aged 35. Born in London. Son of Alfred and Anne Elizabeth Mudie, of 71, Pembroke Crescent, Hove, Brighton. Buried in FORGES-LES-EAUX COMMUNAL CEMETERY, Seine-Maritime, France. Grave III. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN HAROLD BOLINGBROKE MUDIE, Remount Service, President of both the British and Universal Esperanto Associations, was the only son of Alfred Mudie of Mudie's Library. Born 3o January 1880, he was educated at Folkestone and also at University College School, and, by scholarship, at London University. He was first associated with C. J. Whittington and Co., and started business for himself in 1905, being joined by R. C. Tragett in 1906.

But his taste lay in other directions. Speaking several languages he added the International one in 1902, and single-handed founded and edited the "Esperantist" in 1903. He organized and controlled the famous International Congress at Cambridge in 1907, where only Esperanto was spoken. He published the New Testament in Esperanto through the British and Foreign Bible Society. Professor Mayor, of Cambridge, in eulogizing Mudie, said: "It is not only his talent—we have plenty of that here—but wisdom, which is very rare in so young a man."

When war broke out he immediately gave his services. He acted first as recruiter, lecturer, journalist. Then he conveyed horses to the Belgian Government: and of his report, containing "Suggestions for Transport of Horses," General Sir W. H. Birkbeck, K.C.B., C.M.G., Director of Remounts, wrote: "It was a gem in its way; and he was given a commission at the earliest opportunity."

He established the Advance Remount Depot near Forges-lesEaux. His commanding officer wrote: "There seemed nothing he was unable to cope with."

He was killed suddenly on 6 January 1916 while being motored in the dark over one of that district's many level crossings.

Sir T. Vezey Strong, whose Guildhall speech to 1,400 foreign Esperantists was interpreted by Mudie in Esperanto wrote: "I have known and highly esteemed him for many years as one foremost in all good works."

MUNFORD

J B

*Private, Rifle Brigade. Clerk at the Exchange

probably John MUMFORD, Rifleman S/30005, 13th Battalion, Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own). Died of wounds 29th October 1918. Aged 36. Born Bishop's Stortford, hertforshire, enlisted and resident Westminster, Middlesex. Son of Richard and Virginia Mumford; husband of E. L. Mumford, of 70, Cumberland St., Pimlico, London. Buried in MONT HUON MILITARY CEMETERY, LE TREPORT, Seine-Maritime, France. Plot VII. Row L. Grave 5B.

MURRAY

Percy Simmons

*Private G/20843, 7th Battalion, The Buffs (East Kent Regiment). Killed in action 3rd May 1917. Aged 39. Born Madras, India, enlisted Harringay, Middlesex, resident Southgate, Middlesex. Son of James Gough Murray, of India; husband of Emily Murray, of 10, Selborne Rd., Southgate, London. A Member of the London Stock Exchange. No known grave. Commemorated on ARRAS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Bay 2. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

PRIVATE PERCY SIMMONS MURRAY, The Buffs (East Kent Regiment), was born in 1878. He had been a clerk in the firms of Cohen, Laming and Co. and Williams and Gray before becoming a member of the Stock Exchange in 1904, and in 1910 he joined Hubert Williams and Co.

He was a keen cyclist, and a prominent member of the North Road Club, winning many prizes in open competitions.

At the outbreak of the South African War he volunteered for service but was refused on account of his eyesight. Volunteering again seventeen years later he was drafted into The Buffs and underwent six months' training in England before being sent overseas.

Proceeding to France in November 1916, he was reported "Wounded and Missing" on 3 May 1917, during the fiercest period of the Battle of Arras. He had previously refused to go to hospital, making light of his wound to encourage his comrades.

In March 1918 he was posted as "presumed killed."

He left a widow and three children.

MYATT

Walter Cecil

*Rifleman 5904, 1st/9th (County of London) Battalion (Queen Victoria's Rifles), London Regiment. Killed in action 9th October 1916. Born St. John's Wood, enlisted London, resident Bloomsbury. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 9 C. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

RIFLEMAN WALTER CECIL MYATT, Queen Victoria's Rifles, was the son of William James Myatt, and was born in London on 9 October 1869. He was educated at King's College School, where he distinguished himself in classics as well as at athletics. He also won several prizes at athletic sports meetings in open events after leaving school.

He joined Martin A. Nasmith and in 1896 became a member of the Stock Exchange.

Being too old to obtain a commission in any branch of the army that was likely to go into the firing line, he enlisted in the Queen Victoria Rifles (9th London Regiment) and went to France in July 1916, in time to take part in the early engagements of the battle of the Somme.

On 9 October, his forty-seventh birthday, he was reported “wounded and missing" and subsequently as having died on that date or since.

NASMITH, DSO

Arthur Plater

*Captain, 7th Battalion, Border Regiment. Killed in action 23rd April 1917. Awarded the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.). No known grave. Commemorated on ARRAS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Bay 6. Member of the Exchange.

From the VC and DSO Book Volume III

NASMITH, A.P. (D.S.O. L.G. 10.1.17); s. of late Martin A. Nasmith, of Clevenhurst, Weybridge; T/Capt., Bord. Regt.; served Europ. War; Despatches. He was awarded the D.S.O. for gallantry on 2.11.16, at Le Transloy. Capt. Nasmith was killed in action on 23.4.17. His two brothers received decorations during the war, Capt. M. Nasmith, R.N., being awarded the V.C. in 1915 and the C.B. in 1920, and Major R. Nasmith, H.L.I., the D.S.O. and M.C.

London Gazette, 10 Jan 1917.-" War Office, 10 Jan 1917. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the appointments of the undermentioned Officers of the Companion of the Distinguished Service Order, in recognition of their gallantry and devotion to duty in the field."
...
NASMITH, ARTHUR PLATER, Temporary Capt., Border Regt. For conspicuous gallantry in action. He displayed great courage and initiative in organising and leading a succesful attack. He set a splendid example throughout."

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN ARTHUR PLATER NASMITH, D.S.O., Border Regiment, was the eldest son of Martin A. Nasmith of Clevehurst, Weybridge. He was educated at Marlborough College, which he represented at Rugby football. Later he played in the Surrey XV.

On leaving school he joined his father on the Stock Exchange and became a member in 1904.

On the outbreak of war he joined the Inns of Court O.T.C., and after training for a time with that corps he was given a commission in the 7th Border Regiment.

He went to France with his battalion in the summer of 1915 and saw much fighting in the Ypres salient and on the Somme, where he was awarded the D.S.O. for brilliantly organizing an attack on Zenith trench. He was also twice mentioned in despatches.

He was killed at Monchy-le-Preux during the battle of Arras on 23 April 1917.

His Divisional General wrote: "There was no name more often brought to my notice for gallant conduct than his, and I deplore the loss to the Battalion and the Brigade."

NATHAN

David

*Lieutenant, "A" Battery, 155th Brigade, 2nd (London) Brigade, Royal Field Artillery [Territorial]. Killed in action 20th August 1917. Buried in VLAMERTINGHE NEW MILITARY CEMETERY, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot VIII. Row E. Grave 1. Clerk at the Exchange.

From de Ruvigny's ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-18 Part 4, page 143:

NATHAN, DAVID, Lieut., 2nd London, Royal Field Artillery, s. of Henry A. Nathan, of 87, Broadhurst Gardens, South Hampstead, N.W.; b. London, 23 July, 1888; educ. Clifton College; enlisted in Aug. 1914; obtained a commission 29 Oct. following; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from Jan. 1917, and was killed at Ypres 20 Aug. following. Buried at Vlamertinghe; unm.

NATHAN, MC

Robert Percy

Captain, 36th Trench Mortar Battery, Royal Field Artillery. Died of wounds 22nd March 1918. Aged 25. Son of Benjamin Arthur and Rosina Nathan, of 22, Belsize Park, London. Joined the Honourable Artillery Company in August 1914. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). Buried in HAM BRITISH CEMETERY, MUILLE-VILLETTE, Somme, France. Plot I. Row E. Grave 19.

NEEDHAM

Leslie Alfred

*Rifleman 2742, 1st/9th Battalion (Queen Victoria's Rifles), London Regiment. Killed in action 21st April 1915. Aged 26. Enlisted London, resident West Kilburn. Son of Alfred George and Rosa Hannah Needham, of 8, Milman Rd., Kilburn, London. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Clerk at the Exchange.

NEVILL

Cuthbert St. John

*Lieutenant, "C" Battery, 251st Brigade, Royal Field Artillery [Territorial]. Killed in action 18th April 1918. Buried in CHOCQUES MILITARY CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot III. Row A. Grave 1. Member of the Exchange.

NEVILL

John Henry Gaythorne

*[Listed as John Henry Caxthorne on SDGW] Second Lieutenant, 3rd Battalion, Grenadier Guards attached Special Reserve. Killed in action 24th December 1914. Son of the late Henry M. Nevill, of Mettingham, Suffolk. Buried in LE TOURET MILITARY CEMETERY, RICHEBOURG-L'AVOUE, Pas de Calais, France. Plot I. Row B. Grave 8. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

SECOND LIEUTENANT JOHN HENRY GAYTHORNE NEVILL, Grenadier Guards, was born in 1884 and educated at Ampleforth College, Yorkshire. He played both cricket and football for his school.

He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1911 and a partner in the firm of Belisha, Shaw, and Co.

On the outbreak of war he joined the Grenadier Guards, and went to the front in December 1914. He was killed within a few hours of arriving in the line on 24 December.

One of his brother officers wrote: “He was a gallant fellow, and we mourn him greatly." Another wrote: “Both in his Regiment and in ours everyone spoke so touchingly of him—everyone who knew him felt that he had lost a friend."

In their school journal an old boy of his school wrote: "Just after the declaration of war Jack Nevill said to me, If England had not stood by France in the war, I should have shaken the dust of this country off my feet and gone elsewhere; and he meant it. Whole-hearted in what he set himself to do, full of geniality, spreading always a sense of cheerfulness among his associates on the Stock Exchange, in society, and in his home . . . . he liked everything well done. The slovenly or the second-rate he could not understand. His religion always took first place."

He married a daughter of the late Alexander Dick-Cunyngham.

NEWMAN

Nathaniel Halford

Driver L/25954, "C" Battery, 173rd Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Died 23rd May 1918. Aged 36. Enlisted East Ham, Essex, resident Manor Park, Essex. Son of Joseph William and Isabela Newman; husband of Lillie Jane Morris (formerly Newman), of 26, West Rd., Sawbridgeworth, Herts. Buried in FORESTE COMMUNAL CEMETERY, Aisne, France.

NEWTON

Edgar Charles

*[Listed as Privatein book] Rifleman 303184, "A" Company, 2nd/5th (City of London) Battalion (London Rifle Brigade), London Regiment. Killed in action 9th September 1917. Aged 23. Enlisted Wandsworth. Son of Charles and Rebecca Newton, of 61, Temple Sheen Rd., East Sheen, London. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 52 and 54. Clerk at the Exchange.

NOAKES

Stuart Bertram

*Captain, Motor Transport, Royal Army Service Corps. Drowned 30th December 1917. No known grave. Commemorated on CHATBY MEMORIAL, Egypt. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN STUART BERTRAM NOAKES, Royal Army Service Corps, was the youngest son of Wickham Noakes of Selsdon Park, near Croydon.

Born in 1876, he was educated at Rugby, and on leaving went on the Stock Exchange, where he became a Member in 1899.

He was a keen all-round sportsman and had travelled a great deal. He joined the A.S.C. in 1915 as a private, and on getting his commission, in 1917, he was sent to the Motor Transport Depot at Avonmouth.

When taking a detachment out to Egypt on the R.M.S. Aragon, he was drowned, the ship being torpedoed off Alexandria on 31 December 1917.

Captain Noakes left a widow.

NOSSITER

Guy Valentine

*Captain, London Regiment. Birth regietred in 1891 at Lambeth. Married Olive Ledward, marriage registered in the December Quarter of 1914 at Wandsworth. Clerk at the Exchange.

OAKENFULL

Herbert Joseph

*Second Lieutenant, 10th (County of London) Battalion (Hackney) attached 1st/1st Battalion, London Regiment. Killed in action 7th October 1916. Buried in SERRE ROAD CEMETERY No. 2, Somme, France. Plot XLI. Row A. Grave 5. Clerk at the Exchange.

OLIVER

Cyril Francis Harrison

*Captain, 12th Battalion, Prince of Wales's Own (West Yorkshire Regiment). Killed in action 14th July 1916. Aged 35. Son of the Rev. H. F. Oliver and Elizabeth M. Oliver; husband of Margaret Grant Oliver (now Clark), of "Hillview," Gresham Rd., Oxted, Surrey. Buried in FLATIRON COPSE CEMETERY, MAMETZ, Somme, France. Plot XI. Row E. Grave 8. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN CYRIL FRANCIS HARRISON OLIVER, West Yorkshire Regiment, was the son of the Rev. H. F. Oliver and was born in 1880.

He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1901, firstly as a member of the firm of Hughes Bros., and later in business on his own account.

He had been a member of the Inns of Court O. T. C. before the war, and on its outbreak he was given a commission in the 12th West Yorks Regiment.

He was gassed at the battle of Loos and mortally wounded at Bazentin-le-Grand on 14. July 1916.

Captain Oliver was a fine athlete and won many quarter and half mile races. He was a prominent member of the London Athletic Club.

Married in 1907, he left a widow and three children.

O'REARDON

Timothy Thomas

*Private 49780, 25th Battalion, Durham Light Infantry. Killed in action 29th May 1918. Born London, enlisted Kingston-on-Thames, resident Tooting. No known grave. Commemorated on SOISSONS MEMORIAL, Aisne, France. Clerk at the Exchange.

OUDIN, MC

Lucien Eugene

*[Listed as L'eugene Oudin on SDGW] Captain, 7th Battalion, Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry. Died of wounds 24th August 1916. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). Buried in DIVE COPSE BRITISH CEMETERY, SAILLY-LE-SEC, Somme, France. Plot II. Row G. Grave 14. Clerk at the Exchange.

Extract from London Gazette 16th May 1916, page 4:

Temp. 2nd Lt. Lucien Eugene Oudin, 7th Bn., D. of Corn. L.I. For conspicuous gallantry. When cut off in a bombing post with a machine gun and a few men, he held his own under a very heavy bombardment, and, when attacked, succeeded in repelling the enemy.

PACK

Joseph Henry

*[Listed as Trooper in book] Private T/270284, 10th (Royal East Kent and West Kent Yeomanry) Battalion, The Buffs (East Kent Regiment), Killed in action 13th August 1918. Aged 32. Born Islington, Middlesex, enlisted Herne Bay, Kent, resident Finsbury Park, Middlesex. Son of Alice Elizabeth Pack, of 22, Hatherley Gardens, East Ham, London, and the late Joseph Pack; husband of the late Alice Eliza Pack. Formerly 2302, 1st/1st Battalion, East Kent Yeomanry. No known grave. Commemorated on LOOS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 15 to 19. Clerk at the Exchange.

PAGE, MC

Vernon

*Second Lieutenant, "D" Battery, 315th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Died of wounds 23rd September 1917. Aged 32. Son of Edward H. and Kate E. Page, of "Ballynona," Sandown, Isle of Wight. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). Buried in VOORMEZEELE ENCLOSURES No. 1 and No. 2, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Clerk at the Exchange.

PAILTHORPE, MiD

Harold Anderson

*[Dedication booklet states Royal Air Force] Flight Lieutenant, Royal Naval Air Service. Died 23rd May 1917. Aged 26. Son of Henry Noel and Caroline Georgina Louisa Pailthorpe, of Downs Cottage, Hillborough, Herne Bay. Mentioned in Despatches. Buried in CABARET-ROUGE BRITISH CEMETERY, SOUCHEZ, Pas de Calais, France. Plot XV. Row G. Grave 24. Clerk at the Exchange.

PALMER

Lawrence Grant

*Lance Corporal G/13148, 6th Battalion, The Buffs (East Kent Regiment). Died 10th January 1917. Born, resident and enlisted Tottenham, Middlesex. Formerly G/12777, 9th Battalion, Royal West Surrey Regiment. Buried in AVESNES-LE-COMTE COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Pas de Calais, France. Plot III. Row B. Grave 18. Clerk at the Exchange.

PAPIER

George

*Lance Bombardier/Acting Bombardier 128448, 284th Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery. Killed in action 26th October 1917. Aged 24. Born Snaresbrook, Essex, enlisted Woolwich, Kent, resident Hansell, Middlesex. Son of Victorine Papier, of "Park View," Alwyne Rd., Hanwell, London. Born at Wanstead, London. Buried in THE HUTS CEMETERY, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot XII. Row C. Grave 6. Clerk at the Exchange.

PARKER

Thomas

*Corporal, Royal Fusiliers. Clerk at the Exchange

possibly Thomas PARKER, Corporal 26616, Royal Fusiliers transferred to 60450, Labour Corps.

PAVITT, MC

Charles Frederick

*Captain, 18th Division Train, Royal Army Service Corps. Died 17th August 1918. Aged 35. Son of Joseph Henry and Annie Pavitt, of Tudor Lodge, Parkside, Wimbledon Common, London; husband of Josephine Pavitt. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). Buried in PUTNEY VALE CEMETERY AND CREMATORIUM, WANDSWORTH, London. Grave reference D.4. 34. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN CHARLES FREDERICK PAVITT, M.C., Royal Army Service Corps, was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Pavitt of Tudor Lodge, Parkside, Wimbledon Common. He was educated at Tonbridge and represented his school at Rugby football for two years. He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1904 and a partner in the firm of Blackwell and Co.

Shortly after the outbreak of war he joined the H.A.C., and after training with that corps for some months he was given his commission in the Army Service Corps, being promoted Lieutenant in March, and Captain in August 1915.

