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LORDS CRICKET GROUND MCC MEMBERS WORLD WAR 1 MEMORIAL

World War 1 - Detailed information
Compiled and Copyright © Martin Edwards 2008

MCC MEMBERS WORLD WAR 1 MEMORIAL

The memorial is to be found on the top staircase of the Lord’s pavilion and takes the form of a nowy-headed wooden board with gold lettering that is accompanied by a framed print giving details of membership, date elected, date of death and place of burial. The club emblem can be found at the top of the board. There are 330 names listed.

1914-1918
TO THE MEMORY
OF THE MEMBERS OF THE MCC
WHO DIED IN THE SERVICE OF THEIR
COUNTRY DURING THE GREAT WAR

ABERCROMBIE

Cecil Halliday

Lieutenant, HMS Defence, Royal Navy. Lost with his ship 31st May 1916. Aged 29. Born 12th April 1886, Mozufferpore, India. Son of Walter D. Abercrombie (Indian Police) and Kate E. Abercrombie; husband of Cecily Joan Abercrombie (nee Baker), of 22, Cottesmore Gardens, Kensington, London. Scottish Rugby International. Played cricket for Hampshire. No known grave. Commemorated on PLYMOUTH NAVAL MEMORIAL, Devon. Panel 10.

Note: HMS Defence was a Minotaur-class armoured cruiser of the Royal Navy, launched in 1907. She was the last armoured cruiser built for the Royal Navy. She was the flagship of Rear Admiral Sir Robert Arbuthnot, leading the First Cruiser Squadron at the Battle of Jutland on 31 May 1916. The other ships of the squadron (HMS Warrior, HMS Duke of Edinburgh, and HMS Black Prince) were of a similar outmoded class. While closing for the kill at high speed with the SMS Wiesbaden, drifting and crippled between the German and British fleets, Defence presented a target for the combined firepower of the German battlecruisers, whose proximity was hidden by smoke and mist. After initial damage she was struck by a salvo which blew up her after magazine, triggering explosions on the ammunition rails leading to the broadside 7.5 inch guns. Within seconds, another salvo immediately hit forward, and she blew up in a spectacular explosion, sinking with the loss of Arbuthnot and her entire complement of 903 men.

His profile from Cricinfo - Wisden Cricketers' Almanack :

Born in India on April 12, 1886, was killed aged 30 in the naval action off Jutland on May 31, 1916, while serving as a Lieutenant in the Royal Navy on HMS Defence.

He played 13 games for Hampshire in 1913, scoring 126 and 39 on his debut against Oxford University at Southampton, 144 v Worcestershire at Dudley and 165 v Essex at Leyton when Hampshire followed on 317 behind and in a stand with George Brown (140*) he put on 325 for the seventh wicket. In first-class matches that year he scored 936 runs with an average of 35.92. By 1914 he was already away on service, so his fame rests on what he accomplished in a single season. In 1912 he gave an earlier indication of his ability as a free-scoring batsmen when he hit 37 and 100 for the Royal Navy v Army at Lord's.

He also played Rugby football for Scotland.

ALEXANDER

Reginald

Lieutenant-Colonel, 3rd Battalion, Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own). Died of wounds 29th December 1914. Aged 48. Son of Caledon Dupre Alexander. Served in the South African Campaign. Buried in BAILLEUL COMMUNAL CEMETERY (NORD), Nord, France. Plot/Row/Section F. Grave 3.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour 1914-1918:

ALEXANDER, REGINALD, Lieut.-Col., 3rd Battn. The Rifle Briagde (The Prince Consort's Own); b. 6 Sept. 1867; gazetted 2nd Lieut. West Kent Regt. from the Militia, 23 Jan. 1889; transferred to the Rifle Brigade 8 May following; was promoted Lieut. 16 Dec. 1891, Capt. 19 July, 1897, Major 5 April, 1905, and Lieut.-Col. 15 Oct. 1913; was Adjutant to his Regiment from 30 Nov. 1894, to 12 April, 1898; served in the South African War 1899-1902; took part in the operations in Batal March to June, 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 Nov. 1900, including action at Belfast (26 and 27 Aug.), where he was severely wounded, and those in the Transvaal 30 Nov. 1900, to 31 May, 1902; was Commandant at Uitkyk from 22 July, 1901, and afterwards at Olifant's River from 3 Sept. to 20 Nov. 1901 (mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 Sept. 1901, and 29 July, 1902]; Queen's Medal with two clasps and King's medal with two Clasps); served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders, and died 29 Dec. 1914, from wounds received in action.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

LIEUTENANT-COLONEL REGINALD ALEXANDER, 3rd BATTN. RIFLE BRIGADE, died on the 29th December,1914, from wounds received in action. He was born on the 6th September, 1867, and joined the Royal West Kent Regiment from the Militia in January, 1889. In December, 1891, he was transferred to the Rifle Brigade as Lieutenant, and from 1894-98 was Adjutant of his Battalion.

He was a fair cricketer, very fond of racing and of a most cheery disposition.

He served in the South African War, taking part in operations in Natal, including the action at Laing's Nek; in the Transvaal east of Pretoria, including action at Belfast, being severely wounded. Later he was Commandant at Uitkyk, and afterwards at Olifant's River. He was twice mentioned in Despatches ("London Gazette," 10th September, 1901. and 29th July, 1902), and received the Queen's and the King's medals, each with two clasps.

He obtained his Majority in April, 1905, and succeeded to the command of his Battalion in October, 1913.

ANTROBUS

Edmund

Lieutenant, No 4. Company, 1st Battalion, Grenadier Guards. Killed in action 24th October 1914. Aged 27. Son of Sir Edmund Antrobus, 4th Bart., of Antrobus, Cheshire. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 9 and 11.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

LIEUTENANT EDMUND ANTROBUS, 1st BATTN. GRENADIER GUARDS, who was killed in action on the 24th October, 1914, was the only son of Sir Edmund Antrobus, 4th Baronet, of Antrobus, County Chester, and Rutherford, County Roxburgh, at one time commanding 3rd Battalion Grenadier Guards. Lieutenant Antrobus was born on the 23rd December, 1886, and received his commission as Second Lieutenant in the Grenadier Guards from the Militia in May, 1908, being promoted Lieutenant in November, 1908.

The 1st Battn. Grenadier Guards formed part of the 20th Brigade of the VIIth Division which was in the centre of our line at the first Battle of Ypres. On the 24th October the Germans made a determined effort to break through on the left of the Grenadiers near Kruiseik, and No. 4 Company, to which Lieut. Antrobus belonged, made a counterattack, driving back the enemy. He was killed while gallantly fighting with his platoon, only one officer and forty-five men of the Company returning unhurt.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour 1914-1918:

ANTROBUS, EDMUND, Lieut., Grenadier Guards, only s. of Col. Sir Edmund Antrobus, 4th Bart., of Antrobus, co. Chester, of Amesbury Abbey, co. Wilts., and Rutherford, co. Roxburgh, late Grenadier Guards, by his wife, Florence Caroline Mathilde, dau. of the late Jules Alexander Sartoris, of Hopsford Hall, co. Warwick; b. Eaton Square, S.W., 23 Dec. 1886; educ. Eton and in France; gazetted as 2nd Lieut. to the Grenadier Guards from the Militia, 27 May, 1908; became Lieut. 21 Nov. 1908; killed in action at Ypres, 24 Oct. 1914. Buried in the orchard of a small farmhouse in the village of Keghside; unm. Lieut. Antrobus was reported a very keen and courageous officer, and highly popular.

Further information kindly supplied by Marrietta from the Great War Forum.

There is a marble drinking fountain in his memory in the gardens of Royal Hospital Chelsea although it has not been possible to establish the family connection with RHC yet. It reads:

"In loving memory of Lieutenant Edmund Antrobus of the 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, only son of Colonel Sir Edmund Antrobus of Amesbury Abbey, Salisbury and Florence his wife who fell on the evening of the 24th October 1914 in a counter attack against the Germans a few hundred yards north of Kruisick east of Ypres."

Part of the Antrobus estate included Stonehenge which, in 1898, Edmund's father tried to sell to the Government for £125k, this offer was refused. Sir Edmund then enclosed the ruins and tried to charge one shilling for entrance, this resulted in a mass picket and protests. Sir Edmund also had a run in with the Druids as he tried to get them to pay towards the site's costs. Apparently they put a curse on him. Sir Edmund and his son Edmund died within a year.

ARBUTHNOT, Baronet, K.C.B., M.V.O.

Sir Robert Keith

Rear-Admiral, HMS Defence, Royal Navy. Lost with his ship 31st May 1916. Aged 52. 4th Baronet. Husband of Lina Arbuthnot, of 51, Elsworthy Road, Hampstead, London N.W. Member of the Royal Victorian Order (M.V.O.) No known grave. Commemorated on PLYMOUTH NAVAL MEMORIAL, Devon. Panel 10.

Note: HMS Defence was a Minotaur-class armoured cruiser of the Royal Navy, launched in 1907. She was the last armoured cruiser built for the Royal Navy. She was the flagship of Rear Admiral Sir Robert Arbuthnot, leading the First Cruiser Squadron at the Battle of Jutland on 31 May 1916. The other ships of the squadron (HMS Warrior, HMS Duke of Edinburgh, and HMS Black Prince) were of a similar outmoded class. While closing for the kill at high speed with the SMS Wiesbaden, drifting and crippled between the German and British fleets, Defence presented a target for the combined firepower of the German battlecruisers, whose proximity was hidden by smoke and mist. After initial damage she was struck by a salvo which blew up her after magazine, triggering explosions on the ammunition rails leading to the broadside 7.5 inch guns. Within seconds, another salvo immediately hit forward, and she blew up in a spectacular explosion, sinking with the loss of Arbuthnot and her entire complement of 903 men.

ASH, D.S.O.

William Claudius Casson

Lieutenant-Colonel, 23rd Battalion, Duke of Cambridge's Own (Middlesex Regiment). Mortally wounded on 15 September 1916, while o/c (Lt-Col) of the 23rd (S) Battalion, Middlesex Regiment and wounded at Loos, 25th September 1915, died of wounds 29th September 1916. Aged 46. Husband of Edith Learoyd Ash, late of 94A, Palmerston Rd., Southsea, Hants. Awarded the Distinguished Service Order (DSO). Buried in ETAPLES MILITARY CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot I. Row A. Grave 53. Also listed on Mill Hill Memorial

Extract from Distinguished Service Order 1916-1923 published by Naval & Military Press:

ASH, W.C.C. (D.S.O. L.G. 14.1.16); s. of W. H. Ash; ent. Middx. R. 28.9.92; Lt. 31.7.95; Capt. 14.3.00; Major 1.5.09; T/Lt.-Col. He died of wounds 29.9.16.

ATKINSON, D.S.O.

Frederick St John

Major, 9th Hodson's Horse, Indian Army. Died 30th November 1917. Aged 35. Son of Amy Caroline and the late Frederick James Atkinson; husband of Lorna Ethel Atkinson, of 8, Cumberland Mansions, Bryanston Square, London, W.1. Awarded the Distinguished Service Order (DSO). Buried in VILLERS-FAUCON COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Somme, France. Plot I. Row A. Grave 16.

Extract from Distinguished Service Order 1916-1923 published by Naval & Military Press:

ATKINSON, F.ST.J. (D.S.O. L.G. 1.1.18); Major, 9th Hodson's Horse. He was killed in action in France on 30.11.18.

AWDRY, D.S.O.

Charles Selwyn

Major, 6th (Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry) Battalion, Wiltshire Regiment formerly Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry. Killed in action 24th March 1918. Son of Charles Awdry, of Notton, Wilts; husband of C. L. Awdry, of Hitchambury, Taplow, Bucks. Awarded the Distinguished Service Order (DSO). No known grave. Commemorated on POZIERES MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Panel 6.

Extract from Distinguished Service Order 1916-1923 published by Naval & Military Press:

AWDRY, C. S.. (D.S.O. L.G. 2.12.18); Major, R. Wilts. Yeom., attd. 6th Bn. R. Wilts. R. He was killed in action 24.3.18.

Extract from London Gazette 2nd December 1918:

"AWDRY, CHARLES SELWYN, Major, Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry, attached 6th Battn. Wiltshire Regt For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He showed the greatest coolness and contempt of danger in conducting the retirement of the remnants of his battalion, and though greatly exhausted organized a new line of defence during the night. Next day, by his fine example he did much to steady the men of many scattered units."

Extract from Winchester Old Boys Magazine:

MAJOR CHARLES SELWYN AWDRY, DSO

ROYAL WILTS YEOMANRY

MAJOR CHARLES SELWYN AWDRY (C, 1890-1896) was born on March 23rd, 1877 - son of C. Awdry Esq. (COLL., 1861-1865); he was one of three Wykehamist brothers and nephew of the late Right Rev. William Awdry, Bishop of Tokio (Second Master, 1868-1872). He came to Winchester from Waynflete School, played for Lords in 1896 and the same year went up to New College, Oxford. On the outbreak of the South African War he went to the Cape with the Imperial Yeomanry and was mentioned in Despatches. In 1904 he became a partner in the firm of W. H. Smith & Son.

For some years before the war he held a commission in the Royal Wilts Yeomanry and in 1917 was appointed to command the 6th Battalion Wiltshire Regiment. In this capacity he rendered conspicuous service, receiving the D.S.O. and being twice mentioned in Despataches. They were heavily engaged in March 1918 at Bapaume during the Allied retreat of that month, and on 25th Major Awdry was reported missing. He is presumed to have fallen then.

He married in 1908 Miss Constance Lilias Bateson, of Heston, Middlesex: and was a justice of the Peace for the County of Wilts.

Some details and the photograph here are from the Great War Forum

BAKER

Cecil Douglas

[Listed as Lieutenant on SDGW] Captain, 1st Battalion, Grenadier Guards and Special Reserve. Killed in action 29th July 1917. Aged 49. Son of Arthur Baker, of Beckenham, Kent; husband of Gwendoline Baker, of Walton-on-Thames. Buried in DUHALLOW A.D.S. CEMETERY, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot VIII. Row C. Grave 11. See also the Stock Exchange memorial.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour 1914-1918:

BAKER, CECIL DOUGLAS, Capt. (Special Reserve), Grenadier Guards. 3rd s. of Arthur Henry Baker, of Elderslie, Beckenham, co. Kent. J.P., by his wife, Clara (68, Prince's Gate, London, S.W.), dau. of Julius Try Mortimer; b. 6 Dee. 1870 ; educ. The Abbey School, Beckenham; Sherborne, and Merton College, Oxford, where he graduated in 1893; became a member of the London Stock Exchange in 1895; obtained a commission as 2nd Lieut. in the R.N.V.R. Anti-Aircraft Corps in Sept. 1914; transferred to the Grenadier Guards in Sept. 1915, being promoted Lieut. Jan. 1916, and Acting Capt. Jan. 1917 ; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from 28 Oct. 1915; was wounded in April, 1916, and was killed in action at Le Bois des Crapouillots 29 July, 1917. He was a good all-round athlete; played in the Abbey School XI.. and in both the XI. and XV. at Sherborne, and while at Oxford played in the University XV. in 1891, 1892 and 1893, being captain in 1892. He m. at St. Paul's, Knightsbridge, 6 Oct. 1898, Gwendoline, dau. of the late Alexander Peyman.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN CECIL DOUGLAS BAKER, Grenadier Guards, was the third son of the late A. H. Baker, J.P., of Beckenham, and of Mrs. Baker of 68 Princes Gate.

Born in 1870, he was educated at the Abbey School, Beckenham, at Sherborne and Merton College, Oxford.

He played cricket and football for Sherborne, and won his Rugby "blue" at Oxford in 1891, being captain in 1893.

He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1895.

On the outbreak of war he was given a commission in the R.N.V.R., Anti-Aircraft Corps, but was transferred to the Grenadier Guards in September 1915.

He was killed in action on 29 July 1917, and left a widow.

BALFOUR-MELVILLE

James Elliot

Second Lieutenant, 3rd Battalion attached 2nd Battalion, Black Watch (Royal Highlanders). Killed in action 25th September 1915. Aged 33. Born 9th July 1882 in Edinburgh. Son of Leslie M. and Jeanie Amelia Balfour-Melville, of New Club, Edinburgh. No known grave. Commemorated on LOOS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 78 to 83.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour 1914-1918:

BALFOUR MELVILLE, JAMES ELLIOT, 2nd. Lieut., 3rd (Reserve) Battn. The Black Watch (Royal Highlanders), yr. s. of Leslie Melville Balfour Melville, of 3, Learmouth Terrace, Edinburgh, Writer to His Majesty's Signet, by his wife, Jeannie Amelia, dau. of Dr. William Wilson, of Florence; b. Edinburgh, 8 July, 1882; educ. The Academy there; Cargilfield; Malvern College, and Oriel College, Oxford (B.A.); was a Chartered Accountant in Edinburgh; applied on the outbreak of war for a commission, and was gazetted 2nd Lieut. 3rd Black Watch 3 Nov. 1914; trained at Nigg; was attached to the 2nd Battn. in France 15 May, 1915, and was killed in action in the charge of the Scottish Division at Loos 25 Sept. following, after reaching the fifth line of German trenches. The Colonel of the 2nd Battn. wrote: "He was not only popular though, he was a thoroughly capable officer. I feel his loss personally as a friend and also as commanding the battalion, for he was a fine and fearless leader. It is a consolation that he died painlessly in the hour of vitory. I saw him lying in the enemy's fourth-line trench, which his company had been among the first to capture, your son leading. It was greatly due to the bold leading of your son and others like him that the Regiment earned the praise of all three Generals: 'The magnificent attack and conduct of the Black Watch,'" and a brother officer wrote: "he was sniped through the head and killed instantaneously at the furthest point reached by the Regiment in theior charge. To have kept his men together and reached such a point, is a feat of gallantry and dash beyond all praise. It was in front of the fifth line of German trenches that Elliot fell, explaining to his men the work to be done to put the captured trench into a defensive one, evidently exposing himself fearlessly." Like his father (one of the most famous golfers and perhaps the best all-round athlete that Scotalnd ever produced). Lieut, Balfour Melville was prominent in field sports wherever he went. As a cricketer he represented Scotalnd with distinction, his work as a wicket-kepper being of the first rank. he went up from Malvern to oxford in 1902, and got his first Blue for Association Football in his first year, playing also in the three succeeding years, and being captain of the team, 1905. For three out of those four years he played on the right wing with another well-known Malvernian athlete, the late Mr. W. H. B. Evans. he was a member of the Corinthian team that toured in South Africa in 1903. He belonged to the Corinthians and Old Malvernians (Football), the M.C.C., I.Z., Oxford Authentics, and Grange Cricket Clubs. A keen golfer, he was a member of the Royal and Ancient Club, St. Andrews, and the Honourable Company of Edinburgh Golfers, Muirfield; unm.

His profile from Cricinfo - Wisden Cricketers' Almanack :

LIEUT. JAMES ELLIOT BALFOUR-MELVILLE (3rd Black Watch), a son of Mr. Leslie M. Balfour-Melville, was born in Edinburgh on July 9, 1882, and was killed in action in France on September 27. He was a useful hard-hitting batsman and a good wicket-keeper, and for the Malvern College XI in 1901 averaged 23.91: that year he played an innings of 51 v. Uppingham. In 1913 he was a member of the Scotch side which played a few matches in England, and against Surrey at the Oval scored 32 out of 43 in twenty minutes. Among the many clubs to which he belonged were the M.C.C., I. Zingari and Grange. For the last-named he averaged 57 in 1905. At Oxford he obtained his blue for Association football, playing from 1901 to 1905, and in the last-mentioned year being captain.

BAMBRIDGE

William Herbert

Captain, 24th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Killed in action 19th August 1917. Aged 27. Son of William Samuel and Louisa Maria Bambridge, of 35, London Rd., Marlborough, Wilts. Buried in GORRE BRITISH AND INDIAN CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot IV. Row E. Grave 9.

BATTYE

Cyril Wynyard

Lieutenant, Princess Charlotte of Wales's (Royal Berkshire Regiment) and Royal Flying Corps. Killed 13th March 1916. Aged 21. Son of the late Lt. Col. Montague Battye (10th Foot and Military Knight of Windsor), and of Charlotte Battye, of 19, Castle Yard, Windsor Castle. Buried in WINDSOR CEMETERY, Berkshire. Grave reference DN. 107.

BEECH

R J

Lieutenant-Colonel, Warwickshire Yeomanry. Died 30th August 1919. Aged 64. Son of James Beech, of The Shawe, Kingsley. Buried in the family vault under the church in ST. WERBURGH CHURCHYARD, KINGSLEY, Staffordshire.

BENCE-TROWER

Alfred

Second Lieutenant, 1st Battalion, Scots Guards. Died 29th May 1918. Aged 37. Son of the late Percy and Agnes Marian Bence-Trower. Buried in ST. AMAND BRITISH CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot III. Row C. Grave 8.

BILL

John Hugo Hepburn

Lieutenant-Colonel (Political Officer Mosul), Indian Political Department. Died 2nd November 1919. Buried in BAGHDAD (NORTH GATE) WAR CEMETERY, Iraq. Plot XIX. Row G. Grave 4.

BINNY, D.S.O.

Steuart Scott

Lieutenant-Colonel, 10th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers formerly 19th (Queen Alexandra's Own Royal) Hussars. Killed in action 3rd March 1916. Awarded the Distinguished Service Order (DSO). Buried in SPOILBANK CEMETERY, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot I. Row M. Grave 4.

Extract from Distinguished Service Order 1886-1915 published by Naval & Military Press:

BINNY, STEUART SCOTT, Lieut., was born 1 July, 1871. He was commissioned in the 19th Hussars 2 June, 1894 ; became Lieutenant 22 Oct. 1898, and served in the South African War, 1899-1902, taking part in the operations in Natal, 1899, including actions at Rietfontein and Lombard's Kop ; was present at the defence of Ladysmith, including sortie of 7 Dec. 1899, and action of 6 Jan. 1900; served during operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, Oct. and Nov. 1900; served as Adjutant, 19th Hussars, 1 Jan. to 31 May, 1902 ; took part in the operations in Orange River Colony, March, 1902 (Despatches [London Gazette, 15 Nov. 1901] ; Queen's Medal with two clasps, and King's Medal with two clasps). He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June, 1902] : "Steuart Scott Binny, Lieut., 19th Hussars. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa." He. was Adjutant, 19th Hussars, 1 Jan. 1902, to 31 Dec. 1904, and was promoted to Captain 1 April 1903 ; and to Major 9 July, 1910. Major Binny was killed in action in Flanders 3 March, 1916. He had married, in 1911, Marjorie, third daughter of Henry Champion, of Sibdon Castle, Salop.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour 1914-1918:

BINNY STEUART SCOTT, D.S.O., Lieut.-Col., Comdg. 10th (Service) Battn. The Royal Welsh Fusiliers, and late Major 19th (Queen Alexandra's Own Royal) Hussar's. only s. of the late John Binny, of Sydney, New South Wales, by his wife, Elizabeth Maria (Brent Eleigh, Haywards Heath), dau. of the late Hon. Robert Johnson, M.L.C., of Brooksby, Sydney, New South Wales; and gdson. of the late William Scott Binny, of Queen's Gate Gardens. S.W., late senior partner of Binny & Co., Madras; b. Sydney, New South Wales, 1 July. 1871 educ. Bengeo, co. Herts; Halleybury College, and in Germany: was a very keen cricketer, and member of the M.C.C. and Free Foresters, and a very good shot; gazetted to the 19th Hussars 2 June, 1894; promoted Major 6 July, 1910; served with distinction throughout the South African War of 1900, with his Regiment, including operations in Natal, 1899, and actions at Reitfontein and Lombard's Kop, and Defence of Ladysmith; also operations in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony (mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 15 Nov. 1901]; D.S.O.; Queen's Medal with three clasps and King's Medal with two clasps); was Adjutant of his Regiment from 1901 to 1904, and of the East Kent Yeomanry 1905-8, and on the Staff at Sandhurst from 1910 to March 1914, when he retired from the Army. On the outbreak of war he was appointed Railway Transport Officer, and later promoted to D.A. Director of Railway Transports, and mentioned in F.M. Sir John (now Lord) French's Despatch [ London Gazette, 1 Jan. 1916]; appointed to command the 10th (Service) Battn. The Royal Welsh Fusiliers Feb. 1916, and was killed instantaneously in action near Ypres, 3 March, 1916, by the bursting of a shell in his dug-out. Buried at Shoilbank, near Zillebeke. He m. at St. Peter's, Eaton Square, W., Jan. 1911, Marjorie, dau. of Henry Champion, of Sibdon Castle, co. Salop, and had two children: John Anthony Francis, b. at 11, The Terrace, Royal Military College, Sandhurst, 13 Dec. 1911, and Susan, b. 15 June, 1914.

BIRCHAM, D.S.O.

Humphrey Francis William

Lieutenant-Colonel, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Died of wounds 23rd July 1916. Aged 41. Son of Francis Thomas and Edith Bircham, of Gwentland, Chepstow; husband of Gladys Violet Bircham, of 24, Gerald Road, South Eaton Place, London. Awarded the Distinguished Service Order (DSO). Buried in CORBIE COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Somme, France. Plot 1. Row F. Grave 34.

Extract from Distinguished Service Order 1886-1915 published by Naval & Military Press:

BIRCHAM, HUMPHREY FRANCIS WILLIAM, Major, entered the Army 12 Feb. 1896 ; became Lieutenant 14 Sept. 1898 ; Captain 25 Oct. 1901, and Major 14 Feb. 1914. Major Bircham served in the European War, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 23 June, 1915] : " Humphrey Francis William Bircham, Major, King's Royal Rifle Corps. For distinguished service in the field." He died of wounds 23 July, 1916.

BIRD

Wilfred Stanley

Lieutenant, 5th Battalion attached 2nd Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Killed in action 9th May 1915. Born 28th September 1883 in Yiewsley, Middlesex. No known grave. Commemorated on LE TOURET MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 32 and 33.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour 1914-1918:

BIRD, WILFRED STANLEY, M.A. Oxon, Lieut., 6th (Reserve), attached 2nd, Battn. King's Royal Rifle Corps, s. of the Rev. Henry George Bird, MA., Rector of Newdigate, co. Surrey. by his wife, Henrietta Maria, dau. of William Greenham, of Hendford House, near Yeovil, J.P.; b. Yiewsley Vicarage, co. Middlesex, 28 Sept. 1883. He commenced his education at the Grange (Preparatory) School, Eastbourne, where he captained the cricket and football teams, and was an immense favourite with the masters and boys alike. He later proceeded to Malvern and entered the College at the time Canon Sidney James came to be Headmaster. There he represented his College in cricket, fives and football. His company also won the College Cup for military drill. In 1902 he was entered at New College, Oxford, and his early promise of being a leading sportsman was fully realised. He represented Oxford in cricket on three successive seasons, and was Captain of the Oxford side in 1906. He was a member of the Middlesex Team, though circumstances prevented him from playing in more than two or three matches during the season. He played for the Gentlemen against the Players, and was asked to represent England in South Africa and Australia. He was an extremely careful and good batsman, but specially excelled as a wicket keeper, and one of the best known captains in England said: "He is the best wicket keeper I ever saw." After leaving Oxford. where he won for himself many friends, he became a master at Ludgrove. It was here that he spent the last eight years of his life. His record there is a fulfilment of the promise of his early days at Eastbourne and Malvern, and his keenness on everything to do with Ludgrove, and his willingness to put himself out for others, endeared him to masters and boys alike. He was immensely happy there and it was a terrific struggle to answer the call, but ho never failed to recognise his duty. A member of the O.T.C., be was gazetted Lieut. to the 6th Battn. of the King's Royal Rifle Corps, 29 Dec. 1914, and was afterwards attached to the 2nd Battn. at the Front. He was killed, 9 May, 1915, while gallantly leading his platoon near Richebourg St. V aast; unm. His Major wrote of him: "Bird was gallantly leading his men when he was shot, and died instantly." He adds: "Bird was a splendid fellow, and a very promising officer and very popular with officers and men alike. I am more than sorry to lose him."