He took part in the Battle of the Somme in 1916 and the fighting round Arras and Ypres in 1917, being decorated with the Military Cross for distinguished service in the field. He died of pneumonia on August 17th 1918. His Commanding Officer wrote: "He was exceedingly popular and a general favourite. I was very fond of him as a friend, and as an officer I had a very high opinion of him."

Captain Pavitt left a widow.

PAWLE

Malcolm Gerald

*Captain, 2nd Garrison Battalion, Bedfordshire Regiment. Died 27th June 1917. Aged 44. Son of Mr. and Mrs. F. C. Pawle, of Reigate, Surrey. No known grave. Commemorated on KARACHI 1914-1918 WAR MEMORIAL, Pakistan. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN MALCOLM GERALD PAWLE, was the youngest son of the late Frederick Charles Pawle of “Northcote," Reigate, a member of the Stock Exchange. Born in 1874, he was educated at Marlborough College. At school he was a member of the Shooting Eight, and in 1891 he made the second best score for the school at Risley.

At the outbreak of the war he was, and had been for fourteen years, a member of the Stock Exchange. He enlisted in a battalion of the Royal Fusiliers (University and Public Schools). A good deal older than most of his comrades in the ranks, he went through the full training, and after a time was given a commission in a Norfolk battalion. He was next sent with an Essex Battalion to Mudros and Gallipoli and was afterwards stationed at Ismailia on the Suez Canal.

Never of very great physical strength, he suffered from the climate and was invalided home. On recovery he returned to duty in England, but soon volunteering for foreign service he was sent to India, with the rank of Captain, in a Bedfordshire battalion.

The excessive heat at Hyderabad, Scinde, where he was stationed, overpowered him, and he died in hospital at Lahore of septic pneumonia on 27 June 1917.

PEARSON

Laumann Saxe William

*[Laumarin on SDGW] Second Lieutenant, 13th Battalion attached 10th Battalion, Essex Regiment. Killed in action 19th July 1916. Aged 24. Son of M. Pearson, of Birch Knoll, Crowthorne, Berks., and the late Laumann Saxe Pearson. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 10 D. Clerk at the Exchange.

PEDDEL

Sydney Edgar

*[Spelt PEDDLE on SDGW] Sergeant 8918, "A" Company, 5th (City of London) Battalion (London Rifle Briagde), London Regiment. Killed in action 10th April 1915. Aged 26. Born Winchester, enlisted London, resident Holloway. Son of Edward James and Sarah Elizabeth Peddel, of 60, Crayford Rd., Holloway, London. Buried in RIFLE HOUSE CEMETERY, Comines-Warneton, Hainaut, Belgium. Plot IV. Row K. Row 4. Clerk at the Exchange.

From de Ruvigny's ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-18 Part 1, page 285:

PEDDEL, SYDNEY EDGAR, Sergt., No. 8918, 5th Battn. (London Rifle Brigade) The London Regt. (T.F.), 4th s. of Edward James Peddel, of 33, Cardonzo Road, Caledonian Road, Holloway, N., Coach Trimmer, by his wife, Sarah Elizabeth, dau. of Isaac Salter, of Southampton; b. Salisbury, co. Wilts, 1 July, 1888; educ. St. James's Church School, Holloway; was employed in a city stockbroker's office; joined the L.R.B. in 1907; volunteered for foreign service on the outbreak of war in Aug. 1914; went to France 1 Nov. following; took part in several trench attacks; came home on leave 21 Feb. 1915; returned to the firing line on the 28th, and was killed in action at Ploegsteert, 10 April following, unm. Buried in the L.R.B. Cemetery in the wood there. 2nd Lieut. A. Bryan White wrote : "Although I had only been his platoon commander for a very short time, I have known Sergt. Peddel for many years, and feel that I have not only lost a good N.C.O. but a very old friend. he was liked and respected by every man in the battn., and would have made an excellent officer had his commission gone through sooner." Sergt. Peddel was well known in North London as an indefatigable athlete. He was a leader of the Gymnasium connected with St. James's Church, Holloway, and the possessor of several medals won in various competitions. He took part in the Territorial sports at Stamford Bridge in 1913, when the London Rifle Brigade beat the London Scottish in the Marathon in the record time of 1 hour 33 mins. 37 secs.— a remarkably fine achievement. Sergt. Peddel was then a L.-Corpl. In April, 1914, when the L.R.B. made the forced march from London to Brighton, Corpl. Peddel (to which rank he had been promoted) was pacemaker, and assisted to set up a new record for long-distance marching, the Foreign Legion's record of 50 miles in 154 hours being easily beaten. The time occupied by the L.R.B. to do the 524 miles was 14 hours 23 mins. (marching time 12 hours 44 mins.). Sergt. Peddel secured several prizes in L.R.B. contests. He won a silver cup in the school of arms competition 1913, bayonet v. bayonet, and another cup in the five miles race in the same year. He was also a member of the Orion Harriers, the Archway Harriers, the Crouch End Cyclist Club, and the Alexandra Park Tennis Club.

PELLY

Herbert Richard

*Lieutenant, 1st/7th Battalion (Territorial), Essex Regiment. Killed in action 9th October 1915. Aged 20. Son of Edmund Neville Pelly and E. Mary Pelly, of Witham Lodge, Witham, Essex. His brothers John Noel Pelly and Edmund Godfrey Pelly fell in the 1939-45 War. Buried in 7th FIELD AMBULANCE CEMETERY, Turkey. Plot IV. Row B. Grave 2. Clerk at the Exchange.

PENN

Eric Frank

*Captain, 4th Battalion, Grenadier Guards. Killed in action 18th October 1915. Aged 33. Son of William and Constance Penn, of London; husband of Gladys Penn, of Baldslow Place, Baldslow, Sussex. Buried in VERMELLES BRITISH CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot I. Row K. Grave 11. Member of the Exchange. See also Lord's Cricket Members War memorial

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN ERIC FRANK PENN, Grenadier Guards, was the son of Mr. and Mrs. William Penn, and was born in 1878.

He was educated at Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge. Captain Penn was a distinguished and versatile sportsman. He played cricket and football for Eton, and he won the School Quarter Mile and two other events. He gained his Blue for cricket in 1899.

When the South African war began he went to the front with the 3rd Battalion of the Royal Scots, which he had joined while still at Eton. He was invalided home in 1901 with the rank of Captain.

He went back to Cambridge and again played against Oxford at cricket. Later on he played brilliantly for Norfolk County.

On leaving the University he went into the City and became a partner in the firm of Sir R. W. Carden and Co, and a member of the Stock Exchange in 1905.

On the outbreak of war Captain Penn joined the Norfolk Yeomanry, but in his impatience to get into action transferred to the Grenadier Guards and went to the front with the 4th Battalion as a subaltern.

After the battle of Loos he was promoted to Captain and mentioned in despatches for distinguished gallantry in the field.

He was killed on 18 October 1915 at the Hohenzollern Redoubt.

Captain Penn during his service in the Army gained the same golden reputation as an ideal English gentleman, which he had earned all through his life from his schooldays.

A writer in the “Eton Chronicle” said of him: “Prominent in games and with a stainless record, always cheerful and full of grit, he attracted to himself all that was best at Eton. No one could fail to love and honour him for his noble qualities."

One of his brother officers wrote: “I can never forget what his example has been to me, and I know that it has helped many along the road."

Another wrote “He was an exceptionally fine company commander and his men would have done anything for him."

He married, in 1906, Gladys, daughter of Mr. Charles Ebden of Baldstow Place, Sussex, by whom he had one son, born posthumously.

PETERS

Charles Maurice Sewell

*Private 9403, 1st Battalion, Honourable Artillery Company (Infantry). Died of wounds 22nd April 1917. Aged 29. Born Dawlish, Devon, enlisted Warley, Essex, resident Ilford, Essex. Eldest son of Charles and Margaret Peters; husband of R. M. Peters, of "Hillside," 2, Berkeley Avenue, Reading, Berks. Buried in ETAPLES MILITARY CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot XIX. Row F. Grave 13A. Clerk at the Exchange.

PHILCOX

Percy Vivian

*Second Lieutenant, Royal Army Service Corps attached Royal Garrison Artillery. Killed in action 1st November 1918. Aged 37. Son of Caroline and the late William Philcox; husband of Hetty Florence Philcox, of 24, Downs Park, Herne Bay, Kent. Buried in ROMERIES COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Nord, France. Plot I. Row G. Grave 1. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

SECOND LIEUT. PERCY VIVIAN PHILCOX, A.S.C. (M.T.) was the third son of the late William Philcox of the Stock Exchange. He was educated privately. On leaving school he joined his brother's firm, Philcox, Williamson and Co. In 1905 he became a Member of the Stock Exchange, and in the following year he was taken into partnership. He was very keen on sport, took an active interest in the Territorial movement, and until his marriage belonged to the Queen's Westminsters.

On the outbreak of war he became a special constable, enlisted in the 2/5th The Buffs in May 1916, and obtained a commission in the A.S.C. (M.T.) in May 1917. He went to France two months later in charge of four “Caterpillars," and from November 1917 onwards he was attached to the 26th Siege Battery Ammunition Column, R.G.A. He was killed by a shell on t November 1918.

His Commanding Officer wrote: " He did splendid work during and since the March retirement, and I brought his name to the notice of the General for very excellent and courageous work about six months ago, when he marched with his men continuously for several nights in a place sodden with gas and continuously shelled, to save his Caterpillars' which had been knocked out."

His fellow officers wrote: “England has lost one of her very best men and truest Civilian Soldiers." His batman wrote: "We all loved him."

He was killed in his thirty-ninth year and left a widow and three children.

PIPER

Laurence

*Second Lieutenant, Adjutant 3rd Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment. Killed in action 10th June 1917. Aged 37. Son of Edward and Agnes Piper, of "Belmont," 11, Nevern Place, Earl's Court, London. Native of Carlisle. Buried in ST. QUENTIN CABARET MILITARY CEMETERY, Heuvelland, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot II. Row P. Grave 7. Clerk at the Exchange.

PITT

Percy Douglas

*Private 30011, 9th Battalion, East Surrey Regiment. Killed in action 15th September 1917. Buried in HARGICOURT BRITISH CEMETERY, Aisne, France. Plot I. Row E. Grave 28. Clerk at the Exchange.

PLATER

George Eveleigh

*Private 635649, 2nd/20th (County of London) Battalion (Blackheath and Woolwich), London Regiment. Killed in action 14th September 1918. Brother of Mrs. E. Fosbery, of Park End, Willow Grove, Chislehurst, Kent. Formerly 210071, Rifle Brigade. No known grave. Commemorated on VIS-EN-ARTOIS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 10. Clerk at the Exchange.

POLAND

Guy Bernard

*Second Lieutenant, 24th (County of London) Battalion (The Queen's), London Regiment. Killed in action 21st March 1918. Aged 19. Son of Charles F. A. and Ida Poland, of 37, Norfolk Rd., Littlehampton, Sussex. Buried in FINS NEW BRITISH CEMETERY, SOREL-LE-GRAND, Somme, France. Plot I. Row AA. Grave 19. Clerk at the Exchange.

POTT

Edward Henry

Private G/19123, 7th Battalion, The Buffs (East Kent Regiment). Killed in action 3rd May 1917. Aged 34. Born Marylebone, Middlesex, enlisted London, resident Brodesbury, Middlesex. Son of Alfred and Macena Pott, of Brondesbury, London; husband of Hilda Grace Pott, of Stow, King's Lynn, Norfolk. Formerly 2752, 31st Battalion, Royal Fusiliers. No known grave. Commemorated on ARRAS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France.

POTTER

Harold

*Private, Royal Fusiliers. Clerk at the Exchange.

possibly Harold POTTER, Corporal 1942, Royal Fusiliers then Sergeant then SecondLieutenant then Lieutenant, 3rd Battalion attached 7th Battalion, East Surrey Regiment. Killed in action 9th April 1917. Son of Robert Potter, of Bishop's Sutton, Alresford, Hants; husband of Lillie Rudland Potter, of 5, Mortimer Mansions, Mortimer St., Cavendish Square, London. Buried in FAUBOURG D'AMIENS CEMETERY, ARRAS, Pas de Cal;ais, France. Plot VII. Row G. Grave 19.

POWELL

Leonard Frith

*[Listed in book as Private] Lance Corporal 513696, 1st/14th (County of London) Battalion (London Scottish), London Regiment. Killed in action 9th April 1917. Enlisted Thames Ditton, resident Surbiton. Husband of E. M. Powell, of 1, Devonshire Villas, Shanklin, Isle of Wight. Buried in ACHICOURT ROAD CEMETERY, ACHICOURT, Pas de Calais, France. Plot/Row/Section B. Row 24. Clerk at the Exchange.

PRICE

E S

No further information currently available

PROUGHTEN

Charles Ernest

*Second Lieutenant, Surrey Yeomanry (Queen Mary's Regiment) atatched to 10th Battalion, Queen's (Royal West Surrey Regiment). Killed in action 23rd May 1918. Aged 32. Son of Alfred and Esther Proughten, of Hornsey; husband of Louisa Ethel Proughten, of 24, Summerland Mansions, Muswell Hill, London. Buried in YPRES RESERVOIR CEMETERY, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot IX. Row E. Grave 20. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

SECOND LIEUT. CHARLES ERNEST PROUGHTEN, The Queen's (Royal West Surrey) Regiment, was born in 1885. He went into business at an early age and became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1910.

Joining the Inns of Court O.T.C. in January 1917, he received his commission in the 10th Battalion, The Queen's Regiment, and went to France in April 1918.

He was killed at Ypres on 23 May, five weeks after landing in France.

His Company Commander wrote: "He had proved himself one of the most efficient and trusted officers in the Company. He was a man who knew no fear. He had endeared himself to us all, and died like a soldier."

Lieut. Proughten left a widow and a daughter.

PRYCE, VC, MC and Bar

Thomas Tannatt

*Captain, 4th Battalion, Grenadier Guards. Killed in action 13th April 1918, Vieux Berquin, France, during the Battle of Hazebrouck, as the Allies held off the Germans’ last great offensive. Aged 32. Born in the Hague, Netherlands 17th January 1886. Son of Thomas and Rosalie S. Pryce, of Pentreheylin Hall, Llandysilio, Montgomeryshire, Wales and husband of Margaret Sybil Pryce (married March 1908), of Cranfurd Lodge, Maidenhead, Berkshire, daughter of E. Snow Fordham, Metropolitan Police Magistrate; they had three daughters. Educated at Shrewsbury School and Cirencester School. Joined the firm of Henry Tudor and son, and became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1913. Keen sportsman and a fine shot, kept himself fit mainly by riding and lawn tennis. No known grave. Commemorated on PLOEGSTEERT MEMORIAL, Comines-Warneton, Hainaut, Belgium. Panel 1. See also Shropshire, Mill Mead Schgool Old Boys Memorial.

At the outbreak of war he enlisted in the Honourable Artillery Company and went to France with them in december 1914. He was given a commisison in the Gloucestershire Regiment in October 1915 and was wounded in a night raid at Gommecourt, where he gained the Military Cross.

He retuned to the front in May 1916, and won a bar to his Cross soon after. In September he trasnferred to the Grenadier Guards and went out again with a draft in February 1917.

In relation to his Victoria Cross The London Gazette 21st May, 1918, records the following-

"For most conspicuous bravery, devotion to duty, and self-sacrifice when in command of a flank on the left of the Grenadier Guards. Having been ordered to attack a village he personally led forward two platoons, working from house to house, killing some thirty of the enemy, seven of whom he killed himself. The next day he was occupying a position with some thirty to forty men, the remainder of his company having become casualties. As early as 8.15 a.m., his left flank was surrounded and the enemy was enfilading him. He was attacked no less than four times during the day, and each time beat off the hostile attack, killing many of the enemy. Meanwhile the enemy brought three field guns to within 300 yards of his line, and were firing over open sights and knocking his trench in. At 6.15 p.m., the enemy had worked to within sixty yards of his trench. He then called on his men, telling them to cheer and charge the enemy and fight to the last. Led by Captain Pryce, they left their trench and drove back the enemy with the bayonet some 100 yards. Half an hour later the enemy had again approached in stronger force. By this time Captain Pryce had only 17 men left, and every round of his ammunition had been fired. Determined that there should be no surrender, he once again led his men forward in a bayonet charge, and was last seen engaged in a fierce hand-to-hand struggle with overwhelming numbers of the enemy. With some forty men he had held back at least one enemy battalion for over ten hours. His company undoubtedly stopped the advance through the British line, and thus had great influence on the battle."

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN THOMAS TANNATT PRYCE, V.C., M.C. & bar), Grenadier Guards, was the son of Thomas Pryce of Llandysilio, Montgomeryshire. He was born in 1886 and educated at Shrewsbury and Cirencester.

He joined the firm of Henry Tudor and Son, and became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1913.

A keen sportsman and a fine shot, he kept himself fit mainly by riding and lawn tennis.

At the outbreak of war he enlisted in the Honourable Artillery Company and went to France with them in December 1914.. He was given a commission in the Gloucestershire Regiment in October 1915 and was wounded in a night raid at Gommecourt, where he gained the Military Cross.

He returned to the front in May 1916, and won a bar to his Cross soon after. In September he transferred to the Grenadier Guards and went out again with a draft in February 1917.

On 13 April 1918, at the most critical moment of the German Lys offensive, Captain Pryce with only forty men held up a German battalion for ten hours at a most vital point of the line, when all depended on the staunchness of the Guards. In the end, when the remnant of the little band had fired their last round, they charged the enemy with the bayonet and died fighting, splendidly refusing to surrender. For this superb and invaluable stand Captain Pryce was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross.

H.R.H. The Duke of Connaught wrote: “I have read with pride of the gallantry and endurance shown by all companies of the battalion, but especially of No. 2 Company, so ably led and commanded by Captain Pryce."

His Army Commander wrote: “There is no finer stand in the history of the British Army than this to which Captain Pryce contributed very largely."

His Colonel wrote to his widow: "Your husband was perfectly splendid and his company did wonderfully. Its record will be one of the finest episodes in the war."

Captain Pryce married, in March 1908, Margaret, the younger daughter of E. Snow Fordham, Metropolitan Police Magistrate, by whom he had three daughters.

RABONE

Maxwell

*Second Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, Royal Munster Fusiliers. Died of wounds 22nd August 1915. Aged 24. Son of Ernest and Emma A. Rabone, of 35, Avenue Rd., Highgate, London. No known grave. Commemorated on HELLES MEMORIAL, Turkey. Panel 185 to 190. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

SECOND LIEUTENANT MAXWELL RABONE, Royal Munster Fusiliers, was educated at Highgate School, which he represented at football.

He was the son of E. Rabone of the Stock Exchange and became a member himself in 1912.

On the outbreak of war he enlisted in the Artists' Rifles, and went with them to France in October 1914. He was gazetted to the 2nd Battalion Munster Fusiliers in January, and was invalided home in the following May.

Two months later he was sent out to Gallipoli, and died on 22 August as the result of a wound received on the previous day.

RAMSEY

Frank Blashfield

*Temporary Lieutenant, Hood Battalion, Royal Naval Division, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. Killed in action 20th July 1915. Aged 30. Born 7th February 1885. Son of A. Walter and F. Geraldine Ramsey, of 1, Ranworth Mansions, Compayne Gardens, Hampstead, London; husband of Eileen Mary Ramsey, of 13 Stanhope Gardens, Highgate, London, later of: 11a Heather Gardens, Golders Green, later of Gerrard's Cross, Buckinghamshire. Employed with the Stock Exchange. No known grave. Commemorated on HELLES MEMORIAL, Turkey. Panel 8 to 15. Clerk at the Exchange.

Service history: Enlisted in the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve on 21st October 1903 for 5 years, re-enlisted 31st August 1914; Commissioned Temporary Sub-Lieutenant Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve 14th January 1915, then Temporary Lieutenant 17th February 1915; included in the draft for the Mesopotamian Expeditionary Force 28th June 1915, subsequently joined Hood Battalion 18th July 1915 until his death 20th July 1915.

RAMSEY

Harry Victor

*Lieutenant, Royal Field Artillery. Died 5th August 1918. Buried in LUTON CHURCH BURIAL GROUND, Bedfordshire. Plot/Section Z. Row R. Grave 40. Clerk at the Exchange.

RAW, DSO

Rupert George

*Captain, 8th Battalion, Northumberland Fusiliers. Killed in action 7th August 1915. Aged 35. Son of George Henry Raw. Served in the South African war. Awarded the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.). No known grave. Commemorated on HELLES MEMORIAL, Turkey. Panel 33 to 35. Member of the Exchange.

From the VC and DSO Book Volume II:

RAW, RUPERT GEORGE, Second Lieut., was born 28 July, 1880 son of George Henry Raw. He was educated at Clifton College, and Brasenose College, Oxford. He served in South Africa, 1901-2, taking part in operations in the Transvaal, Nov. 1901, to March, 1902; operations in Cap Colony, Oct. to Nov. 1901; Jan. 1902, and-March to 31 May, 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 29 July, 1902]; awarded the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and was created a Companion of th Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 Oct. 19021: “Rupert George Raw, Second Lieut., The Northumberland Fusiliers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa." Lieut. R. G. Raw afterwards retired from the Service, and joined the Reserve of Officers He served in the European War; was promoted Captain, 8th Battn. Northumberland. Fusiliers. He was killed in action, Aug. 1915, in Gallipoli was married, and left a son and a daughter.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN RUPERT GEORGE RAW, D.S.O., Northumberland Fusiliers, was the son of George Henry Raw of Natal, South Africa, and Albert Court, London. He was born in 1880 and educated at Clifton and Brasenose College, Oxford, where he showed himself a good cricketer, footballer and boxer.

At the age of twenty he obtained his commission in the army and joined the Northumberland Fusiliers ("Fighting Fifth") in South Africa, serving there until the end of that war. He was mentioned by Lord Kitchener in Despatches, won the D.S.O., and earned a medal with five clasps. He retired from the army in 1904 and became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1910.

On the outbreak of war in 1914 he immediately volunteered and was given a Captaincy in the 8th Battalion of his old Regiment. After a year's training he went with his Regiment to Gallipoli. They landed at Suvla Bay on 7 August 1915 and were at once engaged in the fighting. On the morning of to August Captain Raw was wounded in the arm. He would not return to the beach but continued to advance with his men. With a party of about twenty he was in advance of his battalion.

That night some men reported that the advanced party had been cut off at Sulajik, near Chocolate Hill. Nothing further was ever seen or heard of any member of his party. All efforts to trace them have failed.

RAWLINGS

Douglas

*[Listed as Private in book] Corporal STK/210, 10th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Killed in action 16th November 1916. Aged 20. Born and resident Twickenham, enlisted London. Son of Mrs. E. J. Rawlings, of Neston Lodge, Sandycoombe Rd., East Twickenham, Middx., and the late Mr. W. H. F. Rawlings. Buried in NEW MUNICH TRENCH BRITISH CEMETERY, BEAUMONT-HAMEL, Somme, France. Plot/Row/Section F. Grave 26. Clerk at the Exchange.

RAYNER

George Biddulp

*[Listed in book as Lieutenant] Second Lieutenant, 3rd Battalion, Essex Regiment attached 2nd Battalion, Gloucestershire Regiment. Killed in action 12th May 1915. Aged 31. Son of William Stockham Rayner and Annie Rayner, of 24, Birchington Rd., West Hampstead, London. Buried in BEDFORD HOUSE CEMETERY, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Enclosure No. 4 Plot XI. Row C. Grave 8. Clerk at the Exchange.

REACHER

Stanley William

*Captain, 16th Battalion, Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own). Died of wounds 4th July 1916. Aged 23. Son of John William and Emily B. S. Reacher, of "Heathercroft", 61. Putney Hill, London. Buried in LE TOURET MILITARY CEMETERY, RICHEBOURG-L'AVOUE, Pas de Calais, France. Plot III. Row H. Grave 32. Clerk at the Exchange.

From de Ruvigny's ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-18 Part 3, page 226:

REACHER, STANLEY WILLIAM, Capt., 16th (Service) Battn. The Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own), only s. of John William Reacher, of Arkindale, Putney Hill, London, S.W., Retired Stockbroker, by his wife, Emily Santo, dau. of the late John Crowle. of Phillimore Gardens, Kensington, W.; b. Putney, S.W., 2 Nov. 1892; educ. Willington School there; St. Paul's School, and Hann-Münden, near Cassel, Germany; subsequently joined the staff of Messrs. Gordon L. Jacobs & Co., of the London Stock Exchange, with whom be remained until the outbreak of war; joined the Artists' Rifles in Sept. 1914; was gazetted 2nd Lieut. The Royal Warwickshire Regt. 10 Feb. 1915; transferred to the 16th Regt. The Rifle Brigade the following month; was promoted Lieut. in July, and Capt. in Sept.; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from Feb. 1916, and died in hospital at Bethune 4 July following, from wounds received in action a few hours previously, during a night raid upon the enemy's trenches near Festubert. Buried in the British Cemetery at Le Touret. His Colonel wrote “In a large raid on the German trenches your son was gallantly leading his men when he was mortally wounded in the chest, and died the following morning. He led most gallantly, and his men avenged his death well. The operations were a great success, and your son's gallant charge through the enemy's wire, and on to the parapet, where he was wounded, had a great deal to do with that success. He had all the best attributes of a soldier; brave as a lion, he had done most excellent patrol work without flinching and went into action with a smile. He will be hard to replace in the battalion. My own personal loss is great," and Capt. Brickwood, his senior in the company, who received the D.S.O. for his part in the raid, wrote: "He was a keen soldier. I see him now, leading his men across the enemy trenches that night, encouraging them on, until he got hurt. . . . I have lost my best friend." Unm.

READ

Arthur James

*Corporal 630006, 2nd/20th (County of London) Battalion (Blackheath and Woolwich), London Regiment. Killed in action 30th April 1918. Aged 34. Born and resident Greenwich, enlisted Blackheath. Son of Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Read, of 6, Dartmouth Hill, Greenwich, London; husband of Edith Read, of 27, Mount Nod Square, Lewisham Rd., London. No known grave. Commemorated on JERUSALEM MEMORIAL, Israel. Panels 47 to 53. Clerk at the Exchange.

REAY

Wilfred Francis

*[Listed as in book as Corporal] Lance Corporal STK/212, "A" Company, 10th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Killed in action 28th September 1915. Aged 24. Born and resident Wallington, enlisted London. Son of Mr. J. H. A. Reay (retired Civil Servant); husband of Dorothy Katherine Livermore (formerly Reay), of 67, Elm Park Mansions, West Brompton, London. Authorised Clerk (Stock Exchange). No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 8 C 9 A and 16 A. Clerk at the Exchange.

REID

Egbert

*Private 6397, 15th (County of London) Battalion (Prince of Wales' Own Civil Service Rifles). Killed in action 7th October 1916. Aged 33. Enlisted Leyton, resident Leytonstone. Son of Elizabeth A. Reid, of 10 Cambridge Rd., Leytonstone, London, and the late G. T. Reid. His brother Oscar H. Reid also fell (see below). Buried in WARLENCOURT BRITISH CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot V. Row C. Grave 25. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

PRIVATE EGBERT REID, 15th (Civil Service Rifles) Lon- don Regiment, was born on 10 June 1883. He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1904.

His unit was one of the battalions of the famous 47th (London) Division, which went to France in March 1915, one of the first Divisions of volunteers that ever fought in war.

Private Reid was killed at Estcourt L'Abbaye, in the later stages of the first Somme battle on 7 October 1916.

His brother, Oscar Harold Reid, a corporal in the 4th Bedfords, an unauthorized clerk with Matthey, Harrison and Co., was missing on 23 April 1917 at Gavrelles, and is presumed killed on that date.

REID

H D

probably Hugh Douglas REID, Acting Regimental Sergeant Major 220, 2nd King Edward's Horse. Born St Helier, Channel Islands, enlisted White City, resident Acton, London W. Awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal (D.C.M.). Buried in GROVE TOWN CEMETERY, MEAULTE, Somme, France. Plot IV. Row B. Grave 18.

REID

Oscar Harold

*Corporal 33476, 4th Battalion, Bedfordshire Regiment. Killed in action 23rd April 1917. Aged 27. Born and resident Leytonstone, enlisted Leyton, Essex. Son of George Thomas and Elizabeth Ann Reid, of 10 Cambridge Rd., Leytonstone, London. His brother Egbert Reid also fell (see above). No known grave. Commemorated on ARRAS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Bay 5. Clerk at the Exchange.

REYNELL

Frederick Henry

*[Dedication booklet states Royal Air Force] Second Lieutenant, 35th Squadron, Royal Flying Corps and General List. Died 23rd April 1917. Aged 25. Son of Frederick and Katharine Hasler Reynell, of "The Retreat," Sandy Lane, Wallington, Surrey. Buried in AUBIGNY COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Pas de Calais, France. Plot VI. Row C. Grave 12. Clerk at the Exchange.

RICHARDS

Roland

*Lieutenant, 16th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment) attached 7th Battalion, Royal MUnster Fusiliers. Killed in action 7th December 1915. No known grave. Commemorated on DOIRAN MEMORIAL, Greece. Clerk at the Exchange.

RISLEY, MC

Nathan Bright

*Captain, 16th Battalion, Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own). Died of wounds 20th September 1917. Aged 35. Son of Charles and Harriett Risley, of 4, Rochester Rd., Camden Rd., London. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). Buried in RENINGHELST NEW MILITARY CEMETERY, Poperinge, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot IV. Row F. Grave 24. Clerk at the Exchange.

From de Ruvigny's ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-18 Part 4, page 169-170:

RISLEY, NATHAN BRIGHT, M.C., Capt., The Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own), s. of Charles Risley. of 4, Rochester Road, Camden Town, London, N.W., by his wife. Harriett, dau. of Alderman N. Robinson, L.C.C., J.P.; London, 16 Nov. 1881; educ. St. Pancras, N.W.; was engaged on the Stock Exchange; enlisted in the Empire Battn. The Royal Fusiliers 7 Sept. 1914; trained at Warlingham; obtained a commission in May, 1915; underwent a course at Camberley Staff College; was promoted Lieut. in March, 1916, and Capt. the following Aug.; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from 3 March, 1916; was wounded 3 Sept. 1916, and blown up by a shell in Aug. 1917; was again wounded 28 Sept. following, during the advance in Shrewsbury Forest, and died the same day at No. 37 Field Ambulance. Buried in the New Military Cemetery, Reninghelst, south-west of Ypres. His Colonel wrote: “I cannot tell you what a loss he is to me; he was so thoroughly reliable and always displayed the greatest gallantry, and led his company to its final objective under most difficult circumstances. His loss is irreparable to my battalion. Our heartfelt sympathy goes out to you in your great loss." He was awarded the Military Cross [London Gazette, 14 Nov. 1916], for gallantry in leading his men, although wounded, in face of a terrific gun fire, to the German front line, and thereby saving a position; unm.

ROBERTSON

Henry Fergus

*Private 3323, "A" Company, 20th (County of London) Battalion (Blackheath and Woolwich), London Regiment. Died of wounds 28th September 1915. Aged 21. Born Balham, Surrey, enlisted Blackheath, resident Hither Green. Son of Elizabeth Harriet Hooper (formerly Robertson), of 99, Broadfield Rd., Catford, London, and the late Henry James Robertson. Buried in NOEUX-LES-MINES COMMUNAL CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot I. Row C. Grave 24. Clerk at the Exchange.

ROBERTSON-ROSS

Patrick Maitland

*Captain, "D" Company, 8th Battalion, Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regiment). Killed in action 26th September 1915. Aged 27. Son of Sophy Robertson-Ross, of 3, Foulis Terrace, Onslow Gardens, London, and the late Patrick Robertson Ross (Black Watch). No known grave. Commemorated on LOOS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 95 to 97.Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN PATRICK MAITLAND ROBERTSON-ROSS, Royal West Kent Regiment, was the son of the late Patrick Robertson-Ross and grandson of Major-General P. Robertson-Ross, C.B. He was educated at Dover College and played football for his school and shot for the Bisley Team.

On leaving school he joined the firm of Arthur Gibbs and Co. and became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1914.

On the outbreak of war he enlisted in the 21st London Regiment, and soon afterwards was given a commission in the 8th Battalion, Royal West Kent Regiment, being gazetted Captain in June 1915.

He went to France in August with his battalion and was killed at Loos on 26 September whilst gallantly trying to force a way for his company through uncut wire in front of the German trenches.

One of the men with him that day wrote that “his leading was glorious and it was an honour to be led by such a man. He was a very brave man."

His name and the names of those who fell with him are engraved in the church at Hucqueliers, and the Cure wrote: “We will never forget Captain Robertson-Ross and his quiet piety, and the example he set his men and the villagers while billeted here."

ROBERTSON-WALKER, MiD

Arthur Murdoch Maxwell

*Captain, Adjutant 8th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Killed in action 7th July 1916. Aged 36. Son of the late James and Emily Robertson-Walker, of Gilgarran, Distington, Cumberland; husband of Madge Robertson-Walker. Mentioned in Despatches (MiD). No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Pier and Face 8 C 9 A and 16 A. Member of the Exchange. See also Lord's Cricket Members War Memorial

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN ARTHUR MURDO MAXWELL ROBERTSON-WALKER, Royal Fusiliers, was the son of James Robertson-Walker and was born in 1881. He was educated at Harrow and University College, Oxford, was a good golfer and cricketer and an all-round sportsman.

He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1905 and was associated with the firm of Buckley, Hartopp, and Co.

In December 1914 he obtained his commission in the 8th Royal Fusiliers and went out to France in the following May. He was promoted Captain and made Adjutant of his battalion, being subsequently mentioned in dispatches.

He was killed on 7 July 1976 in the attack on Ovillers during the opening phase of the battle of the Somme.

A brother officer wrote: “I cannot help testifying what a vast loss the Regiment has suffered in his death. As adjutant his energy and coolness always surprised me even through the many trying times we went through in France. Thanks to such as 'Bobby' the battalion earned a name of which any Fusilier may be proud."

Captain Robertson-Walker married a daughter of the late Mr. Alexander McIver.

RODDIS

Leonard William

*Private STK/215, 1oth Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Killed in action 21st February 1916. Aged 23. Born Forest Hill, enlisted London, resident Tooting. Son of Frederick William Roddis, of 26, Terrapin Rd., Tooting Bec Common, London. Buried in DOUCHY-LES-AYETTE BRITISH CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot I. Row E. Grave 7. Clerk at the Exchange.

ROSE

William Charles Herbert

*[Listed in book as Private] Rifleman 2386, 1st/16th (County of London) Battalion (Queen's Westminster Rifles). London Regiment. Enlisted Westminster, resident Richmond. No known grave. Commemorated on LOOS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 132. Clerk at the Exchange.

ROSS

Cyril G

*Petty Officer Motor Mechanic F/1355, Royal Navy Armoured Car Division (Dardanelles), Royal Naval Air Service. Died 4th June 1915. Buried in TWELVE TREE COPSE CEMETERY, Turkey. Commemorated on Special Memorial C. 10. Clerk at the Exchange.

Note: There are now 3,360 First World War servicemen buried or commemorated in the cemetery. 2,226 of the burials are unidentified but special memorials commemorate many casualties known or believed to be buried among them, including 142 officers and men of the 1st Essex who died on 6th August 1915, and 47 of the 1st/7th Scottish Rifles killed on 28th June.