His profile from Cricinfo - Wisden Cricketers' Almanack :

Lieut. Wilfrid Stanley Bird (6th Battalion King's Royal Rifle Corps.) was born at Yiewsley, Middlesex, September 28, 1883, and killed in action on April 9. He was educated at the Grange, Eastbourne, where he was captain of the cricket and football elevens, and afterwards at Malvern, where he represented the College at cricket, football and fives. He was in the Malvern eleven in 1900-1-2, among his contemporaries being A.P. Day and G. N. Foster. Going up to Oxford with good credentials as a wicket-keeper he would in the ordinary course of events have stepped straight into the eleven, but Oxford in 1903 had a wicket-keeper of established reputation in W. Findlay. However, he kept wicket for Oxford in 1904-5-6, being captain of the eleven his last year. As a wicket-keeper he had not the genius of Martyn or Macgregor, but he was decidedly above the average. It was his privilege to keep wicket for the Gentlemen at Lord's in 1908 and 1912. He also played on a few occasions for Middlesex. His skill was, perhaps, never seen to better advantage than when keeping to D. W. Carr's googlies at Scarborough in 1909. As a batsman he was only moderate, but he helped the late W. H. B. Evans to save the University match in 1904. He was a master at Ludgrove School for several years, and was gazetted to the King's Royal Rifles in January, 1915. He had been a member of the M.C.C. since 1905.

BLACKBURNE, MiD

John George

Major, 9th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Killed in action 22nd August 1915. Aged 42. Son of John George Lees Blackburne and Mary Shadforth Boger Blackburne, of Dryclough, Oldham; husband of Lilian Monica Blackburne, of New Century Club, Hay Hill, London, W.1. Mentioned in Despatches (MiD). Buried in GREEN HILL CEMETERY, Turkey. Plot I. Row C. Grave 2. See also Charterhouse School War Memorial

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour 1914-1918:

BLACKBURNE, JOHN GEORGE, Major (temp.) and 2nd in Command, 9th (Service) Battn. The Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regt.), eldest s. of the late Charles Edward Blackburne, of Oldham, by his wife, Mary (now wife of William Shadforth Boger, of St, Leonards-on-Sea), dau. of John Riley; b. Oldham, co. Lancashire, 12 March 1872; educ. Charterhouse, and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst; gazetted 2nd Lieut. 1st Battn. (45th Foot) Sherwood Foresters, 19 Nov. 1892; was promoted a Leiut. 3 April, 1895, and retired 1899. He afterwards served in the 45th Coy., Imperial Yeomanry (Irish hunt Contingent), during the South African War 9Medal), and when the European War broke out in 1914, joined the Reserve of Officers as a Lieut. 2 Sept. He was appointed temp. Major and 2nd in Command of the 9th Battn. of his old Regiment 29 Oct. 1914; went with it to the Dardenelles 30 June, 1915, and was killed in action 21 Aug. following. he was mentioned in Despatches by Sir Ian Hamilton [London gazette, 28 Jan. 1916], for gallant and distinguished service in the field, and general H.P. maxwell wrote: "I saw a great deal of your husband as I had to be constantly up and down the trenches, and it was during this time I fully grasped his value as a soldier. He had no Adjutant or Quartermaster, and only two youngsters with him, and had to do the work of ten, and was always so full of good spirits and encouragement to his men and example to all, and, above all, never complaining. God knows how I felt for them all; no words of mine can express the courage and determination of all ranks, and the debt I owe them is inestimable. We left those lines in the night of the 20th, and went down to the beach and got ready for the big battle next day. We were in Divisional Reserve, with orders to push through at all costs, the attack to start at 3 p.m. The Battalion consisted then of about 1,600 men, and I had to divide the officers who were left so that each battalion had only four or five officers. The Sherwoods were the leading battalion. The last I saw of your husband was on the top of Sula baba, as I gave him and his Commanding Officer final directions, and pointed out the line of attack and wished them good luck. Your husband was in front with the leading company, and I watched them all down the hill and into the plain, and followed myself with Colonel Bosanquet and the rear company. On the low ground I lost sight of the leading lines, and after about a mile I had to stop and send a report, and give instructions to the other battalion who were coming up to the rear. I never saw either of them again." general Hammesley also wrote: "Major Blackburne was perfectly splendid in every way, and everyone was simply devoted to him. While Major Blackburne was in command for some time when the Colonel was wounded, he did splendidly. I couldn't say enough to his praise"; and added that he was a terrible loss to the Regiment and the country, as he was such a fine soldier and so splendid in every way, and all ranks regretted his loss, and a brother officer: "It seems that on the 21st August, about 3 p.m., a party of men were held up by the enemy's fire south of Chocolate Hill. Major Blackburne went to rally these and get them forward. he then shouted, 'Are there any Sherwoods here?' and 15 men got up; these he led forward and was shot while jumping a bush. His body was afterwards recovered and buried by another unit. His loss was felt by all the battalion, and we were left without a leader who had worked wonders in organizing those men left after the advance of Aug. 9th." he was a well-known cricketer, was in the Charterhouse XI., played for the Army in ireland and for Devonshire County, also for the Free Foresters and M.C.C., Na Shuler and Phoenix. he was also much interested in literary work. He m. at St. peter's and St. Edward's Church, Palace Gate, S.W., 31 Aug. 1897, Lilian Monica (4, Ashburn Place, S.W.), dau. of the late Major William Blount, of the 7th Madras N.I.; s.p.

BLACKETT

William Stewart Burdett

[Listed as Lieutenant on SDGW] Captain, Leicestershire Yeomanry. Died of wounds 25th November 1914. Aged 41. Son of Capt. Blackett (R.N.); husband of Mrs. Blackett Swiny, of Arbigland, Dumfries. Served in the South African Campaign with Grenadier Guards. Buried in POPERINGE COMMUNAL CEMETERY, Poperinge, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot I. Row B. Grave 1.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour 1914-1918:

BLACKETT, WILLIAM STEWART BURDETT, of Arbigland, co. Dumfries, and Manton Grange, Oakham. co. Rutland, Capt., Leicestershire Yeomanry, late Grenadier Guards. eldest s. of the late Capt. Archibald Campbell Steuart Blackett, R.N., by his wife, Clara Blanche Harriet, eldest dau. of Lieut.-Col. Charles Sedley Burdett, Coldstream Guards, and nephew and heir of Christopher Edward Blackett, of Arbigland, J.P., Lieut.-Col. 26th and 93rd Regts. and Coldstream Guards [a cadet of the family of Blackett, of Wylam, co. Northumberland] ; b. London, 24 Oct. 1873 ; educ. Wellington and Sandhurst ; joined the 3rd Grenadier Guards 8 May, 1895, becoming Lieut. 12 Feb. 1898, and Capt. 1901. He served through the South African War, 1899-1902, in the 8th Division under General Rundle, was present at the Battle of Biddulphsberg, and received the Queen's medal with two clasps and the King's with two clasps. He retired in 1903, but on the outbreak of war joined the Leicestershire Yeomanry, and was gazetted 15 Aug. 1914. He went to France with the Expeditionary Force, was wounded in action near Ypres on 20 Nov. 1914, and died in a French hospital at Poperinghe 24 Nov. following, and was buried there. He m. Staplestown Church, Carlow, 6 April, 1907. Kathleen Prudence Eirene (Arbigland, Dumfries), dau. of Beauchamp Frederick Bagenal, of Benekerry House, co. Carlow, D.L., and had a son, Christopher William Stewart Blackett, now of Arbigland, b. 27 April, 1908.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

CAPTAIN WILLIAM STEWART BURDETT BLACKETT attd. LEICESTERSHIRE YEOMANRY, formerly 3rd GRENADIER GUARDS, (of Arbigland, Dumfries), was born in 1873, and was the only son of Commander A. S. Blackett, R.N. Captain Blackett was the nephew and heir of his uncle, Colonel Blackett, of Arbigland, Dumfries.

He was educated at Wellington College, and at the R.M.C., Sandhurst, and joined the Grenadier Guards in May, 1895, being promoted Lieutenant in February, 1898, and Captain in May, 1900.

With the 3rd Battalion he served during the whole of the South African War, for which he received the Queen's medal with three clasps, and the King's medal with two clasps.

In the Great War he was attached for service to the Leicestershire Yeomanry, and died on the 24th November, 1914, from wounds received at Ypres on the 20th November.

Captain Blackett was a keen fisherman and cricketer, and fond of hunting and shooting. He was a member of the Guards', Bachelors', and Army and Navy Clubs.

He married Kathleen Prudence Eirene, youngest daughter of B. F. Bagenal, D.L., of Benekerry, Carlow, and left one son, C. W. S. Blackett, born 1908.

BLAKE

Cecil Rodolph

Captain, 10th Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Killed in action 4th April 1917. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 13 A and 13 B.

BLAKE

Maurice Frederice

Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Killed in action 14th September 1914. No known grave. Commemorated on LA FERTE-SOUS-JOUARRE MEMORIAL, Seine-et-Marne, France.

BLANE

James Pitcairn

Captain, 8th Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Died opf wounds 23rd November 1915. Son of Capt. Rodney Blane and Mary Georgina Blane, of 44, Montpelier St., Kensington, London. Native of Norwich. Buried in LIJSSENTHOEK MILITARY CEMETERY, Poperinge, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot II. Row A. Grave 6.

BODEN

Anthony Drummond

Major, Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own). Killed in action 24th September 1914. Aged 43. Husband of Nathalie Boden, of 15, Pelham Place, South Kensington, London. No known grave. Commemorated on LA FERTE-SOUS-JOUARRE MEMORIAL, Seine-et-Marne, France.

BOLITHO, D.S.O.

William Edward Thomas

Lieutenant-Colonel, commanding Royal 1st Devon Yeomanry. Died 21st February 1919 in Bath. Aged 56. Born 2nd July 1862, Polwithen, Madron, Penzance, Cornwall. Son of William Bolitho and Mary H. Bolitho, of Polwithen, Penzance; husband of Ethel Grace Bolitho (nee Macleod), of Trevelloe, Paul, Penzance. Played cricket for Oxford University between 1883 and 1885. Served in the South African Campaign. Awarded the Distinguished Service Order (DSO). Buried north-east of the church, beside the path, in ST. GULVAL CHURCHYARD, GULVAL, Cornwall. See also Madron War Memorial, Cornwall.

Extract from Distinguished Service Order 1886-1915 published by Naval & Military Press:

BOLITHO, WILLIAM EDWARD THOMAS, Major, was born at Penzance 2 July, 1862, son of the late William Bolitho, of Polwithen, He was educated at Harrow, and Trinity College, Oxford. He played for Harrow and Oxford at Lord's Cricket, Ground (two years for Harrow, and two years for Oxford). He joined, as Second Lieutenant, the 1st Royal Devon Yeomanry in May, 1889; served with the 7th Battn. 27th Imperial Yeomanry in the South African War, 1900-1 ; was wounded at, Noitgedacht, Transvaal, Nov. 1900 ; took part in advance to Pretoria, Battle of Diamond Hill, and holding the Mahaliesburg range of hills. He was mentioned twice in Despatches, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 Sept. 1901] " William Edward Thomas Bolitho, Major, 7th Battn. Imperial Yeomanry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa." The Insignia were presented by the King 29 Oct. 1901. He won the D.S.O. at Noitgedacht, Transvaal, when he led a forlorn hope up the kloof in the early morning, front General Clement's Camp, to relieve the Northumberland Fusiliers on top of the hill. He was wounded in the thigh, and lay out with his men for two days before being fetched in to an ambulance. He became Captain, 1st Royal Devon Yeomanry, 7 Aug. 1914. He became Acting Lieutenant-Colonel, 2/1st Royal Devon Yeomanry 15 Sept. 1914, and commanded the Itegt. until 11 Nov. 1918, when he resigned on account of had health, and went to Bath for treatment, where he died on 21 Feb. 1919. Lieut.-Colonel Bolitho was joint Master of the Foxhounds (Western), and hunted the hounds himself. Hunting was his great passion ; he was also a good cricketer and fisherman. He had married, at Iverness, 21 June, 1888, Ethel Grace Macleod, daughter of R. B. Ææas Macleod, of Cadboll, and they have two sons : William Torquill Macleod (late 19th Hussars ; killed in action 24 May, 1915), and Simon Bruce (who died in 1910) ; and one daughter, Brenda Grace.

His profile from Cricinfo

BOND

Charles Gordon

Captain, 2nd Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire Regiment). Killed in action 25th November 1915. Aged 34. Son of the Rev. Gordon Bond, of Savernake, Wilts.; husband of Dorothy Melian Bond, of Thistledown, Bude, Cornwall. Buried in GUARDS CEMETERY, WINDY CORNER, CUINCHY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot II. Row G. Grave 6.

BONHAM-CARTER

Norman

Second Lieutenant, Household Battalion, Household Cavalry. Killed in action 3rd May 1917. Buried in CRUMP TRENCH BRITISH CEMETERY, FAMPOUX, Pas de Calais, France. Plot II. Row C. Grave 7.

BOSCAWEN, D.S.O.

the Hon George Edward

Major, 116th Battery, Royal Field Artillery. Died 7th June 1918. Aged 29. Son of the late 7th Viscount Falmouth, K.C.V.O., C.B., D.L., J.P., and of Viscountess Falmouth, of 11, Stanhope Place, Connaught Square, London. Awarded the Distinguished Service Order (DSO). Commemorated on Notre Dame-de-Liesse Memorial 9, LA VILLE-AUX-BOIS BRITISH CEMETERY, Aisne, France.

Extract from Distinguished Service Order 1886-1915 published by Naval & Military Press:

BOSCAWEN, THE HONOURABLE GEORGE EDWARD, Lieut., was born 6 Dec. 1888, second son of the 7th Viscount Falmouth and Kathleen, daughter of the 2nd Lord Penrhyn. He entered the Army in Dec. 1907. He served in the European War from 1914 ; became Captain 30 Oct. 1914 ; was mentioned in Despatches, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 9 Nov. 1914] : " The Honourable George Edward Boscawen, Lieut., Royal Field Artillery. For gallantly fighting his section of guns in front of La Bassée on 13 Oct., when all his detachment except himself were wounded, and all infantry had fallen back from where the guns were." The award of his D.S.O. was published in the first list gazetted for the European War. He became Captain 30 Oct. 1914, and was given the Brevet of Major. He died of wounds 27 May, 1918.

BOWKER

Francis Jearrad

Lieutenant-Colonel, 1st/4th Battalion (Territorial), Hampshire Regiment. Killed in action 21st January 1916. Aged 47. Son of Alexander and Charlotte Bowker; husband of Esme Nicoll (formerly Bowker), of 2, Albert Place, Victoria Rd., Kensington, London. Buried in AMARA WAR CEMETERY, Iraq, Plot XIX. Row D. Grave 1.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour 1914-1918:

BOWKER, FRANCIS JEARRAD, Lieut.-Col., 1/4th Battn. The Hampshire Regt. (T.F.), late Major Hampshire Regt., 3rd s. of the late Alexander Bowker, of Dersingham, co. Norfolk, by his wife. Charlotte, dau. of George Smith, of Paddockhurst, co. Sussex; b. Paddockhurst aforesaid, 24 July, 1868; educ. Harrow, and Sandhurst; gazetted 2nd Lieut. 22 Aug. 1888; became Lieut. 4 Jan. 1890, and Capt. 27 March, 1897: was A.D.C. to Major-General Sir C. B. Knowles, K.C.B., Commanding the Infantry Brigade, Malta, 10 Feb. 1894, to 30 Sept. 1895, and to the same when Major-General Commanding in Egypt. 1 Oct. 1895, to 13 Aug. 1897; served in the South African War Jan. 1900. to July, 1902; took part in the operations in the Orange Free state Feb. to May, 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17-26 Feb. 1900); actions at Poplar Grove, Karee Siding, Vet River (5-6May) and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg and Pretoria (mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 29 July, 1902]; brevet of Major; Queen's Medal with three clasps and King's Medal with two clasps); promoted Major 27 Sept. 1905, and retired from the Army and joined the Reserve of Officers 8 Aug. 1908. On the outbreak of war in Aug. 1914, he rejoined the Depot at Winchester until given command of 1/4th Territorial Battalion Hampshire Regt. in Sept.; went to Poona, India, in that month with the battalion, thence to Rawal Pindi, and from there to Mesopotamia in March, 1915; was wounded at Nasariyeh in July, and was killed in action at Orah Creek on the River Tigris 21 Jan. 1916. He was twice mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette. ?], for his services in Mesopotamia. He m. at Cairo, 20 April, 1897, Esme, (Longparish, co. Hants), dau. of the late Rev. George Elliott, of Egland. Honiton. co. Devon, and had two children: Charles, b. 29 Aug. 1898, and James, b. 2 July, 1901.

BOWLBY

Geoffrey Vaux Salvin

Captain, Royal Horse Guards (The Blues). Killed in action 13th May 1915. Son of Mrs. Salvin Bowlby, of 56, Lowndes Square, London husband of The Hon. Mrs. Geoffrey Bowlby, of Croughton House, Brackley, Northants. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 3.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour 1914-1918:

BOWLBY, GEOFFREY VAUX SALVIN, Capt., Royal Horse Guards (The Blues), 6th but 2nd surviving s. of the late Edward Salvin Bowlby, of Gilston Park, Harlow, Essex, and Knoydart, Inverness, J.P., D.L., by his 2nd wife, Elizabeth, dau. of Robert Vans-Agnew, of Barnbarroch, and Sheuchan, co. Wigtown; b. London, 1 Dec. 1884 ; educ. Eton, and joined the Royal Horse Guards from the Militia (King's Own Scottish Borderers) as 2nd Lieut., 9 March, 1901. He was promoted Lieut. 1 Feb. 1905, and Capt. 6 May, 1908. Ile went to Ireland in 1909 as A.D.C. to Sir Neville Lyttleton, returning to his regt. in Sept. 1910 to take over the Adjutancy which he held to Sept. 1913. On the outbreak of war he was sent to France in advance of the composite regt., as billeting officer to the 4th Cavalry Brigade, rejoining his regt. the day before the battle of Mons. After the fight at Wytschaete, 29 Oct.-1 Nov. 1914, Capt. Bowlby was the senior officer left and took over command of the composite regt. for a short time, until each squadron went back to its own regt. On rejoining the "Blues" he commanded the A Squadron. He was killed leading his squadron in a charge across 1,000 yards of open country north of Bellewarde Farm, during the 2nd Battle of Ypres, on the afternoon of 13 May, 1915. His commanding officer wrote : "I cannot tell you what a loss he is to the regt.; he was as gallant as he could be and a magnificent soldier. He was so keen and energetic and proud of his squadron, of which he took the greatest care." Capt. Bowlby was a fine polo player, and enjoyed great popularity at the London grounds. In his day there were few to surpass him in skill and dash. For several seasons he was No. 1 in the Blues' team, and in two years (1910 and 1912) he helped the side to win the Inter-Regimental Cup at Burlingham. The other members of those victorious sides were: Capt. Lord Alastair Innes-Ker, Capt. H. E. Brassey, and Capt. J. F. Harrison. Capt. Bowlby was in the team again in 1913 and in 1914, but his regt. was in both years beaten by the 1st Life Guards. He m. at Holy Trinity Church, Sloane Street, 18 Oct. 1911, the Hon. Lettice, née Annesley, 4th dau. of Arthur, 11th Viscount Valentia, C.B., M.V.O., and had two children: John Edward Richard, b. 8 May, 1914 ; and Elizabeth Mary, b. 3 Feb. 1913.

BOWLES

James Arthur

Lieutenant, Adjutant to 28th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Killed in action 26th August 1914. Aged 31. Son of Maj. Gen. F. A. Bowles, R.A., of Hartnolls, Tiverton Devon; husband of Dorothy Emily Bowles, of The Warren Farm, Knockdown, Tetbury, Glos. Commemorated in LE CATEAU MILITARY CEMETERY, Nord, France. Special Memorial A. 10.

Note: Le Cateau had been a German railhead and an important hospital centre, and the military cemetery was laid out in February 1916, with separate plots for the Commonwealth and German dead. It contains the graves of over 5,000 German soldiers, in part burials made during the occupation, the rest brought in from other German cemeteries after the Armistice. A separate plot contains the graves of 34 Russian prisoners of war. The Commonwealth plots contain 698 burials and commemorations of the First World War. 187 of the burials are unidentified but there are special memorials to 20 casualties known or believed to be buried among them.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

LIEUTENANT JAMES ARTHUR BOWLES, ROYAL FIELD ARTILLERY, was born on March 9th, 1883, and was the son of General F. A. Bowles, C.B., Royal Artillery, and was educated at Boxgrove School, Guildford, Surrey ; Clifton College, and the Royal Military Academy.

He obtained his first Commission in the Royal Artillery in July, 1902. From 1909-12 he served on the Staff as A.D.C. to his father, General F. A. Bowles, when commanding at Devonport. In April, 1912, he joined the 28th Brigade Royal Field Artillery, and in the same year was appointed Adjutant of the Brigade. Previous to this he had served with the 132nd Battery at Fermoy, and in the Royal Horse Artillery at the Depot, Woolwich.

He was killed in action at Le Cateau, France, on the 26th August, 1914.

He married Dorothy Emily, youngest daughter of Mrs. Bainbridge and the late Rear-Admiral J. II. Bainbridge, of "Elfordleigh," Plympton, South Devon, and "Frankfield," Cork. Ireland, and left two children, Rose Ella Moina, born 26th June, 1912, and Ruth Kathleen, horn 26th September, 1913.

Lieutenant Bowles was a member of the Junior Army and Navy Club.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour 1914-1918:

BOWLES, JAMES ARTHUR, Lieut., R.F.A., s. of General F. A. Bowles, C.B., R.A.: b. 9 March. 1883; educ. Boxgrove School, Guildford; Clifton College, and the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich; gazetted 2nd Lieut. R.A.:11 July, 1902; promoted Lieut. 31 July, 1905; was A.D.C. to his father, when he was G.O.C. South-West Coast Defence, Southern'Command, from 1 Aug. 1909, to 16 April. 1912, after which he joined the 28th Brigade, R.F.A., being appointed Adjutant of the Brigade 1 Feb. 1913; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders, and was killed in action at Le Cateau 26 Aug. 1914. He m. Dorothy Emily, yst. dau. of the late Rear-Admiral J. H. Bainbridge, of Elfordleigh, Plympton, South Devon, and of Frankfield. co. Cork, and had two dam.: Rose Ella Moina, b. 26 June, 1912, and Ruth Kathleen, b. 26 Sept. 1913.

BRADFORD, Baronet

Sir Evelyn Ridley

Lieutenant-Colonel, commanding 2nd Battalion, Seaforth Highlanders (Ross-shire Buffs, the Duke of Albany's). Killed in action 14th September 1914 near Bucy-le-Long, Soissons, France. Aged 47. Born 16th April 1869, Goonha, India. Son of the late Col. Sir Edward Bradford, 1st Bart., and of Lady Bradford (nee Knight); husband of Elsie Clifton, Lady Bradford (nee Brown) of Medstead Manor, Alton, Hants. Buried in CROUY-VAUXROT FRENCH NATIONAL CEMETERY, CROUY, Aisne, France. Plot/Row/Section B. Grave 11.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

LIEUTENANT-COLONEL SIR EVELYN RIDLEY BRADFORD, BART., p.s.c., COMMANDING 2nd BATTN. SEA-FORTH HIGHLANDERS (ROSS-SHIRE BUFFS, THE DUKE OF ALBANY'S), was the second son of the late Colonel Sir Edward R. C. Bradford, Bart., some time Commissioner of Police, and was born on the 16th April, 1869.

Educated at Eton and the R.M.C., Sandhurst, he was gazetted to the Seaforth Highlanders in August, 1888, becoming Lieutenant in June. 1890, and Captain in July, 1895. As an Officer qualified for Staff employment in consequence of service on the Staff in the Field, and as a Staff College Graduate, he had considerable Staff service at home and abroad, in peace and in war. He served with his battalion in the Nile Expedition of 1898, being present at the battles of Atbara and Khartoum. From May, 1899, to January, 1900, he was A.D.C. to the Governor and Commander-in-Chief, Malta. He also went through the South African War, partly with his battalion, and during 1901-1902 as a Staff Officer and as Deputy Assistant Adjutant-General, being present at operations in the Orange Free State from February to May, 1900, including actions at Poplar Grove and Driefontein; at operations in the Orange River Colony from May to November, 1900, including action at Wittebergen, and again from the latter date to January, 1901; at operations in Cape Colony from February to March, 1901. For his services he was twice mentioned in Despatches ("London Gazette," 7th May and 10th September, 1901), was placed on the list of Officers qualified for Staff employment, and received his Brevet Majority June, 1902, the Queen's medal with four clasps and the King's medal with two clasps. After returning to England he held appointments as Brigade-Major at Aldershot, Commander of a Company of Gentlemen Cadets (General Staff Officer second grade), and a General Staff Officer at Head-quarters of the Army, War Office.

He obtained his substantive majority in March, 1905. and reached the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel in May, 1913, succeeding to the command of the 2nd Battalion of his Regiment in June, 1913. He took his battalion to the front, in August, 1914. For his services in the earlier part of the war he was mentioned in Sir John French's Despatch of 8th October, 1914. He was killed in action by a shell on the 14th September, 1914, at the battle of the Aisne. Lieutenant-Colonel Sir E. Bradford was a cricketer, and played for the county of Hampshire, and for the Army.

He married in 1909, Elsie Clifton, daughter of Colonel J. Clifton Brown, who survives him, and left three sons, Edward Montagu Andrew, born November, 1910—who succeeds to the title—Ridley Lewkenor, born April, 1912, and Donald Clifton, born May, 1914.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour 1914-1918:

BRADFORD, SIR EVELYN RIDLEY, 2nd Bt., Lieut.-Col. 2nd Seaforth Highlanders, eldest s. of Sir Edward Ridley Colborne Bradford, 1st Bt., some time (1890-1903) Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis, and an extra Equerry to His Majesty the King, by his 1st wife, Elizabeth Adela, dau. of Edward Knight, of Chanton House, Alton; b. India, 16 April, 1869; educ. Eton and Sandhurst; gazetted 2nd Lieut. 22 Aug. 1888, and promoted Lieut 11 June, 1890, Capt. 3 July 1895, Major 26 June, 1902, Brevet Lieut.-Col. 10 May, 1913, and Lieut.-Col. 10 June, 1913. He served with the Soudan Expedition in 1898, being present at the Battles of the Atbara and Khartoum, and on the staff in the South African War, 1899-1902. He took part in the operations in the Orange Free State from May to 29 Nov. 1900, including actions at Poplar Grove, and Driefontein, and Witteberjer (1-29 July), and during the operations in Cape Colony, Feb.-March, 1901. His services were twice mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 7 May and 10 Sept. 1901], and in addition to the Queen's medal with four clasps and the King's medal with two clasps, he received his brevet majority and was placed on the list of officers considered qualified for staff employment in consequence of service on the Staff in the field. At the time of the outbreak of the European War he was in command of the 2nd Battn. of the Seaforths, the old 78th. and took them out from Shorncliffe in Brig.-Gen. J. A. L. Haldane's 10th Infantry Brigade, which was brought up from the lines of communication in France to cover the retirement of the Expeditionary Force on Cambray. This duty was performed in the centre of the line by Major-Gen. Snow's 4th Division, consisting of the 10th, 11th and 12th Infantry Brigades. These units broke the front of the German pursuit, and suffered in consequence as the 1st and 2nd Army Corps fell back. He was killed in action at the Battle of the Aisne, 14 Sept. 1914, and was buried at Bucy Le Long, near Soissons. Sir Edward Bradford was a famous cricketer and played many fine games for Hampshire and the Army with Major Poore and Capt. Wynyard, of the Staff College, as contemporaries, the last time he played in the County Eleven being against Surrey, at Aldershot, in 1902 He m. at Colgate, Faygate, Sussex, 25 Nov. 1909, Elsie Surrey, 3rd dau. of Col. James Clifton Brown, and had three children: Sir Edward Montagu Andrew, now 3rd Bt., b. 30 Nov. 1910; Ridley Lewkenor, b. 11 April, 1912, and Donald Clifton, b. 22 May, 1911.

His profile from Cricinfo - Wisden Cricketers' Almanack

SIR EVELYN RIDLEY BRADFORD, 2nd Bart., Colonel of the Seaforth Highlanders, was killed in action in France in September. Born on April 16, 1869, he was thus in his forty-sixth year at the time of his death. He was a fine batsman with good defence, a safe field and a fast bowler whose action was not approved by several first-class umpires. Whilst playing for Hampshire in 1899 he was no-balled by White and Pickett in the match with the Australians at Southampton, and by A. F. Smith at Leicester. In the last-mentioned game, however, he scored 102, the next highest score in the innings being only 39, and this was his best batting performance for his county. Against Essex at Southampton three years before he had taken six wickets for 28 runs in the first innings and five for 40 in the second. In military matches he was a heavy run-getter, and as recently as May, 1913, had played an innings of 251 for Shorncliffe Garrison against Folkestone. For Aldershot Command v. Incogniti in May, 1895, he scored 248. His father, the Chief Commissioner of London Police, married twice, his first wife being a daughter of Edward Knight, of Hampshire and Kent, and his second a daughter of William Nicholson, of Harrow and M.C.C. Through his grandfather, Col. Bradford was thus related to a whole host of famous cricketers, including the Jenners, Normans, Nepeans, Barnards, Bonham-Carters, Wathens, and Dykes.

BRAKSPEAR

Ronald William

Major, 8th Battalion, Princess Charlotte of Wales's (Royal Berkshire Regiment). Died of wounds 2nd October 1915. Aged 39. Son of Mr. and Mrs. George Brakspear, of Glenwood, Silverdale Rd., Eastbourne, Sussex, and of Copse Hill, Henley-on-Thames. Buried in ETAPLES MILITARY CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot I. Row B. Grave 8. See also Henley-on-Thames Memorial.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour 1914-1918:

BRAKSPEAR, RONALD WILLIAM, Major, 8th (Service) Battn. Princess Charlotte of Wales's (Royal Berkshire Regt.), eldest s. of the late George Edward Brakspear, of Henley-on-Thames, a Director of Messrs. W. H. Brakspear & Sons, Ltd. by his wife, Florence (Glenwood, Silverdale Road, East- bourne), dau. of the Rev. F. R. Perry; b. Henley-on-Thames, 12 Nov. 18..; educ. Charterhouse; served as a Capt. in the Royal Bucks Militia for three years in Ireland, at the time of the Boer War. On the outbreak of war he volunteered for foreign service, and obtained a captaincy in the 8th Berkshire Regt., 1 Nov. 1914, being promoted Major 30 Dec. following; went to France at the end of Aug. 1915, and died at Etaples 2 Oct. following, from wounds received in action during the advance on Hulluch and Loos on 25 Sept. Buried in the Camier Road Cemetery, Etaples. Major Brakspear was a splendid shot and keen golfer. On the declaration of war he gave sufficient money towards the Town Hall at Henley-on-Thames being fitted up as a hospital, in which he took a great interest; unm.

BRAND

W J H

Major, 14th Battalion (London Scottish), London Regiment. Died 20th January 1920. Aged 49. Son of James Brand, of Sanderstead Court, South Croydon; husband of Ethel G. Brand, of 5, Upper Hamilton Terrace, St. John's Wood, London. Buried in the south-west part of ST. ANDREW CHURCHYARD, KINGSWOOD, Surrey.

BRANDT

Douglas 'Druce' Robert

[Douglas on SDGW and Druce on CWGC] Lieutenant, 1st Battalion, Rifle Briagde (The Prince Consort's Own). Died of wounds 6th July 1915. Born 20th Octobr 1887 at Streatham, London. Son of the late Robert E. Brandt, of 23, Brompton Square, London. Played for Oxford University 1907-1908. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 46 - 48 and 50

His profile from Cricinfo

BRASSEY

Harold Ernest

Lieutenant-Colonel, Royal Horse Guards (The Blues) attached 8th Battalion, South Lancashire Regiment. Killed in action 15th July 1916. Buried in BOUZINCOURT COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Somme, France. Plot II. Row F. Grave 1.

BRODHURST

Bernard Maynard Lucas

Major, 1st Battalion, 4th Gurkha Rifles. Died 27th May 1915. Aged 41. Born 6th August 1873, Benares (now Varanasi), Uttar Pradesh, India. Son of the late Mr. Justice Maynard Brodhurst, of the High Court, United Provinces, India, and Mrs. Mary Brodhurst. Buried in LA BRIQUE MILITARY CEMETERY No. 2, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot I. Row G. Grave 21.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 2:

MAJOR BERNARD MAYNARD LUCAS BRODHURST, 1/4th GURKHA RIFLES, was killed in action near Ypres on the 27th April, 1915, while advancing against the German trenches, being at the time in, temporary command of his battalion.

He was the younger son of the late Maynard Brodhurst, I.C.S., Judge of the High Court, North West Provinces, India, and was born on the 6th August, 1873. Educated at Clifton College and the R.M.C., Sandhurst, he was in the Cricket XI ; he also played, when at home, for the M.C.C., of which he was a member, for the Old Cliftonians, and for the Gurkha Brigade in India, and assisted Hampshire in one match.

On passing for the Indian Army he was gazetted to the unattached list in September, 1892, and served for a year in India with the 2nd Battalion, The Border Regiment. In January, 1894, he was appointed to the 1/4th Gurkhas, becoming Lieutenant in December of the same year. In 1900 he was made Adjutant of his battalion, and was promoted Captain in September, 1901. He took part in the Waziristan Expedition, 1894-95, for which he received the medal with clasp, and was on service in China in 1900, receiving the medal. From 1903-06 he was Inspector of Signalling to the Imperial Service troops, having been the first officer to hold the appointment, and he obtained his Majority in September, 1910.

His profile from Cricinfo - Wisden Cricketers' Almanack

Born on August 6, 1873, at Benares, India. He was killed in action near Ypres, Belgium, on April 27, 1915, aged 41, while serving as a Major in the 4th Gurkha Rifles.

He played as a fast bowler in the Clifton XI from 1889 to 1891, his best season being 1890 when he took 30 wickets at 14.66. In 1891, when he had a batting average of 15.30, it was said of him: "Would be a most destructive bowler if he could only bowl with the same confidence and luck with which he bats: he has improved in fielding." In 1892 he was in the Sandhurst Eleven. He played once for Hampshire, in the last match of the 1897 season when Leicestershire were defeated at Southampton. He scored 9 but failed to take a wicket in seven overs. [The next entry in the 1916 Wisden Obituaries is that for Sub-Lieut Rupert Brooke, who died four days before Brodhurst. Brooke headed the Rugby Eleven bowling averages in 1906 with 19 wickets at 14.05. Wisden noted: "He had gained considerable reputation as a poet."]

BROUGHTON-ADDERLEY, M.C.

Peter Handcock

Captain, 1st Battalion, Scots Guards. Died of wounds 16th October 1918. Aged 27. Eldest son of H. J. and the Hon. F. M. Broughton-Adderley. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). Buried in DELSAUX FARM CEMETERY, BEUGNY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot I. Row G. Grave 15.

BROWN

Douglas Crow

Lieutenant, 3rd Battalion, Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment) attached Machine Gun Corps (Infantry). Died of wounds 13th September 1917. Aged 25. Son of James Wyld Brown and Primrose Marianne Roose Brown, of Eastrop Grange, Highworth, Wilts. Buried in ZUYDCOOTE MILITARY CEMETERY, Nord, France.

BROWNING

Charles Hunter

Captain, 124th Battery, 28th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Killed in action 26th August 1914. Aged 36. Son of Capt. Hugh E. Browning, late of Clapham Park, Beds. Served in the South African Campaign. Buried in LE CATEAU MILITARY CEMETERY, Nord, France. Plot III. Row B. Grave 5. See also Clapham War Memorial, Bedfordshire

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour 1914-1918:

BROWNING, Charles Hunter. Captain, 124th Battery, 28th Brigade, R.F.A.. Son of Captain Hugh Edmond Browning of Clapham Park, co. Beds, late 2nd Dragoons (Royal Scots Greys). born Clapham aforesaid 9-4-1878, educated Eton and the Royal Military Academy, Woolowich. gazetted 2nd Lieut, R.F.A. 24-6-1898; promoted Lieutenant 16-2-1901; and Captain 13-3-1906, served in the South Africa War 1899-1900; took part in the operations in the Orange Free State Feb to May 1900, including actions at Poplar Grove and Dreifontein (Queens medal with 2 clasps); served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders, and was killed in action at Le Cateau 20-8-1914.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

CAPTAIN CHARLES HUNTER BROWNING, 124th BATTERY, XXVIIIth BRIGADE, ROYAL FIELD ARTILLERY, son of Captain Hugh Edmond Browning, late of the 2nd Dragoons (Royal Scots Greys) of Clapham Park, Bedfordshire, was born at The Woodlands, Clapham, Bedford, on the 9th April, 1878.

He was educated at Eton, where he was captain of the School in 1897, and in the Eton XI (kept wicket) in 1896 and 1897. Proceeding to the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, he obtained his commission in the Royal Field Artillery in June, 1898. becoming Lieutenant in February, 1901, and Captain in March, 1908. He served in the South African War, taking part in operations in the Orange Free State, including engagements at Poplar Grove and Driefontein, from February to May, 1900, subsequently receiving the Queen's medal with two clasps.

Captain Browning was killed on the 26th August at Le Cateau, while his battery was under very heavy fire.

He was the prospective Liberal candidate for Windsor at the next election.

BUCKINGHAM

Aubrey Webster

Major, 3rd Battalion attached 1st/5th Battalion, Gordon Highlanders. Killed in action 17th November 1914. Aged 44. Son of Joseph Hicks Buckingham, of Lancaster Gate, London; husband of Mabel F. Buckingham, Harrietsham Manor, Maidstone, Kent. Buried in YPRES RESERVOIR CEMETERY, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot XI. Row D. Grave 33.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour 1914-1918:

BUCKINGHAM, AUBREY WEBSTER, Major, 3rd Battn. Gordon Highlanders, 3rd s. of the late Joseph Hicks Buckingham, of Lancaster Gate, W., and Truro, by his wife, Lucy Webster, dau. of Benjamin Hallewell, of Leeds; b. London, 11 Oct. 1870; educ. Elstree, and Harrow; gazetted Lieut. in the London Scottish volunteers in 1892, and saw service in the South African War, 1899-1902. He took part in the operations in Natal in 1899 in command on volunteer details, and was afterwards appointed garrison adjutant at Green Point Camp, and for his services received the Queen's medal with three clasps and the King's medal with two clasps. He was given the rank of honorary Capt. in the Army, 31 May, 1901, and that of Major 11 Jan. 1902, and was attached to the 3rd Battn. (Reserve of Officers) of the Gordon Highlanders. He settled at Harrietsham in 1902. purchasing a large portion of the Stede Hill Estate and becoming lord of the manor. On the outbreak of war he was transferred to the 1st Battn. and went to the front on 6 Sept. 1914. He was killed in action near lunge, 17 Nov. 1914. Major Buckingham m. at Harrietstham, 2 June, 1908, Mabel Felizardae (Harrietsham Manor, Kent), dau. of the late Col. Walter Reginald Rudge, of Stede Court, Harrietsham, R.A. ; s.p.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

MAJOR AUBREY WEBSTER BUCKINGHAM, 3rd (attd. 1st) BATTN. GORDON HIGHLANDERS, of Harrietsham Manor, Kent, who was killed in action on the 17th November, 1914, near Ypres, was the son of the late J. H. Buckingham, of Lancaster Gate, and was born in 1870. He was educated at Elstree and Harrow (Rendalls 1884-1887), and served in the South African War, being present at operations in Natal in 1899. He was in command of Volunteer details, and afterwards Garrison Adjutant at Green Point Camp, near Capetown. For his services he received the Queen's medal with three clasps, and the King's medal with two clasps. He also had the Coronation medal, 1911.

Major Buckingham was a member of the Junior Athenaeum Club, and of the M.C.C. He was promoted honorary Captain in the Army in May, 1901, and honorary Major in January, 1902. He married Mabel Felizarda, daughter of the late Colonel Walter Rudge, Stede Court, Harrietsham, Kent.

BURNS

William Beaumont

Second Lieutenant, 1st Battalion, Worcesterhire Regiment. Killed in action 8th July 1916. Aged 32. Born 29th August 1883, Rugeley, Staffordshire. Played cricket for Worcestershire. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 5 A and 6 C. See also King'sSchool, Ely Memorial

His profile from Cricinfo

BURY

Harold Sterndale Entwisle

Second Lieutenant, 1st Battalion, Grenadier Guards and Special Reserve. Killed in action 25th January 1915. Aged 26. Son of Henry Entwisle Bury, and Angela Mary Bury, of Owlhurst, Weybridge, Surrey. No known grave. Commemorated on LE TOURET MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 2.

BUTLER

the Hon Brian Danvers

Lieutenant, 13th Battalion attached 7th Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Brigade. Killed in action 18th August 1916. Born 18th April 1876, Swithland Hall, Leicestershire. Son of 6th Earl of Lanesborough. Played for the MCC 1913-1914. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 13 A and 13 B.

His profile from Cricinfo

BUTLER, VC, D.S.O.

John Fitzhardinge Paul

Captain, King's Royal Rifle Corps attached Gold Coast Regiment, W.A.F.F. Died of wounds 5th September 1916. Aged 27. Born 20th December 1888 in Berkeley, Gloucestershire. Son of Lt. Col. Francis John Paul Butler and the Hon. Elspeth Butler; husband of Alice Amelia Butler, of Apsley House, Portfield, Chichester. Awarded the Distinguished Service Order (DSO) and the Victoria Cross (VC). Buried in MOROGORO CEMETERY, Tanzania. Plot III. Row C. Grave 3. See also Berkeley War Memorial, Gloucestershire

Extract from Symbol of Courage by Max Arthur:

AFRICA - Allied strategy in the war was concentrated on taking German colonies, particularly Togoland, Cameroon, South-West Africa and German East Africa. Fighting in 1914 was in West Africa, where an Anglo-French invasion of Cameroon made swift progress, and in German East Africa, where twelve thousand troops of the Indian Army's Expeditionary Force C were thrown back after an ill-prepared attack on the main port, Tanga.

BUTLER, John Fitzhardinge Paul Lieutenant, King's Royal Rifle Corps, attached Pioneer Coy., Gold Coast Regiment

17 November 1914 – In the Cameroons with a party of thirteen men he went into thick bush and attacked and defeated a much greater force of the enemy. A machine-gun and many loads of ammunition were captured. 27 December 1914 – Whilst on patrol duty with a few men, he swam the Ekam River under heavy fire, carried out his reconnaissance on the far bank and swam back to safety.

Lord Gifford VC was his uncle.

An extract from The London Gazette dated 23rd August 1915:-

"For most conspicuous bravery in the Cameroons, West Africa. On 17th November, 1914, with a party of 13 men, he went into the thick bush and at once attacked the enemy, in strength about 100, including several Europeans, defeated them, and captured their machine gun and many loads of ammunition. On 27th December, 1914, when on patrol duty, with a few men, he swam the Ekam River, which was held by the enemy, alone and in the face of a brisk fire, completed his reconnaissance on the further bank, and returned in safety. Two of his men were wounded while he was actually in the water".

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour 1914-1918:

BUTLER, JOHN FITZHARDINGE PAUL, V.C., D.S.O., Capt., 4th Battn. The King's Royal Rifle Corps, only s. of Lieut.-Col. Francis Paul John Butler, of Wyck Hill, co. Gloucester, late 18th Hussars, by his wife, Elspcth Fitzhardinge, dau. of the 2nd Baron Giffard; b. Berkeley, co. Gloucester, 20 Dec. 1888; educ. Wellington College, and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst; gazetted 2nd Lieut. King's Royal Rifle Corps 13 Feb. 1907; promoted Lieut. 21 Aug. 1909, and Capt. 4 March, 1915; was employed with the West African Frontier Force from Oct. 1913; served in West and East Africa during the European War 1914-16, and died at Kirunga, East Africa, 4 Sept. 1916, from wounds received in action there. Buried at Matomloo Mipion. Capt. Butler was awarded the Victoria Cross [London Gazette, 23 Aug. 1915]. "for most conspicuous bravery in-the Cameroons, West Africa. On 17 Nov. 1914, with a party of 13 men, he went into the thick bush and at once attacked the enemy, in strength about 100, including several Europeans, defeated them, and captured their machine gun and many loads of ammunition. On 27 Dec. 1914, when on patrol duty, with a few men, he swam the Ekam River, which was held by the enemy, alone and in the face of a brisk fire, completed his reconnaissance on the further bank, and returned in safety. Two of his men were wounded while he was actually in the water," and was awarded the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June, 1916], for distinguished bravery in the field, being also twice mentioned in Despatches for gallant and distinguished service in the field; unm.

Extract from Distinguished Service Order 1916-1923 published by Naval & Military Press:

BUTLER, J. F. P. (D.S.O. L.G. 26.6.26), Capt., K.R>R>C.: V.C. He was killed in action 4.9.16.

BYNG

Arthur Maitland

Captain, 4th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Killed in action 14th September 1914. Aged 42. Son of Lt. Comdr. Arthur Hervey Byng (late R.N.). Member of the M.C.C. Served in the South African War. No known grave. Commemorated on LA FERTE-SOUS-JOUARRE MEMORIAL, Seine-et-Marne, France.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour 1914-1918:

BYNG, ARTHUR MAITLAND, Capt.. 4th Battn. The Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regt.), s. of Major A. H. Byng, late Leinster Regt., formerly Lieut. R.N.; b. Southsea, co. Hants, 26 Oct. 1872 ; educ. The Grange, Cowes, and by an Army tutor at Caen; gazetted 2nd Lieut. West Indian Regt. 28 Sept. 1895; promoted Lieut. 14 Oct. 1897, and Capt. 27 June, 1900. transferring to the Royal Fusiliers 16 March. 1901; served in the South African War 1902, being employed with the Mounted Infantry: took part in the operations in the Transvaal, Orange River Colony and Cape Colony, Jan. to 31 May, 1902 (Queen's Medal with four clasps): was employed with the Egyptian Army from 3 Nov. 1903, to 26 Aug. 1905, and from 20 Nov. 1908, to 19 May, 1912, was Adjutant of the Special Reserve; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders, and was killed in action at Vailly, during the Battle of the Aisne, 14 Sept. 1914.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

CAPTAIN ARTHUR MAITLAND BYNG, 4th ROYAL FUSILIERS (CITY OF LONDON REGIMENT), was the son of Major A. H. Byng, late of the Prince of Wales's Leinster Regiment, and formerly Lieuenant Royal Navy, and was related to the Viscount Torrington. He was born at Southsea on the 26th October, 1872.

Captain Byng was educated at "The Grange," Cowes, and by an Army Tutor at Caen. In September, 1895, he was gazetted to the West Indian Regiment, and served in it till March, 1901, being promoted Captain in June, 1900; he was transferred to the Royal Fusiliers, as Captain in March, 1901. He served in the South African War in 1901 and 1902, having been employed with the Mounted Infantry, and being present at operations in the Transvaal, Orange River Colony and Cape Colony. He received the Queen's medal with four clasps.

From 1903-05 he was employed with the Egyptian Army and was Adjutant in the Special Reserve from 1908-1912. At Hounslow he inaugurated a Labour Department for Old Soldiers who were out of work, and set on foot schemes for the social improvement of Army dependents, and amongst other things had such soldiers' wives as wished it, taught to cook properly.

Captain Byng was killed at Vailly, at the battle of the Aisne, on the 14th September, 1914, while looking through his field glasses; he was shot in the throat and killed instantaneously.

Brother officers gave the following account of him and his work during the early part of the war :--" He has done very well with his Company ; no man could have done more. . . . He was our great interpreter, being very good at French." Again: "He was always taking risks and leaving the trenches with a rifle to walk about in front."

Captain Byng was a member of the M.C.C. and had played both cricket and football for Hampshire. He was a fine all-round cricketer, being a clean and effective bowler, with very deceptive pitch and pace, and a polished and punishing bat. He had taken many wickets and made hundreds of runs for the Royal Fusiliers.

BYTHELL, C.B.E.

William John

Colonel, Royal Engineers. Died 30th June 1920 at Elm Grove, Southsea, Hampshire. Aged 57. Born 9th September 1862, Poona (now Pune), Maharashtra, India. Awarded the Companion of the British Empire (CBE). Buried north-west of the church in CHRIST CHURCH CHURCHYARD, PORTSDOWN, Hampshire.

His profile from Cricinfo

CAMPBELL

Allan William George

Lieutenant, Coldstream Guards. Died of wounds 20th September 1914. Aged 29. Son of Allan Campbell; husband of Lady Moya Campbell, of 42A, Buckingham Palace Rd., London. Buried in VENDRESSE BRITISH CEMETERY, Aisne, France. Plot III. Row J. Grave 9.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour 1914-1918:

CAMPBELL, ALLAN WILLIAM GEORGE, Lieut., Special Reserve, Coldstream Guards, only s. of Allan Campbell, of 21, Upper Brook Street, London, W.; b. London, 20 Oct. 1884; educ. E. P. Arnold's Wixenford Preparatory School; Eton, and New College, Oxford; was gazetted 2nd Lieut. Coldstream Guards in Feb. 1908, and promoted Lieut.: 31 Oct. 1910, joining the Special Reserve of the 2nd Battn. in Aug. 1913; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders, being attached to the 1st Battn., and died 20 Sept. 1914, from wounds received in action at the Battle of the Aisne the previous day. Buried in Troyon Churchyard. He m. 15 Feb. 1912, Moya Melisende, 2nd dau. of George Mick Browne, Marquis of Sligo, and had a son, b. Oct. 1913.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

LIEUTENANT ALLAN WILLIAM GEORGE CAMPBELL, SPECIAL RESERVE, COLDSTREAM GUARDS, who died of wounds received at the battle of the Aisne on the 20th September, 1914, was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. Allan Campbell, of 21, Upper Brook Street, London.

He was born in London on the 20th October, 1884, and was educated at E. P. Arnold's Wixenford Preparatory School, where he was in the school XI. for cricket and football; at Eton, and New College, Oxford. He was gazetted to the Coldstream Guards as Second-Lieutenant in February, 1908, becoming Lieutenant in October, 1910. In August, 1913, he joined the Special Reserve of the 2nd Battalion Coldstream Guards.

When at Eton he was captain of, and played cricket and football for his House, Mr. A. A. Somerville's, was a leading member of the Musical Society, and won a cup for fives ; he was a member of the Volunteer Band and was "sent up for good" several times (original Greek and Latin verse), and won the Headmaster's Prize. Later in life he frequently played cricket for the Household Brigade. His recreations were cricket, shooting, fishing, golf, tennis, billiards, racquets and motoring. He was also very fond of music, and was a good musician, being able to play by ear anything he heard, including operas. While at Oxford he conducted a small orchestra of his own.

He was a member of the following clubs: the Guards', Lord's, Travellers', Bath, Junior Carlton, United Empire, Royal Automobile, Prince's, Queen's, Alpine Sports; Worpleston and Harewood Downs Golf Clubs, and of the Free Foresters and Eton Ramblers.

In June, 1914, he was accepted as Unionist Candidate for the Doncaster Division of Yorkshire.

On the outbreak of the war he rejoined his Regiment, and was one of three officers to take out the first draft to the front. He was serving with the 1st Battalion when he was mortally wounded at the Aisne on the 19th September, 1914, and succumbed to his wounds next day. He was buried in Troyon Churchyard.

Lieutenant Campbell married on the 15th February, 1912, Lady Moya Melisende Browne, second daughter of the sixth Marquess of Sligo, and Agatha Stewart, daughter of J. Stewart-Hodgson of Lythe Hill, Haslemere, and left a son born October, 1913.

CAMPBELL, C.B., C.M.G.

Charles Lionel Kirwan

Brigadier-General, General Staff commanding 5th Cavalry Brigade, 2nd Cavalry Division late 16th (The Queen's) Lancers. Died 31st March 1918. Aged 44. Son of Mr. and Mrs. Campbell, of Scotland. Buried in DEAN, OR WESTERN CEMETERY, Edinburgh. Grave reference D. 620.

CAMPBELL, D.S.O.

the Hon John Beresford

Captain, 1st Battalion, Coldstream Guards. Killed in action 25th January 1915. Aged 48. Eldest son of Hallyburton George Campbell, 3rd Baron Stratheden and Campbell, and Lady Stratheden and Campbell; husband of Alice Susan, Lady Stratheden and Campbell, of Hunthill, Jedburgh, Roxburghshire. Awarded the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.). No known grave. Commemorated on LE TOURET MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panels 2 and 3.

Extract from Distinguished Service Order 1886-1915 published by Naval & Military Press:

CAMPBELL, THE HONOURABLE JOHN BERESFORD, Capt., son of the Earl and Countess of Cawdor; served in the European War from 1914, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 18 Feb. 1915]: "The Hon. John Beresford Campbell, Capt., Reserve of Officers, 1st Battn. Coldstream Guards. For gallantry in the operations at Givenchy 21 to 23 Dec. 1914, when he handled his company with great efficiency."

CAMPBELL

John Davies

Lieutenant, "L" Battery, Royal Horse Artillery. Killed in action 1st September 1914. Son of Mrs. Jennie M. Campbell, of Howden Court, Tiverton, Devon, and the late Mr. J. D. Campbell. Buried in NERY COMMUNAL CEMETERY, Oise, France.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

LIEUTENANT JOHN DAVIES CAMP. BELL, "L" BATTERY, ROYAL HORSE ARTILLERY, was born at Tacna, Chile, South America, on the 1st March, 1883, the son of J. D. Campbell, Esq., of Howden Court, Tiverton, Devon.

He was educated at Cheltenham College, and the R.M.A., Woolwich, entering the Royal Artillery in 1901, and becoming Lieutenant in December, 1904. He was killed on the 1st September, 1914, at Nery, near Compiegne, France, during " L " Battery's glorious stand at that place (see Captain E. K. Bradbury, V.C.).

CAMPION

Edward

Lieutenant-Colonel, 2nd Battalion, Seaforth Highlanders (Ross-shire Buffs, the Duke of Albany's). Died 25th February 1916. Buried in HURSTPIERPOINT OLD CEMETERY, Sussex. Grave reference D. 108.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour 1914-1918:

CAMPION, EDWARD, Major and Temp. Lieut.-Col., 2nd Battn. (78th Foot) Seaforth Highlanders (Ross-shire Buffs, The Duke of Albany's), 3rd and yst. s. of Col. William Henry Campion, C.B., V.D., of Danny, Hassocks, co. Sussex, Honorary Colonel 4th Battn. (T.F.) Royal Sussex Regt., who served in the Crimean and Indian Mutiny Campaigns, by his wife, Gertrude, 2nd dau. of the Right Hon. Sir Henry Bouverie William Brand, 1st Viscount Hampden; b. Danny. 18 Dec. 1873; educ. at Eton; gazetted 2nd Lieut. Seaforth Highlanders. from the Militia, 7 Dec. 1895; promoted Lieut. 8 June, 1898, Capt. 19 March. 1901. Major 22 Oct. 1914 and Temp. Lieut.-Col. 29 Sept. 1915; served in Crete in 1897; A.D.C. to the Major-General Infantry Brigade, Aldershot, Oct. 1900 to Oct. 1901; served in the Nile Expedition 1898; Battles of the Atbara and Khartoum (Egyptian Medal with two clasps and Khedive's Medal); also in the South African War (1901-2), chiefly in the Lydenberg district of the Transvaal (Queen's Medal with five clasps); afterwards served in India; on the outbreak of war in 1914 went to France with his battalion; was mentioned in Sir John (now Lord) French's Despatches [London Gazette, 17 Feb. 1915]; his name appeared in the casualty list as suffering from gas poisoning, near Ypres, in May, 1915: he had a relapse during convalescence in England, and died from the effects of the gas poison in London, 25 Feb. 1916. Buried at Hurstpierpoint, co. Sussex; unm.

CARPENTER-GARNIER

John Trefusis

Major, 1st Battalion, Scots Guards. Killed in action 14th September 1914. Aged 40. Son of Mr. and the Hon. Mrs. Carpenter-Garnier, of Rookesbury Park, Wickham, Hants. Educated at Harrow and Christ Church (Oxford). Served in the South African Campaign. Buried in VENDRESSE CHURCHYARD, Aisne, France. Grave 1. See also Wickham, Hampshire Memorial.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour 1914-1918:

CARPENTER-GARNIER, JOHN TREFUSIS, Major, Scots Guards, eldest s. of John Carpenter-Garnier, of Rookesbury Park, Wickham, co. Hants, J.P, D.L., M.P. for South Devon, 1873-84; by his wife, the Hon. Mary, née Trefusis, 2nd dau. of Charles Rudolph, 19th Lord Clinton; b. Rookesbury Park afsd., 2 Feb. 1874: educ. Barrow and Christ Church, Oxford; entered the Royal Scots Militia in 1894, and was gazetted 2nd Lieut. to the Scots Guards, 26 Aug. 1896, and promoted Lieut. 13 April. 1898; Capt. 25 Oct. 1902, and Major 10 Oct. 1908, and was Adjutant 1903-05, and Regimental Adjutant 1906 to 1909. He served through the South African War, 1900-2; took part in the operations in the Orange Free State from May to Nov. 1900, including the actions at Biddulphsberg and Wittebergen, and subsequently in those in the Transvaal, and received the Queen's medal with three clasps and the King's with two. On the outbreak of the European War he went to France with his regt., which formed part of the first Expeditionary Force on 13 Aug. 1914; served through the retreat from Mons, and was killed in action at the Battle of the Aisne, 15 Sept. 1914; unm. He was buried at Vendresse, France.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

MAJOR JOHN TREFUSIS CARPENTER-GARNIER, 1st BATTN. SCOTS GUARDS, was the eldest son of John Carpenter-Gamier, Esq., J.P., D.L., M.P. for South Devon, 1873-84, and the Hon. Mary Louisa Carpenter-Gamier, daughter of the nineteenth Baron Clinton. He was born in 1874 at Rookesbury Park, Wickham, Hants, and was educated at Harrow and Christ Church, Oxford.