ROSS

George William

*Temporary Sub-Lieutenant, Howe Battalion, Royal Naval Division, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. Killed in action 4th June 1915. Born 23rd September 1890. Employed by the Stock Exchange. Only son of Thomas Ernest Ross, of South Benfleet, Essex. No known grave. Commemorated on HELLES MEMORIAL, Turkey. Panel 8 to 15. Clerk at the Exchange.

Service history: Enlisted 4th August 1914; with Benbow Battalion B/19/364 22nd August 1914 until 7th January 1915 when he was discharged to Commission; with Howe Battalion 22nd February 1915 until his death 4th June 1915.

ROSS

James

*Private 2565, 1st/14th (County of London) Battalion (London Scottish), London Regiment. Missing in action after the London Scottish charge at Messines in the first battle of Ypres on Halloween 31st October/1st November 1914. Born Rutherford, Roxburgh in 1880, enlisted London, resident Chipstead. Son of Richard Ross. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 54. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

PRIVATE JAMES ROSS, London Scottish, was born at Ruther- ford, Roxburgh, N.B., in 1880, the son of Richard Ross. He was educated at Cargilfield, Trinity, Edinburgh, and at Fettes College, where he carried off several prizes, and was in the Hockey Eleven, Cricket Eleven, and Rugby Fifteen (captain 1897-8-9).

He left school and joined the firm of Renton Bros. and Co. in 1899 and became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1905. In 1901-2 he had won his Scottish International Cap as a forward. Later still he took to rowing and was a member of the Kingston Rowing Club, but he soon gave up rowing for golf and joined the Raynes Park Golf Club. Latterly he was a member of the Chip-stead Club.

When the war broke out he was a partner in Robson and Ross. He enlisted straightway in the London Scottish, and went to France in September 1914.

He was missing after the London Scottish charge at Messines in the first battle of Ypres on Hallowe'en, October 31-November 1, and nothing further has ever been heard of him.

RUSSELL

James Tarrell

*[Listed as James Farrell ROSS on SDGW] Sergeant S/18698, "B" Company, 7th Battalion, Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders. Killed in action 28th April 1917. Aged 23. Born West Hampstead, Middlesex, enlisted and resident London, Middlesex. Son of Robert and Isabella Tarrell Russell, of 101, Ivy Rd., Cricklewood, London. Buried in TANK CEMETERY, GUEMAPPE, Pas de Calais, France. Plot/Row/Section F. Grave 1. Clerk at the Exchange.

SALTER

Eric Fay

*Private 127606, 115th Sanitary Section, Royal Army Medical Corps. Died in Egypt 1st Ocotber 1918. Aged 24. Born and resident Hornsey, Middlesex, enlisted Whitehall. Son of the late Francis John and Edith Salter, of 40, Lone Rd., Stroud Green, London. Buried in ALEXANDRIA (HADRA) WAR MEMORIAL CEMETERY, Egypt. Section F. Grave 216. Clerk at the Exchange.

SANDERSON

Geoffrey Evan

*[Listed in book as Royal Irish Rifles] Lieutenant, 107 Company, Machine Gun Corps (infantry). Killed in action 1st July 1916. Aged 27. Son of W. J. and Amy Sanderson, of Eastfield Hall, Warkworth, Northumberland. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 5 C and 12 C. Clerk at the Exchange. Also listed on Warkworth War memorial and in the church at Warkworth

SARFAS

Harold Colenso

Private 92945, 3rd Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (London Regiment). Killed in action 9th October 1918. Aged 18. Born Kentish Town, enlisted East Ham, resident Manor Park. Son of Walter and Mary Ann Sarfas, of 17, Sixth Avenue, Manor Park, London. Formerly TR/1360951, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Buried in AIX-NOULETTE COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Pas de Calais, France. Plot II. Row H. Grave 19.

SAUNDERS

Harold Oscar

*Sergeant 300269, 1st/5th (City of London) Battalion (London Rifle Briagde), London Regiment. Killed in action 16th AUgust 1917. Aged 27. Born Ryde, Isle of Wight, enlisted London, resident Wimbledon. Son of Mrs. E. A. Saunders, of 55, Alexandra Rd., Wimbledon, London, and the late Edward George Saunders. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 52 and 54. Clerk at the Exchange.

SCHNEIDER

Arthur Ferdinand

*Private 32430, 7th Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire Regiment). Died of wounds in Salonika 25th April 1917. Aged 29. Born Charing Cross, London, enlisted and resident Ilford, Essex. Husband of Stella Frances Schneider, of "St. Ives" Agate Rd., Clacton-on-Sea, Essex. Formerly 29722, Duke of Cambridge's Own (Middlesex Regiment). Buried in SARIGOL MILITARY CEMETERY, KRISTON, Greece. Plot?Row/Section B. Grave 226. Clerk at the Exchange.

SCHWARZ, MC

Reginald Oscar

*Captain Temporary Major, 6th Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps attached to H.Q. 1st Echelon, Staff Con. of Salvage. Died in the Spanish flu epidemic 18th November 1918. Aged 43. Born 4th May 1875, Lee, London. South African Cricketer, played in twenty test matches and international rugby footballer. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). Buried in ETAPLES MILITARY CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot XLV. Row A Grave 4. Member of the Exchange. See also Lord's Cricket members War memorial

Sporting career: Schwarz won three caps for England at rugby against Scotland in 1899, and Wales and Ireland in 1901.

Schwarz played a handful of games for Middlesex in 1901 and 1902 before emigrating to South Africa and joining Transvaal; but it was on his return to England with the South African cricket team in 1904 that he made his mark, having learning from Bosanquet how to bowl the googly. Unusually, he bowled it as his stock delivery, with considerable success: in 1904 and 1907 he topped the bowling averages, in the latter year taking 137 wickets at just 11.70 apiece, and he was named as a Wisden Cricketer of the Year in 1908. On that 1907 tour, the first on which South Africa played Tests in England, they had no fewer than four leg-break and googly bowlers, Schwarz having passed on the secret of the googly to Aubrey Faulkner, Bert Vogler and Gordon White.

Schwarz retired from regular playing after the 1912 season, though he appeared thrice more for L Robinson's XI over the next two seasons. In all he took 398 wickets at a fine 17.58 average, and in Tests he took 55 at 22.60. Despite his poor batting -- he passed fifty only twice in first-class cricket -- Schwarz did make a century: 102 in a non-Test game against an England XI at Lord's in 1904.

See Wikipedia, Reggie Shwarz for more information

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

MAJOR REGINALD OSCAR SCHWARZ, M.C., King's Royal Rifle Corps, was born in 1875, and educated at St. Paul's School and Christ's College, Cambridge.

He was a brilliant athlete. He was the best cricketer at St. Paul's, but it was many years later that he became one of the most famous slow bowlers in the history of the game, for to .him was due, as much as to anyone, the development of that method of concealing the break on a ball, known as "Googly" bowling. When at his best he was the most consistent and least punished of all the bowlers of his type. He played as a regular member of the South African Test Match team for many seasons.

At Rugby football he was one of the great half-backs of his time, playing for his school, University, and England.

He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1911 and a partner in the firm of Parsons and Henderson.

During the war he served in German South-west Africa for a year as a Staff Captain, being mentioned in despatches, and in January 1916 went to France, where he served on the staff of a division. Early in 1918 he was transferred to the Salvage Corps through ill health, and he died on 18 November of that year.

For his services in France he was awarded the Military Cross and again mentioned in despatches.

One of his Commanding Officers wrote: “Combined with far more than his share of good looks, and the lithe figure of the trained athlete, he possessed the most supreme modesty and self-effacement. Tremendously cheerful, bubbling over with fun and good spirits, and possessing a real sense of humour, it was small wonder that he owned such a host of friends. If one were asked to sum him up in a sentence, one would say that it is inconceivable that he could ever have had an enemy.”

SCOTT-GATTY

Charles Comyn Scott

*Major, 3rd/1st Battalion, Hertfordshire Regiment. Died 24th July 1916. Aged 33. Son of Sir Alfred Scott-Gatty, K.C.V.O., Garter Principal King of Arms, and Lady Scott-Gatty, of Wendover Lodge, Welwyn; husband of Cicely Muriel Scott-Gatty (nee Gathorne-Hardy), of 8, Cromwell Crescent, Earl's Court, London. Buried in WELWYN CEMETERY, Hertfordshire. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

MAJOR CHARLES COMYN SCOTT SCOTT-GATTY, Hertfordshire Regiment, was the son of Sir Alfred and Lady Scott-Gatty of Welwyn, Herts. He was born in 188o and educated at Rugby. He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1904 and a partner in the firm of Grenfell and Co.

He joined the 10th Herts Volunteer Battalion (Bedfordshire Regiment) in 1901, being promoted to Captain in 1906. On the outbreak of War he was recalled for service to his Regiment, and was gazetted temporary Major in October.

Ill health prevented him from going to the Front, but he worked indefatigably in raising additional battalions of his Regiment. His health forced him to retire in December 1915 and he died on 24 July 1916.

Major Scott-Gatty married, in 1904, a daughter of Colonel the Honourable Charles Gathorne-Hardy. In collaboration with his wife he wrote the words and music of several musical comedies and many successful songs.

SEAGER

Edward

*Lance Corporal STK/1102, "A" Company, 10th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers. Killed in action 10th April 1917. Aged 28. Born Camberwell, enlisted London, resident Tooting. Son of Mrs. W. Seager, of 8, Thurso St., Tooting, London, and the late Mr. G. W. Seager. Buried in FEUCHY CHAPEL BRITISH CEMETERY, WANCOURT, Pas de Calais, France. Plot I. Row G. Grave 25. Clerk at the Exchange.

SHAIRP

Walter Vernon

*[Listed as SHARP on CWGC] Acting Corporal E/285, 17th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of Lodnon Regiment). Killed in action 14th November 1916. Born Hammersmith, enlisted Westminster, resident Acton Hill. Formerly 14924, Bedfordshire Regiment. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 8 C 9 A and 16 A. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CORPORAL WALTER VERNON SHAIRP, Royal Fusiliers, was born in 1883 and educated at the Royal Naval School, Eltham and University College School. He entered the firm of Durham and Gayton in 1899 and became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1913.

Enlisting in September 1914 he went to France in November 1915, being attached to a Trench Mortar Battery. He was killed at the Battle of Beaumont Hamel on November 14th, 1916. His Captain wrote: "Had he come through he would have been recommended for his good work and devotion to duty. His work at all times reflected his whole character—he was a man beloved and respected by officers and men."

SHATTOCK

Montague de Mancha

*Captain, 16th (County of London) Battalion (Queen's Westminster Rifles). Killed in action 8th January 1915. Buried in HOUPLINES COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Nord, France. Plot III. Row B. Grave 21. Member of the Exchange.

From de Ruvigny's ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-18 Part 1, page 323-324:

SHATTOCK, MONTAGU DE MANCHA, Capt., No. 4 Coy., 16th Battn. (Queen's Westminster Rifles) The London Regt. (T.F.), 3rd s. of Henry Foster Shattock, member of the London Stock Exchange, by his wife, Charlotte Rice (88A, Lexham Gardens, Kensington, W.), dau. of James Allerton; b. Broad Green, Croydon, co. Surrey, 9 Oct. 1867; educ. St. John's, Hurstpierpoint, and King's College, London, and was afterwards a member of the Stock Exchange. He enlisted in the Queen's Westminsters in Nov. 1892, and after passing through the ranks as Corpl., Sergt. and Colour-Sergt., obtained his commission as 2nd Lieut, 5 April, 1902, and was promoted Lieut. 6 June, 1903 and Capt. 21 March, 1905. He afterwards went through the Hythe musketry courses and became musketry instructor for the refit., under Lieut.-Col A Shcolbred, whose firm provides a company in the corps. He had resigned some time before the war broke out, but rejoined, and obtained his company again, 5 Aug. 1914. He went with his regt. to the Front, served in France and Flanders, and was killed in action, presumably by a German sniper, in the trenches near River Lys, Armentieres. France, 9 Jan. 1915, and was buried there behind the trenches; unm. In 1905 he captained the team of the Queen's Westminsters which defeated a team of the 7th New York National Guard at Risley. In the following year he took a team to New York, the return match being won by the Americans.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN MONTAGUE MANCHA SHATTOCK, Queen's Westminsters, was the son of Henry Foster Shattock, late of the Stock Exchange. Born on 9 October 1867, he was educated at St. John's, Hurstpierpoint, and at King's College, London. His membership of the Stock Exchange dated from 1889.

He joined the Queen's Westminsters as a volunteer in 1892 and obtained his captaincy in 1905 on being appointed Musketry Instructor to the Regiment. An enthusiastic, popular and influential officer, he captained the team of the "Queen's" which defeated the 7th New York National Guard at Bisley in 1905, and which visited New York for the return match in the following year. When the Queen's Westminsters became the 16th County of London (Territorial) Regiment he remained with them, retiring at length at the age of forty-six in 1913.

When war broke out, he immediately rejoined, and was posted to the 1st Battalion in France in November 1914. His Commanding Officer wrote: “It was with the greatest pride and thankfulness that we received him back . . . a much-loved and valued comrade."

He was killed, by a sniper's bullet through the head, near Armentieres, on 8 January 1915.

“Poor old Mont, we all miss him fearfully," wrote a brother officer. “The only consolation is that he died a hero's death." “We all in the mess loved Montie," wrote another. “Out here he was a very pattern of cheerfulness."

SHAW

Max Joseph

*Lieutenant, 16th Battalion attached 26th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Killed in action 15th September 1916. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 8 C 9 A and 16 A. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

LIEUTENANT MAX JOSEPH SHAW, Royal Fusiliers, was a son of the late Michael Schwabacher. After leaving Harrow he studied mining engineering at the University of Freiberg, near Dresden, and after passing out with high honours, took up a post in Mexico. He developed there after a few years a sort of vertigo on going any distance below earth, and was advised by the doctors he must never go down a mine again. He accordingly returned to England and went on the Stock Exchange, becoming a member in 1910 as a partner of the firm of Sternberg Bros.

In September 1914 he joined the Old Boys Corps and took a commission in January 1915 in the Royal Fusiliers, going to the Front in May 1916. He was killed in actions on 15 September at the age of thirty-four.

Not long before his death he had been recommended for honours for saving the lives of wounded men in No Man's Land.

The Officer Commanding the battalion to which he was attached wrote to his own Colonel: “I wish to bring to your notice the gallantry of Lieutenant Shaw . . . who was observed fighting very bravely and gallantly leading his men before he was killed. Will you please assure his relatives that this officer died in a very gallant manner."

The Captain of his company wrote to his widow: “I deeply regret to inform you that your husband, Lieutenant Shaw, was killed in action on the 15th inst. under circumstances of the greatest bravery, and while nobly doing his duty. . . . It is difficult as yet to gather all the fads of the case, but so far as I can gather, he, being with another officer and a handful of men, captured four German field guns, a most daring and splendid thing to do, and it was after this admirable piece of bravery that he was hit. But this is only one of the many plucky things he did, and he was beloved and admired by all the men and his loss is regretted by all who came in contact with him."

SHAW

Raymond Pugh

*[Listed in book as Lieutenant] Captain, 5th Battalion attached 2nd Battalion, Royal Fusiliers City of London Regiment). Killed in action 28th November 1915. No known grave. Commemorated on HELLES MEMORIAL, Turkey. Panel 37 to 41 or 328. Clerk at the Exchange.

From de Ruvigny's ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-18 Part 1, page 324:

SHAW, RAYMOND PUGH, M.A., Capt., 5th, add. 2nd, Battn. Royal Fusiliers, s. of the late William Sissmore Shaw, of Madras, India, Merchant, by his wife, Violet Amy Yule (now wife of Robert Francis Chiappini de Winton, of The Grange, Folkestone), dau. of Major-Gen. Arthur Thaddeus Searle; b. Madras, India, 15 Aug. 1887; educ. Warren Hill, Eastbourne; Harrow; Cheltenham College, and Trinity College, Cambridge (graduated M.A.), and was afterwards a partner with Mr. B. F. de Winton in a Preparatory School at Gore Court, Sittingbourne, and The Grange, Folkestone, but on the outbreak of war was given a commission as 2nd Lieut. in the Royal Fusiliers, 15 Aug. 1914, promoted Lieut. 13 March, 1915, and Capt. Oct. 1915; went to the Dardanelles, 7 Aug. 1915, and was killed in action at Suvla Bay, 27 Nov. following, being shot dead on leaving his trench to go to the help of a wounded man in the open; unm. Buried there. His brother, Capt. H. J. Shaw, was killed in action in France. 12 Nov. 1914 (see his notice).

SHELDON

Archibald Edward

*Second Lieutenant, "C" Company, 5th Battalion (Territorial) , Essex Regiment. Died of wounds 28th June 1917. Aged 25. Son of John and Constance Theodosia Sheldon, of 17, Conyers Rd., Streatham, London. Buried in HILL 10 CEMETERY, Turkey. Plot II. Row B. Grave 6. Clerk at the Exchange.

SHEPPARD, DSO

Samuel Gurney

*Lieutenant Colonel, Hertfordshire Yeomanry. Died of wlounds 21st August 1915. Aged 50. Son of Samuel Gurney Sheppard and Mary Ann Sheppard, of Herts; husband of Eileen Mary Winchester Sheppard, (nee Clowes), of Great Offley House, Hitchin. Awarded the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.). Buried in GREEN HILL CEMETERY, Turkey. Plot II. Row C. Grave 22. Member of the Exchange.

From the VC and DSO Book Volume II:

SHEPPARD, SAMUEL GURNEY, Lieut., was born 23 March, 1865, at Walton-on-Thames, son of Samuel Gurney Sheppard, of Leggatt's, Potter's Bar, and of Mary Ann Sheppard. He was educated at Rottingdean, at Thorpe Mandeville, and at Eton, and afterwards travelled for a year, before going into the Stock Exchange. He served in the South African War of 1899 1901, with the Imperial Yeomanry. He took part in the several operations in the Transvaal, Orange River Colony and Cape Colony, April, 1901, to 31 May, 1902. He received the South African Medal, and was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 3 Dec. 1901] : " 32nd Company, Imperial Yeomanry, Lieut. S. 0. Sheppard, on 18 Sept. headed a party which swam to some islands on the Vaal River, held by armed Boers, and took them prisoners. On 19 Sept. rescued a man from drowning at great personal risk." He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June, 1902] : " Samuel Gurney Sheppard, Lieut., Imperial Yeomanry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa." (The D.S.O. was awarded for the former of the acts mentioned above.) He was invested by the King 24 Oct. 1902. He became Major in the Herts Yeomanry 20 Dec. 1903. He went to Egypt as Second-in-Command of the Hertfordshire Yeomanry 10 Sept. 1914; was promoted Temporary Lieutenant-Colonel in Jan. 1915; left for Gallipoli 14 Aug. 1915, and was killed in action in the advance on Chocolate Hill 21 Aug. 1915. The following is an extract from a letter written by a sergeant in the Hertfordshire Yeomanry : " Among the first to fall was our gallant leader, Lieut.-Colonel S. G: Sheppard. He was bravely marching at the head of the Regiment, when he was terribly wounded by shrapnel, but as his men reached him he very gallantly sat, up to urge them on. His last command : Go on, the Herts ! Go on, the Herts ! ' will be remembered by all ranks for all time to come." He had married, 27 June, 1906, at Hayes, Kent, Eileen Mary Winchester, daughter of Winchester and Ellie Clowes, of Hitchin, Herts, and their children are : Kathleen Penelope; Daniel Gurney, born 21 Dec. 1908; Ellie Dorothea and Graham Hugh, born 3 April 1913.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

LIEUT.-COLONEL SAMUEL GURNEY SHEPPARD, D.S.O., commanding the Hertfordshire Yeomanry, of Wantage, Berkshire, was the elder son of the late Samuel Gurney Sheppard, of Leggats, Potters Bar, and the Stock Exchange. Born in 1865, he was educated at Eton, where he was a member of the School Volunteer Corps. Soon after leaving Eton he became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1887, and was ultimately senior partner in the firm of Sheppards, Pelly, Price and Pott.

He went to South Africa in 1901 with the 32nd Company of the Imperial Yeomanry and saw service in the Transvaal, Orange Free State, and Cape Colony. In addition to receiving the Queen's Medal with five clasps, he was mentioned in despatches and awarded the D.S.O. At the end of the war he became an honorary lieutenant in the Army. For some years subsequently he commanded the Enfield and Barnet troop of the Herts Yeomanry.

On the outbreak of the war he volunteered for foreign service, and in January 1915 was gazetted Lieutenant-Colonel of the Herts Yeomanry, with whom he had been in Egypt since the early days of the war.

He died of wounds received in action in the Dardanelles in August 1915.

"Our Colonel's death," wrote one of his brother-officers, "will be an irreparable loss to the Regiment, as there was no one more beloved by his officers and men; they would all have gone through hell itself for him."

And another wrote to his widow: "I don't think it is possible for me, or any one else, to tell you how beloved he was by every one; ourselves and the men did more than worship him."

SHERIDAN

Edward Hill

*Private 305242, "A" Company, 1st/5th (City of London) Battalion (London Rifle Brigade), London Regiment. Died of wounds 28th September 1918. Aged 36. Born Shepherd's Bush, enlisted St. Pancras. Husband of Constance Sheridan, of 38, Quernmore Rd., Stroud Green, London. Previously wounded in 1917. Buried in DUISANS BRITISH CEMETERY, ETRUN, Pas de Calais, France. Plot VII. Row A. Grave 31. Clerk at the Exchange.

SHERIDAN

William Frederick Temple

*[W F R in book at front] Captain, 5th Battalion attached 2nd Battalion, Rifle Briagde (The Prince Consort's Own). Killed in action 25th September 1915. No known grave. Commemorated on PLOEGSTEERT MEMORIAL, Comines-Warneton, Hainaut, Belgium. Panel 10. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN WILLIAM FREDERICK TEMPLE SHERIDAN, Rifle Brigade, the son of A. Brinsley Sheridan, was the grandson of Motley, the historian, and great-great-grandson of the dramatist.

He was educated at Harrow. On leaving school he went to the Stock Exchange in 1904 and was a partner in the firm of Leonard Clow and Co.

At the outbreak of war he joined the 11th London Regiment, and was afterwards transferred to the 5th Rifle Brigade, being promoted Lieutenant. He went to the front in May 1915 and was attached to the 2nd Battalion as Captain.

He was killed, at the age of thirty-six, on 25 September at the battle of Loos, when leading the assault at the head of the bombers.

The General commanding his division wrote: “He had done excellent work while serving with this division, and was a most promising officer. You have every reason to be proud of his gallantry and devotion to duty."

His Colonel wrote to his widow: “He was a magnificent leader of men and is the greatest loss to the army and the Regiment."

Captain Sheridan married in 1910 Clare Consuelo, daughter of Clara and Moreton Frewen, of Brede Place, Sussex, and left a son and daughter.

SHILCOCK

John Wynton

*Lieutenant, 5th Battalion (Territorial), Queen's (Royal West Surrey Regiment). Killed in action between 22nd and 24th November 1915. Aged 26. Son of the Rev. S.I.W. Shilcock, M.A., and Mrs. E.W. Shilcock, of Titsey Rectory, Oxted, Surrey. No known grave. Commemorated on BASRA MEMORIAl, Iraq. Panel 6. Clerk at the Exchange.

From de Ruvigny's ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-18 Part 2, page 274:

SHILCOCK, JOHN WYNTON, Lieut., 5th Battn. The Queen's (Royal West Surrey Regt.) (T.F.), attd. 2nd Battn. (9th Foot) The Norfolk Regt., eldest s. of the Rev. Sidney Isaac Welbank Shilcock, Rector of Titsey, co. Surrey, formerly Head Master of St. Winifred's, Kenley, by his wife, Eva Winifred, dau. of Peter Wynton Spence, of Kenley; b. Kenley, co. Surrey, 15 May, 1889; educ. Repton, and Christ's College, Cambridge, where he graduated B.A. in 1910: obtained a commission in the Cambridge O.T.C. 22 Aug. 1909; was subsequently a member of the London Stock Exchange; obtained a commission as 2nd Lieut. in the West Surrey Territorials 5 Jan. 1911, and was promoted Lieut. 1 July, 1912; volunteered for Imperial Service on the outbreak of war in Aug. 1914; left for India 29 Oct. 1914; volunteered to take a draft to serve with the Indian Expeditionary Force in Mesopotamia in May, 1915, when he was attached to the 2nd Norfolk Regt., and died at Ctesiphon 23 Nov. following, from wounds received in action there the previous day. Buried near the Arch of Ctesiphon; unm.

SIMMONDS

George Albert

*Sergeant G/1504, 7th Battalion, Queen's (Royal West Surrey Regiment). Killed in action 1st July 1916. Aged 24. Born and resident South Norwood, Surrey, enlisted Croydon, Surrey. Son of George and Eunice Simmonds, of 120, Crowther Rd., South Norwood, London. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 5 D and 6 D. Clerk at the Exchange.

SIMMONDS

Guy Bloxham

*[Listed in book as Lieutenant] Second Lieutenant, 86th Company, 5th Battalion, Machine Gun Corps (Infantry). Killed 29th Decmeber 1916. Aged 29. Son of William Henry and Amy Slmmonds, of Hobart, Tasmania. Joined Public Schools Bn. (16th Middlesex) on the outbreak of war as a Private. Born at Acocks Green, Worcs. Buried in ST. PIERRE CEMETERY, AMIENS, Somme, France. Plot VI. Row B. Grave 6. Clerk at the Exchange.

From de Ruvigny's ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-18 Part 5, page 151:

SIMMONDS, GUY BLOXHAM, 2nd Lieut., 88th Machine Gun Coy., Machine Gun Corps, 2nd s. of William Henry Simmonds, of Tasmania, Editor of the "Hobart Mercury," by his wife, Amy, dau. of the late C. W. N. Bloxham, Surgeon, of Halesowen; b. Acocks Green, co. Worcester, 22 April, 1887; educ. privately in South Africa, and at Whitgift School, Croydon; was in the London Stock Exchange; volunteered for active service on the outbreak of war, and joined the 16th Battn. (Public Schools) The Duke of Cambridge's Own (Middlesex Regt.) as a Private; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders, 1914-16; returned to England, and was given a commission, and gazetted 2nd Lieut. Machine Gun Corps 5 Aug. 1915; proceeded again to France in Dec. 1916, and was killed in a railway accident while on active service at Ailly-sur-Somme 29 Dec. 1916. Buried in St. Pierre Cemetery; unm.

SIMPSON

Ernest Herbert

*Second Lieutenant, "G" Anti-Aircraft Battery, Anzac Section, Royal Garrison Artillery. Died of wounds 2nd October 1917. Aged 41. Husband of Violet A. Gerry (formerly Simpson), of 3, Belle Vue, Sunderland. Buried in LONGUENESSE (ST. OMER) SOUVENIR CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot IV. Row E. Grave 21. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

SECOND LIEUTENANT ERNEST HERBERT SIMPSON, Royal Garrison Artillery, was the second son of F. H. Simpson of Beckenham and the Stock Exchange. See also Lord's Cricket Members War Memorial

Born in 1875, he was educated at Malvern College. He was in his school cricket eleven for three years, was captain in 1895, and played for Kent in 1896.

He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1900 and subsequently started as a dealer in the American market.

In June 1916 he joined the 29th A.A. section of the Royal Garrison Artillery. Later he was given his commission and went to France.

He was mortally wounded on 27 September 1917 near Vlamertinghe by an aeroplane bomb and died at St. Omer in October. In 1913 he married a daughter of W. B. Bishop of Beckenham.

SIMPSON

Walter Septimus

*Private, Royal Marine Artillery transferred to Royal Naval Air Station, Munstone near Ramsgate. Contracted tuberculosis while serving his duty and was discharged in July 1917 eventually dying in March 1918. Son of Henry Simpson of Stanwell, Middlesex. *** Not listed on CWGC as he died outside of service *** Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

PRIVATE WALTER SEPTIMUS SIMPSON, Royal Marine Artillery, was the son of Henry Simpson of Stanwell, Middlesex. He was born in 1864. He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1889.

In February 1915 he joined the Royal Marine Artillery, and was subsequently transferred to the Royal Naval Air Service station at Munstone, near Ramsgate.

While on this duty he contracted tuberculosis and was discharged in July 1917.

He died in the following March, leaving a widow.

SMITH

Albert Leonard

*[Listed as Private on memorial] Rifleman Z/2928, 1st Battalion, Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own). Killed in action 3rd May 1915. Aged 24. Born Leicester, enlisted London, resident Upper Clapton, Middlesex. Son of William and Alice Cheshire Smith. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 46 - 48 and 50. Clerk at the Exchange.

SMITH, MC

Gordon Keith

*[Dedication booklet states Royal Air Force and Flight Commander] Captain, 27th Squadron, Royal Flying Corps and General List. Died 21st August 1917. Aged 26. Son of George and Anna Maria Smith, of 131, Harrow Rd., Paddington, London. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). Buried in Y FARM MILITARY CEMETERY, BOIS-GRENIER, Nord, France. Plot/Row/Section N. Grave 28. Clerk at the Exchange.

Extract from London Gazette 12th October 1915, page 4.

Alexandra, Princess of Wales' s Own (Yorkshire Regiment). Gordon Keith Smith to be temporary Second Lieutenant. Dated 7th October, 1915.

SMITH

Julian [Horace] Martin

*Second Lieutenant, Inteeligence Corps, Special List attached 9th (queen's Royal) Lancers. Died 10th September 1914. Aged 26. Son of Martin Ridley Smith, of Warren House, Hayes, Kent. Buried at the west end of NANGIS COMMUNAL CEMETERY, Seine-et-Marne, France. Member of the Exchange. See also Canterbury, 9th Lancers Memorial

From de Ruvigny's ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-18 Part 4, page 190:

SMITH, JULIAN MARTIN, 2nd Lieut. attd. 9th Lancers, s. of the late Martin Ridley Smith, by his wile (—) (15. Cadogan Square. S.W.) : served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders, and died at Nangis, near Paris, after an operation supervening wounds received in action.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

SECOND LIEUTENANT JULIAN MARTIN SMITH, attached 9th Lancers, was the first Volunteer to fall in the war. Born in London in 1887, the son of the late Martin Ridley Smith, the banker, he was educated at Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge.

His athletic record was a distinguished one. At Eton he was Keeper of the Field and of the Racquets, and had his “Wall" and “Mixed Wall" colours. From Eton he went to Trinity and played golf for the University, his handicap at that time being plus 2.

On coming down from Cambridge he went straight into the City, joining the Stock Exchange in 1909. He became a partner in the firm of Rowe and Pitman.

On the day war was declared he volunteered for alive service, and was attached to the 9th Lancers as Interpreter. He was with the Regiment throughout the retreat from Mons.

On 7 September 1914 he was wounded, and died after an operation two days later.

SMITH

W A

*Trooper, Yeomanry. Clerk at the Exchange.

STANLEY

Ronald B

*Captain, Royal Air Force. Died 17th February 1919. Buried in DATCHET CEMETERY, Buckinghamshire. Grave 460. Clerk at the Exchange.

STEPHENS

Kyrle Nalder

*[Listed as Lieutenant in book] Second Lieutenant, Royal Army Service Corps. Died 31st December 1917. Aged 36. Son of Arthur Nalder Stephens, of Bridport Harbour, Dorset; husband of Rose Mildred Stephens, of Burford, Broxbourne, Herts. Buried in ST. MARY CHURCH CEMETERY, BURTON BRADSTOCK, Dorset. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

LIEUTENANT KYRLE NALDER STEPHENS, Royal Army Service Corps, was the eldest son of Arthur Nalder Stephens, of Hendon, Middlesex. Born in June 1881, he was educated at the Philberds, Maidenhead, and at Cholmeley School, Highgate. After leaving school he joined the firm of B. M. Clarke and Co., in which firm his father was partner. He was elected a member of the Stock Exchange in the year 1904, and in 1910, on the death of B. M. Clarke, he became senior partner.

At Highgate School he did well at cricket and football, and was in the cricket and football eleven for the year 1898 and cricket for 1899.

In 1902 he was elected a member of the Leathersellers' Company.

In July 1915 he joined the Inns of Court O.T.C., and a few months later obtained a commission in the Army Service Corps. After doing home service at various stations he was sent in 1917 to India, and stationed first at Meerut and afterwards at Bareilly. At the latter cantonment he became seriously ill and was ordered home. He died on 31 December 1917.

A friend wrote: “At Newcastle, Larkhill, and Somerleyton, we had been very much Rose Mildred, younger daughter of John Kempster, J.P., of St Ann's, Hendon.together, and I was truly sorry when we separated, he going to India and I to France. He made himself very much endeared to all brother officers who met him, and we feel his loss very keenly."

He married in 1906.

STEPHENS

Samuel Charles

*Private STK/536, 10th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Killed in action 15th July 1916. Aged 31. Born Stonehouse, Gloucester, enlisted London, resident Stoke-on-Trent. Son of Bessie M. Stephens, of 124, Trentham Rd., Stoke-on-Trent, and the late William Stephens. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 8 C 9 A and 16 A. Clerk at the Exchange.

STEPHENSON, MiD x 2

Kenneth Langton

*Second Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, Bedfordshire Regiment. Killed in action 26th September 1915. Aged 23. Son of Henry Langton Stephenson, of 5, Copthall Court, Throgmorton St., London. Twice Mentioned in Despatches No known grave. Commemorated on LOOS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 41. Clerk at the Exchange.

STILES

Edgcumbe Leopold

*Second Lieutenant, 4th Battalion (Territorial), The Buffs (East Kent Regiment). Killed in action 14th April 1918. No known grave. Commemorated on PLOEGSTEERT MEMORIAL, Comines-Warneton, Hainaut, Belgium. Panel 2. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

SECOND LIEUT. EDGCUMBE LEOPOLD STILES, The Buffs, attached 4th South Staffordshires, had been a member of the Stock Exchange since 1904. He obtained his commission in the former Regiment, after serving for ten months in the ranks.

Subsequently he was attached to the South Staffordshires and went to France with them in August 1917.

He was killed eight months later, during the great retreat, on 14 April 1918 while on a wiring expedition at Neuve Eglise.

It was found impossible to recover his body and his place of burial is unknown.

Lieut. Stiles left a widow.

STOCK

Charles Herbert

*Second Lieutenant, 13th Battalion, Hampshire Regiment attached 9th Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment. Died 31st May 1916. Aged 43. Son of Bernard Camidge Stock and Caroline Elizabeth Stock; husband of the late Mabel Agnes Stock (nee Yule). Buried in AMARA WAR CEMETERY, Iraq. Plot XXI. Row D. Grave 3. Member of the Exchange.