He first served in the Royal Scots Militia from 1894-96. In August of the latter year he joined the Scots Guards, and served in the South African War for two and a half years in General Rundle's Division, being present at the actions of Biddulphsberg and Wittebergen, receiving the Queen's medal with three clasps and the King's medal with two clasps.

From 1903-06 he was Adjutant of his battalion, and Regimental Adjutant from 19061.909. In August, 1914, he was appointed second in command of his battalion. In the Battle of the Aisne he was struck by shrapnel on the 14th September, and died of his wounds on the following day. His body was buried in Vendresse Churchyard.

Major Carpenter-Gamier was a member of the Guards' and Bachelors' Clubs, and was a keen cricketer, belonging to the M.C.C. and I Zingari. He also played polo, and was fond of hunting and shooting. He was not married.

CECIL, M.C.

the Hon William Amherst

Captain, 2nd Battalion, Grenadier Guards. Killed in action 16th September 1914. Aged 28. Son of Col. Lord William Cecil, C.V.O., and Baroness Amherst of Hackney; husband of Lady Amherst of Hackney, of The Red House, Windsor. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). Buried in SOUPIR COMMUNAL CEMETERY, Aisne, France. Plot/Row/Section B. Grave 1.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour 1914-1918:

CECIL, THE HON. WILLIAM AMHERST, M.C., Capt., 2nd liattn. Grenadier Guards, eldest s. of Lord William Cecil, C.V.O.. M.V.O.. by his wife, Mary Rothes Margaret. The Baroness Amherst of Hackney; b. 30 June. 1881; educ. Eton; gazetted 2nd Lieut. Grenadier Guards 1 Aug. 1904: promoted Lieut. 11 July. 1908, and Capt. 9 Sept. 1914; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders, and was killed in action at the Battle of the Aisne 19 Sept. 1914. Capt. Cecil was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette. 19 Oct. 1914] by F.M. Sir John (now Lord) French, for gallant and distinguished service in the field, and was awarded the Military Cross. He m. in 1910, Evelyn Gladys, only child of Henry Baggallay, of Heatherhurst Grange, Frimley. co Surrey, and had two sons: William Alexander Evering, b. May. 1912, and Henry Kerr Auchmutz, b. April. 1914.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

CAPTAIN the Honble. WILLIAM AMHERST CECIL, 2nd BATTN. GRENADIER GUARDS, was born in London on the 30th June, 1886, the eldest son of Lord William Cecil, Gre nadier Guards, and Lady William Cecil, Baroness Amherst of Hackney, and heir to the Barony.

He was educated at Eton, and joined the Grenadier Guards in August, 1907, becoming Lieutenant in July, 1908.

For his services in the Great War he was mentioned in Sir John French's Despatch of the 8th October, 1914, was awarded the Military Cross, and recommended for the Legion of Honour. He was promoted Captain on the 9th September, 1914. Captain Cecil was at Landrecies in command of the Machine Gun Section of the 2nd Battalion Grenadier Guards, and was killed at the Battle of the Aisne on the 16th September, 1914.

Captain Cecil was very keen about his profession, especially everything in relation to machine guns; he was a clever draughtsman and took a special interest in Egyptology, in which he was an expert. He was very musical, played the piano, and also the bagpipes. He was also fond of all sports, particularly cricket, hunting, yachting, and shooting. He was a member of the Guards' and the Junior Carlton clubs. Captain Cecil married in 1910, Evelyn Gladys, only child of Henry Baggallay, Esq., of Heatherhurst Grange, Frimley, Surrey, and left two sons, William Alexander Evering, born May, 1912, and Henry Kerr Auchmutz, born April, 1914, the elder of whom becomes heir to the Barony of Amherst of Hackney.

CHALONER

Richard Godolphin Hume

Captain, 3rd Battalion attached 20th Battalion, Prisoner of War Company, Wiltshire Regiment. Died 3rd April 1917. Aged 33. Eldest son of Richard Godolphin Walmesley (1st Baron Gisborough of Cleveland, in Yorkshire) and Margaret, his wife, of Gisborough Hall, Gisborough, Yorks. Served in the South African Campaign. Buried in CALAIS SOUTHERN CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot A. Row Officers. Grave 15.

CHAPLIN

Charles Slingsby

Lieutenant-Colonel, 9th Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Killed in action 30th July 1915. Aged 52. Son of Clifford Waterman Chaplin; husband of Gwladys Greenfield (formerly Chaplin), of Erbistock House, Ruabon, Denbighshire. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 51 and 53.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour 1914-1918:

CHAPLIN, CHARLES SLINGSBY, Lieut.-Col., 9th (Service) Battn. King's Royal Rifle Corps, s. of the late Clifford Waterman Chaplin, of Burrough Hill, Melton Mowbray, co. Leicester, J.P., by his wife, Rosa, dau. of William Chaplin, M.P.; b. Norfolk Square, Hyde Park, London, 31 May, 1863; educ. Eton and Pembroke College, Oxford; joined the City of London Regt. in May, 1885, from the Militia, and was transferred the same month to the "Green Jackets," and gazetted Capt. to the King's Royal Rifles 1894; served with the Chitral Force under General Low (medal with clasp); and in the South African war as Special Service Officer for Mounted Infantry; and later, from Aug. 1901, in command of the 1st Regt. of Mounted Infantry, doing excellent work in the Transvaal and the line of the Orange River (mentioned in Despatches, medal with five clasps). After the campaign he obtained his majority in 1903, and was posted to the 2nd Battn. King's Royal Rifles at Gharial, in the Punjab; he succeeded to the command of the 3rd Battn. 18 March, 1908, at Crete, and later took the battn. to Malta, afterwards returning to India and serving at Umballa. From half-pay in 1912 he retired, and was placed in the Reserve of Officers, being at the top of the list when mobilisation took place, and was one of the big batch of officers who were given command on 19 Aug. 1914. He was killed in action after a 12 hours' fight, when he and his men had just captured a trench, being shot through the head at Hooge, in Flanders, at 3.30 p.m. 30 July, 1915. He was buried at Chateau Hooge, close to where he fell. The following telegram was sent to the 9th Service Battn. from Headquarters, 2nd Army, at 1 p.m. on 31 July, 1915: "The Army Corps Commander wishes you to convey to the officers and men of the 9th Battn. King's Royal Rifles his appreciation of the way in which they carried out the attack on the trenches north of the Menin Road yesterday afternoon, and maintained themselves under heavy artillery fire." Lieut.-Col. Chaplin m. at Bombay, India, 29 Sept. 1905, Gwladys Hamilton (Erbistock House, Ruabon), dau. of Col. Stanley Creek, late Royal Welsh Fusiliers, and had three sons and a dau.: Clifford, b. 23 Sept. 1906; Nigel Gilbert Forbes, b. 9 Jan. 1908; Patrick Slingsby, b. 4 July, 1910; and Zara, b. 18 March, 1914.

CHINNERY

Esmé Fairfax

Captain, Coldstream Guards and 4th Squadron, Royal Flying Corps. Accidentally killed 18th January 1915. Aged 28. Born 28th March 1886, Hatchford Park, Cobham, Surrey. Son of Walter Moresby Chinnery, D.L., J.P., and Alice Emily Chinnery. Played for Surrey in 1906. Buried in the family plot in ST. MATTHEW CHURCHYARD, HATCHFORD, Surrey.

His profile from Cricinfo

CHINNERY

Harry Broderick

Lieutenant, 1st [SDGW] or 13th [CWGC] Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Killed in action 28th May 1916. Born 6th February 1876, Teddington, Middlesex. Played for Middlesex and Surrey. Commemorated in on a special memorial in BERLES-AU-BOIS CHURCHYARD EXTENSION, Pas de Calais, France. See also Stock Exchange Memorial

Note: Berles-au-Bois Churchyard Extension was begun by French troops, whose graves are in the South corner. It was continued by the 46th North Midland and other Divisions from September 1915, until January 1917, when it was closed. There are now over 100, 1914-18 war casualties commemorated in this site. Of these, a small number are unidentified and one grave, destroyed by shell fire, is represented by a special memorial.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

LIEUTENANT HARRY BRODRICK CHINNERY, King's Royal Rifle Corps, second son of the late W. M. Chinnery of Hatchford Park, Cobham, Surrey, was born in 1876 and educated at Eton.

His name was long famous in the cricketing world. He played for Eton against Harrow in 1894 and 1895, and was afterwards a regular member first of the Surrey and then of the Middlesex Eleven. He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1898, and a partner in his late father's firm, Chinnery Bros.

As soon as war broke out he offered his services to the War Office and was given a commission in the r3th (Service) Battalion of the 60th (King's Royal Rifles).

He was killed in France on 28 May 1916, in circumstances that are thus described by his Company Commander: "He was in the middle of his men, encouraging them in a moment of danger. He was killed by the last shell fired at a night working party which was advancing our line nearer to the enemy. It was a trying night, and he did splendidly all the earlier part of it in keeping them at their work and keeping up their spirits."

His Colonel wrote: "He will be greatly missed by his brother-officers and the men of his Company, while by his death the Battalion has lost a valuable officer whom it would be difficult to replace."

Lieut. Chinnery's popularity with his men may be judged by the following extracts from a letter written by a rifleman "on behalf of the fellows in his Platoon and myself":

"Mr. Chinnery was loved and respected by all of us that he came in contact with. While in charge of the Machine Gun Section in England, and last Autumn out here, he was looked upon as something more than a good officer and a perfect gentleman; and although he had only been with No. 6 Platoon six weeks, yet no Officer was more respected and had their complete confidence.

"Many are the stories told by his men of his splendid courage and coolness on Sunday night (the night of his death); always first in his area to go to a wounded man, to assist and cheer with a kindly word."

His profile from Cricinfo - Wisden Cricketers' Almanack

Lieutenant Harry Chinnery was stylish batsman and useful fielder who was in the Eton XI in 1894 and 1895, topping the averages in his final season. In the annual match against Harrow he scored 75 and 64. In 1897 he played regularly for Surrey, scoring 761 runs including 149 against Warwickshire. He was admitted to the Stock Exchange in 1898 and so only played a handful of representative matches in 1898 and then between 1899 and 1902 he appeared irregularly for Middlesex. In 1901 he opened the season with 105 and 165* for MCC against Oxford University and later made 100 for Middlesex against Gloucestershire. In 1904 he was back at Surrey for his final Championship matches. He carried on playing first-class cricket until 1910, mainly for the Gentlemen of England. Wisden noted that his "early retirement was much to be regretted, but he continued to assist the Eton Ramblers and I Zingari". He was killed while serving with the King's Royal Rifles in France. He was a son of Walter Chinnery, a champion mile runner in the early days of amateur athletics.

CHISENHALE-MARSH

Atherton Harold

Captain, 9th (Queen's Royal) Lancers and 34th Division General Staff. Killed in action 28th September 1918. Son of Swaine Chisenhale-Marsh, of Gaynes Park, Epping, Essex. Buried in LIJSSENTHOEK MILITARY CEMETERY, Poperinge, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot XXV. Row H. Grave 27.

CHOWNE

Gerald Henry Tilson

Captain, 9th Battalion, East Lancashire Regiment. Died of wounds 2nd May 1917. Husband of Nora Chowne. Buried in KARASOULI MILITARY CEMETERY, Greece. Plot/Row/Section B. Grave 288.

CHURCH

Harold

Captain, 2nd/1st Buckinghamshire Battalion, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry. Killed in action 19th July 1916. Aged 33. Son of Charles and Mary Church; husband of Elsie Neilson Church, of Court House, Rottingdean, Sussex. Buried in LAVENTIE MILITARY CEMETERY, LA GORGUE, Nord, France. Plot II. Row E. Grave 23.

CLARKE

C H G M

Major, Rifle Brigade. Died 27th July 1919. Buried west of the church in ST. MARY CHURCHYARD, WAVENDON, Buckinghamshire.

CLERKE

Francis William Talbot

Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, Coldstream Guards. Killed in action 26th September 1916. Aged 30. Son of Sir William Clerke, 11th Bart., of Hitcham, and Lady Clerke; husband of Albinia Mary Clerke, nee Evans-Lombe (now Mrs. Ludlow Hewitt), of Westbrook House, Bromham, Wilts. Commemorated on a special memorial in GUARDS' CEMETERY, LESBOEUFS, Somme, France.

Note: There are now 3,136 casualties of the First World War buried or commemorated in this cemetery. 1,643 of the burials are unidentified but there are special memorials to 83 soldiers known or believed to be buried among them. Other special memorials record the names of five casualties buried in Ginchy A.D.S. Cemetery, whose graves were destroyed by shell fire, and three officers of the 2nd Bn. Coldstream Guards, killed in action on 26th September 1916 and known to have been buried together by the roadside near Lesboefs, whose grave could not later be located.

CLOETE

W B

No reference to this man on SDGW or CWGC

CLOWES

Henry Arthur

Lieutenant-Colonel, 1st Battalion, Staffordshire Yeomanry. Died 8th March 1916. Aged 48. Husband of Louisa L. Clowes, of Norbury, Ashbourne, Derbyshire. Buried in CAIRO WAR MEMORIAL CEMETERY, Egypt. Section D. Grave 344.

COBB

Kenneth Rhodes

Captain, 15th Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Killed in action 1st July 1915. Aged 40. Son of Elizabeth Cobb, of Wealdstone House, Harrow. Resident of Harrow Weald, Middx. Commemorated in TWELVE TREE COPSE CEMETERY, Turkey. Specual Memorial B. 10.

Note: There are now 3,360 First World War servicemen buried or commemorated in the cemetery. 2,226 of the burials are unidentified but special memorials commemorate many casualties known or believed to be buried among them, including 142 officers and men of the 1st Essex who died on 6th August 1915, and 47 of the 1st/7th Scottish Rifles killed on 28th June.

COCKERELL

Samuel Pepys

Lieutenant, Royal flying Corps. Died 20th March 1915. Aged 34. Son of the late William Acland Cockerell and Sidney Ada Cockerell. Member of the Cambridge University Boat Race Team of 1900. Former Commercial Attache to Spain and Portugal. Buried in ISMAILIA WAR MEMORIAL CEMETERY, Egypt. Section A. Grave 117. See also the Stock Exchange memorial.

COKER, MiD

John Cadwallader

Lieutenant, 1st Battalion, South Wales Borderers. Died of wounds 26th September 1914. Aged 27. Son of Col. L.E. Coker, of Bicester House, Oxfordshire. Mentioned in Despatches (MiD). Buried in VENDRESSE BRITISH CEMETERY, Aisne, France. Plot I. Row B. Grave 8.

Extract from Du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

COKER, JOHN CADWALLADER, Lieut., 2nd Battn. (24th Foot) The South Wales Borderers, yst s. of Col. L. E. Coker, of Bicester House, co. Oxon: b. 20 Jan. 1887; was gazetted 2nd Lieut. South Wales Borderers 12 Aug. 1908, being promoted Lieut. 22 June, 1911; served with th Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders, and was killed in action at the Battle of the Aisne 26 Sept. 1914.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 2:

LIEUTENANT CADWALLADER JOHN COKER, 1st BATTN. THE WELSH REGIMENT, who was killed in action on the 22nd June, 1915, was the younger son of the late James Gould Coker, and was born in Bath, Somersetshire, on the 11th May, 1892.

He was educated at Wellington College, from 1906-11, where he was a College Prefect and a member of the Cricket XI, and at Oriel College, Oxford, where he was a member of the Cricket, Football, and Hockey teams, and of the Shooting VIII, and while at the University he was a member of Vincent's, The Authentics, and the Cryptics. At both Wellington and Oxford he was a Sergeant in the O.T.C., and received his commission as a University candidate in September, 1914. He was promoted Temporary Lieutenant in January, 1915, and was confirmed in the rank on the 1st February.

He went out to the front in March, 1915, and was killed in the trenches by a sniper on the 22nd June, 1915. He was buried in the Military Cemetery at Dickebusch, south-east of Ypres. Had he lived one day longer he would have received his promotion to Temporary Captain. On the 24th May he had been wounded at Hooge, and was also slightly gassed in the second Battle of Ypres.

Referring to this fighting, the Medical Officer wrote : "He was slightly wounded on Whit Monday in a street which was heavily shelled by the enemy. About forty officers and men were hit in a short time. Mr. Coker refused all attention until the others were seen to, helped to carry and dress them, and set a magnificent example to the rest of the wounded by his pluck and coolness. It hardly struck me at the time : it was so entirely what one would have expected of him. He was a fine type of officer and gentleman."

His Commanding Officers wrote of him : "He was one of the best and smartest officers we had in the Regiment, and he is a very great loss to us all. He was always cheerful and invaluable in encouraging the men in the trenches when under heavy shell fire." And : "We were very sorry to lose your son. He was always so gallant and very popular." And of his death : "At daybreak he saw a German outside the trench, and got up to shoot him. Unfortunately he remained above the parapet too long, and he was shot through the head and killed instantaneously."

Following details kindly supplied by Richard Daglish:

John was a Liverpool Cricket Club member, elected 1914. Mentioned in French’s Dispatch of Oct 1914 [London Gazette 19th October 1914]. He was also named on a memorial at the former St Catharine’s Church, Abercromby Square, Liverpool [later demolished]. From the South Wales Borderers Museum the following notes:

COKER, John Cadwallader (Jack); 2nd Lieutenant 12 August 1908; Lieutenant 22 June 1911 To France with 1st Battalion South Wales Borderers 12 August 1914; Died of wounds 26 September 1914. Mentioned in Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1; and War Illustrated (Album de Luxe) Volume 1 page 350 ; The Graphic 141017 page 561, Sphere (Daily Newspaper August 1914 - Dec 1919) 141017 page 75 [probably incorrect, dates may have bene confused being in US style].

A report in the Liverpool Echo was headed ‘Liverpool cricketer killed in battle’ It said he had been educated at Cheltenham, Woolwich and Sandhurst and that his mother had been the third daughter of James A. Tobin, mayor of Liverpool in 1854/55. JCC had served previously in the South African Mounted Light Infantry.

The published memoirs of a local cricketer of note stated that Coker ‘played frequently for Liverpool CC and was a very fast bowler’ as well as being a charming young man. (E. Roper: A Sportsman’s Memoirs.)

This photo is from a group photograph - each summer Liverpool CC sent a touring team to play two or three public schools, a tradition which lasted until around 1939.

COLBECK, MC

Leonard George

Second Lieutenant, "C" Battery, 59th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Died 3rd January 1918 off the Cape of Good Hope in HMS Ormonde. Born 1st January 1884, South Harrow, Middlesex. Educated Marlborough College and Cambridge University. Played for Cambridge University, Europeans (India) and Middlesex. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). No known grave. Commemorated on HOLLYBROOK MEMORIAL, SOUTHAMPTON, Hampshire.

His profile from Cricinfo - Wisden Cricketers' Almanack

2nd Lieut. Leonard George Colbeck (R.F.A.) MC died at sea off the Cape of Good Hope. A classical scholar, he excelled at cricket, rackets and hockey. He returned from India to enlist, won the Military Cross

He had a fine record as a batsman at Marlborough, but his name will live in cricket history by reason of the extraordinary innings he played in the University match of 1905. Going in for the second time against a balance of 101 runs Cambridge lost six wickets for 77, and looked to be a hopelessly beaten side. At this point Colbeck, in with the score at 11, was joined by McDonnell, and in the course of 85 minutes the two batsmen put on 143 runs together, completely pulling the match round. McDonnell kept up his wicket while Colbeck hit on the off-side with amazing brilliancy. The partnership recalled the memorable stand made for Cambridge in the 1870 match by Yardley and J. W. Dale. Colbeck took all sorts of risks, cutting balls off the middle stump to the boundary, but his eye served him so well that he was very rarely at fault. He hit thirteen fours in his 107 and was batting for two hours and a quarter. Like Yardley in 1870 he had his reward, Cambridge in the end winning the match by 40 runs. Colbeck had splendid figures for Cambridge in 1908, scoring 552 runs with an average of 42, but when tried in half-a-dozen matches for Middlesex in 1906 he did very little. He played one innings of 46 and another of 30 but on all other occasions he failed dismally. In 1906, however, he again did very well for Cambridge, scoring 63 and 44 against Oxford at Lord's, and heading the University batting with an average of 39. Against W. G. Grace's XI at Cambridge he played an innings of 175 not out.

COLBY

Laurence Robert Vaughan

Major, 1st Battalion, Grenadier Guards. Killed in action 24th October 1914. Aged 34. Son of Mrs. Colby, of Ffynone, Pembrokeshire, and the late John Vaughan Colby. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 9 and 11.

Extract from Du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

COLBY, LAWRENCE ROBERT VAUGHAN, Major, 1st Battn. Grenadier Guards, only s. of (—) Colby, of Ffynone. co. Pembroke; b. 3 April. 1880; educ. Eton; gazetted 2nd Lieut. Grenadier Guards 11 Feb. 1899; promoted Lieut. 1 Jan. 1900, Capt. 30 Sept. 1905, and Major in Sept. 1914; served in the South African War 1899-1902; took part in the operations in the Orange Free State April to May. 1900 ; operations in Orange River Colony May to 29 Nov. 1900, including actions at Biddulphsberg and Wittebergen (1 to 29 July), and those in Orange River Colony Dec. 1900, to 31 May, 1902 (Queen's Medal with two clasps and King's Medal with two clasps); served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders, and was killed in action near Gheluvelt 24 Oct. 1914, while leading his men. Buried on the battlefield. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 17 Feb. 1915] by F.M. Sir John (now Lord) French, for gallant and distinguished service in the field.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

MAJOR LAWRENCE ROBERT VAUGHAN COLBY, 1st BATTN. GRENADIER GUARDS, who was killed on the 24th October, 1914, was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. Colby of Ffynone, Pembrokeshire. He was born on the 3rd April, 1880, and educated at Eton, joining the Grenadier Guards in February, 1899, and becoming Lieutenant in January, 1900.

He took part in the South African War, being present at operations in the Orange Free State, April to May, 1900; Orange River Colony, May to November, 1900, including actions at Biddulphsberg and Wittebergen, and again in the same Colony from the end of 1900 to May, 1902. He received the Queen's and the King's medals, each with two clasps.

He became Captain in September, 1905, and obtained his Majority in September, 1914. He was a member of the Guards' Club and was unmarried.

In the action in which he lost his life, Major Colby was valiantly leading his men in a charge near Gheluvelt, and he was buried in a soldier's grave on the field of battle close to where he fell. For his services in his last fight he was mentioned in Sir John French's Despatch of the 14th January, 1915.

COOKSON

Mostyn Eden

Major, 2nd Battalion, Royal Sussex Regiment. Killed in action 14th September 1914. Aged 46. Son of the late Major William Cookson; husband of Josephine Cookson. No known grave. Commemorated on LA FERTE-SOUS-JOUARRE MEMORIAL, Seine-et-Marne, France.

Extract from Du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

COOKSON, MOSTYN EDEN, Major, 2nd Battn. (107th Foot) The Royal Sussex Regt., s. of the late Major William Cookson, 80th Foot; b. Skipon-in-Craven, co. York, 1 Jan. 1868; gazetted 2nd Lieut. Royal Sussex Regt. 5 Feb. 1887; promoted Lieut. 6 Aug. 1890, Capt. 29 May, 1895, and Major 23 Sept. 1904; served with the Expeditionary Force in France & Flanders, and was killed in action at the Battle of Aisne 14 Sept. 1914. He m. Josephine, dau. of W. G. Pinder; s.p.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

MAJOR MOSTYN EDEN COOKSON, 2nd BATTN. ROYAL SUSSEX REGT., of which he was the senior Major, was the son of the late Major William Cookson, 80th Foot, and was born on the 1st January, 1868, at Skipton - in - Craven, Yorkshire.

He joined the Royal Sussex Regiment in February, 1887, becoming Lieutenant in August, 1890, and Captain in May, 1895. He was a member of the Naval and Military Club, and of the M.C.C.

He was killed on the 14th September, 1914, by shrapnel at the Battle of the Aisne.

Major Cookson, who obtained his Majority in September, 1904, married Josephine, daughter of W. O. Pinder, and left no issue.

CRAWLEY

Eustace

Major, 12th (Prince of Wales's Royal) Lancers. Killed in action 2nd November 1914. Aged 46. Born 19th April 1868, Highgate, Middlesex. Son of the late Baden Crawley; husband of Lady Violet Crawley (nee Finch), of 5, Lancaster Gate Terrace, London, W. Played cricket for Cambridge University 1887-1889. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 5.

Extract from Du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

CRAWLEY, EUSTACE, Major, 12th (Prince of Wales's Royal) Lancers, 3rd s. of the late Baden Crawley; b. 16 April, 1868; educ. Harrow; gazetted 2nd Lieut. 12th Lancers, from the Militia, 7 Aug. 1889; promoted Lieut. 7 Jan. 1891, Capt. 17 Nov. 1897, Brevet Major 29 Nov. 1900, and Major 29 July, 1905; was A.D.C. (extra) to the Lord Lieutenant, Ireland, from 19 Feb. 1894, to 8 July, 1895; took part in the operations in Sierra Leone 1898-99 (Medal with clasp); served in West Africa 1898, where he was in command of the Expedition to Bula; in the South African War 1899-1902, as Special Service Officer, being afterwards employed on the Staff; took part in the advance on Kimberley, including action at Magersfontein and the Relief of Kimberley; operations in Orange Free State Feb. to May, 1900, including actions at Paardeberg, Poplar Grove, Dreifontein, Houtnek (Thoba Mountain) and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg and Diamond Hill; operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 29 Nov. 1900; operations in the Orange River Colony May to 29 Nov. 1900, Including actions at Lindley, Bethlehem and Wittebergen, and those in Cape Colony Aug. 1901, to 31 May, 1902 (mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 Sept. 1901]; brevet of Major; Queen's Medal with four clasps and King's Medal with two clasps); served in West Africa (Northern Nigeria) 1903; took part in the Kano-Sokoto Campaign (Medal with clasp), and in the operations in the district to the east of Zaria, being in command; was D.A.A.G. India, from 17 April, 1909, to 16 April, 1913; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders, and was killed in action near Ypres 2 Nov. 1914. He in. 14 Dec. 1904, Violet Ella, elder dan. of Charles Wightwick Finch, 8th Earl of Aylesford.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

MAJOR EUSTACE CRAWLEY, 12th (PRINCE OF WALES'S ROYAL) LANCERS, who was killed near Ypres on the 2nd November, 1914, was born on the 16th April, 1868, third son of the late Baden Crawley.

He was educated at Harrow, and joined the 12th Lancers from the Militia becoming Lieutenant in 1891, and Captain in November, 1897. Major Crawley saw much active service. In 1898-99 he took part in operations at Sierra Leone, West Coast of Africa, for which he received the medal and clasp. Again, in 1899 he was in command of the Bula Expedition in Nigeria, being mentioned in Despatches by General Wilcox, in December, 1899. He commanded the Nigeria Company Constabulary from the latter date.

In 1900-02 he was appointed a Special Service Officer in the South African War; was D.A.A.G. Ridley's Corps of Mounted Infantry from April to December, 1900; took part in General Ian Hamilton's march, being present at the actions of Diamond Hill, Johannesburg, and Wittebergen; and also at operations in Cape Colony under General French; he was Intelligence Officer to Capper's Column at the end of 1901, and Staff Officer to Doran's Column from December, 1901, to May, 1902. For his services he was mentioned in Despatches by Lord Roberts, 4th September, 1901, given the Brevet rank of Major from November, 1900, and received the Queen's medal with four clasps, and the King's medal with two clasps. From May to November, 1902, he was D.A.A.G. on the staff of Colonel Hickman, commanding the troops at Middelburg, Cape Colony.

In 1902-03 he again saw service in Nigeria, being in command of a column in the Kano Expedition, for which he received the medal and clasp. In 1903 he commanded Mounted In-fantry, in India, and obtained the substantive rank of Major in July, 1905. In 1906-07 he was officiating Brigade-Major of the Amballa Cavalry Brigade and to the Inspector-General of Cavalry in India.

Major Crawley married, in December, 1904, Lady Violet Ella Finch, elder daughter of the eighth Earl of Aylesford.

His profile from Cricinfo

CRICHTON, D.S.O., M.V.O.

Viscount Henry William

Major (Brevet Lt. Col.), Royal Horse Guards (The Blues). Killed in action 31st October 1914. Aged 42. Viscount Crichton. Son of the 4th Earl of Erne, of Crom Castle, Ireland; husband of Viscountess Crichton (now Lady Mary Stanley, of Sopworth, Chippenham, Wilts). Awarded the Distinguished Service order (D.S.O.) and Member of the Royal Victorian Order (M.V.O.). Buried in ZANTVOORDE BRITISH CEMETERY, Zonnebeke, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot V. Row B. Grave 11.

Extract from Distinguished Service Order 1886-1915 published by Naval & Military Press:

CRICHTON (VISCOUNT), HENRY WILLIAM, Capt., was born 30 Sept. 1872, son of the 4th Earl of Erne (deceased), and Lady Florence Cole, daughter of the 3rd Earl of Enniskillen. He was educated at Eton, and the Sandhurst; joined the Royal Horse Guards 5 May, 1894; became Lieutenant 6 Feb. 1895; was Adjutant, R.H.G., 8 Dec. 1896, to 6 Oct. 1899. He served in the South African War as A.D.C. to Major-General Brocklehurst, Cavalry Brigade, Natal, 7 Oct. 1899, to 24 Jan. 1901; was present at the Defence of Ladysmith; operations in Natal, March to June, 1900; operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to Nov. 1900. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 Feb. 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette 19 April, 1901] : "Henry William, Viscount Crichton, Capt., Royal Horse Guards. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa." He had become Captain 24 Feb. 1900; was Equerry to His Royal Highness the Duke of Cornwall and York during his colonial tour. The Insignia of the D.S.O. were sent to Adelaide, South Australia, and presented there by H.R.H. the Duke of Cornwall and York. He was appointed Equerry-in-Ordinary to H.R.H. the Prince of Wales from 21 Feb. 1903, to 12 May, 1908; was created an M.V.O. in 1906, and Extra Equerry to H.M. King George V. in 1910. During the European War Lord Crichton served as Major, Royal Horse Guards, with the Braise Expeditionary Force; was mentioned in Despatches, and created an Officer of the Legion of Honour. He was reported missing at Wytschaete 1 Nov. 1914, and reported dead June, 1916. Lord Crichton married, in 1933, Lady Mary Grosvenor, daughter of the 1st Duke of Westminster and they had one son, John Henry George, Earl of Erne, and one daughter, Mary Kathleen.

Extract from Du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

CRICHTON, HENRY WILLIAM CRICHTON, Viscount, M.V.O., D.S.O., Major and Brevet Lieut.-Col., Royal Horse Guards; Extra Equerry to His Majesty the King, etc. eldest s. of John Henry, 4th Earl Erne, K.P., P.C., by his wife, Lady Florence Mary (21, Knightsbridge, S.W.), nee Cole, dau. of William Willoughby, 3rd Earl of Enniskillen, F.R.S.; b. at Crom Castle, 30 Sept. 1872; educ. Eton, and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst; gazetted 2nd Lieut. Royal Horse Guards, 5 May, 1894, and promoted Lieut. 6 Feb. 1895, Capt. 24 Feb. 1900, Major 7 May, 1910, and Brevet Lieut.-Col. 7 Nov. 1914; was Adjutant 8 Dec. 1896, to 6 Oct. 1899; A.D.C. to H.M. when Duke of Cornwall during his Colonial Tour, 1901; Equerry, 19 Nov. 1901, to 12 May, 1908, and Extra Equerry 1 April, 1909, to 6 May, 1910, to H.M. when Prince of Wales, etc., and Extra Equerry to H.M. the King from 10 June, 1910; M.V.O. (4th Class) 1906; served (1) in the South African War 1899-1900, on Staff; was A.D.C. to Major-General Commanding Cavalry Brigade, Natal, 7 Oct. 1899, to 24 Jan. 1901; took part in Defence of Ladysmith; operations in Natal, March to June, 1900, and in the Transvaal east of Pretoria, July to Nov. 1900 (mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette. 8 Feb. 1901]; D.S.O.; Queen's Medal with five clasps); and (2) in the European War, Aug. to Nov. 1914 (mentioned in Despatches [London Gazettes, 19 Oct. 1914, and 17 Feb. 19151), and was officially reported missing 1 Nov. 1914. For over a year it was supposed that he might be a prisoner in Germany, and his father dying 2 Dec. 1914, he appeared in the Peerages for 1915-16 as 5th Earl Erne. According to a list received by the Foreign Office from the German Government through the United States Embassy, Lord Crichton fell in Oct. 1914, and was buried in the cemetery of Wervice Nord [Grave No. 1596]. His death. therefore, has been accepted as having occurred on or about 31 Oct. 1914. From a statement issued by the family in Feb. 1917, it appears that Lord Crichton disappeared at 2 a.m. at Wytschaete. Captain Bowlby, a brother officer of the Royal Horse Guards, since killed, stated that during the fighting round Ypres lie and Lord Crichton went out to bring in some men whom Lord Crichton believed to belong to his own Regiment. Captain Bowlby thought that they were Germans, and Lord Crichton courageously went out. He was seen riding up to them; they closed around him, and he did not return. Cond. Coppinger, Royal Horse Guards, who was in hospital in Boulogne after the incident, stated that he was within 50 yards of Lord Crichton when they had retired from the trenches. Lord Crichton went off on a horse to get into communication with other troops and ran straight into the Germans. It was dark at the time, but Coppinger could hear German niece. Another soldier of Coppinger's party said that he heard a German say in good English : "Most delighted !" Coppinger added that there was no sound of a shot or a struggle, and he had no doubt that Lord Crichton fell unharmed into the Germans' hands. He m. 10 June, 1903, Lady Mary Cavendish (Crom Castle, Newton Butler, Fermanagh; 21. Knightsbridge, S.W.), née Grosvenor, dau. of Hugh Lupus, 1st Duke of Westminster, K.G., and had three children : George David Hugh, b. 12 (d. 18) May, 1904; John Henry George, now 5th Earl Erne (for whom H.M. the King was sponsor), b. 22 Nov. 1907, and Mary Kathleen (for whom H.M. the Queen was sponsor), b. 8 July, 1905.

CUNINGHAME

Boyd Alexander

Major, 5th Battalion, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders attached Northern Rhodesia Rifles. Died 16th March 1917. Son of William Boyd Cuninghame and Marion Harriett Cuninghame (nee Paterson); husband of Elsie Cuninghame (nee Burrell, now Lady Baker, of Ranston, Blandford, Dorset). Served in the South African War. (Mentioned in Despatches.) Buried in LUBUMBASHI CEMETERY, Congo (Democratic Republic)

CUNLIFFE, Baronet

Sir Foster Hugh Egerton

Major, 13th Battalion, Rifle brigade (The prince Consort's Own). Killed in action 10th July 1916. Aged 41. Born 17th August 1875, Belgravia, Westminster, London. 6th Bart. Son of Sir Robert A. Cunliffe and Lady Cunliffe (nee Eleanor Egerton Leigh), of Acton Park, Denbighshire. Buried in BAPAUME POST MILITARY CEMETERY, ALBERT, Somme, France. Plot I. Row G. Grave 3.

His profile from Cricinfo - Wisden Cricketers' Almanack

Major Sir Foster Hugh Egerton Cunliffe, 6th Bart. (Rifle Brigade), born at Acton Park, Wrexham, on August 17, 1875, died of wounds on July 1. As a batsman he had a fine, free style, and he excelled as a left-handed medium-pace bowler, having a good length and sending down a difficult ball that came with his arm. He was in the Eton XI in 1893 and 1894, and in his four Public School matches obtained 35 wickets for 10.17 runs each; he took 11 for 74 v. Winchester in 1893 and 13 for 94 v. Harrow in 1894. At Oxford he obtained his Blue as a Freshman and in 1898, his last year in the XI, was captain. In his four games against Cambridge he scored 99 runs in five completed innings and took 26 wickets for 22.88 runs each. Against Surrey, at Oxford, in 1896, he obtained eight wickets in an innings for 26 runs. In 1897, when he began to appear for Middlesex, he was chosen for the Gentlemen at Lord's, and took three wickets in each innings of the Players. In 1895 he became a member of the M.C.C., serving on the committee from 1903 until 1906. He was a Fellow of All Soul's, Oxford, and a distinguished military historian.

CURRIE, C.M.G., D.S.O., Mid

Ryves Alexander Mark

Brigadier-General, General Staff late Somerset Light Infantry. Died 30th March 1920. Aged 44. Son of the late Lt. Col. F. A. Currie, Norfolk Regt; husband of Ida Melville Currie. Four times Mentioned in Despatches (Mid). Buried in MALBORK COMMONWEALTH WAR CEMETERY, Poland. Plot 8. Row A. Grave 7.

Extract from Distinguished Service Order 1916-1923 published by Naval & Military Press:

CURRIE, R. A. M. (D.S.O. L.G. 14.1.16); b. 18.6.75; s. of late Lt.-Col. F. A. Currie, Norfolk R.; m. Ida Melville, d. of J. H. Hatchell, M.D.; ethic. Wellington College; ent. Som. L.I. 6.6.96; Lt. 14.12.98; Capt. 1.1.04; Major, 1.9.15; T/Brig.-Gen.; served on N.W. Frontier of India, 1897-8 (Medal with clasp); Europ. War; Despatches 6 times; Bt. Major, 18.2.15; Bt. Lt.-Col. 1.1.17; Bt. Col. 1.1.18; C.M.G. He died at Danzig, E. Prussia, 30.3.20.

CURWEN

Wilfred John Hutton

Captain, 6th Battalion attached 3rd Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Killed in action 9th May 1915. Aged 32. Born 14th April 1883, Beckenham, Kent. Son of the late John and Maria Curwen. Played for Oxford University and Surrey. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 6 and 8. See also Charterhouse War Memorial

His profile from Cricinfo

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 2:

CAPTAIN WILFRED JOHN HUTTON CURWEN, 6th BATTN. (RESERVE) ROYAL FUSILIERS, CITY OF LONDON REGIMENT, when the war broke out was serving as A.D.C. to the Right Hon. Sir R. C. Munro-Ferguson, G. C. M. G., Governor-General and Commander-in-Chief of the Commonwealth of Australia. Captain Curwen was then a Lieutenant in the 2nd Battalion, London Regiment (T.F.), which he had entered in April, 1911, being promoted Lieutenant in July, 1912. He had also previously served as A.D.C. to Sir John Fuller, Bart., K.C.M.G., Governor of Victoria, and also to the Right Hon. Lord Denman when Governor-General of Australia. On war being declared he obtained permission to resign his appointment as Aide-de-camp to Sir R. C. Munro-Ferguson, and returning to England as soon as possible, offered his services, which were immediately accepted, and on joining he was promoted Captain in the 6th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers, on December 25th, 1915. Born at Beckenham, Kent, in 1883, he was the only son of John M. Curwen, Esq., and Mrs. Curwen, of The High House, Thames Ditton, Surrey, and of 53, Carlisle Mansions, S.W., and was educated at Charterhouse and at Magdalen College, Oxford. He was brother-in-law to the famous Charterhouse and Oxford half-back, Mr. C. Wreford Brown, to whom his sister was married. He was an excellent cricketer, and a fine Association football player, and represented his school and University at both games, and played against Cambridge at Lord's. He also belonged to the I Zingari, the Free Foresters, the Harlequins, and the M.C.C., and represented Charterhouse at rackets, also playing football for the Old Carthusians on many occasions. He was a member of the Bath Club.

He fell in action on May 13th, 1915, in the second Battle of Ypres, and was Acting-Adjutant at the time of his death, being killed at a critical moment in the fighting, while gallantly directing some of his men.

His Commanding Officer, in writing concerning his death, stated : "He died bravely while doing his duty." Captain Curwen was buried close to where he was killed.

CUTHBERTSON

Edward Hedley

[Edward Hadley on SDGW] Lieutenant, 9th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Died 24th July 1917. Aged 28. Born 15th December 1887, Hackney, London. Son of Edward Hedley Cuthbertson and Alice Cuthbertson; husband of Mary Constance Follett (formerly Cuthbertson), of 72, Onslow Gardens, South Kensington, London. Educated Malvern and Cambridge University. Buried in AMARA WAR CEMETERY, Iraq. Plot XIII. Row L. Grave 6. See also Stock Exchange Memorial

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

LIEUTENANT EDWARD HEDLEY CUTHBERTSON, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was born in 1888, the son of Edward Hedley Cuthbertson, formerly a member of the Stock Exchange.

Educated at Malvern College and Clare College, Cambridge, he was given his Blue for Association football, and he also played cricket for his University several times.

He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1911.

Enlisting in the Public Schools Battalion of the Royal Fusiliers in August 1914, he was eventually given his commission in the Warwickshire Regiment.

He went to France in March 1915 and was wounded at Ypres a few weeks later. Returning to France, he was invalided home again in July 1916.

After a period of convalescence in England he was sent to Mesopotamia and died in hospital at Amara on 24 July 1917.

His profile from Cricinfo - Wisden Cricketers' Almanack

Lieut. E. Hedley Cuthbertson (Royal Warwickshire Regt.), born December 15, 1889, killed July 24. Malvern; Cambridge Freshmen, 1908; Seniors, 1909 and 1910. He played a few times for the University, but did not get his Blue. Clare (Camb.) XI, Hertfordshire; made 151 v. M. C. C. and Ground, at Lord's, 1910. Sound defensive left-hand bat and good wicket. A member of the M.C.C. since 1909. Got his blue for Association Football.

CUTHBERTSON

Norman William

Major, 1st Battalion, Black Watch (Royal Highlanders). Died 12th February 1915. Aged 53. Son of William Gilmour Cuthbertson and Jane Agnes Cuthbertson. Buried in EAST FINCHLEY CEMETERY AND ST. MARYLEBONE CREMATORIUM, Middlesex. Grave reference E. 17. 52.

Extract from Du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

CUTHBERTSON, NORMAN WILLIAM, Major, Reserve of Officers, late Royal Highlanders, 4th s. of William Gilmour Cuthbertson, by his wife, Jane Agnes, dau. of James Lister; b. at Shanghai, 21 Oct. 1861; educ. Trinity College, Glenalmond; entered the Army as Lieut. Royal Highlanders, 9 Sept. 1882; and was promoted Capt. 7 Dec. 1888, and Major 13 July 1898; passed through the Staff College 1894; was Instructor Royal Military College, 25 Aug. 1897 to 21 Oct. 1899; served in the Egyptian Campaign (medal and bronze star), and in South African War in the 2nd Battn. Royal Highlanders; took part in the advance on Kimberley, including the action at Magersfontein, at which he was severely wounded, and also at Paardeberg, Poplar Grove, Driefontein and Vet River, and afterwards served on the Staff (mentoned in despatches, Queen's medal with five clasps) retiring in 1901. On the outbreak of the European War he was appointed a General Staff Officer (second grade), 5 Aug. 1914. He died in London, 12 Feb. 1915, while serving as a Staff Officer at Plymouth.

DALLAS, M.C.

A S

Lieutenant, Royal Artillery. Died 30th Janaury 1921. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). Buried in Trimulgherry Cantonment Cemetery, India and commemorated on MADRAS 1914-1918 WAR MEMORIAL, CHENNAI, India. Face 3.

DAUN

Edward Charles

Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, Royal Sussex Regiment. Killed in action 14th September 1914. Aged 29. Son of Charles James and Ada Margaret Daun. No known grave. Commemorated on LA FERTE-SOUS-JOUARRE MEMORIAL, Seine-et-Marne, France.

Extract from Du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

DAUN, EDWARD CHARLES, Lieut. and Assistant Adjutant, 2nd Battn. Royal Sussex Regt., 2nd Infantry Brigade, only s. of Charles James Daun, by his wife, Ada Margaret, dau. of Lieut.-Gen. Edward Arthur Williams, C.B., Colonel Commandant. R.A., and great-grandson of Col. Henry Williams, R.A., who served at Waterloo; b. Streatham, Surrey, 15 June, 1885; educ. Sunningdale School and Harrow; joined the 3rd Battn. Royal Sussex Regt. 27 Feb. 1904; gazetted 2nd Lieut. in the 2nd Battu. 29 Nov. 1905, and promoted Lieut. 10 Nov. 1909. On the outbreak of war he left Woking for the Front, 12 Aug. 1914; was present in the fighting at, and retreat from, Mons, and was killed near Troyon at the Battle of the Aisne, 14 Sept. 1914; unm. A comrade wrote: "We were in the same company. I was unfortunately sent home with an injured leg, but last saw your son on 4 Sept. At that time he was in splendid health and in such good spirits. He was a splendid officer, and worked night and day for the good of his regt. and his company, and had a great future before him. He was to have been our next Adjutant, and will be a great loss to the regt." The Colonel, senior Major and Adjutant all fell the same day. Lieut. Dann was a fine rifle shot, and won the Officers' Cup at the Aldershot Command Meeting in 1912 and 1913, and was second in 1914. Of his uncles. Lieut.-Col. H. F. Williams, Royal Munster Fusiliers, and Lieut.-Col. E. G. Williams, C.M.G., commanding 1st Battn. Devonshire Regt., are at the Front; and Capt. A. L. Williams, Royal Scots (died 24 May, 1906) served with the Bechuanaland Expedition, 1884-85; while of his great-uncles, Lieut.-Gen. Sir H. F. Williams, K.C.B., 60th Rifles, served through the Mutiny and Lieut.-Col. the Hon. H. R. Handpick, 97th Regt., was killed at the storming of the Redan in the. Crimean war; and his great-great-uncle, Admiral Sir William Pierson, K.C.B., was wounded as a Midshipman in the Belleisle at Trafalgar.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

LIEUTENANT EDWARD CHARLES DAUN, 2nd BATTN. ROYAL SUSSEX REGIMENT, who was born in June, 1885, at Streatham, Surrey, was the only son of Charles James Daun, Esq., and Ada Margaret, his wife, daughter of the late Lieutenant-General E. A. Williams, C.B., Colonel Commandant of the Royal Artillery. He came of military stock, among his immediate relatives and ancestors being Lieutenant-Colonel E.G. Williams, C.M.G., Commanding the 1st Battalion Devonshire Regiment in the present war; Lieutenant-General Sir H. F. Williams, K.C.B., Colonel Royal Sussex Regiment, and afterwards Colonel Commandant 3rd K.R.R.C.; Colonel Henry Williams, R.A., who was present at Waterloo: Captain G. B. Williams, R.N., and others more remotely connected.

Lieutenant Daun was educated at Sunningdale School and Harrow, and joined the 3rd Battalion Royal Sussex Regiment in 1904, being gazetted to the 2nd Battalion in 1905, and becoming Lieutenant in November, 1909. He served with his battalion in the Mediterranean and in Ireland (including the Belfast riots). He had been Instructor of Musketry and of Machine Gunnery, and also Assistant Adjutant.

He fell at the Battle of the Aisne on the 14th September, 1914, the following account of the occurrence appearing in the " Sussex Daily News " of the 14th January, 1915:-

"On reaching the top of the ridge ' A ' Company came under rifle fire from the trenches near the Chemin. de Dames. B ' Company and the machine gun came up, and a strong firing line was built up. Soon a white flag was seen displayed by the Germans, and large numbers of them came forward to surrender. Shortly a heavy rifle and artillery fire was opened by the Germans upon the assembled mass of friend and foe. Under this fire 'A' Company suffered heavily, and it was during this time that . . . Lieutenant Daun was killed."

A Captain in his company wrote: "He was a splendid officer, and worked night and day for the good of his Regiment and his company, and had a great future before him. He was to have been our next Adjutant, and will be a great loss to the Regiment."

Lieutenant Daun was a member of the United Service Club and of the M.C.C. He was a good rifle shot, winning the Officers' Cup at the Aldershot Command Meeting in 1912 and 1913, securing second place in 1914.

DAVIDSON, M.C.

Donald Alastair Leslie

Captain, 19th [CWGC] or 9th [SDGW] Squadron, Royal Flying Corps. Killed in action 30th April 1917. Aged 25. Son of Col. W. Leslie Davidson, C.B., (R.A.), and Lady Theodora Davidson, of Hampton Court Palace. Severely wounded in Mesopotamia. A Page of Honour to H.R.H. King Edward VII, 1902-08. Educated at Wellington College and McGill University, Canada. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). No known grave. Commemorated on ARRAS FLYING SERVICES MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France.

DAVIDSON, C.B.

William Leslie

[Known as Leslie] Colonel, 4th General base Depot, Royal Horse Artillery. Died 3rd August 1915. Aged 65. Born 31 January 1850 at Inchmarlo, Kincardinshire, Scotalnd. Son of Patrick Davidson and of Mary Ann Leslie, his wife, of Inchmarlo, Kincardineshire; husband of Lady Theodora Davidson. Served in the Zulu War, 1879 (Mentioned in Despatches); Afghan War, 1880; and South African War, 1899 (Mentioned in Despatches). Was a Gentleman-Usher to H.M. The King, and J.P. for County Kincardine. Buried in ST. SEVER CEMETERY, ROUEN, Seine-Maritime, France. Officers section, Plot A. Row 1. Grave 3.

Extract from Du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

DAVIDSON, WILLIAM LESLIE, C.B., J.P., Col. on the Staff, ILA., 2nd s. of the late Patrick Davidson, of Inchmarlo, co. Kincardine, LL.D., J.P., D.L., by his wife. Mary Anne, eldest dau. of William Leslie, 10th Laird of Warthill, co. Aberdeen ; b. Aberdeen, :31 Jan. 1850; educ. the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich (passing in twenty-seventh and out twenty-seventh), and entered the. Army as Lieut. 7 July, 1869; was promoted Capt., 24 Jan. 1880 ; Major, 7 June, 1885 ; Lieut.-Col., 25 June, 1896 ; and Col., 23 Jan. 1900. He was for some time A.D.C. to the Commander-in-Chief in India. and subsequently to the Governor of Gibraltar ; served through the Zulu Campaign (wounded at Ulundi—mentioned in Despatches, medal with clasps), 1879. Had charge of Cetewayo for some time in Cape Town. Took part in the Afghan War (medal), 1880. Served in the South African War, 1899-1900; commanded the R.H.A. on the forced march to the Relief of Kimberley : Was present at Paardeburg, Poplar Grove. Driefontein and Karoo Siding, and afterwards commanded the town defences of Bloemfontein (twice mentioned in Despatches, Queen's medal with four clasps and C.B.). He retired in 1907, and in 1913 was appointed Gentleman Usher to the King. On the outbreak of the European War, in Aug. 1914, although 63 years of age, he immediately volunteered for active service and was sent to command No. 4 General Base Depot at Rouen. There he fell a victim to over-exertion and died on active service, 3 Aug. 1915, from heart failure. Be was buried with full military honours in the portion of the cemetery at Rouen reserved for British officers. A brother officer wrote : "He died when in the fulfilment of a duty to his country, towards which he devoted a life-time full of energy and heartiness. I felt sure that with his keen and vigorous sense of duty he would spare no pains to try and take his share of work in the Nation's task." Another "A soldier to the backbone, he leaves a very fine record." One from Rotten : "He was such a favourite amongst us all that we all feel the loss of a dear friend." A naval officer: "He has given everything and laid down his life for the country like many another gallant gentleman." A relation from France : "I can't be thankful enough for those two afternoons that I saw him over this side, nor will I ever forget him, as I looked back, standing there in the sun, his hand raised in farewell, laughing with pure joy of life and the summer day. He was so smart and upright, with his rows of decorations, as he stood beside his pony, a British officer on active service. And he was so kind to everyone, all there seemed to be his friends and to want a word from him as they passed." He m. at the Oratory, Brompton, 1 Feb. 1887, Lady Theodora, née Koppel, eldest surviving dau. of William Coutts, 7th Earl of Albemarle, and had two sons and four daus. : Donald Alastair Leslie, Lieut. Royal Flying Corps, formerly a Page of Honour to His Majesty King Edward VII, now (1916) on active service with the British Expeditionary Force, returned home severely wounded, b. 6 Oct. 1891; Colin Keppei. Lieut. R.A., now (1916) on active service, b. 1 Sept. 1895; Doris, b. May, 1888 and d. 14 Oct. 1888; Hilary, b. 13 April, 1889; Vera Marian, b. 6 Aug. 1893, m. 17 Dec. 1919, Aylmer Probyn Maude, Lieut. Rifle Brigade; and Lena Theodora, b. 14 Sept. 1894. His nephew, Capt. D. H. Davidson, younger, of Inchmarlo, was also killed in action (see his notice).

His profile from CricInfo:

Colonel William Davidson (Royal Artillery) died of heart failure while holding a depot command at the base. He was widely believed to be the oldest British military casualty of the war at that time - he was 65 - and quite possibly of it's duration. Wisden said he was "a fine, free hitter, and represented the Royal Artillery at cricket, football, rackets, and billiards. In 1809 he was in the Woolwich XI, scoring 8 and 50 against Sandhurst, and had been a member of the M.C.C. since 1873." He took part in the Zulu, Afghan and Boer Wars, was mentioned in despatches twice, and received the CB in 1901.

DAVIES

Robert Finden

Captain, 1st/9th Battalion (Queen Victoria's Rifles), London Regiment. Killed in action 9th September 1916. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 9 C.

DAWNAY, D.S.O.

the Hon Hugh

[Spelt DAWNEY on SDGW] Major, 2nd Life Guards. Killed in action 6th November 1914. Aged 39. Second son of the 8th Viscount Downe; husband of Lady Susan Dawnay, of Whitfield Court, Waterford. Awarded the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.). Buried in HARLEBEKE NEW BRITISH CEMETERY, Harelbeke, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot XVII. Row A. Grave 14.

Extract from Du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

DAWNAY, THE HON. HUGH, D.S.O.. Major, 2nd Life Guards, 2nd s. of Sir Hugh Richard Dawnay, the Viscount Downe, K.C.V.O., C.B., by his 1st wife, Lady Cecilia Maria Charlotte, V.A. (Lady of the Bedchamber to Queen Victoria), only dau. of Charles William, 3rd Earl of Sefton ; b. 19 Sept. 1875 : gazetted 2nd Lieut. Rifle Brigade 2 Oct. 1895 ; promoted Lieut. 1 Jan. 1898, Capt. 18 March, 1901, and Major in the Life Guards 18 Jan. 1911 ; served (1) in the Nile Expedition 1898 (mentioned in Despatches ; Fourth Class of the Medjidie ; Egyptian Medal with clasp, and Medal) ; (2) in the South African War 1899-1900 (mentioned in Despatches [London Gazettes, 8 Feb. and 10 Sept. 1901] : Queen's Medal with clasp, and D.S.O.) ; (3) in East Africa (Somaliland) 1908-10 (mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 17 June. 19101, and Medal with clasp) ; (4) with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders, and was killed in action 6 Nov. 1914. Major Dawnay was mentioned in Despatches (London Gazette, 19 Oct. 1914] by F.M. Sir John (now Lord) French, for gallant and distinguished service in the field. He m. 28 April. 1902, Lady Susan de la Poor Beresford (109, Gloucester Place, W.), dau. of John Henry, 5th Marquess of Waterford, and had four sons : David, b. 10 July, 1903 ; Peter, b. 14 Aug. 1904 ; Ronald, b. 2 Feb. 1908. and Michael. b. 24 Oct. 1912.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

MAJOR the Honble. HUGH DAWNAY, D.S.O., p.s.c., 2nd LIFE GUARDS, who was killed in action on the 6th November, 1914, was the second son of Viscount Downe. He was born on the 19th September, 1875, and received his commission in the Rifle Brigade in October, 1895, becoming Lieutenant in January, 1898; from February, 1899, to November, 1900, he was Adjutant of his battalion. He became a Captain in the Rifle Brigade in March, 1901, and in February of that year was appointed A.D.C. to the Commander-in-Chief, retaining the position till February, 1904, and from April, 1904, to January, 1905, was A.D.C. to the G.O.C., North West District.

He took part in the Nile Expedition, being present at the Battle of Khartoum, and being mentioned in Despatches, “London Gazette," 30th September, 1898; received the medal, 4th class of the Order of Medjidieh, and the Egyptian medal with clasp.

He next served in the South African War, 1899-1900, while Adjutant of his Battalion, being present at operations in Natal, including actions at Lombard's Kop; the defence of Ladysmith, including sortie of the 10th December, 1899, and action of the 6th January, 1900. He was twice mentioned in Despatches ("London Gazette," 8th February and 10th September, 1901); was awarded the D.S.O., and received the Queen's medal with clasp.