From de Ruvigny's ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-18 Part 2, page 286:

STOCK, CHARLES HERBERT, 2nd Lieut., 13th (Service) Battn. The Hampshire Regt., 2nd s. of Bernard Camidge Stock, of Lyndhurst, Princess Road, Bournemouth, late of the London Stock Exchange, by his wife, Caroline Elizabeth, dau. of George Herring, of Kensington; b. Teddington, co. Middlesex, 10 July, 1873; educ. Aldenham School, Elstree, co. Herts; was on the Stock Exchange; served for seven years with the H.A.C.; volunteered for foreign service, and rejoined on the outbreak of war in Aug. 1914; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders March, 1915; was wounded at Neuve Chapelle in the same year; obtained a 2nd Lieutenancy in the Hampshire Regt. 28 May, 1915; served with the Indian Expeditionary Force in Mesopotamia from Jan. 1916, and died near Abu-Roman Mounds 31 May, 1916, from gastroenteritis, contracted while serving in the trenches. Buried by Mason's Mounds on the Tigris. A brother officer wrote: “Lieut. C. H. Stock was very popular with the men of his Company (C), which he was commanding, and was also a favourite with his brother officers, who felt his loss very keenly. His devotion to duty was magnificent, and it was with difficulty that he was persuaded to go to the Field Ambulance." He m. at St. George's Church, Croydon, 15 July, 1904, Mabel Agnes (died from the effects of a motor accident in June, 1914), dau. of the late Bransby Yule, of Hampstead and Bournemouth, and had two sons: Geoffrey Charles, b. 17 Sept. 1906, and Laurence Bernard, b. 10 Oct. 1910.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

SECOND LIEUTENANT CHARLES HERBERT STOCK, Hampshire Regiment, attached Worcester Regiment, was the second son of Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Stock, of Bournemouth West. Educated at Aldenham School, Herts, he was a good all-round sportsman and was in the 1st Eleven, both of cricket and football.

He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1897.

At the beginning of the War, though over forty, he rejoined the Honourable Artillery Company, was promoted to Corporal, and went out with his Regiment to France. He was severely wounded at the battle of Neuve Chapelle, being shot through the neck, and was sent to hospital in England. On recovery he returned to his Regiment and then got a commission in the 13th Hants Regiment, with which in July 1916 he sailed for Egypt. From there he was sent to Mesopotamia and attached to the 9th Worcester Regiment.

While in the front trenches a few miles from Kut, he collapsed owing to illness and gastric troubles. He was carried to the field ambulance, but succumbed quite suddenly on 31 May 1916, after being unconscious about two days.

An officer of his battalion wrote that during his short service there “He had endeared himself to his fellow officers and men" and "how much he would be missed."

He left two boys—now orphans—having previously lost his wife in a motor accident in 1914.

STRANG

George Nicholas

*Temporary Sub-Lieutenant, Howe Battalion, Royal Naval Division, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. Missing, later reported killed in action 13th November 1916. Aged 29. Born 15th July 1887. Son of John H. and Kate C. Strang, of 3, Leamington Park, Acton, London. No known grave. Clerk with the Stock Exchange. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 1 A. Clerk at the Exchange.

Service history: Enlisted 4th August 1914; with Benbow Battalion C/19/560 22nd August 1914 to 2nd November 1914 (at Antwerp 1914); Commissioned as a Temporary Sub Lieutenant, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, 10th March 1915. With the draft for Mesopotamian Eexpeditionary Force 28th June 1915 and joined Howe Battalion 18th July 1915 to 28th September 1915 when he fell ill and was invalided to United Kingdom due to dysentery 13th November 1915; in the draft for the British Expeditionary Force (Machine Gunner & Trained Scout) 7th July 1916, joined Howe Battalion 12th July 1916 until his death 13th November 1916.

SYER, MC

Hubert Lionel

*Captain, 1st/14th (County of London) Battalion (London Scottish), London Regiment. Died of wounds 18th November 1916. Aged 38. Son of the Rev. and Mrs. Barrington Blomfield Syer, of Kedington Rectory, Suffolk; husband of H. M. Syer, of "Westwode," Little Maplestead, Halstead, Essex. Served in the South African Campaign. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). Buried in HAMPSTEAD CEMETERY, London. Plot H. Row 12. Grave 118. Clerk at the Exchange. See also Kedington, Suffolk

From de Ruvigny's ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-18 Part 3, page 262 and Part 4 page 205 (identical entries):

SYER, HUBERT LIONEL, MC., Capt., 14th Battn. (London Scottish) The London Regt. (T.F.), 4th s. of the Rev. Barrington Blomfield Syer, Rector of Kedington, by his wife. Amelia Katherine, dau. of the late Rev. William Wright, Head Master of the Royal Grammar School, Colchester; b. Kedington Rectory, co. Suffolk, 10 March, 1878; educ. Felixstowe; was on the Stock Exchange; joined the London Scottish in 1895; served in the South African War, 1899-1902, attached to the Gordon Highlanders, winning the Queen's Medal with five clasps; rejoined the London Scottish on the outbreak of the European War and volunteered for foreign service; obtained a commission as End Lieut. 1 Sept. 1914; was promoted Capt. 13 Nov. following; served with the Expeditionary Force in France from 30 Dec. 1914; took part in the Battle of Loos in Sept. 1915; was Regimental Transport Officer at Boulogne for a few months in 1916; rejoined his Regiment in July, and died in St. Thomas's Hospital, London, S.W., 18 Nov. following, from wounds received in action on the Somme 19 Sept. His Colonel wrote: "Captain Syer embodied everything which a soldier should be; a wonderful organizer, brave almost to a fault, he at all times set an example of courage and endurance under hardships and peril. He was beloved by all ranks, and his death is a severe loss to the Regiment and the British Army. I have lost a splendid officer." Captain Syer was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 1 Jan. 1916], by P.M. Sir John (now Lord) French, for gallant and distinguished service in the field, and was awarded the Military Cross [London Gazette, 13 Jan. 1016], for meritorious service in the field at Loos. He m. at Holy Saviour's Tynemouth, Northumberland. 12 Sept. 1908, Helen May, yst. dau. of the Rev. Canon Herbert S. Hicks, M.A., Vicar of Tynemouth Priory, Northumberland; s.p.

TABOR

John Morton

*Second Lieutenant, 18th Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Killed in action 21st September 1917. No known grave. Commemorated on TYNE COT MEMORIAL, Zonnebeke, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 115 to 119 and 162A and 163A. Clerk at the Exchange.

TAFFS

William Clifford

*[Listed in book as Private] Rifleman 4186, 1st/16th (County of London) Battalion (Queen's Westminster Rifles), London Regiment. Killed in action 1st July 1916. Born and resident Bow, enlisted Westminster. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 13 C. Clerk at the Exchange.

TAPP, MC and Bar

Theodore Arthur

*Captain, Coldstream Guards attached 3rd company, Machine Gun Guards. Killed in action 21st october 1917. Aged 34. Son of Charles James and Olga M. H. Tapp, of Bromley, Kent; husband of Margaret Flagg (formerly Tapp), of New York, U.S.A. A member of the London Stock Exchange. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.) and Bar. Buried in DOZINGHEM MILITARY CEMETERY, Poperinge, West-Vlaanderen. Belgium. Plot X. Row E. Grave 6. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from London Gazette 14th December 1917, page 3

Capt. Theodore Arthur Tapp, M.C., C. Gds., Spec. Res., attd. M.G. Gds. (M.C. gazetted 26th September, 1917.)

Extract from London Gazette 8 January 1918, page 90-91.

Lt. (A./Capt.) Theodore Arthur Tapp, CL Gds., Spec. Res., attd. M.G. Gds. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in getting his guns into position previous to an attack, in spite of heavy casualties, and in leading his men in the attack with great coolness, courage and resource, liy his fine personal example he helped a great deal towards the success of the operations.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN THEODORE ARTHUR TAPP, M.C. and Bar, Coldstream Guards, was the eldest son of the late C. J. Tapp, of Bromley and the Stock Exchange. He was born in 1883 and educated at Rugby and Caius College, Cambridge. On leaving Cambridge he intended entering the diplomatic service, but for reasons of health relinquished the idea and became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1905, and a partner in the firm of C. Andreae and Co.

He was a fine golfer and cricketer.

Soon after the outbreak of war he was given his commission in the Coldstream Guards, went to the front in November 1914 and was wounded at Cuinchy. He returned to France in the following March and remained there till January 1916, when he was again invalided home. When he returned to the front he was attached to the Guards' Machine Gun Corps. He was mortally wounded at the battle of Flanders on 11 October 1917.

He was awarded the Military Cross "For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in getting his guns into position previous to an attack, in spite of heavy casualties, and leading his men in the attack with great coolness, courage, and resource." Later on he received a Bar to his Cross.

TATE

Roberet Somers

*Corporal 544, Honourable Artillery Company (Infantry). Killed in action 18th December 1914. Born and resident Wimbledon, enlisted Armoury House. Buried in LOKER CHURCHYARD, Heuvelland, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot II. Row E. Grave 15. Clerk at the Exchange.

TAYLOR

William Alfred

*Bombardier 96630, 199th Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery. Killed in action 15th May 1918. Aged 30. Enlisted Wood Green, Middlesex. Son of Alfred Edward and Minnie Taylor, of Wood Green, London; husband of Edith Maud Taylor, of 77, Pellatt Grove, Wood Green, London. Buried in COUIN NEW BRITISH CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot/Row/Section D. Grave 61. Clerk at the Exchange.

THOMAS

Geoffrey Owen

*Second Lieutenant, 19th Battalion, Fusiliers. Killed in action 25th April 1918. Aged 34. Son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Samuel James Thomas, of Barnet; husband of Ethel Mabel Thomas, of Evanston, Churchfields, Woodford, Essex. No known grave. Commemorated on TYNE COT MEMORIAL, Zonnebeke, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 54 to 60 and 163A. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

SECOND LIEUTENANT GEOFFREY OWEN THOMAS, Lancashire Fusiliers, was born in 1884, and became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1910.

He joined the Royal Fusiliers as a Private in October 1914, and went to France as a Lance-Corporal in November 1915. He served with a Trench Mortar Battery for some time, and on one occasion was recommended for conspicuous gallantry. On being recommended for a commission he came home and after being trained at a Cadet school returned to France in June 1917 as an officer to join the 19th Lancashire Fusiliers.

He was killed on Kemmel Hill on 25 April 1918. In the absence of runners he had volunteered to carry a message forward from H.Q., where he was acting as Assistant Adjutant. He delivered the message but never returned.

His Colonel wrote to his widow: "Your husband died like a soldier. He gave the last ounce for the battalion. He was always perfectly cool and colleted under fire, and always most energetic in all his duties."

One of his men wrote: "He was a real fine man and as straight as a die. When he was in command of his platoon his men almost worshipped him. A real true British gentleman and one whom everyone misses."

And another: "He undoubtedly was one of the most popular officers in the Battalion. He always inspired one with confidence by his great unconcern under the worst of conditions."

THORPE

George R

*[Listed in book as Second Lieutenant] Captain, 1st Battalion, Honourable Artillery Company (Territorial Force). Died of wounds 25th April 1917. Aged 30. Husband of Agnes M. Thorpe, of 32, Ashurst Rd., North Finchley, London. Buried in DUISANS BRITISH CEMETERY, ETRUN, Pas de Calais, France. Plot III. Row F. Grave 12. Clerk at the Exchange.

TOMKINS

Albin George

*[Listed in book as Lieutenant] Second Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, Irish Guards. Killed in action 13th September 1916. Aged 31. Son of Albin and Rosa Cavell Tomkins; husband of Hilda Case Sinclair (formerly Tomkins), of Ene-Ametza, Biarritz, France. Buried in GUILLEMONT ROAD CEMETERY, GUILLEMONT, Somme, France. Plot VII. Row N. Grave 7. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

LIEUTENANT ALBIN GEORGE TOMKINS was the son of A. B. Tomkins of West Byfleet. Educated at Rugby, he became a member in 1911 and a partner in the firm of Cavell Strachan and Lardelli, 16 Tokenhouse Yard.

He obtained a commission in the Irish Guards, and was killed in action on 13 September 1916 during the later stages of the first Battle of the Somme.

TREW

Frederick

*[Listed in book as Trooper] Private 779, [CWGC] City of London Yeomanry (Rough Riders) or [SDGW] 3rd County of London Yeomanry (Sharpshooters Hussars). Died in Egypt 7th June 1915. Aged 27. Born and resident Upper Holloway, enlisted London. Son of Frederick W. and Eleanor A. Trew, of 15, St. John's Park, Upper Holloway, London. Buried in ISMAILIA WAR MEMORIAL CEMETERY, Egypt. Plot/Row/Section A. Grave 106. Clerk at the Exchange.

TROUGHTON

Harold Willis

*Sub Lieutenant, Hood Battalion attached 190th Brigade Trench Mortar Battery, Royal Naval Division, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. Killed in action 13th November 1916. Aged 30. Former Able Seaman H.M.S. "Temeraire". Born 17th October 1886. Son of Charles Willis Troughton and Catherine Elizabeth Troughton, of Hanover Court, Hanover Square, London. Buried in ANCRE BRITISH CEMETERY, BEAUMONT-HAMEL, Somme, France. Special Memorial 28. Member of the Exchange.

Note: There are now 2,540 Commonwealth casualties of the First World War buried or commemorated in the cemetery. 1,335 of the graves are unidentified, but special memorials commemorate 43 casualties known or believed to be buried among them. There are also special memorials to 16 casualties know to have been buried in other cemeteries, whose graves were destroyed by shell fire.

Serice history: Commissioned Temporary Sub Lieutenant RNVR 24th July 1915; Draft for Hood Battalion Mesopotamian Expeditionary Force 16th Bebruary 1916, attached Base Depot Buda Point Mudros 6th March 1916, joined Base Depot Mudros 24th May 1916, to 4th Army Corps Training School for Light Trench Mortars 24th June 1916, posted to 190th Brigade Light Trench Mortar Battery 5th July 1916 until his death on 13th November 1916.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

SUB-LIEUTENANT HAROLD WILLIS TROUGHTON, R.N.V.R., attached 190th Trench Mortar Battery, was the younger son of Charles W. Troughton, of Blackheath and the Stock Exchange. Born in 1886, he was educated at Blackheath School and in Paris, and became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1913.

He joined the R.N.V.R. in 1909, and during his five years' training in the London Division was devoted to his duties, gaining several cups for gunnery and rowing. In the course of his training he also cruised on H.M.S. “Superbe."

On the outbreak of war he served on board H.M.S. "Téméraire" until July 1915, when he was granted a commission and was attached to the Royal Naval Division. After training at the Crystal Palace and Blandford, he proceeded to Mudros and was temporarily on detachment duty at Lemnos.

In the early summer of 1916 his division was transferred to France for the Somme campaign, and he was attached to the 190th T.M.B.

He was killed 13 November of that year in the Battle of the Ancre. The Adjutant of his Battery thus described his death: “Your son died under circumstances of exceptional bravery. He went forward with another man to get into touch with another battalion, although the ground he had to go over was swept by intense fire both from machine guns and sniping. He achieved his object, but in returning to our guns he was struck down by a bullet and instantly killed. His loss to the Battery and the Brigade will be irreparable."

Commander James, under whom he served on the "Téméraire," wrote: "I noticed the great heart he used to put into everything he put his hand to, and I regretted very much when he left us to take up his commission, which he richly deserved. No more gallant officer and good fellow has fallen in the service of his Sovereign and country."

TURNER

Arthur Thomas

*Private 12310, 1st Battalion, Northamptonshire Regiment. Killed in action 20th April 1918. Born Stepney, Middlesex, enlisted Walthamstow, Essex. Buried in POST OFFICE RIFLES CEMETERY, FESTUBERT, Pas de Calais, France. Plot III. Row C. Grave 19. Clerk at the Exchange.

TYLER

Harold Robert

*Captain, 1st/4th Battalion (Territorial), Essex Regiment. Killed in action 18th August 1915. Aged 27. Son of Ellen Louise Tyler, of 28, Hamilton Rd., Harrow, and the late I. W. Tyler. Buried in AZMAK CEMETERY, SUVLA, Turkey. Special memorial 54. Clerk at the Exchange.

Note: There are now 1,074 First World War servicemen buried or commemorated in this cemetery. 684 of the burials are unidentified, but special memorials commemorate by name a number of casualties known or believed to be buried among them. Also among the unidentified graves are those of 114 officers and men of the 1st/5th Battalion Norfolk Regiment (the Sandringham battalion) who died on 12 August 1915.

TYSER

George Beaumont

*Major, 7th Battalion, East Lancashire Regiment. Killed in action 5th July 1916. Aged 39. Youngest son of George Walter and Annie Tyser, of Oakfield, Mortimer, Reading. Buried in BAPAUME POST MILITARY CEMETERY, ALBERT, Somme, France. Plot I. Row B. Grave 7. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

MAJOR GEORGE BEAUMONT TYSER, East Lancashire Regiment, was born in 1876, and educated at Harrow and Camborne Mining College.

He served in the South African War for two years, acting as Lance Bearer to Lord Methuen. On returning home he went on the Stock Exchange and became a member in 1911, joining the firm of Robinson and Glyn.

On the outbreak of war he was given a commission in the 7th East Lancashire Regiment, and was promoted to Captain soon afterwards. He went to France in July 1915 and later was given his Majority. He was killed at the head of his men in the attack on La Boiselle on 5 July 1916.

UNDERHILL

William Samuel

*Private 40898, 2nd Battalion, Suffolk Regiment. Died 25th December 1916. Aged 35. Born Hackney, Middlesex, enlisted Croydon, Surrey. Son of the late Samuel Underhill, (of the Stock Exchange, London, and of Croydon) and of Louisa Underhill; husband of Mary J. Underhill, of 27, Thornton Rd., South Croydon, Surrey. Buried in PUCHEVILLERS BRITISH CEMETERY, Somme, France. Plot VI. Row F. Grave 36. Member of the Exchange.