He also served in East Africa, Somaliland Expedition, 1908-10 for which he was mentioned in Despatches (" London Gazette," 17th June, 1910), and received the medal with clasp.

In the Great War, Major Dawnay was serving as General Staff Officer, 2nd grade, and was mentioned in Sir John French's Despatch of the 8th October, 1914.

Major Dawnay married, in 1902, Lady Susan Beresford, daughter of the fifth Marquess of Waterford, and left four sons.

Extract from Distinguished Service Order 1886-1915 published by Naval & Military Press:

DAWNAY, THE HONOURABLE HUGH, Lieut., was born on the 19th Sept. 1875, second son of Viscount Downe and Lady Cecilia Maria Charlotte Molyneux, V.A. (who died in 1910), daughter of the Earl of Sefton. He received his commission in the Rifle Brigade in Oct. 1895, and became Lieutenant in Jan. 1898, and took part in the Nile Expedition, being present at the Battle of Khartum, and being mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 30 Sept. 1898]. He received the Medal; the 4th Class of the Order of the Medjidie, and the Egyptian Medal with clasp. From Feb. 1899, to Nov. 1930, he was Adjutant of his battalion, and in that capacity served in the South African War in 1899 and 1900, being present at operations in Natal, including actions at Lombard's Kop; the Defence of Ladysmith, including sortie of the 10th Dec. 1899, and action of the 6th Jan. 1900. He was twice mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 Feb. and 10 Sept. 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with clasp, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 Sept. 1901]: “The Honourable Hugh Dawnay, Lieut., The Rifle Brigade. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa." The Insignia were presented by the King 29 Oct. 1901. He became Captain in the Rifle Brigade in March, 1901, and in Feb. of the same year was appointed A.D.C. to the Commander-in-Chief. Major Dawnay was transferred to the 2nd Life Guards, and served in the European War. He was killed in action on the 6th Nov. 1914. In 1902 he married Lady Susan Beresford, daughter of the 5th Marquess of Waterford, and they had four sons.

DE HOGHTON

Vere

[Spelt HOUGHTON on some records] Captain (Adjutant), 1st/4th Battalion, Lincolnshire Regiment. Killed in action between 11th and 13th October 1915. No known grave. Commemorated on LOOS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 31 to 34.

Extract from Du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

DE HOGHTON, VERE, Capt., 1st (10th Foot). attd. 5th (T.F.). Battn. The Lincolnshire Regt., 2nd surv. s. of Sir James de Hoghton, of Hoghton Tower, near Preston, 11th Bart., late Major, Lincolnshire Regt. and D.A.A.G. School of Musketry, Hythe, by his wife, Aimie Jean, dau. of John Grove, of Fern, co. Wilts ; b. Sitapore, India, 6 March, 1882 ; educ. Harrow ; gazetted 2nd Lieut. Lincolnshire from the Militia 5 Jan. 1901 ; promoted Lieut. 25 June, 1904, and Capt. 15 Jan. 1913 ; served for nine years in India ; returned to England in 1912, and was appointed Adjutant to the 5th Battn. (T.F.) 15 Jan. 1913 ; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from Feb. 1915, and was killed in action during the attack on the 'Hohenzollern Redoubt 13 Oct. following. Capt. de Hoghton was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 1 Jan. 1916] by F.M. Sir John (now Lord) French, for gallant and distinguished service in the field. He was a keen rifle shot, and while at Harrow shot at Bisley for the Ashburton Shield ; later, when in India in 1907, shot as a member of the team of the 1st Lincolnshire Regt. for the Queen Victoria Cup, and in 1912 shot for the Empire Cup when stationed at Aden. He m. at All Saints', Margaret Street, London, 9 Nov. 1911, Alice Dorothy Patience (Greyfriars, Preston, co. Lancaster), dau. of Sir Frank Hollins, 1st Bart., and had a dau., Diana, b. 3 Sept. 1913.

DENISON, D.S.O.

Harry

Major, "O" Battery, Royal Horse Artillery. Died of wounds 28th August 1917. Aged 35. Son of Brig. Gen. Henry Denison C.B., C.B.E., and Edith Kate Denison, of 41, Evelyn Gardens, Kensington, London. Served at Gallipoli with 29th Div. and in battles on the Somme, Messines, Vimy Ridge, Ypres and Langemarck. Awarded the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.). Buried in DOZINGHEM MILITARY CEMETERY, Poperinge, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot IV. Row F. Grave 1.

Extract from Distinguished Service Order 1916-1923 published by Naval & Military Press:

DENISON, H. (D.S.O. L.G. 3.6.16); b. 12.4.82; 2nd s. of Brig.-Gen. and Mrs. Denison; educ. Eton; R.M.A., Woolwich; 2nd Lt., B.A., 21.12.00; Lt. 21.12.03; Capt.; Major 11.0.15; served Europ. War in Gallipoli; Despatches. On 27.8.1917 he was wounded and died on the following day. He was a good, all-round sportsman, and as a boy held the “record” for bowling, taking on one occasion nine wickets for one run, and five in one over.

DENISON

William Frank Evelyn

Second Lieutenant, 15th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Died of wounds between 22nd and 28th March 1918. *** Cannot locate on CWGC *** Buried Ameins.

Extract from Du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

DENISON, WILLIAM FRANK EVELYN, 2nd Lieut., The Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regt.), only s. of the late Capt. William Evelyn Denison, of Ossington Hall, Newark-on-Trent, co. Nottingham, D.L., J.P., by his wife Lady Elinor, dau. of the 2nd Earl Amherst; b. London, 22 Dec. 1878; educ. Eton , and New College, Oxford; gazetted 2nd Lieut. The Sherwood Foresters in May, 1917; served with the Expeditionary Force in France & Flanders from the following June, and died at Amiens 26 March, 198, of wounds received in action near Amiens on 24th. Buried there; unm.

DENT

Wilfrid Harry

[Listed as Wilfred on SDGW] Major, 10th Battalion, Alexandra, Princess of Wales's Own (Yorkshire Regiment). Killed in action 27th September 1915. Aged 48. Son of the Rev. Canon J. J. D. Dent and Laura M. Dent, of Red House, Hursley, Winchester. Born at Hunsingore, Yorks. Buried in CABARET-ROUGE BRITISH CEMETERY, SOUCHEZ, Pas de Calais, France. Plot XVIII. Row E. Grave 1.

DOCKER

George Arthur Murray

Captain, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment) attached 1st Battalion, King's Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment). Killed in action 17th November 1914. Aged 37. Son of Arthur Robert and Florence Lucy Docker, of Sydney, New South Wales; husband of Anna Louisa Maud Josephine Stonhouse-Gostling (formerly Docker, nee Goodeve), of The Warren, Berrow, Somerset. Gazetted 1900. Served in the South African Campaign. Instructor, Sandhurst, 1907-1911. Adjutant of 10th Bn. Middlesex Regt., 1912, till recalled for active service. Buried in LE TOUQUET RAILWAY CROSSING CEMETERY, Comines-Warneton, Hainaut, Belgium. Plot/Row/Section A. Grave 11.

Extract from Du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

DOCKER, GEORGE ARTHUR MURRAY, Capt., The Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regt.) attd. 1st Battn. (4th Foot) The King's Own (Royal Lancaster Regt.), elder s. of Arthur Robert Docker, late of Sydney, New South Wales; b. 18 Nov. 1876; educ. Oriel college, Oxford; gazetted 2nd Lieut. Liverpool Regt., from the Militia, 21 April, 1900; promoted Lieut. 20 Dec. following transferring to the Royal fusiliers 26 Oct. 1901, and Capt. 19 Sept. 1908; served in the South African War 1899-1901 (Queen's Medal with four clasps); was Instructor of Military Law and Administration at the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, from 16 April, 1907, to 31 July, 1911, being appointed Adjutant to the Territorial Force 23 April, 1912; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from 9 Nov. 1914, when he took out a draft of the 3rd King's Own (Royal Lancaster Regt.) to join the 1st Battn, and was killed in action at Le Touquet on the 17th. He m. in 1903, Anna Louisa Maud Josephine, dau. of the late Louis Arthur Goodeye, Barrister-at-Law, and had four children: Arthur Guy, b. Nov. 1904; Peter Goodeye, b. June, 1908; Michael Lee, b. Nov. 1911, and Alison Everilda Josephine, b. Feb. 1914.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

CAPTAIN GEORGE ARTHUR MURRAY DOCKER, ROY AL FUSILIERS, (CITY OF LONDON REGIMENT), who was born on the 18th November. 1876, was the elder son of Arthur Robert Docker, late of Sydney, New South Wales. He was at Oriel College, Oxford, where he studied Law, and passed the Law Preliminary Examination, but did not take his degree, as he proceeded to South Africa with the 3rd (Militia) Battalion King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment.

He received his commission in the King's (Liverpool Regiment) in 1900, becoming Lieutenant the same year; he was transferred to the Royal Fusiliers in 1901 as Lieutenant, and was promoted Captain in 1908. Captain Docker served during the South African War, where he raised and commanded a section of Mounted Infantry at Zand River, and fought in the engagement there on the 14th June, 1900. Shortly after this, he was on the Staff of Lieutenant-Colonel White, R.A., for two months, while the latter was in command of a flying column sent in pursuit of De Wet in the Orange Free State, and also took part in the action at Ladybrand, 2nd to 7th September, 1900. In October, 1900, he joined the 1st Battalion King's at Machadodorp, in the Transvaal. From there he went to Balmoral, under Brigadier-General Barker, and was in several engagements, including an attack on Balmoral on the 19th November, 1900. Subsequently he had charge of a Mounted Infantry detachment at Wilge River. He was invalided home in June, 1901, having had a very severe attack of rheumatic fever. For his services he received the Queen's medal with four clasps.

In 1902, after six months' sick leave, he went to Burma to join the 1st Battalion Royal Fusiliers. In March, 1904, he was posted to the Depot at Hounslow. He rejoined the 1st Battalion at Parkhurst, Isle of Wight, in March, 1906. In that year he went through the musketry and Maxim gun courses at the School of Musketry, Hythe, passing out well in both examinations. From the 16th April, 1907, to the 31st July, 1911, he was Instructor of Military Law and Administration to "F" Company at the R.M.C., Sandhurst, which appointment lie held three months beyond the usual term. In June, 1910, he passed with honours his examination for promotion. On the expiration of his appointment at Sandhurst, he was sent to the 4th Battalion of his Regiment at Aldershot, pending absorption, and was ultimately posted to the 3rd Battalion in India.

He returned home in April, 1912, to take up the appointment of Adjutant of the 10th Battalion (Duke of Cambridge's Own) Middlesex Regiment. While Adjutant of this battalion, Captain Docker did a great deal to enable it to gain the reputation it has earned since its formation by Colonel St. Leger Glyn (late Grenadier Guards) in 1908.

When the 10th Middlesex were mobilised on the outbreak of the war with Germany, they were sent to Sittingbourne, and very shortly after that, as both the Colonel and the Second-in-Command had to go on sick leave, Captain Docker was for some time in temporary command of the battalion, as well as being Adjutant, and his untiring zeal helped to bring it to a high state of efficiency, while his personal influence did much to raise the whole morale of the corps. At the end of October the battalion was ordered to proceed to India. They had actually embarked, and the ship was on the point of leaving, when Captain Docker was recalled by telegram for service with the Expeditionary Force, and was ordered to take out a draft of the 3rd King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment to the 1st Battalion of that Regiment in Flanders.

He left England with the draft on the 8th November, and reached the 1st Battalion on the 15th November, 1914. The following evening he went into the trenches, and he was killed next morning, the 17th November, at Le Touquet, near Armentieres. He was buried near the station there, where there were already many graves of officers and men of the King's Own. Captain Docker married in 1903 Anna Louisa Maud Josephine, daughter of the late Louis Arthur Goodeve, Barrister-at-Law, and left four children : Arthur Guy, born November, 1904 ; Peter Goodeve, born June, 1908; Michael Lee, born November, 1911; and Alison Everilda Josephine, born February, 1914.

Captain Docker was well known as a cricketer. He was a member of the M.C.C., the Free Foresters, and the Oxford University Authentics, and was one of the M.C.C. team sent to the West Indies in 1913. He represented his college in cricket, football, and athletics, and played polo and cricket for his Regiment. He also won many prizes for athletics and golf. He was a member of the Inner Temple, and was called to the Bar in June, 1914.

See his statistics on CricInfo

DOLL

Philip Walter Rudolph

Lieutenant, Machine Gun Officer, 1st/8th Battalion, The King's (Liverpool Regiment). Killed in action 31st October 1914. Aged 24. Son of Charles Fitzroy Doll, F.R.I.B.A., F.S.I., J.P., (London and Hertford), and Emily Frances Doll (nee Tyler), of Hadham Towers, Much Hadham, Herts. Winner of Lord Roberts' Gold Cup at Aldershot, 1914, with his guns. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 4 and 6. See also Charterhouse School War Memorial

Extract from Du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

DOLL, PHILIP WALTER RUDOLPH, Lieut., 1st Battn. (8th Foot) The King's (Liverpool Regt.), 4th s. of Charles Fitzroy Doll, of Hadham Towers, Much Hadham, co. Herts, J.P.; b. 28 May, 1890; educ. Charterhouse, and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst; was gazetted 2nd Lieut. King's Liverpool Regt. 6 Nov. 1909, and promoted Lieut. 10 April, 1912; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders, and was killed in action at the First Battle of Ypres 31 Oct. 1914.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

LIEUTENANT PHILIP WALTER RUDOLPH DOLL, 1st BATTN. THE KING'S (LIVERPOOL REGIMENT), was killed in action near Ypres on the 31st October, 1914, having previously been reported as missing. He was the fourth son of Mr. Charles FitzRoy J.P., and Emily Frances, his wife, of Hadham Towers, Much Hadham, Herts. He was born on the 28th May, 1890, and was educated at Charterhouse, where he was in the Cricket XI, and at the R.M.C., Sandhurst, where he was in the Football Team; he played both cricket and football in the Army, and at the Army Rifle Association meeting won Lord Roberts's prize for machine-gun practice with his squad. He entered “The King’s” in November, 1909, and was promoted Lieutenant in April, 1910.

DOUGLAS

William Sholto

[Major on SDGW] Captain, Royal Engineers. Died of wounds 14th November 1914. Aged 39. Son of Colonel and Mrs. Douglas, of Lansdown House, Lansdown, Bath. Buried in BOULOGNE EASTERN CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot II. Row B. Grave 4. Also listed on the Bath War Memorial.

Extract from Du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

DOUGLAS, WILLIAM SHOLTO, Major, R.E., of the Headquarters Staff, only s. of Col. John Charles Douglas, of Lansdowne House, Bath, late Worcester Regt., and nephew of General Sir Charles Douglas, Chief of the Imperial General Staff ; b. St. Peter's, Jersey, 18 Sept. 1875 ; educ. Bath College ; joined the Royal Engineers as 2nd Lieut. 22 Oct. 1895 ; promoted Lieut. 22 Oct. 1898, Capt. 22 Oct. 1904, and Major, 30 Oct. 1914 ; was attached to the Egyptian Army, 1898 ; served with the Nile Expedition, 1899 (Egyptian medal and clasp), and in the South African War, 1899-1900, being present during the operations in the Orange Free State, including the actions at Wittebergen (1 to 19 July), where he was slightly wounded while destroying arms (Queen's medal with two clasps). On his return home at the end of 1900 he was specially employed in the Intelligence Department at Headquarters, and from Aug. 1910, to 28 May, 1912, he was Assistant Director of Army Signals (2nd Division) at Aldershot, when he was appointed General Staff Officer (3rd Grade), Scottish Command (29 May, 1914). On the outbreak of war he was appointed to the Headquarters Staff of the 7th Division, Expeditionary Force, was badly wounded in the action at Ypres, 2 Nov. 1914, and died at Boulogne 14 Nov. following. He was mentioned in Sir John French's Despatch of 14 Jan. 1915. Major Douglas m. King's Walden, Herts, 21 Oct. 1903, Gladys Mary, elder dau. of Thomas Fenwick Harrison, Lord of the Manor and Patron of King's Walden, and had an only child, John Willoughby Sholto, b. 17 Jan. 1906 ; died 13 Dec. 1913.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

MAJOR WILLIAM SHOLTO DOUG- LAS, p.s.c., ROYAL ENGINEERS, who died at Boulogne on the 14th November, 1914, of wounds received in action near Ypres on the 2nd of that month, leaving a widow, was the only son of Colonel and Mrs. Douglas, Lansdowne House, Bath. He was born on the 18th September, 1875, and joined the Royal Engineers in October, 1895, becoming Lieutenant in October, 1898. He saw much Staff service, chiefly with the Intelligence Department, being a Staff College graduate and a first-class interpreter in French. From December, 1890, to September, 1899, he was specially employed with the Egyptian Army, and from December, 1900, to September, 1901, in the Intelligence Department at headquarters of the Army, becoming in October in the latter year Staff Captain (Intelligence) at headquarters, and remaining so employed till May,1906 having been promoted Captain in October, 1904. In 1910 he was appointed Assistant Director of Army Signals, IInd Division Aldershot Command, and in the Great War he was employed as a General Staff Officer, 3rd grade. He was gazetted to the rank of Major after his death, to date from the 30th October, 1914.

DOWLING

Geoffrey Charles Walter

Captain, 7th Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Killed in action 30th July 1915. Aged 23. Born 12 August 1891, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. No known grave. Played cricket for Sussex. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 51 and 53.

See his statistics on CricInfo

DU BOULAY, D.S.O.

Arthur Houssemayne

Major (Brevet Lt. Col.), A.Q.M.G. Third Army G.H.Q., Royal Engineers. Died 25th October 1918. Aged 38. Born 18 June 1880, New Brompton, Chatham, Kent. Officer of the Order of Agricultural Merit (France), Officer of the Order of Leopold II with Palm (Belgium), Croix De Guerre (Belgium). Son of Col. W. E. Du Boulay, R.E., and Rose Du Boulay (nee Hawkins); husband of Blanche Du Boulay (nee Hornung), of 3, West Halkin St., Belgrave Square, London. Played cricket for Gloucestershire and Kent. Awarded the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.). Buried in FILLIEVRES BRITISH CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot/Row/Section A. Grave 36.

See his statistics on CricInfo

Extract from Distinguished Service Order 1916-1923 published by Naval & Military Press:

DU BOULAY, A.H. (D.S.O. L.G. 3.6.18); b. 18.6.80; 2nd. Lt., R.E., 22.11.99; Lt. 22.11.02; Capt. 22.11.08; Major and Bt. Lt.-Col.; Despatches. He died 25.10.18.

DUNLOP

Alesander Hamilton

Second Lieutenant, 12th (Ayr and Lanark Yeomanry) Battalion, Royal Scots Fusiliers formerly Ayrshire Yeomanry. Killed in 6th November 1917. Son of Mr. W. H. and Mrs. I. M. Dunlop, of Doonside, Ayr. Buried in BEERSHEBA WAR CEMETERY, Israel. Section M. Grave 71.

DURANT

Noel Henry Colin Fairfax

Lieutenant, 1st Battalion, Irish Guards. Killed in action 30th November 1917. Aged 29. Son of Charles Richard Durant, and the Hon. Mrs. Charles Durant of 22, Emperor's Gate, London. No known grave. Commemorated on CAMBRAI MEMORIAL, LOUVERVAL, Nord, France. Panel 2 and 3.

DURNFORD

Richard Selby

Captain, 9th Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Killed in action 31st July 1915. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 51 and 53.

EARLE

Walter Colby

Captain, Cheshire Regiment. Died 7th April 1915. Aged 54. Son of Henry Earle; husband of Eliza Julia Earle, of Ovey's Farm, Cookham, Berks. Buried in the old OVERLEIGH CEMETERY, CHESTER, Cheshire. Grave 6364.

EDWARDS

A C

Captain
either
Alfred Cecil EDWARDS, Royal Army Medical Corps attached 1st/4th Battalion, King's Own (Yorkshire Light Infantry). Died of wounds 25th July 1917. Aged 37. Son of the Rev. Charles and Anna Maria Edwards, of Bingley, Yorks. warded the Military Cross (M.C.). Buried in MONT HUON MILITARY CEMETERY, LE TREPORT, Seine-Maritime, France. Plot IV. Row A. Grave 8A.
or
Arthur Corbett EDWARDS, 8th Battalion, Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regiment). Killed in action 25th September 1915. No known grave. Commemorated on LOOS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 95 to 97.

EGERTON

Philip de Malpas Wayne

Captain, 19th (Queen Alexandra's Own Royal) Hussars. Killed in action 8th October 1918. Aged 23. Son of Sir Philip Henry Brian Grey Egerton, 12th Bart., of Oulton Park, Cheshire, and Mary Carolyn Campbell Grey Egerton, his wife (now Mrs. Richard McCreery). His brother, R L B Egerton also served. Buried in BUSIGNY COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Nord, France. Plot IV. Row B. Grave 29.

EGERTON

Robert Randle

Lieutenant, 1st Field Squadron, Royal Engineers. Killed in action 15th [SDGW] or 16th [CWGC] November 1914. Aged 26. Son of Robert Walter and Flora Augusta Egerton, of Stansty Lodge, Wrexham, Denbighshire. Buried in NEW IRISH FARM CEMETERY, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot XXXIII. Row C. Grave 2.

Extract from Du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

EGERTON, ROBERT RANDLE, Lieut., R.E., only s. of Robert Egerton, of Stansty Lodge, Wrexham; b. 20 March, 1888; educ. Clifton College, and the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich; gazetted 2nd Lieut. R.E. 18 Dec. 1908; promoted Lieut. 4 feb. 1911; served in the European War, and was killed in action 15 Nov. 1914. He was awarded the Royal Humane Society's Certificate for saving a man from drowning.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

LIEUTENANT ROBERT RANDLE EGERTON, ROYAL ENGINEERS, who was killed in action on the 15th November, 1914, was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Egerton, of Stansty Lodge, Wrexham. He was born on the 20th March, 1888, and was educated at Clifton College and the R.M.A., Woolwich, from which he passed into the Royal Engineers in December, 1908, becoming Lieutenant in February, 1911. Lieutenant Egerton was a cricketer and hockey player, having twice played cricket for his corps against the R.A., and twice as goalkeeper at hockey for Army v. Navy. He was also a good revolver and rifle shot, having won the Army championship for the former, and having often shot at Bisley in the Army Eight. He also held the Royal Humane Society's certificate for saving a man from drowning.

EGERTON-GREEN

John William

Captain, 1st Battalion, Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own). Died of wounds 9th October 1917. Aged 25. Eldest son of Claude and Helen Egerton-Green. Buried in BOULOGNE EASTERN CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot VII. Row A. Grave 31.

EGERTON-WARBURTON

John

Captain, Scots Guards. Died of wounds 31st August 1915. Aged 31. Son of Piers Egerton-Warburton, of Arley Hall, Northwich; husband of Lettice Egerton-Warburton (now Mrs. Waters), of 9, Berkeley Square, London. Buried in ST. MARY AND ALL SAINTS CHURCHYARD, GREAT BUDWORTH, Cheshire.

ELCHO

(Lord) Hugo Francis Charteris

[The family name is CHARTERIS and but he served under this name ELCHO] Captain, Gloucestershire Yeomanry (Royal Gloucestershire Hussars). Killed in action 23rd April 1916. Aged 32. Son of the 11th Earl and Countess of Wemyss, of Gosford, Aberlady, Edinburgh; husband of Lady Elcho (nee Lady Violet Catherine Manners (now Lady Violet Benson), of 32, Montagu Square, London, W. His brother, Yvo Alan Charteris also fell. No known grave. Commemorated on JERUSALEM MEMORIAL, Israel. Panel 3.

ELLERSHAW

Wilfrid

Brigadier-General, Royal Artillery attached to Lord Kitchener's Staff. Drowned 6th June 1916. Aged 44. First and second class Orders of St. Stanislas (Russia). Son of the Rev. John Ellershaw, of Clifton, Bristol; husband of Catherine Ellershaw, of Wymering, Cosham, Hants. Commanded 113th Battery, Royal Field Artillery from August to November 1914. No known grave. Commemorated on HOLLYBROOK MEMORIAL, SOUTHAMPTON, Hampshire.

ENGLISH

Robert Ernest

Captain, North Somerset Yeomanry. Killed in action 13th May 1915. Aged 31. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 5.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 2:

CAPTAIN ROBERT ERNEST ENGLISH, NORTH SOMERSET YEOMANRY, second son of the late Robert English, was born in South Africa on the 6th November, 1883.

He was educated at Harrow and Magdalen College, Oxford, and took great interest in Magdalen College Mission. He entered the North Somerset Yeomanry in 1909, became Lieutenant in August, 1912, and Captain in September, 1914.

Captain English was a member of the Bath Club, and was devoted to all kinds of shooting and fishing. In 1913 he went to Nairobi for big-game shooting.

On the outbreak of war he volunteered for Imperial Service and was sent to France in November, 1914. He was killed by shell on the 13th May, 1915, in a trench near Hooge during a heavy bombardment by the Germans.

EWING

James Robert

Captain, Royal Sussex Regiment. Died 19th May 1915. Buried in ST. BARTHOLOMEW CHURCHYARD, BURWASH, Sussex.

EYRE

Charles Howard

Lieutenant, 6th Battalion attached 2nd Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Killed in action 25th September 1915. Born 26 March 1883, Toxteth, Liverpool, Lancashire. Buried in DUD CORNER CEMETERY, LOOS, Pas de Calais, France. Plot V. Row E. Grave 8.

See his statistics on CricInfo

FARMER

Charles George Edgar

Lieutenant, 7th Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Killed in action 18th August 1916. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 13 A and 13 B.

FARMER

Henry Gamul

Captain, 7th Battalion, Seaforth Highlanders (Ross-shire Buffs, the Duke of Albany's). Died of wounds 12th November 1915. Aged 28. Son of Charles Edward and Emily Anne Farmer, of 18, Sloane Court, Chelsea, London. Buried in COLOGNE SOUTHERN CEMETERY, Koln (Cologne), Nordrhein-Westfal, Germany. Plot VIII. Row G. Grave 4.

FILMER, M.C.

Sir Robert Marcus, Baronet

Captain, 4th Battalion, Grenadier Guards. Died of wounds 27th January 1916. Aged 37. 10th Bart. Son of Sir Edmund Filmer, 9th Bart., and the Hon. Lady Filmer, of East Sutton Park, Maidstone. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). Buried in MERVILLE COMMUNAL CEMETERY, Nord, France. Plot VII. Row A. Grave 4.

FISHER

Charles Dennis

Lieutenant, HMS Invincible, Royal Naval volunteer Reserve. Lost with his ship at the Battle of Jutland 31st May 1916. Aged 38. Born 19, June 1877, Blatchington Court, Sussex. Son of the late Herbert William Fisher. No known grave. Commemorated on PORTSMOUTH NAVAL MEMORIAL, Hampshire. Panel 24.

See his statistics on CricInfo

FISON, M.C., MiD

James Frederick Lorimer

Captain (Brigade Major), 4th Battalion previously 6th (Cyclist) Battalion (Territorial), Suffolk Regiment. Died of wounds 2nd November 1917. Aged 27. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.) and twice Mentioned in Despatches. Son of James Oliver and Lucy Maud Fison, of Stutton Hall, Stutton; husband of Hazel Patricia Charlotte Fison (now Mrs. Dorling). Buried in north-east corner of ST. PETER CHURCHYARD, STUTTON, Suffolk.

FITZGERALD

Alfred Edward

Lieutenant-Colonel, East Surrey Regiment attached 15th Battalion, Durham Light Infantry. Died of wounds 13th July 1916. Buried north-east of the church in THE ASSUMPTION CHURCHYARD, TWYFORD, Buckinghamshire.