From de Ruvigny's ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-18 Part 3, page 273:

UNDERHILL, WILLIAM SAMUEL, Private, No. 40898, 4th (Territorial) Battn. The Suffolk Regt., s. of the late Samuel Underhill, of the Stock Exchange; b. London, 25 Feb. 1881; educ. The Limes School, Croydon, and Mill Hill School; was engaged on the Stock Exchange; served as a Volunteer in the London Rifle Brigade, 1903-6; enlisted 28 June, 1916; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders; was recommended for a commission, and died 25 Dec. 1916, at No. 2 Casualty Clearing Station of septic poisoning, contracted after one week in a trench behind the line. Buried at Pontevilliers, near Albert. He m. at Tunbridge Wells, 18 June, 1908, Mary Julia, dau. of the late Thomas Griffiths Woollacott, and had three children : Irene Mary, b. 17 Oct. 1909; Dorothy Louise, b. 21 Jan. 1913, and Marjorie, b. 14 May, 1915.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

PRIVATE WILLIAM SAMUEL UNDERHILL, Suffolk Regiment, was born at Clapton in 1881. He was the second surviving son of the late Samuel Underhill, formerly Deputy-Chairman of the Stock Exchange. Educated at Mill Hill, he entered his father's firm, Underhill and Le Mare, in 1897 on leaving school. In 1902 he became a member, acting as authorized clerk.

He enlisted in the Suffolk Regiment in June 1916 and after a few months' training in Norfolk his battalion was sent to France to complete its training. In December he went to the Front, but while his battalion was waiting to take its part in the next attack he fell sick and was rem0ved from the trenches suffering from trench foot and septic poisoning.

He died in a Casualty Clearing Station on Christmas Day 1916, at the age of thirty-five, leaving a widow and three children. He had applied for a commission in the Army Service Corps, on the advice of one of his officers, before leaving England, and was expecting to be sent back at any moment. His papers recommending him were finally signed a few days before his death.

He was a great lover of music and literature. He was held in high esteem both by his comrades in his business life, the fellow-workers at his church, and those who were his comrades during his few months of army life.

VERTUE

Alan Francis

*Corporal 797, 1st Battalion, Honourable Artillery Company (Infantry). Died of wounds 22nd April 1915. Aged 20. Born Twickenham, enlisted Armoury House, resident Richmond. Son of Alfred and Mina Grace Vertue, of 20, Bishopsgate, London. Born at Strawberry Hill, Middx. Buried in LA CLYTTE MILITARY CEMETERY, Heuvelland, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot I. Row E. Grave 13. Clerk at the Exchange.

VILLIERS

Algernon Hyde

*Lieutenant, Lothians and Border Horse (Territorial) and 121st Company, Machine Gun Corps (Infantry). Killed in action 23rd November 1917. Aged 31. Son of the Rt. Hon. Sir Francis Hyde Villiers, P.C., G.C.M.G., G.C.V.O., and Lady Villiers; husband of Beatrix Villiers (now The Hon. Mrs. Walter Gibbs), of Stanstead Lodge, Stanstead Abbots, Herts. No known grave. Commemorated on CAMBRAI MEMORIAL, LOUVERVAL, Nord, France. Panel 1. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

LIEUTENANT ALGERNON HYDE VILLIERS, Lothians and Border Horse, was the youngest son of the Hon. Sir Francis Hyde Villiers, British Minister to Belgium, and grandson of Lord Clarendon, the famous Foreign Secretary.

Born in 1886, he won a scholarship at Wellington, and when only sixteen gained a Demyship at Magdalen College, Oxford, where he graduated with double honours. After travelling in America with Charles Buxton, the first Head of Ruskin College, he entered the office of James Capel and Co. and in 1912 became a partner in the firm of Govett, Sons and Co. He had married in 1911 Beatrix, only daughter of Mr. Herbert Paul, by whom he had a son and a daughter.

At the outbreak of war he enlisted in the Hertfordshire Yeomanry and immediately went with them to Egypt. He returned in the following summer to take a commission in the Lothians and Border Horse, being promoted Captain in 1916. The effects of malaria kept him at home for some time, but in 1916 he went to France, attached to a Machine Gun Company.

He was killed in the capture of Bourlon Wood on 23 November 1917, at the age of 31. An officer on the Staff of his Division wrote: "The General has paid a particular tribute to the work done by the Machine Gunners, and that such praise is really deserved by Villiers' men is largely due to the infinite pains he took over their training, and to the inspiring example he set them to the very end. His brother officers cannot speak too highly of his capacity as a leader, of his charm as a companion, and of all those qualities of his which made him the leading spirit of his mess and the idol of his men. He loved his men and they loved him, and his invincible optimism carried him safely through those dark days of danger and discomfort, which set weaker men grumbling and despairing. It is no exaggeration to say that officers and men adored him."

VOWLER

Edward Maxwell

*Second Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry. Killed in action 14th March 1915, Buried in SANCTUARY WOOD CEMETERY, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot V. Row M. Grave 9. Clerk at the Exchange.

WAINMAIN, MM

George

*[Listed as WAINMAN on CWGC and SDGW] Lance Sergeant 28278, 11th Battalion, Border Regiment. Killed in action 25th November 1917. Aged 31. Born Bow, Middlesex, enlisted Warley, Essex, resident Seven King's, Essex. Son of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Wainman, of 44, Blenheim Rd., Stratford, London; husband of Florence Mabel Wainman, of 57, Pembroke Rd., Seven Kings, Essex. Formerly 32925, Essex Regiment. Awarded the Military Medal (M.M.). No known grave. Commemorated on TYNE COT MEMORIAL, Zonnebeke, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 85 to 86. Clerk at the Exchange.

WALL

Henry Norman

*Private 1st Class 28455, Royal Air Force. Died 17th october 1918. Husband of Mrs. D. E. Lawrence (formerly Wall), of 138, Wymering Mansions, Maida Vale, London. Buried in WANDSWORTH (EARLSFIELD) CEMETERY, London. Grave reference G. 3. 9043. Clerk at the Exchange.

WALLACE

Henry H.

*[Listed as Harry Herbert WALLACE on SDGW] Second Lieutenant, "D" Company, 27th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion, Northumberland Fusiliers. Died of wounds 21st January 1917. Aged 20. Son of Henry and Amy Elizabeth Wallace, of 79, Gladstone Avenue, Manor Park, Essex. Buried in TROIS ARBRES CEMETERY, STEENWERCK, Nord, France. Plot I. Row D. Grave 21. Clerk at the Exchange.

WARD

William Thomas

*Lance Corporal STK/268, 10th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London). Killed in action 18th November 1916. Born West Kensington, enlisted London, resident Kensington. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 8 C 9 A and 16 A. Clerk at the Exchange.

WARE

George Phillip

*[Listed in book as Private] Rifleman 554190, 16th (County of London) Battalion (Queen's Westminster Rifles), London Regiment. Died at sea 30th December 1917. Born York, enlisted Westminster. No known grave. Commemorated on CHATBY MEMORIAL, Egypt. Clerk at the Exchange.

WARRE

Cecil Alberic Hardy

*Second Lieutenant, 88th Battalion, Machine Gun Corps (Infantry). Killed in action 24th April 1917. Aged 36. Son of Rosa F. Warre, of Caixo 336, Santos, Brazil, and the late William George Warre. Buried in FEUCHY CHAPEL BRITISH CEMETERY, WANCOURT, Pas de Calais, France. Plot I. Row C. Grave 39. Clerk at the Exchange.

WATSON, MM

Charles

*Company Quartermaster Sergeant 550052, 16th (County of London) Battalion (Queen's Westminster Rifles), London Regiment. Killed in action 8th April 1917. Aged 37. Born Bromley, enlisted Westminster, resident Manor Park. Son of William and Mary Ann Watson, of Manor Park, Essex. Buried in ACHICOURT ROAD CEMETERY, ACHICOURT, Pas de Calais, France. Plot/Row/Section E. Grave 3A. Clerk at the Exchange.

WATSON

Reginald

*Second Lieutenant, 11th Battalion, Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regiment). Killed in action 7th October 1916. Aged 29. He was born on the 18th of October 1887 the son of Charles William Watson and Mrs F.A. Watson. He was educated at the King’s School Canterbury from 1900 to 1905 where he gained a junior scholarship in 1902 and a senior scholarship in 1904. A keen athlete he held the record for the open mile as well as being a member of the rugby XV in 1903 and 1904. He was awarded his sports colours in 1904 and 1905 and was appointed a monitor in 1904. On leaving school he went to work in the London Stock Exchange as a clerk; on the outbreak of war he joined the University and Public Schools Corps. On the 5th of August 1916 he was commissioned into the Queen’s Own (Royal West Kent) Regiment and arrived in France on the 4th of October 1916. He was killed in action three days later at the Battle of Transloy Ridge. Buried in WARLENCOURT BRITISH CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot III. Row C. Grave 8. Clerk at the Exchange.

WATTAM

John William

*Private SS/1323, 7th Division H.Q., Royal Army Service Corps. Killed in action 5th November 1914. Born Stickney, Lincolnshire, enlisted London, resident North Kensington. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 56. Clerk at the Exchange.

WEBBER, MiD

Henry

*Lieutenant, 7th Battalion, prince of Wales's Volunteers (South Lancashire Regiment). Died of wounds 21st July 1916. Aged 67. Son of William Webber, M.D., and Eliza Webber (nee Preston); husband of the late Emily Webber (nee Morris). Native of Horley, Surrey. For over 40 years a member of the London Stock Exchange. Henry Webber is the oldest known battle death recorded for the First World War. Mentioned in Despatches. Buried in DARTMOOR CEMETERY, BECORDEL-BECOURT, Somme, France. Plot I. Row E. Grave 54. Member of the Exchange.

He was born in 1849 the son of Dr William Webber of Norwich and Tunbridge Wells. He was educated at Tonbridge School where he was in the cricket eleven in 1865-7 and at Pembroke College Oxford where he achieved a BA in 1871.

In 1872 he joined the Stock Exchange and became a member of the firm of Norman Morris and Co and 1874 he married the eldest daughter of Mr Norman Morris of Lingfield in Surrey who was one of the firm's senior partners.

He was a well known sportsman, a prominent member of the Surrey Stag Hunt, a good shot and a keen cricketer. He played cricket for the "Icogniti" (his old boys side) and captained a MCC side against his old school. When he was 55 he scored 200 for his old village side Horley.

He was a JP for Surrey, an original member of the Surrey County Council, honorary treasurer of the local Cottage Hospital and a church warden of the parish church.

On the outbreak of war he offered his services to the War Office as a "rough rider" or in any other capacity. Rejected he tried very hard to form a mounted company of hunting men, which was also rejected so he set off to get a commission.

Shortly before his 68th birthday he was gazetted on the 1st of May 1916 as a 2nd Lieutenant in the 7th Battalion of the South Lancashire Regiment and after a short period of training at Park Royal was appointed Transport Officer and left for France.

With his battalion he took part in the opening phases of the Somme including the capture of La Boiselle on the 3rd of July. Two weeks later, on the 17th of July he wrote to a friend:

"Fifty one years ago I got my colours in the XI and last week 51 years ago was bowling against the old boys and looking on some of them as "sitters" and in the "sere and yellow leaf". Yet here I am a Lieutenant in HM army having to salute three sons if I meet them out here, a Colonel and two Majors. I am 1st Line Transport Officer to this Battalion and we have been plumb in the centre of the picture during the last ten days and gained no end of "kudos" and also a very severe mauling. I am so far extraordinarily fit and well, though, when I tell you that for four consecutive days I was either on my feet or in the saddle for twenty one hours, out of twenty four, you will see that there is a bit of work attached to the job."

Four days later, before the letter was received, he was dead. He had taken rations up for his battalion and was talking to his CO at Battalion HQ in Mametz Wood when he was struck by a shell fragment. He was taken to the advanced dressing staion, and still unconcious was taken to the nearest Field Hospital where he died on the same evening, the 21st of July.

His Commanding Officer wrote "He was so gallant and full of energy. We all had the greatest admiration and respect for him."

He was mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig's despatches of the 4th of January 1917.

His three serving sons were Lt Col N.W. Webber DSO RE, Maj H.H. Webber RGA and Major LM Webber RFA. He left a widow and eight children.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

LIEUTENANT HENRY WEBBER, South Lancashire Regiment, the youngest son of the late Dr. William Webber, of Norwich and Tunbridge Wells, was born in 1849 and educated at Tonbridge, where he was in the cricket eleven in 1865-6-7, and Pembroke College, Oxford.

He graduated in 1871, and three years later married the eldest daughter of Mr. Norman Morris of Lingfield, Surrey. When he entered the Stock Exchange in 1872, he became a member of his father-in-law's firm, Norman Morris and Co.

Henry Webber was a well-known sportsman, a prominent member of the Surrey Stag Hunt, a good shot and a keen cricketer. For many decades he was a familiar figure to the boys of his old school, playing for the Incogniti or the "Old Boys" and often captaining an M.C.C. side against the School. When he was 55 he scored over 200 playing for his local club, Honey.

Nor did he confine his activities to sport. He was a J.P. for Surrey, an original member of the Surrey County Council, honorary treasurer of the local Cottage Hospital, and for many years a churchwarden of the parish church. On the outbreak of war he naturally took a prominent part in the recruiting campaign. But this was not enough. He had already offered his services to the War Office as a rough-rider "or in any other capacity." Rejected by the War Office, he tried very hard with others to form a mounted company of hunting men. Again baffled by the War Office he set to work to get a commission.

He was within a few weeks of celebrating his 68th birthday when he was at length gazetted on 1 May 1916 to the South Lancashire Regiment, "victorious after a strenuous fight with the WO.," as he himself expressed it. Thanks to his knowledge of horses he was appointed Transport Officer to the 7th Battalion, when at the end of May, after a short training at Park Royal, he proceeded to France.

With his Battalion he took part in the opening phases of the first Battle of the Somme, including the capture of La Boisselle on 3 July 1916. A fortnight later be wrote in a letter to his old school.

"Fifty-one years ago I got my colours in the XI and last week 51 years ago was bowling v. the Old Boys and looking on some of them as 'sitters' and in the 'sere and yellow leaf.' And here I am a Lieutenant in H.M. Army having to salute three sons if I meet them out here, a Colonel and two Majors. I am 1st Line Transport Officer to this Battalion and we have been plumb in the centre of the picture during the last ten days and gained no end of 'kudos' and also a very severe mauling. I am so far extraordinarily fit and well, though, when I tell you that for four consecutive days I was either on my feet or in the saddle for twenty-one hours out of the twenty-four, you will see that there is a bit of work attached to the job."

Four days later, before this letter was received, he was already dead. He had taken up the rations for his battalion and was talking to his Commanding Officer at Battalion H.Q. in Mametz Wood, when he was struck on the head by a fragment of shell. He was attended to at the advanced dressing station, and taken, still unconscious, to the nearest Field Hospital.

Here he died, the same evening, on 21 July 1916, without regaining consciousness. He was buried in Dartmoor Cemetery at Bécourt-Becordel, just south of Albert. His Commanding Officer wrote: "He was so gallant and full of energy. We all had the greatest admiration and respect for him."

Special messages of sympathy were received by his family from their Majesties the King and Queen and from the Army Council. Lieutenant Henry Webber was mentioned in despatches by Sir Douglas Haig on 4 January 1917.

WELHAM, MC

Harry George

*[Listed in book as Captain] Lieutenant, 3rd Battalion attached 9th Battalion, Royal Sussex Regiment. Killed in action 4th November 1918. Aged 27. Son of Frank and Ellen Welham, of Mountnessing Rd., Billericay, Essex. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). Buried in south-east part of WARGNIES-LE-PETIT COMMUNAL CEMETERY, Nord, France. Clerk at the Exchange.

WEST

Harold

*Second Lieutenant, 1st Battalion, Black Watch (Royal Highlanders). Killed in action 9th May 1915. Aged 31. Brother of Mr. T. T. West, of "Moorings", Clarendon Rd., Red Hill, Surrey. No known grave. Commemorated on LE TOURET MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panels 24 to 26. Clerk at the Exchange.

WEST

Herbert St John Carr

*[Listed as CARR WEST, Herbert St. John on CWGC] Major, 12th Battalion, Durham Light Infantry. Died of wounds 27th October 1918. Aged 40. Next of kin Miss West, 30 Glebe Road, Bromley, Kent. Son of Alfred Thomas and Blanche Ophelia West, of London. Went to France 25th August 1915. Birth registered at Lewisham 1877. Buried in GIAVERA BRITISH CEMETERY, ARCADE, Italy. Plot 6. Row B. Grave 4. Clerk at the Exchange.

WHINNEY

Edward

*Major, 7th Battalion, Middlesex Regiment. Killed in action 26th September 1916. Aged 46. Son of the late Frederick and Emma Whinney; husband of Maude Whinney, of 10, Aubrey Walk, Campden Hill, Kensington, London. Buried in CONNAUGHT CEMETERY, THIEPVAL, Somme, France. Plot I. Row E. grave 10. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

MAJOR EDWARD WHINNEY, Middlesex Regiment, son of the late Frederick Whinney, was born in 187o, and educated at Westminster, becoming a member of the Stock Exchange in 1895.

At the outbreak of war he joined the 2/7th Battalion, Middlesex Regiment, as a Captain, and was promoted Major in October 1914.

He went with his Regiment first to Gibraltar and then to Egypt, where he took part in the campaign against the Senussi.

On returning to France in the summer of 1916, he joined the 12th Battalion.

He was killed at the capture of Thiepval 26 September 1916. Married, in 1897, to the elder daughter of J. Cox, late of Laurence Sons and Gardner, he left three sons and a daughter.

WHITAKER

George

*Captain, 5th (City of London ) Battalion (London Rifle Brigade), London Regiment. Killed in action 20th September 1917. Aged 25. Son of George and Eliza Annie Whitaker, of 2, Albemarle Mansions, Kingsway, Hove, Sussex. No known grave. Commemorate don YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 52 and 54. Clerk at the Exchange.

WHITEHEAD

James Hugh Edendale

*Second Lieutenant, 9th Battalion, Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regiment). Died 13th March 1919. Aged 28. Son of Sir George Hugh Whitehead, 2nd Bart. and Lady Whitehead, of The Shrubbery, 72, Woodstock Rd., Oxford, formerly of Wilmington Hall, Dartford, Kent. Buried in the family vault in the south-east corner of ST. MICHAEL CHURCHYARD, WILMINGTON, Kent. Member of the Exchange. Also listed on the Wilmington War memorial, Kent and Lord's Cricket Members War Memorial

From de Ruvigny's ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-18 Part 5, page 170:

WHITEHEAD, JAMES HUGH EDENDALE, 2nd Lieut., 9th Battn. The Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regt.), eldest and only surv. s. of Sir George Hugh Whitehead, Bart, of Wilmington Hall, o. Kent, and of The Shrubbery, Oxford, L.P., by his wife, Gertrude Grace, dau. of Sir William Ascroft, Bart., of Overleigh House, Preston, co. Lancaster, J.P.; and brother to Lieut. G. W. E. Whitehead (q.c.); b. Bromley, co. Kent, 8 July, 1890; educ. The Old Ride, Bournemouth; Clifton College, and Trinity College, Oxford; was a member of the Stock Exchange, and a partner in the firm of George Whitehead & Chown; volunteered for active service on the outbreak of war, and was gazetted 2nd Lieut. Royal West Kent Regt. 5 Nov. 1914; served with the Regiment from that date until he resigned his commission in 1918, having contracted on service, during the first winter of the war, the illness from which, after three and a half years of patient fortitude, he died in London 13 March, 1919. Buried in Wilmington Churchyard. He was a prominent cricketer while at Clifton; one of their best Fives players and a keen athlete. At Oxford he made a good score-57 and 17—in the Freshmen's match, and on the running track represented the University against Cambridge in the hurdles. He was well known in Kent cricket, and, with his brother, is one of the Kent cricketers commemorated by the fountain erected at Canterbury.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

SECOND LIEUT. JAMES HUGH EDENDALE WHITEHEAD, Royal West Kent Regiment, the son of Sir George and Lady Whitehead of Wilmington Hall, Dartford, was born in 1890, and educated at Clifton College and Trinity College, Oxford.

He played cricket for Clifton, captained Trinity and represented Kent second Eleven with great success.

His hitting powers were superb, and on one occasion he hit a ball out of the Oval. In addition he got his Blue for athletics, representing Oxford in the Hurdles in 1912. He was for a time Champion Hurdler of the Stock Exchange, of which he became a member in 1914, being a partner in his father's firm, George Whitehead and Chown.

He joined the army in November 1914, and obtained his corn-mission in the 9th Battalion of the Royal West Kents.

Contracting a severe illness from the hardships of the winter of 1914-1915, he was invalided out of the service in 1916.

With his health seriously undermined Lieutenant Whitehead was unable to resist a severe attack of influenza, and he died on 13 March 1919.

A friend wrote of him: "Both at Clifton and Oxford I had every opportunity of recognizing in him an exceptionally fine character, modest, simple, sensitive, and with any amount of grit."

WHITFELD

Nigel B

*Lieutenant, 62 Squadron, Royal Air Force. Died 7th July 1918. Buried in FOREST ROW CEMETERY, Sussex. Grave reference 899. C. Clerk at the Exchange.

WILKINSON

Gordon Frederick Noble

*Second Lieutenant, 10th Battalion, King's Own (Yorkshire Light Infantry). Killed in action 1st July 1916. Aged 23. Son of Robert Daniel and Kate Wilkinson, of Blackheath, London. Educated at Westminster School. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 11 C and 12 A. Clerk at the Exchange.

WILKINSON

N

No further information currently available

WILLATS

David James E

*Private 42013, 9th Battalion, Essex Regiment. Killed in action 20th August 1917. Aged 19. Born Stoke Newington, Middlesex, enlisted Mill Hill, Middlesex, resident Tottenham, Middlesex. Son of Walter James and Amelia Ellen Willats, of 6, The Lodge, 132, Lansdowne Rd., Bruce Grove, Tottenham, London. Formerly 21624, Bedfordshire Regiment. Buried in MONCHY BRITISH CEMETERY, MONCHY-LE-PREUX, Pas de Calais, France. Plot I. Row K. Grave 25. Clerk at the Exchange.

WILLATS

Harry Ashley

*Second Lieutenant, Royal Field Artillery. Died 12th February 1917. Buried in ABNEY PARK CEMETERY, London. Grave reference J.10. 1. RN. 17402. Clerk at the Exchange.

WILLIS

Ernest

*Major, Kite Balloon Section, Royal Air Force. Died 1st July 1918. Son of David and Charlotte Louisa Willis. Buried in PIETA MILITARY CEMETERY, Malta. Plot B. Row XIX. Grave 1. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

MAJOR ERNEST WILLIS, Royal Air Force, was born in 1883 and educated at Haileybury. He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1908 and was a partner in the firm of Aston and Willis.

On the outbreak of war he joined the R.N.V.R. as Sub-Lieutenant and was for a time in a motor boat, which he later commanded as a Lieutenant. In June 1915 he transferred to the Kite balloon section of the R.N.A.S. and was appointed to H.M.S. Canning as balloon Pilot.

He observed for the fleet in many bombardments. When the Canning was ordered home Major Willis remained at Thasos as Beachmaster.

In 1916 he was invalided home with malaria, and on recovering was sent to the Scilly Isles to erect a balloon station. From there he went to Shotley, and finally to Malta, where he attained the rank of Major when the R.N.A.S. was absorbed by the R.A.F. He died at Malta on 12 July 1918.

WILSON

Arthur Leslie

*Second Lieutenant, 5th Battalion, Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders. Killed in action 18th July 1918. Aged 30. Only son of Arthur and Rebecca Wilson, of Kynaston Court, Harrow Weald, Middlesex. Buried in BAILLEUL COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION (NORD), Nord, France. Plot IV. Row A. Grave 21. Clerk at the Exchange.

WILSON

James Edward Holmes

*[Listed in book as Private] Corporal G/3210, 12th Battalion, Duke of Cambridge's Own (Middlesex Regiment). Killed in action 26th September 1916. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 12 D and 13 B. Clerk at the Exchange.

WILSON, MC

George Henry

*Major, "D" Battery, 282nd Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Died of wounds 4th November 1917. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). Buried in GWALIA CEMETERY, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot II. Row E. Grave 12. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

MAJOR GEORGE HENRY WILSON, M.C., 282nd Brigade, R.F.A., was the younger surviving son of William H. Wilson of Carrickmines House, Co. Dublin. Born in 189o, he was educated at Radley and Trinity College, Dublin, and became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1911.

As soon as war broke out he sought and obtained a commission in the R.F.A. (Territorial). He went to France with his Brigade as Captain in October 1915. In June 1917 he obtained his Majority and was mentioned in despatches. The award of the Military Cross to Major Wilson was thus described in the "London Gazette" : "For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty—on one occasion carrying two advances and bringing his guns into action in an exposed position with great skill and judgment, and carrying on harassing fire without being located by the enemy. He has repeatedly set an example to his men by his coolness and courage when his battery has been under heavy shell fire."

He was killed at his post in command of his battery on 4 November 1917, at the age of twenty-seven. His Colonel wrote of him: “Your son performed his duties to my entire satisfaction; they were hard, calling for both courage and endurance, in neither of which he was ever lacking. He won for himself the respect and affection of all ranks."

His eldest brother, a lieutenant in the 'Warwickshire Regiment, died in India in 1905. His youngest brother was killed in action in France in November 1916, and his elder brother, also in France, in May 1917.

He married in July 1912 Mary Clementina, daughter of Sir Ellis Cunliffe, and left one daughter.

WINTERBOURN

Frank Thomas

*Captain, 2nd (City of london) Battalion (Royal Fusiliers), London Regiment. Drowned 10th October 1918. Buried in GRANGEGORMAN MILITARY CEMETERY, County Dublin, Republic of Ireland. Church of England Officers Grave 13. Clerk at the Exchange.

WOOD

Charles Perceval

*Lieutenant, Motor Launch, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. Member of the Exchange. Died of illness at Newhaven April 1916. Aged 33.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

LIEUTENANT CHARLES PERCEVAL WOOD, R.N.V.R., was the son of the late J. W. Wood, and was born in 1883.

He was educated at the Mercers' School. On leaving school he went into the City, and in 1906 became a member of the Stock Exchange.

He joined the R.N. V.R. in October 191 5, and was promoted Lieutenant in November. He was in command of a Motor-Launch for some months. While on this duty at Newhaven he contracted an illness to which he succumbed in April 1916 at the age of 33.

"No one," says a writer in his school magazine, “can recall Charlie's' pleasant smile without a friendly recollection. He was one of the best.”

Lieut. Wood left a widow and little son.

WOOD, MC

Hector Frederick

*Captain, 32nd Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Killed in action 20th September 1917. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). No known grave. Commemorated on TYNE COT MEMORIAL, Zonnebeke, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 28 to 30 and 162 to 162A and 163A. Clerk at the Exchange.

WOOD

John Patrick Hamilton

*Captain, 22nd Battalion, Manchester Regiment. Killed in action 11th January 1917. Aged 36. Son of Alexander Wood, M.A. (Oxon), and Gertrude Wood, of 18, Antrim Mansions, Hampstead, London. Served with Paget's Horse in the South African campaign. Buried in FRANKFURT TRENCH BRITISH CEMETERY, BEAUMONT-HAMEL, Somme, France. Plot/Row/Section D. Grave 19. Clerk at the Exchange.

WOODBRIDGE, MC

Austin Hale

Captain, 8th Battalion (Territorial), Duke of Cambridge's Own (Middlesex Regiment). Died 28th February 1919. Aged 43. Son of Thomas Hurray Riches Woodbridge and Frances Elizabeth Woodbridge, of Uxbridge, Middx; husband of Norah Woodbridge, of 4, Upper Belgrave Rd., Durdham Down, Bristol. Served with Unit Aug., 1914, to Jan., 1917, afterwards Town Major of Bray-sur-Somme and late Area Commandant of Hornoy-sur-Somme. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). Buried in PONT-REMY BRITISH CEMETERY, Somme, France. Plot I. Row B. Grave 14. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN AUSTIN HALE WOODBRIDGE, M.C., Middlesex Regiment, was born in 1876, the son of T. H. R. Woodbridge of Uxbridge.

He was educated at Westminster, and became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1900.

He was one of the partners in the firm of Woodbridge and Flint from 1906 until the dissolution of the firm in 1916.

On the day war was declared he was in camp with the 1/8th (Territorial) Battalion of the Middlesex Regiment, in which he held the rank of captain, and was mobilized immediately, being sent first to Gibraltar.

He went to France in 1915 and fought all through the early battles of that year round Ypres with such distinction that he was mentioned in despatches. He was awarded the Military Cross for conspicuous gallantry at Fleurbaix on 25 September.

His company was almost annihilated and he subsequently became Town Major of Bray-sur-Somme.

At the time of his death he held the rank of temporary Major and was Area Commandant at Hornoy on the Somme. It was there that he contracted pneumonia following influenza, to which he succumbed on 28 February 1919.

Capt. Woodbridge was an enthusiastic Freemason, being a member of the old Westminster Lodge. He left a widow.

WOODBRIDGE, MC

Stanley George

*Captain, 13th Battalion, Northumberland Fusiliers. Died of wounds 19th December 1918. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). Buried in the north-west corner of ST. MARY LOWER CHURCHYARD, HARROW, Middlesex. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the London Gazette 24th August 1917, page 19.

T./Lt. Stanley George Woodbridge, North'd Fus. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. At a moment when his company was held up by enemy wire close to their objective, he displayed the greatest gallantry in attacking the wire under very heavy fire, and cutting a way through it for his men. At the moment of completing his task he was shot through the chest.

WOODS

Francis Joseph

*[Listed in book as Francis James WOODS] Private STK/1159, 10th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Killed in action 15th July 1916. Born Stoke Newington, enlisted London, resident Wimbledon. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 8 C 9 A and 16 A. Member of the Exchange.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

PRIVATE FRANCIS JAMES WOODS, Royal Fusiliers, was born in 1876 and educated at St. Edmund's College, Ware, and London University.

He was a keen fisherman and all-round sportsman.

He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1902, being at one time connected with the firm of Heseltine, Powell and Co., and later in partnership with Cecil W. Landon.

Joining the 10th Battalion of the Royal Fusiliers in September 1914, he went to France in the summer of 1915.

He was killed on 15 July 1916 at the attack on Pozières.

His Colonel wrote: "He bore himself gallantly and died like a true soldier for King and Country. He was universally loved and respected in the battalion."

One of his comrades wrote: "It is the wish of the remainder of Number 14 Platoon that I should convey to you their heartfelt sympathy. We all feel the loss of such a true and gallant chum. Often, when things were bad, his remarks would bring a smile to the dreariest man."

Another wrote: "He was bright and fearless, and died as he lived, a true British gentleman."

WOODWARD

Samuel Herbert

*[Listed in book as Corporal] Lance Corporal 5314, 2nd Battalion, Honourable Artillery Company (Infantry). Died of wounds 14th January 1917. Aged 29. Enlisted Armoury House, resident Upper Clapton. Son of George and Charlotte Matilda Woodward, of London; husband of Jessie Kezia Woodward, of "Chadwickham," Bolsover St., London. Buried in DOULLENS COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION No. 1, Somme, France. Plot IV. Row G. Grave 2. Clerk at the Exchange.

WORLEY

Reginald George

*[Listed in book as Private] Rifleman 2408, 9th (County of London) Battalion (Queen Victoria's Rifles), London Regiment. Died of wounds 4th April 1915. Aged 23. Enlisted London, resident Brixton. Son of Thomas Braddock Worley and Ellen Worley, of 85, Angell Rd., Brixton, London. Buried in BEDFORD HOUSE CEMETERY, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Enclosure No. 2 Plot IV. Row A. Grave 17. Clerk at the Exchange.

WREFORD-BROWN

Oswald Eric

*Captain, 9th Battalion, Northumberland Fusiliers. Died of wounds 7th July 1916. Aged 39. Son of Mr. and Mrs. W. Wreford-Brown, of Clifton, Bristol, Gloucestershire. Buried in CORBIE COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Somme, France. Plot 1. Row B. Grave 48. Member of the Exchange. See also Charterhouse School War Memorial

From de Ruvigny's ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-18 Part 3, page 39:

WREFORD-BROWN, OSWALD ERIC, Capt., 9th (Service) Battn. The Northumberland Fusiliers, 6th s. of the late William Wreford-Brown, of 5, Litileld Place, Clifton, by his wife, Clara Jane (5, Litfleld Place, Clifton, Bristol), dau. of Henry Clark, M.D.; and brother to Capt. C. Wreford-Brown, D.S.O. [see Vol. I., page 57]; b. Clifton, Bristol, 21 July, 1877; educ. Waynflete; Durdham Down, and Charterhouse; was a member of the Stock Exchange, and a keen sportsman; played for Middlesex County Cricket Club in 1900; he had spent two years in Canada, and shortly after the outbreak of war trained in the Inns of Court Corps, and was gazetted Temp. Lieut. Northumberland Fusiliers 8 Nov. 1914; promoted Capt. 7 July, 1916; was for nine months in the Ypres salient, Flanders wounded in action during the Battle of the Somme, by a shell in the quadrangle trench, near Fricourt, 5 July, 1916, and died in a casualty clearing station 7 July following. Buried in Corbie Communal Cemetery, near Amiens, the following day. Though he had no natural inclination for a military life, he gave himself up wholly to it, and had become a capable officer; his one thought was for his men, their comfort and welfare, and he had won their respect and love; unm.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN OSWALD ERIC WREFORD BROWN, Northumberland Fusiliers, was born in 1877 and educated at Charterhouse, representing his school at both cricket and football. Before becoming a member of the Stock Exchange in 1902 he had spent four years in Canada.

Soon after the outbreak of war he joined an Officers Training Corps and was given his commission in the Northumberland Fusiliers in November 1914.

He went to France with his Regiment in the following July, and soon after was promoted to Captain. He was mortally wounded at Fricourt on 5 July 1916, and died three days later.

His Colonel wrote: "None gave his life with greater gallantry or showed greater contempt for danger. No one was more solicitous for the welfare of his men who loved him so well."

And another Colonel under whom he served: “Nobody could possibly be more unselfish or so unsparing of himself. He treated his company like his children. All our men, who spent two years nearly with him, will be the better for it, for he gave them such a splendid example of always playing the game."

One of his sergeants wrote: “A stouter heart I never knew. He was a Britisher absolutely, and never flinched. He was everyone's favourite."

One of his men wrote: "The captain had a heart like a lion."

And another: "He was always a soldier and a gentleman, and the greatness of his loss to us all cannot be put into words."

A Charterhouse master: " To some of us older ones here . . this is the worst knock we have had, and that 's saying a good deal. We shall never forget the keenest and cheeriest of Carthusians."

WRIGHT

R D

*Sergeant-Major, School of Musketry. Clerk at the Exchange.

probably Ralph Douglas WRIGHT, Company Sergeant Major 310, Royal Ar Force. Died 12th September 1918, death registered at Woolwich, born 1878 at Richmond, married 1908 in Steyning. Buried in HOVE OLD CEMETERY, Sussex. Section E. Grave 146.

WRITER, MM

Frank Thomas B

*[Listed on SDGW as Private and no MM mention] Lance Corporal STK/290, 10th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Killed in action 15th July 1916. Aged 24. Born Brixton, enlisted London, resident Ilford. Son of Thomas Augustus Writer, of "Broadlands", St. John's Rd., Orpington, Kent. His brother William Cecil also fell. Awarded the Military Medal (M.M.). Buried in POZIERES BRITISH CEMETERY, OVILLERS-LA BOISSELLE, Somme, France. Plot III. Row H. Grave 35. Clerk at the Exchange.

Last updated 26 July, 2016

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