Extract from Du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

FITZGERALD, ALFRED EDWARD, Lieut.-Col., 15th (Service) Battn. The Durham Light Infantry, 2nd s. of the late Robert Allan Fitzgerald ; b. Liverpool, 25 Oct. 1872 ; educ. Harrow ; served in the ranks of the B.S.A. Police 1896 (Medal) ; entered the Army through the Militia in 1899 ; obtained a commission in the West India Regt. 1899 ; served as Garrison Adjutant in Jamaica ; was employed on the Gold coast in 1900 ; took part in the operations at Ashanti (Medal and clasp) ; subsequently was attached to the Egyptian Army 1904-8 ; promoted Capt. 1907 ; transferred to the East Surrey Regt. the same year, being promoted Major 1915, and Lieut.-Col. Sept. 1915, when he was given command of the 15th Battn. Durham Light Infantry : served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders ; took part in the Battle of Loos ; was wounded near Fricourt. during the operations on the Somme, 1 July, 1016, and died in a London hospital on the 13th of that month. Buried at Twyford, co. Buckingham. His Brigadier wrote " There is no harm in telling you now that his name went in for immediate reward ' for a D.S.O., and I have no doubt whatever lie would have got it, as I had especially starred his name. This is what was actually said : "This officer commanded his battalion until wounded on the evening of 1 July. He was placed in command of the captured German position, and acted with great coolness, and showed a sound appreciation of the situation. His messages were always clear,'" and a brother officer wrote : "There was not an officer or a man in the Regiment who would not have followed him anywhere, and, what is more, did so, when they were asked to the other day. The Regiment did so well that the division made a lasting name for itself, and that is undoubtedly due to the manner in which he led his men ; one hears of it on every side." One of his men wrote : "The Colonel proved himself not only an officer, but a man who loved his men and the N.C.O.'s. The men out here will never forget how brave he was, and how he inspired them and led them to victory that day." He m. at Arthuret, co. Cumberland, 7 Aug. 1907, Mary Eleanor, dau. of the late Col. T. A. Irwin, of Lynehow. Carlisle, and had two daus. : Pamela, b. 5 Dec. 1911, and Patricia, b. 19 April, 1916.

FOLJAMBE

Hubert Francis Fitzwilliam Brabazon

Major, "B" Company, 2nd Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Killed in action 14th September 1914. Son of the Right Hon. F. J. S. Foljamhe, P.C., and Lady Gertrude Foljambe; husband of Gladys Foljambe, of 8, Pont St., London. Educated at Eton. Served in the South African War. No known grave. Commemorated on LA FERTE-SOUS-JOUARRE MEMORIAL, Seine-et-Marne, France.

Extract from Du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

FOLJAMBE, HUBERT FRANCIS FITZWILLIAM BRABAZON, Major, King's Royal Rifle Corps, : 3rd s. of the Right Hon Francis John Savile Foljambe, P.C., by his wife, Lady Gertrude Emily, née Acheson, eldest dau. of Archibald, 3rd Earl of Gosford, K.P. ; b. in London, 16 Nov. 1872 ; educ. Eton ; gazetted to the King's Royal Rifle Corps, 6 March, 1895, and promoted Lieut., 18 Feb. 1898, Captain, 20 July, 1901, and Major, 17 July, 1912. He served in the South African War, 1900-2 ; took part in the operations in Natal, May, 1900, also in those in the Transvaal, 30 Nov. 1900, to 31 May, 1902, and was for some time Commandant at Helvetia. For his services he was awarded the Queen's medal with two clasps and the King's medal with two clasps. When the European War broke out, Major Foljambe went out with the first Expeditionary Force in Aug. 1914 ; served through the retreat from Mons, and was killed in action on the Aisne, 14 Sept. 1914. Our troops had crossed the river and he was leading his men in a flanking movement when he fell. Major Foljambe was a typical Regimental officer and Company Commander, sincerely attached to his men and by them deeply loved and implicitly trusted. His Colour-Sergt. wrote : "He was killed instantly. He was brave and I miss him. The men all loved him." He was a good shot and rider, and a very keen cricketer, and played for the Eton Ramblers, Free Foresters and "Greenjackets." He m. at Sprotborough, co. York, 16 Nov. 1909, Gladys, dau. of Gen. Robert Calverley Alington Bewicke-Copley, of Sprotborough Hall, co. York, C.B., J.P., D.L., and had a son, John Savile, b. 6 Oct. 1911.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

MAJOR HUBERT FRANCIS FITZWILLIAM BRABAZON FOLJAMBE, 2nd BATTN. THE KING'S ROYAL RIFLE CORPS, who was born on the 16th November, 1872, was the son of the Right Hon. F. J. S. Foljambe and the Lady Gertrude Foljambe, daughter of the third Earl of Gosford, of Osberton, Nottinghamshire.

He was educated at Eton, and joined the King's Royal Rifle Corps from the Militia in March, 1895, becoming Lieutenant in February, 1898, and Captain in July, 1901. He served in the South African War, being present at operations in Natal in May, 1900, and in the Transvaal from November, 1900, to May, 1902. He was Commandant at Helvetia for some time from December, 1901, and for his services he received the King's and the Queen's medals, each with two clasps.

Major Foljambe was a member of the Army and Navy Club. He was a good rider, a very keen cricketer, a good shot, and fond of racquets. He played cricket for the Eton Ramblers, Free Foresters, and the “Green Jackets."

He was killed on the 14th September, 1914, while leading his company up the heights of the Aisne, near Troyon.

Major Foljambe, who was promoted to that rank in July, 1912, married Gladys, daughter of General and Mrs. Bewicke-Copley, of Sprotborough, Yorkshire, and left one son, John Savile, born October, 1911.

FOLLETT, D.S.O., M.V.O.

Gilbert Burrell Spencer

Brigadier-General, commanding 3rd Guards briagde, general Staff formerly Coldstream Guards. Killed in action 27th September 1918. Aged 40. Son of John Skirrow Follett and Blanche Katharine Kenneth Follett; husband of Lady Mildred Follett (now Lady Mildred Fitzgerald, of Warren House, Stanmore, Middx.). Native of London. Awarded Croix de Guerre (France), the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.) and Member of the Royal Victorian Order (M.V.O.). Buried in BEAUMETZ CROSS ROADS CEMETERY, BEAUMETZ-LES-CAMBRAI, Pas de Calais, France. Plot/Row/Section F. Grave 24.

Extract from Distinguished Service Order 1916-1923 published by Naval & Military Press:

FOLLETT, G. B. S. (D.S.O. L.G. 10.1.17); b. 1878; o. s. of J. S. Follett; m. 1904, Lady Mildred, fifth d. of 7th Earl of Dunmore; educ. Eton and Sandhurst; ent. C. Gds. 1899; Major, 1914; Bt. Lt.-Col. Jan. 1918; T/Brig: Gen.; M.V.O.; served S. Africa (wounded; Queen's Medal, 2 clasps); Europ. War; thrice wounded; Despatches. He was killed in action 27.9.18.

London Gazette, 10 Jan. 1917.—" War Office, 10 Jan. 1917. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the appointments of the undermentioned Officers to be Companions of the Distinguished Service Order, in recognition of their gallantry and devotion to duty in the field."

FOLLETT, GILBERT BURRELL SPENCER, M.V.O., Major (Temporary Lieut.-Colonel), Coldstream Guards. For conspicuous gallantry in action. Although wounded, he inspected the front-line trenches under heavy fire. Later, he remained with the battalion until they were relieved. He has on many previous occasions done tine work.

FRANCE-HAYHURST

Frederick Charles

Lieutenant-Colonel, commanding 4th (Denbighshire) Battalion (Territorial), Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Killed in action 9th May 1915. Aged 43. Son of Col. Charles Hosken France-Hayhurst, of Bostock Hall, Middlewich, Cheshire. Buried in CABARET-ROUGE BRITISH CEMETERY, SOUCHEZ, Pas de Calais, France. Plot XXVIII. Row B. Grave 20.

FREEMAN

Edward

Major, 10th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Killed in action 3rd March 1916. Aged 41. Son of Harold and Alice Freeman, of Malvern Wells; husband of Katherine M. Ffoulkes (formerly Freeman), of Gallt-Y-Beran, Pwllheli, Carnarvonshire. Buried in SPOILBANK CEMETERY, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot I. Row M. Grave 5.

FREEMAN-THOMAS

the Hon Gerard Frederick

Second Lieutenant, 1st Battalion, Coldstream Guards. Killed in action 14th September 1914. Aged 21. Son of 1st Viscount Willingdon and Viscountess Willingdon, of 5, Lygon Place, London and of Ratton, Willingdon, Sussex. No known grave. Commemorated on LA FERTE-SOUS-JOUARRE MEMORIAL, Seine-et-Marne, France.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

2nd LIEUTENANT the Honble. GERARD FREDERICK FREEMAN-THOMAS, 1st BATTN. COLDSTREAM GUARDS, is believed to have been killed on or since the 14th September, 1914, in France; but his name had not been included in the monthly official casualty lists up to November, 1915, although it is omitted from the Army List of that month. He was the elder son and heir of the first Baron Willingdon and the Baroness Willingdon, daughter of Earl Brassey, and was born on the 3rd May, 1893. He was gazetted to the Coldstream Guards in September, 1913, and when killed was serving with the 1st Battalion, which formed part of the 1st Division.

FRYER

John

Major, 7th (Queen's Own) Hussars. Died 2nd March 1920. Aged 49. Son of Lt. Gen. Sir John Fryer, K.C.B., Col. The Carabineers; husband of Winifred Fryer, of Derwent Hill, Stamford Bridge, Yorks. Buried in ST. ANDREW CHURCHYARD, KINSON, Hampshire.

GEDGE

Cecil Bertie

Second Lieutenant, 3rd (City of London) Battalion (Royal Fusiliers), London Regiment. Killed in action 25th September 1915. No known grave. Commemorated on LOOS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 130.

Extract from Du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

GEDGE, CECIL BERTIE, 2nd Lieut., 3rd Battn. (Royal Fusiliers) The London Regt. (T.F.), attd. Grenadier Coy., Garhwal Brigade. I.A., only surv. child of Sydney Gedge, of Mitcham Hall, co. Surrey, Solicitor, by his wife, Augusta, dau. of Robert Herring ; b. Mitcham Hall aforesaid, 20 Feb. 1866 ; educ. Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge, where he graduated B.A.; was a Barrister, being called to the Bar (Inner Temple) in 1891, and afterwards practised on the South-Eastern Circuit and at the Essex and Herts Sessions ; joined the Sportsman's Battn. 9 Oct. 1914 ; was gazetted 2nd Lieut. 3rd London Regt. 1 April, 1915 ; went to France in June. when he was attached to the Grenadier Coy., Garhwal Brigade, and was killed in action at the Battle of Loos 25 Sept. following. His Colonel wrote : "He was wounded early in the advance and came back and had his wounds dressed, and then went out again to lead his men, and he has not been seen since. He was a brave English gentleman, and we are glad to think he was one of us. . . . I am very sorry to say I have had strict orders not to send forward for 'Mention' any officer who has been killed. If it were not for this very strict rule I should have sent forward your husband's name," and a brother officer : "There is one thing that may console you, and that is, your husband showed the greatest courage. He was wounded by shrapnel early in the morning, but refused to go back. He just had his men bind him up, and when the order came to go over the parapet, he led his men over like a hero." He was a good sportsman, being well known in Switzerland as a curler ; was also a keen scholar, and had edited various publications, including "Granta" in 1890, "Huts," 1902-3, and was sub-editor of Lord Halsbury's "Laws of Ayland." He m. at St. Margaret's, Westminster, 6 Aug. 1892, Jessie Bickley (Brackondale, Strawberry Hill, Twickenham), 3rd dau. of Bery Bickley Rogers, and had a dau., Sydney, Jessie, b. 12 Sept. 1893.

GILLIAT

Otho Claud Skipwith

[Spelt GILLIATT on SDGW and also Claude on SDGW] Captain, 1st Battalion, Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own). Killed in action 30th October 1914. Aged 31. Son of Howard and Helen Gilliat, of Stragglethorpe Old Hall, Newark-on-Trent. Served in the South African Campaign. Buried in LE TOUQUET RAILWAY CROSSING CEMETERY, Comines-Warneton, Hainaut, Belgium. Plot/Row/Section A. Grave 1.

Extract from Du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

GILLIAT, OTHO CLAUDE SKIPWITH, Capt., 1st Battn., The Rifle briagde (The Prince Consort's Own), s. of the late Howard Gilliat, of Abbot's Repton Hall, Huntingdon; b. Buckingham Gate, London, S.W., 7 Dec. 1881; educ. Golden Parsonage, Cheam; Eton, and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst; gazetted 2nd Lieut. Rifle Brigade 8 Jan. 1901; served in the South African War 1902 (Queen's Medal with three clasps); retired with the rank of Capt. 29 July, 1911, and joined the 5th (Reserve) Battn. of his Regiment; rejoined the Regular Battn. on the outbreak of the European War; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders, and was killed in action 30 Oct. 1914; unm.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

CAPTAIN OTHO CLAUDE SKIPWITH GILLIAT, 1st BATTN. RIFLE BRIGADE, (THE PRINCE CONSORT'S OWN), born on the 7th December, 1881, at Buckingham Gate, London, S.W., was the son of the late Howard Gilliat, of Abbot's Ripton Hall, Huntingdon, and of Mrs. Howard Gilliat. He was educated at Golden Parsonage, Cheam; and at Eton, where he was in the Cricket XI in 1899, and in the Field XI in 1898 and 1899. He was also a member of the Free Foresters, I Zingari, Eton Ramblers, and Green Jackets Cricket Clubs.
Proceeding to the R.M.C., Sandhurst, he joined the 4th Battalion Rifle Brigade in January, 1901. He served in the South African War, being present during operations in the Orange River and Cape Colonies, receiving the Queen's medal with three clasps. From 1908-09 he was A.D.C. to Admiral Sir F. Bedford, in Western Australia, and to Earl Dudley, Governor-General from 1909-11, in which year he became Captain. He retired from the Regular battalion, and joined the 5th Battalion; but on the outbreak of the Great War he rejoined the Regular Army, proceeding to France with the 1st Battalion. He was shot through the heart by shrapnel bullet on the 30th October, 1914.
Captain Gilliat, who was a member of the Army and Navy Club, was a golf player, handicap “scratch." He was unmarried.

GOLD

Cecil Argo

Lieutenant, Adjutant 5th Battalion, Princess Charlotte of Wales's (Royal Berkshire Regiment). Killed in action 3rd July 1916. Aged 29. Born 3rd June 1887, St Pancras, London. Son of Argo and Mary Gold, of 31, Gloucester Square, Hyde Park, London. Buried in AVELUY COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Somme, France. Plot/Row/Section H. Grave 38.

Extract from Wisden's Crickters Almanac

Lieut. And Adjutant Cecil Argo Gold (Royal Berkshire Regiment) was killed on July 3, aged 29. In 1905 and 1906 he was in the Eton XI, having a batting average of 26.60 in the first year and one of 21.50 in the second. In his matches against Harrow and Winchester he made 186 runs with an average of 23.25, his highest score being 57 against Harrow in 1906. He played in the Freshmen's match at Oxford in 1907, making 0 and 35, but did not obtain his Blue. Since 1907 he had been a member of the M.C.C. He had been mentioned in Dispatches.

GORDON

Gerard Montague

[Gerald on SDGW] Captain, 5th Battalion attached Adjutant, 12th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Killed in action 9th June 1917. Aged 26. Son of George and Mary Gordon, of Wincombe Park, Wilts, and The Barn House, Sherborne, Dorset. Gerald attended Wye College from January 1910 and left Christmas 1911. Whilst at Wye he captained the cricket team in 1911 and was also a member of the hockey team. Buried in RENINGHELST NEW MILITARY CEMETERY, Poperinge, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot II. Row C. Grave 23. See also South Eastern Agricultural Collge, Wye and Durnford School, Langton Matravers, Dorset War Memorial

Extract from Du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

GORDON, GERARD MONTAGUE, Capt. and Adjutant, The Royal Fusiliers, 3rd and yst. s. of George Henry Gordon, of The Barn House, Sherborne, and Wincombe Park, Shaftesbury, J.P. co. Wilts and Dorset. Chairman of the Dorset War Agricultural Committee, by his wife, Mary, dau. of Francis Stanier, of Biddulph, co. Stafford ; b. Sherborne, 8 Jan. 1891 ; educ. at Durnford House ; Wellington College, and the South Eastern Agricultural College, Wye, co. Kent ; obtained a commission 15 Aug. 1914 ; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from Feb. 1915, and was killed in action 9 June, 10 Buried in the Military Cemetery at Reninghelst, near Ypres. A brother officer wrote : "He was one of the bravest men I have met out here, and his sense of duty in returning to the front so soon after his recent operation filled us all with the deepest admiration. He was always so merry and bright, and a great favourite with us all," and another of his Regiment : "His parting from us has caused a deep cloud over the battalion, because he was one of the best, and one we could ill afford to lose." While at Wellington he played for two years in the cricket eleven, and represented his school in the Public Schools' Racket Competition at Queen's Club. He was a member of the M.C.C. and of the Free Foresters, and for several seasons did good service for the Dorset County XI. He was a fine horseman and took high honours as an athlete ; unm.

GORDON-LENNOX

Lord Bernard Charles

Major, 2nd Company, 2nd Battalion, Genadier Guards. Killed in action 10th November 1914. Aged 36. Born 1st May 1878, Westminster, London. Third son of the 7th Duke of Richmond and Gordon; husband of Lady Evelyn Gordon Lennox, of Halnaker House, Chichester, Sussex. Educated Eton. Buried in ZILLEBEKE CHURCHYARD, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot/Row/Section E. Grave 3. See also Boxgrove Priory, Sussex

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

MAJOR LORD BERNARD CHARLES GORDON-LENNOX, 2nd BATTN. GRENADIER GUARDS, who was killed in action at Zillebeke on the 10th November, 1914, was the third son of the seventh Duke of Richmond and Gordon, K.G.

Born in London on the 1st May, 1878, he was educated at Eton College and Sandhurst, from which he joined the Grenadier Guards in February, 1898, becoming Lieutenant in October, 1899.

He took part in the South African War, being present at the operations in the Orange Free State, including the actions at Poplar Grove and Driefontein, for which he received the Queen's medal with two clasps. From 1904-06 he was seconded for service with the Chinese Regiment at Wei-hai-Wei. He was promoted Captain in 1909, and was A.D.C. from November, 1907, to July, 1909, and Assistant Military Secretary, from August, 1909, to November, 1911, to the General Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Northern Command.

For his services in the war he was mentioned in the Supplement to Sir John French's Despatch of 14th January, 1915, published by the War Office in April, 1915.

In 1907 Lord Bernard Gordon-Lennox married Evelyn, second daughter of the first Lord Loch, and left two sons: George Charles, born May, 1908; and Alexander Henry Charles, born April, 1911.

He was a member of the Guards' and Turf Clubs, and was a thorough all-round sportsman, his principal recreations being shooting, fishing, cricket, and polo. By his death the Army has lost a keen and brilliant officer, and the world of sport an exponent of whom there were very few equals.

Extract from CricInfo:

Major Lord Bernard Charles Gordon-Lennox, third son of the Duke of Richmond, who was born on May 1, 1878, was killed in action on November 10 whilst serving with the Grenadier Guards. He did not obtain a place in the Eton XI, but was more fortunate at Sandhurst, for whom he played an excellent innings of 80 against Woolwich in 1897. Subsequently he became a member of the M. C. C. and I Zingari, and in 1914 visited Egypt with the latter's team, scoring 119 against All Egypt at Alexandria. For the Household Brigade Lord Bernard was a prolific scorer.

GOSLING, C.M.G.

Charles

Brigadier-General, commanding 10th Infantry briagde, General Staff formerly King's Royal Rifle Corps. Killed in action 12th April 1917. Aged 48. Husband of Mrs. V. R. Gosling, of Marlingford Hall, Norwich. Buried in HERVIN FARM BRITISH CEMETERY, ST. LAURENT-BLANGY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot/Row/Section C. Grave 6.

GREGSON-ELLIS

Reginald George

Captain, Buckinghamshire Battalion (Territorial), Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry. Died of wounds 17th April 1917. Buried in PERONNE COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Somme, France. Plot I. Row B. Grave 18.

Extract from Du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

GREGSON-ELLIS, REGINALD GEORGE, Capt., 1st Buckinghamshire (Territorial) Battn. The Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry. elder s. of the late Charles Gregson-Ellis, Barrister-at-Law, by his wife, Mildred Agnes (Claremont House, High Wycombe), dau. of Cotterill Scholefield ; b. London. 23 May, 1884 : educ. Horris Hill, and Eton College ; was an Actuary in the Metropolitan life Assurance Society ; obtained a commission as 2nd Lieut. Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry 23 Sept. 1914: promoted Lieut. Aug. 1915, and Capt. 22 July, 1916 ; served with the Expeditionary Force in France from 29 March. 1915 ; took part in the Battle of the Somme, and died at Peronne 17 April, 1917, from wounds received in action while leading his company in an attack on Tomboise Farm, 12 miles east of Peronne. Buried in Peronne Military Cemetery, Capt. Gregson-Ellis was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 25 May, 1917], by F.M. Sir Douglas Haig, for gallant and distinguished service in the field. While at Eton he played for the Cricket 1901, was captain the following year, and was also President of the Eton Society. He m. at the Parish Church. High Wycombe, 23 Sept. 1913, Lucy Monica, eldest dau. of Lewis William Reynolds, of The Priory, High Wycombe, J.P.. and had a dau. Mary, b. 9 Aug. 1911.

GRENFELL, VC

Francis Octavius

Captain, 9th (Queen's Royal) Lancers. Killed in action 24th May 1915. Aged 35. Born 4th September 1880. Son of Pascoe Du Pre Grenfell and Sophia, his wife. Educated at Eton, Francis became "Master of the Beagles" in 1898. Represented his school at cricket. Twin brother of Riversdale (below). On leaving Eton in 1899 he joined the 3rd (Militia) Battalion, Seaforth Highlanders. He saw service in the South African War in the King's Royal Rifle Corps. Awarded the Victoria Cross (V.C.). Buried in VLAMERTINGHE MILITARY CEMETERY, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot II. Row B. Grave 14.

On 24th August 1914 at Audregnies, Belgium, Captain Grenfell and his Regiment had charged a large body of German infantry. Casualties were very heavy and Captain Grenfell was the senior officer left. He was rallying part of the Regiment behind a railway embankment when he was twice hit and severely wounded. When the commander of the 119th Battery, Royal Field Artillery, asked for help in saving the guns near Doubon, Grenfell, despite his wounds, gathered some volunteers, and, under a hail of bullets, helped to push the guns out of range of enemy fire. He recovered from those wounds only to be killed in action at Hooge, Belgium, several months later. His medal is on display at the 9th/12th Lancers Regimental Museum in Derby. An extract taken from the London Gazette dated 16th November, 1914 records the following:-

"For gallantry in action against un-broken Infantry at Andregnies, Belgium, on 24th August, 1914, and for gallant conduct in assisting to save the guns of 119th Battery, Royal Field Artillery, near Doubon the same day."

Extract from Du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

GRENFELL, FRANCIS OCTAVIUS, V.C., Capt., 9th Lancers, 8th s. of the late Pascoe Du Pre Grenfell, of Wilton Park, Beaconsfield, by his wife, Sophia, dau. of Vice-Admiral John Pascoe Grenfell, Brazilian I.N., and nephew of Francis Wallace, 1st Baron Grenfell, P.C., G.C.B. ; G.C.M.G., Field-Marshal ; b. Hatchlands, Guildford. 4 Sept. 1880 ; ethic. Eton (Mr. Durnford's House, 1894-99); received a commission in the 3rd (Militia) Battn. Seaforth Highlanders, 13 Dec. 1899 ; gazetted 2nd Lieut. King's Royal Rifle Corps, 4 May, 1901 , and Lieut. 28 Jan. 1905 ; transferred to 9th Lancers 6 May, 1905 ; promoted Capt. 7 Sept. 1912 ; was Adjutant 1 Nov. 1912 to 13 Jan. 1914 ; served (1) in the South African War, 1901-2 ; took part in operations in Cape Colony and Transvaal, 1901, and in those in Orange River Colony, Jan. to 31 May, 1902 (Queen's medal with five clasps) ; and (2) with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders ; was twice mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 20 Oct. and 16 Nov. 1914] by F.M. Sir John French, and was killed in action, after being twice wounded at Hooge, 24 May, 1915 ; unm. He was awarded the Victoria Cross "For gallantry in action against unbroken infantry at Andregnies, Belgium, on 24 Aug. 1914, and for gallant conduct in assisting to save the guns of the 119th Battery, near Doubon, the same day," being the first officer to receive it in the European War. At Eton he was in the Cricket XI in 1899, and Master of the Beagles. Like his brother, Capt. R. N. Grenfell, he was one of the finest polo players of his day. He did much for modern polo with his brother, was in the Champion side several times, and was instrumental in forming the Old Etonians Polo Team, which at one time was nominated as the Polo Cup Challenger. One of the best known men in the army, he enjoyed a popularity that few men achieve.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 2:

CAPTAIN FRANCIS OCTAVIUS GRENFELL, V.C., 9th (QUEEN'S ROYAL) LANCERS, the first officer to be awarded the Victoria Cross in the Great War, was the third member of his family to give his life fighting against Germany. His twin brother, Captain R. Grenfell, 9th Lancers, fell in action on the 14th September, 1914, and his cousin, Captain Julian Grenfell, D.S.O., Royal Dragoons, died of wounds on the 26th May, 1915.
Captain Francis Grenfell, who was born on the 4th September, 1880, at Hatchlands, Guildford, was the eighth son of the late Mr. Pascoe Grenfell, of 69 Eaton Place, and of Wilton Park, Beaconsfield, and a nephew of Field-Marshal Lord Grenfell. He was educated at Eton. (Mr. Durnford's House 1894-1899) and was in the Eton XI. in his last year. He was Master of the Beagles at the same time as his brother was Whip, and by raising funds they both played a very important part in the building of the present kennels. Captain Grenfell was a celebrated polo player, and, with his brother, did much for modern polo. He was instrumental in forming the Old Etonian Polo Team, which was at one time nominated as the Polo Cup Challenger. Ho was also an excellent rider, winning several inter-Regimental horse races, and in India won the Point-to-Point Race the day his brother won the Kadir Cup. On leaving Eton Captain Grenfell joined the 3rd (Militia) Battn. Seaforth Highlanders, with which he served over a year, and in May, 1901, he was gazetted 2nd Lieutenant in the King's Royal Rifle Corps. He took part in the South African War 1901-2, including operations in the Orange River Colony, in Cape Colony, and in the Transvaal, and he received for his services the Queen's Medal with five clasps. He was promoted Lieutenant in January, 1905, and in May of that year he exchanged to the 9th Lancers, becoming Captain in September, 1912. Captain Grenfell accompanied his Regiment to Flanders as part of the British Expeditionary Force in August, 1914.
“For gallantry in action against unbroken infantry at Andregnies. Belgium, on the 24th August, 1914, and for gallant conduct in assisting to save the guns of the 119th Battery Royal Field Artillery, near Doubon, the same day"
he received the Victoria Cross. (London Gazette, 16th November, 1914). The gunners had all been struck down, and Captain Grenfell called for volunteers to save the guns, which were safely man-handled out of action amid a storm of shell; and, in an episode where all were brave, Captain Grenfell, wounded in the hand and leg, displayed a high heroic courage, which gained him the crown of every soldier's ambition. He was also mentioned in Sir John French's Despatch of the 8th October, 1914. His wounds proved severe and he returned to England, but at the earliest moment he was back again with his Regiment. A little later he was wounded even more dangerously, and recovered a second time, only to be mortally wounded by shrapnel at Hooge on the 24th May, 1915.

GRENFELL

Riversdale Nonus "Rivy"

Captain, Buckinghamshire Yeomanry (Royal Buckinghamshire Hussars) attached 9th (Queen's Royal) Lancers. Killed in action 14th September 1914. Aged 34. Son of Pascoe Du Pre Grenfell. Twin brother of Francis (above). Buried in VENDRESSE CHURCHYARD, Aisne, France. Grave 1.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

GRENFELL, RIVERSDALE NONUS ("RIVY"), Capt., Buckinghamshire Yeomanry (Royal Bucks Hussars), att. 9th Lancers, 9th and yst. s. of the late Pascoe Du Pre Grenfell, Brazilian I.N., and nephew of Francis Wallace, 1st Baron grenfell, P.C., G.C.B., G.C.M.G., Field Marshal; b. Hatchlands, Guildford, 4 Sept. 1880; educ. Eton; received a commission as Lieut. in the Royal Bucks Hussars, 1 Sept. 1908, and was promoted Capt. Aug. 1914; served with the Expeditionary froce in France and Flanders from 18 Aug., att. to the 9th Lancers, and was killed in action at Vendresse during the Battle of the Aisne, 14 Sept. 1914; unm. He was one of the best known players in English polo. He was a member of the Hurlington Committee, which is the governing body of the game, and was among the best Nos. 1 in English polo during the past decade. He played twice in English teams that beat Ireland, and was No. 1 in the Roehampton side that won the Championship Cup in 1909, while three years before he was one of the Freebooters who secured the championship. In 1909 he organised an Old Etonians team, which played a prominent part in London polo. With his twi brother, Francis, he played in the final match for the House Football Cup in 1898, when Durnford's won by a narrow margin. He was whip of the Beagles, Francis being Mast of the BEagles at Eaton. He was founder, Chairman and Treasurer of the Islington branch of the Invalid Children's Aid Association and a Memorial Fund is being raised to endow this branch, now called the Francis and Rivy Grenfell Branch. His twin brother and his two cousins were also killed in action in the European War, while his elder brother, Pascoe St. Leger, was killed in the Matabele War, 1896, and his seventh brother, Robert Septimus, Lieut. 12th Lancers, was killed at Omdurman, 4 Sept. 1898.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

CAPTAIN RIVERSDALE NONUS GRENFELL, BUCKINGHAMSHIRE YEOMANRY (ROYAL BUCKS HUSSARS), attd. 9th LANCERS, was killed in action on the 14th September, 1914, at the beginning of the Battle of the Aisne. He was the ninth son of Mr. Pascoe Dupre Grenfell, of Wilton Park, Beaconsfield, Bucks, and a nephew of Field-Marshal Lord Grenfell. He was born on the 4th September, 1880, was educated at Eton, and joined the Royal Bucks Hussars in September, 1908, becoming Captain in August, 1914. He was well known as a fine polo player, and was a member of the “Old Etonian” team that won the Champion Cup in 1907. While on a visit to his twin brother in India he won the Kadir Cup. Captain Grenfell was a member of the Turf and Bath Clubs, was very interested in philanthropy, and organised a branch of the Invalid Children's Aid Association at Islington. One of his brothers, Lieutenant R. S. Grenfell, 12th Lancers, was killed in action at Omdurman, and his twin brother, Captain Francis Octavius Grenfell,V.C., 9th Lancers, after being twice wounded, fell in action at Ypres on the 24th May, 1915.

GROSVENOR

Lord Hugh William

Captain, 1st Life Guards, Household Cavalry. Killed in action 25th October 1914. Aged 30. Son of the 1st Duke of Westminster and Katharine Duchess of Westminster; husband of Lady Hugh Grosvenor (now Lady Mabel Hamilton Stubber), of 9, Southwick Crescent, London. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 3.

GULL

Francis William Lindley

Major, 1st Battalion attached 13th Battalion, Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own). Killed in action 25th August 1918. Aged 28. Son of the late Sir William Cameron Gull, 2nd Bart., and the Hon. Lady Gull; husband of Mrs. F. W. I. Gull (now the Hon. Mrs. R. Morgan Grenville). Buried in ACHIET-LE-GRAND COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Pas de Calais, France. Plot III. Row A. Grave 16.

GUNNER

John Hugh

Captain, Hampshire Yeomanry (Carabiniers) attached 15th Battalion, Hampshire Regiment. Died of wounds 9th August 1918. Aged 34. Son of Charles Richards Gunner, of Bishop's Waltham, Hants; husband of Dorothy Gunner, of S, Warren Rd., Bournemouth. Buried in LA CLYTTE MILITARY CEMETERY, Heuvelland, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot VI. Row C. Grave 7. See also Bishop's Waltham War Memorial

Extract from CricInfo:

Born at Bishops Waltham on May 17, 1884, the son of C.R. Gunner who played one match for Hampshire in 1878. He was educated at Marlborough, where he was captain in 1902, and Trinity College, Oxford, but did not play first-class cricket for the University. He played in six matches for Hampshire in 1906 and 1907, scoring 65 runs with a highest of 32. A Captain in the Yeomanry, attached to the Hampshire Regiment, he died of wounds at Kemmel, Belgium, on August 9, 1918, aged 34.

HADOW

Arthur de Salis

Colonel, 10th Battalion, Alexandra, Princess of Wales's Own (Yorkshire Regiment). Killed in action 27th September 1915. Buried in ST. PATRICK'S CEMETERY, LOOS, Pas de Calais, France. Plot III. Row G. Grave 8.

HALLIDAY

John Alexander

Captain, 11th (Prince Albert's Own) Hussars. Died 13th November 1914. Aged 39. Buried in north-west part of ALL SAINTS CHURCHYARD, CHICKLADE, Wiltshire.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

HALLIDAY, JOHN ALEXANDER, Capt., 11th Hussars, eldest s. of the late John Halliday, of Chicklade House, co. Wilts (d. 13 Feb. 1915), by his wife, Maria (d. 25 Feb. 1916), dau. of Richard Brown, of Ebbw Vale, Monmouth; b. 10 April, 1875; educ. Harrow and Trinity College, Cambridge; was gazetted 2nd Lieut. from Militia to the 11th Hussars, then in India, 5 Jan. 1898, and promoted Lieut. 3 March, 1900, and Capt. 18 March, 1905; served in the South African War on the Staff as Special Service Officer, 25 July to 22 Aug. 1901, and as Signalling Officer, 23 Aug. 1901 to 14 June, 1902 (Queen's Medal with five clasps); was Adjutant 11th Hussars, and afterwards of the Leicestershire Yeomanry; went to France with the Expeditionary Force, 15 Aug. 1914; served through the retreat from Mons, the Battle of the Marne. the 1st Battle of Ypres, &c., and died in the Duchess of Westminster's Hospital at Le Touquet, 13 Nov. 1914, of wounds received in action at Messines, 31 Oct. previously; unm. Capt. Halliday was a good all-round athlete. and was in both cricket and football elevens at Harrow; capt. of the Gymnasium eight; champion heavy weight boxer for the Public Schools Competition at Aldershot, 1894, and threw the hammer for Cambridge in the University Sports, 1896-7. He was well known in the hunting-field in Ireland and South Wiltshire.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

CAPTAIN JOHN ALEXANDER HALLIDAY, 11th HUSSARS, son of the late John Halliday, of Chicklade House, Salisbury, was born in London on the 10th April, 1875. He was educated at Harrow, where, in 1893, he was in the School Cricket XI, in 189.2- 93 in the Football XI, won the second prize for heavy- weight boxing in the Public Schools' Competition in 1893, and the first prize for the same in 1894. He then went to Trinity College, Cambridge; where he won the hammer-throwing prize at the Inter-'Varsity Sports in 1897.

Captain Halliday joined the 11th Hussars in March, 1898, becoming Lieutenant in March, 1900, and obtaining his troop in March, 1903. He took part in the South African War in 1901 on special service, and afterwards on the Staff, as signalling officer. He was present at operations in the Transvaal, Orange River and Cape Colonies, receiving the Queen's medal with five clasps. From April, 1908, to February, 1911, he was Adjutant of his Regiment, and from March, 1911, to February, 1914, Adjutant of the Leicestershire Yeomanry.

In the Great War he was with his Regiment during the retirement from Mons, and was fatally wounded at Messines on the 31st October. dying from the effects in the Duchess of Westminster's Hospital at Le Touquet on the 13th November, 1914.

Captain Halliday, who was a member of the Cavalry Club and of the M.C.C. and I Zingari, was well known in the hunting field in Ireland, where he hunted for twelve consecutive seasons.

HAMILTON, C.B., C.V.O., D.S.O.

Hubert Ion Wetherall

Major-General, commanding 3rd Division, General Staff. Killed in action 14th October 1914. Aged 54. Son of Lt. Gen. Henry Meade Hamilton, C.B. Awarded the Distinguished Service order (D.S.O.). Buried in ST. MARTIN CHURCHYARD, CHERITON, Kent.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

MAJOR-GENERAL HUBERT ION WETHERALL HAMILTON, C.V.O., G.B., D.S.O., p.s.c., who was killed in action on the 14th October, 1914, and who, when the Great War broke out, was commanding the IIIrd Division Field Troops (Regular) at Bulford, was the third son of Major-General Henry Meade Hamilton, and a brother of General Sir Bruce Hamilton, K.C.B., K.C.V.O.

He was born on the 27th June, 1861, and entered the 2nd Foot (now the Royal West Surrey Regiment) in 1880, and was Adjutant of his battalion from 1886 to 1890. Major-General Hamilton, who was a Staff College graduate, had seen much active service, and held several Staff appointments. He served in the Burmese Expedition, 1886-88, receiving the medal with two clasps. He was A.D.C. from 1896-97 to the Major-General, 3rd Infantry Brigade, Aldershot, and to the Lieutenant-General, Infantry Division, South Africa, from 1899-1900. He was with the Nile Expeditions of 1897 and 1898, including the Battles of Atbara and Khartoum, for the first of which he received the Egyptian medal with clasp, and for the second was mentioned twice in Despatches, and had two additional clasps.

From 1897-9 he was employed with the Egyptian Army, in the latter year as D.A.G. in operations in the first advance against the Khalif a, receiving the D.S.O. and an additional clasp to his Egyptian medal. He was on the Staff as D.A.A.G., A.A.G., and Military Secretary to the General Officer Commanding-in-Chief the Forces in South Africa from January, 1900, to June 1902, during the South African War, being present at operations in the Orange Free State, including operations at Paardeberg, in the Transvaal, including actions near Johannesburg and Pretoria; at further operations in the Transvaal, Orange River Colony, Cape Colony, and on the Zululand frontier of Natal. He was mentioned three times in Despatches and promoted to a half-pay Lieutenant-Colonelcy. He also received the Queen's medal with four clasps and the King's medal with two clasps. During the year 1902 he was employed specially at the headquarters of the Army, and as Military Secretary to the Commander-in-Chief, East Indies. In June of the same year he was appointed A.D.C. to the King.

From 1906-09 he served as Brigadier-General 7th Brigade, Southern Command, and Major-General on the General Staff in the Mediterranean. In January, 1911, he was appointed G.O.C., North Midland Division, Northern Command, and in June, 1914, to the command at Bulford.

In the Great War Major-General Hamilton commanded a Division. The following account of his death was published in "The Times" as given by a distinguished officer and personal friend: “General Hamilton was standing with a group of others in a covered place when a shell burst about one hundred yards off, and he was hit on the temple by a bullet and killed on the spot. No one else was touched. It was a fine death,” adds the writer, “but I know how he would feel that he was taken before his work was done. All day we could not get near the place where he was lying owing to heavy shell fire, but at dusk we went out and carried him to a little church near by. Just as we got there the attack began violently, so that we could not hear the Chaplain's voice for musketry and pom-pom fire close by. Flashes from the guns lit us up now and then, but no other light than a tiny torch for the parson to see to read by. He was doing so splendidly that it was cruel luck that he should have been the one taken out of the group.” Major-General Hamilton was mentioned in Sir John French's Despatch of the 14th January, 1915.

A brass tablet to his memory is placed in the chancel of St. Peter's Church, Marchington, Uttoxeter.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

HAMILTON, HUBERT ION WETHERALL, C.V.O., C.B., D.S.O., Major-General, Commanding the 3rd Division Field Troops, 3rd s. of Major-General Henry Meade Hamilton; b. 27 June, 1880; gazetted 2nd Lieut. 2nd Foot (now the Royal West Surrey Regt.) 11 Aug. 1880: promoted Lieut. 1 July, 1881, Capt. 8 Dec. 1890, Major 20 July, 1898, Lieut.-Col. 29 Nov. 1900, Brevet Col. 26 June, 1902, Col. 28 Nov. following, and Major-General 23 June, 1909; served (1) in the Burmese Expedition 1886-88 (Medal with two clasps): (2) in the Nile Expedition 1897 (Egyptian Medal with clasp); (3) in the Nile Expedition 1898 (mentioned in Despatches [London Gazettes. 24 May, and 30 Sept. 1898]; two clasps to Egyptian Medal; Medal and D.S.O.); (4) in the, Nile Expedition 1899 (clasp to Egyptian Medal); (5) in the South African War 1899-1902 (mentioned in Despatches [London Gazettes, 8 Feb. and 16 April, 1901, and 29 July, 1902]; promoted Lieut.-Col. half-pay; A.D.C. to the King with brevet of Col.; Queen's Medal with four clasps and Ring's Medal with two clasps). From 31 Jan. 1906, to 11 Oct. 1908, he was Brigadier-General, 7th Brigade, Southern Command, and from 12 Oct. 1908, to 31 July, 1909, was Major-General on the General Staff in the Mediterranean, being appointed G.O.C. North Midland Division, Northern Command, 7 Jan. 1911, and to the command at Bulford in June, 1914; served (6) with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders, where he commanded a Division, and was killed in action 14 Oct. 1914. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 17 Feb. 1915] by F.M. Sir John (now Lord) French, for gallant and distinguished service in the field.

Extract from Distinguished Service Order 1886-1915 published by Naval & Military Press:

HAMILTON, HUBERT ION WETHERALL, Major, was born 27 June, 1861; entered the Queen's Regt. in 1880; was Adjutant, 1886-90; served in the Burmese Expedition, 1886-88; received Medal with two clasps. He served in the Nile Expedition of 1897, and received Egyptian Medal with clasp; in the Expedition of 1898, and was present at the Battles of the Atbara and Khartoum; mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 24 May and 80 Sept. 1898]; received two clasps to Egyptian Medal, and also Medal; was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 15 Nov. 1898]; "Hubert Ion Wetherall Hamilton, Major, Royal West Surrey Regt. In recognition of services in Egypt and the Sudan, including, the Battles of Atbara and Khartoum." The Insignia were sent to G.O.C., Egypt, 9 Dec. 1898, and presented by the Duke of Connaught at Omdurman 19 Feb. 1899). Capt. Hamilton was promoted Major in 1898; served in the Nile Expedition, 1899, as D.A.G.; in operations in first advance against Khalifa, and received a clasp to the Egyptian Medal. He served in South Africa, 1899-1902, as D.A.A.G., during operations in the Orange Free State, Feb. to May, 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 Feb.); during operations in the Trans­vaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg and Pretoria; during operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 Nov. 1900; during operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 29 Nov. 1900; in the operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 Nov. 1900; during operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900; operations in the Transvaal, Orange River Colony; on the Zululand Frontier of Natal and in Cape Colony 30 Nov 1900, to 31 May, 1902; mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 Feb. and 16 April, 1901, and 29 July, 1902]. Promoted Lieutenant-Colonel (half-pay); A.D.C. to the King with Brevet of Colonel. He received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps; A.A.G., Army Headquarters, South Africa, in 1900. From 1900 to 1902 he was Military Secretary to General Lord Kitchener, Commander-in-Chief, South Africa. He was Military Secretary to General Lord Kitchener, Com­mander-in-Chief, India, 1902-5; was created a C.B. in 1906; commanded the 7th Brigade, 1906-8; became Major-General, General Staff, Medi­terranean Command, 1908-9; was created a C.V.O. in 1909, and a K.C.B. in 1914. Sir Hubert Hamilton was killed in action 14 Oct. 1914, at La Couture, France.

Lord Ernest Hamilton, in "The First Seven Divisions" (page 146), says; "Sir Hubert Hamilton, the Divisional General, . . . came along on foot to inspect the trenches, disregarding warnings as to the great danger he was running. He proceeded on foot down the Richebourg Road, which was swept by shell fire, in company with Capt. Strutt, commanding the Royal Scots, and was almost immediately killed by a shell, Capt. Strutt, being at the same time rendered unconscious. The General's A.D.C. Capt. Thorp, ran forward and knelt by Sir Hubert's body, trying to screen it from the shells which were now falling thickly on the road. Capt. Strutt shortly afterwards recovered consciousness, but was almost immediately wounded by another shell, and the command of the Royal Scots devolved upon Lieut. Cazenove."

An obituary notice of General Hamilton appeared in the "Times" of 19 Oct. 1914.

HAMMANS

A W

Major, Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry. Died 13th June 1916. Aged 72. Son of Jane Fellows; husband of Mary Josephine Hammans. Served in the Burma Campaign (1892-93). Buried in ST. THOMAS OF CANTERBURY CHURCHYARD, GORING, Oxfordshire.

HANBURY

Evan Robert

Major, Leicestershire Yeomanry (Territorial) attached 14th Battalion, Machine Gun Corps (Infantry). Killed in action 24th March 1918. Aged 30. Son of Mrs. Hanbury, of Braunston Manor, Oakham, Rutland, and the late Evan Hanbury; husband of Sophia Olave Murray Graham (formerly Hanbury), of 15, Mansfield St., Portland Place, London. No known grave. Commemorated on POZIERES MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Panel 6.

HARDY

Guy John Meredith

Lieutenant, 3rd Battalion, Coldstream Guards. Died of wounds 1st August 1917. Aged 35. Only son of Edith Hardy, of 28, Harcourt Terrace, Redcliffe Square, London, and the late G. Meredith Hardy. Buried in DOZINGHEM MILITARY CEMETERY, Poperinge, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot II. Row I. Grave 27.

HARGREAVES, D.S.O.

Alan Knyveton

Captain, 2nd Battalion, Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own). Killed in action 9th May 1915. Aged 33. Son of Reginald G. and Alice Hargreaves, of Cuffnells, Lyndhurst, Hants. His brother is listed below. Awarded the Distinguished Service order (D.S.O.). Buried in LE TROU AID POST CEMETERY, FLEURBAIX, Pas de Calais, France. Plot/Row/Section R. Grave 3.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

HARGREAVES, ALAN KNYVETON, D.S.O., Capt., 3rd Battn. The Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own), eldest s. of Reginald Gervis Hargreaves, of Cuffnells, Lyndhurst, by his wife, Alice Pleasance, dau. of the Very Rev. Henry George Liddell, Dean of Christ Church; and brother to Capt. L. R. Hargreaves (q.v.); b. Cuffnells, Lyndhurst, co. Hants, 25 Oct. 1891; educ. Eton, and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst; gazetted 2nd Lieut. Rifle Brigade 11 Aug. 1900; promoted Lieut. 15 Jan. 1902, and Capt. 22 Jan. 1910; served in the South African War, 1902; took part in the operations in Orange River Colony, Jan. to 31 May, 1902, and those in Cape Colony, Jan. 1902 (Queen's Medal with three clasps); acted as Adjutant to 4th Battn. from 15 Dec. 1910, to 14 Dec. 1913; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from Sept. 1914; was wounded near Hazebrouck the following month; rejoined his Regiment in March, and was killed in action at Fromelles 9 May, 1915. Buried near there. He was awarded the D.S.O. [London Gazette, 24 March, 1915], in recognition of his services with the Expeditionary Force.

Extract from Distinguished Service Order 1886-1915 published by Naval & Military Press:

HARGREAVES, ALAN KNYVETON, Capt., entered the Rifle Brigade 11 Aug. 1900; became Lieutenant 15 Jan. 1902, and Captain 24 March, 1910. He served in the South African War, 1902; took part in the operations in Orange River Colony, Jan. to 31 May, 1902; also in Cape Colony, Jan. 1902 (Queen's Medal with three clasps). Capt. Hargreaves served in the European War from 1914, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 18 Feb. 1915]: "Alan Hargreaves, Capt., The Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own). For services in connection with operations in the field." He was killed in action 9 May, 1915.

   

Alan (above) and Leopold's (below) mother, Alice Liddell was the inspiration for Charles Dodgson/Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland. Their father Reginald Gervis Hargreaves (1852-1926) was an English cricketer who played first class cricket for Hampshire. He also played at first class level for the MCC, an England XI, Gentlemen of England, I Zingari and AW Ridley’s XI.

HARGREAVES, M.C.

Leopold Reginald

Captain, Irish Guards. Died of wounds 25th September 1916. Aged 33. Son of Reginald G. and Alice Hargreaves, of Cuffnells, Lyndhurst, Hants. His brother is listed above. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). Buried in GUILLEMONT ROAD CEMETERY, GUILLEMONT, Somme, France. Plot I. Row C. Grave 4.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

HARGREAVES, LEOPOLD REGINALD, M.C., Capt., 1st Battn. Irish Guards, eldest surv. s. of Reginald Gervis Hargreaves, of Cuffnells, Lyndhurst, by his wife, Alice Pleasance, dau. of the Very Rev. Henry George Liddell, Dean of Christ Church; and brother to Capt. A. K. Hargreaves, D.S.O. (q.v.); b. Cuffnells, Lyndhurst, Hants, Jan. 1883; educ. Eton, and Christ Church, Oxford; was formerly in business in Canada; joined the army 15 Aug. 1914; gazetted Lieut. 1st Battn. Irish Guards 23 Dec. 1914; served at the front in France from Nov. 1914, to Nov. 1915, when he was invalided home; returned to France in Aug. 1916, and was killed in action at Les Boeufs 25 Sept. 1916. He was awarded the Military Cross: unm.

Further information kindly supplied by Marrietta from the Great War Forum.

Known as Reginald or Rex, he made his first-class debut for Hampshire against Kent at Catford Bridge in June 1875, scoring 9 and 1 and taking no wickets as Kent won by an innings inside two days. His next game, against Sussex in the only first-class match ever played on the Green Jackets Ground in Winchester, saw another innings defeat for Hampshire, but he claimed his first wickets by taking 3/86 in the first innings.

Reginald Hargreaves' career-best score came while playing for an England XI against Cambridge University in 1877; he top-scored with 46 in the English first innings to help set up a four-wicket victory. With the ball, he took four wickets on just one occasion, recording figures of 4/55 for Hampshire against Derbyshire in July 1878; Hampshire was nevertheless once again beaten by an innings.

His last two first-class appearances came two years apart. In August 1883, he played for Hampshire against Somerset at the Antelope Ground in Southampton, and was dismissed in the second innings by Edward *******. Hargreaves' final match at this level, in August 1885, was once more against Somerset, once again at Southampton, but this time the venue was the County Ground, enjoying its first season of use. Once more (in the first innings) he was dismissed by *******, though Hargreaves ended his career by being run out in the second.

At the time of his death, Reginald was a vice-president of Hampshire CCC. His sons were members of the MCC.

The first name of "Rex" was Leopold after Queen Victoria's son Prince Leopold who was interested in the young Alice. Leopold named his first child Alice.

HATFEILD, M.C.

Charles Eric

[Spelt HATFIELD on SDGW] Captain, 10th (Royal East Kent Yeomanry) Battalion, The Buffs (East kent Regiment). Killed in action 21st September 1918. Aged 31. Born 11th March 1887, Hartsdown, Margate, Kent. Son of M. H. S. Hatfeild, of Hartsdown, Margate, and the late Capt. C. T. Hatfeild (King''s Dragoon Guards). Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). Buried in HARGICOURT COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Aisne, France. Plot/Row/Section C. Grave 11.

See his statistics on CricInfo

HEATHCOAT-AMORY, MiD

Ludovic

Captain, Royal 1st Devon Yeomanry attached to 32nd Division H.Q. Died of wounds 25th August 1918. Aged 37. Born 11th May 1881, Westminster, London. Son of Sir John Heathcoat Amory, of Knightshayes, Tiverton; husband of Mary Stuart Heathcoat Amory, of Chevithorne Barton, Tiverton, Devon. Mentioned in Despatches (MiD). Buried in DAOURS COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Somme, France. Plot VI. Row B. Grave 2.

See his statistics on CricInfo

HEDDERWICK

Ronald Young

Private 1113, Honourable Artillery Company (Infantry). Killed in action 16th May 1915. Aged 27. Born and resident Eltham, enlisted Armoury House. Son of Robert Munter Hedderwick and Isabel Corbet Hedderwick, of Woodlands, Chislehurst, Kent. Buried in VOORMEZEELE ENCLOSURE No. 3, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot XIV. Row H. Grave 5.

HELME

Thomas Herbert

Captain, 16th (County of London) Battalion (Queen's Westminter Rifles), London Regiment). Died of wounds 3rd November 1918. Aged 35. Son of Herbert and Annie Helme, of "Downside", Salvington, Worthing, Sussex. Born at Cobham, Surrey. Buried north-east of the church in LITTLE BOOKHAM CHURCHYARD, Surrey. Also listed on the Worthing War Memorial

HENTY

George Herbert

Major, 7th Battalion, Suffolk Regiment. Killed in action 30th November 1917. No known grave. Commemorated on CAMBRAI MEMORIAL, LOUVERVAL, Nord, France. Panel 4.

HEYWORTH, C.B., D.S.O.

Frederic James

Brigadier-General, commanding 3rd Guards Brigade, General Staff formerly Scots Guards. Killed in action 9th May 1916. Aged 53. Husband of Violet Heyworth, of Biddlesden Park, Brackley, Northants. Awarded the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.). Buried in BRANDHOEK MILITARY CEMETERY, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot II. Row C. Grave 2.

Extract from Distinguished Service Order 1886-1915 published by Naval & Military Press:

HEYWORTH, FREDERIC JAMES, Major, was born 25 March, 1863. He entered the Scots Guards 5 Dec. 1883; served in the Sudan, 1885 (Medal with clasp, and Khedive's Star); was A.D.C. to Brigadier-General, Curragh, 1 April, 1890, to 30 April, 1891; A.D.C. to Major-General, Dublin District, 1 May, 1891, to 31 March, 1895; was promoted Captain 29 July, 1896; became Major 7 March, 1900. Major Hepworth served in the South African War, 1899-1902, taking part in the advance on Kimberley, including the actions at Belmont, Enslin, Modder River and Magersfontein; operations in the Orange Free State, Feb. to May, 1900, including actions at Poplar Grove, Dreifontein, Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 Nov. 1900, including action at. Belfast (26 and 27 Aug.); operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 29 Nov. 1900; operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 Nov. 1900. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 Sept. 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 Oct. 1901]: "Frederic James Heyworth, Major, Scots Guards. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa." The Insignia were presented by the King 24 Oct. 1902. He was promoted Lieut.-Colonel 1 April, 1908, and Colonel 6 Dec. 1911. He was Colonel, Scots Guards and Regimental District, 9 Oct. 1913. In 1913 he married Mrs. Hatfeild-Harter. Colonel Heyworth served in the European War from 1914; was Temporary Brigadier-General from 13 Nov. 1914, and was killed in action, and an obituary notice of him appeared in the "Times" of 17 May, 1916.

HICHENS

James Bryan

Lieutenant, 16th Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Killed in action 16th July 1916. Aged 43. Son of the late John Knill Jope Hichens and Mary Helen Hichens. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 13 A and 13 B.

HIGGINBOTHAM

Charles Ernest

Major, 2nd Battalion, Northamptonshire Regiment. Killed in action 11th March 1915. Aged 48. Born 4th July 1866, Charing Cross, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland. Son of Mr. and Mrs. C. T. Higginbotham, of Craigmaddie, Milngavie, Glasgow. No known grave. Commemorated on LE TOURET MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 28 to 30.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 2:

MAJOR CHARLES ERNEST HIGGINBOTHAM, 2nd BATTN. THE NORTHAMPTONSHIRE REGIMENT, was the Senior Major in the Line battalions of his Regiment when he was killed in action at Neuve Chapelle on the 12th March, 1916.

The second son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Higginbotham, of Craigmaddie, Milngavie, he was born on the 4th July, 1866, and was educated at Rugby and at the R.M.C., Sandhurst, whence he received his first appointment in the Northamptonshire Regiment in February, 1887, becoming Lieutenant in April, 1890, and Captain in January, 1899. From July of that year to July of 1902 he was Superintendent of Gymnasia, Western District; from November, 1903, to May, 1904, District Assistant Adjutant-General (temporary) South Africa; and from the latter date to May, 1907, was Staff Captain, Standerton Sub-District, South Africa.

He received his Majority in June, 1907, and from September, 1909, to August, 1913, was Superintendent of Gymnasia, Aldershot Command. He was at one time Captain of the Aldershot Cricket XI, and did much to encourage love of sport among both officers and men, and “was a sportsman in every sense of the word."

His Commanding Officer, writing of him from France after his death, said: “Had he alone survived I should have been content for the future of the Regiment." Major Higginbotham married, in 1890, Florence Hopkins, who died in Africa in 1906. In 1909 he married Lucy Frances Gray, fourth daughter of the Right Honourable James Round, who predeceased him by a few days, leaving no family.

As a sportsman, Major Higginbotham's interests covered a wide ground, and included shooting, hockey, golf, skating, lawn tennis, rackets, and (in his younger days) football and running, but cricket was essentially his game. He belonged to the “Rag” (Army and Navy), M.C.C., and innumerable other cricket clubs, including “Butterflies” and “Incogniti.”

See his statistics on CricInfo

HILL, D.S.O., M.V.O.

Hugh

Major (Brevt Lt.-Col.), Royal Wlesh Fusliers and G.S.O.I., General Staff. Killed in action 10th September 1916. Aged 41. Son of Katharine Shepperson (formerly Hill), of 8, Cresswell Gardens, South Kensington, London, and the late James Eardley Hill (Barrister at law). Awarded the Distiguished Service Order (D.S.O.) and Member of the Royal Victorian Order (M.V.O.). Buried in BETHUNE TOWN CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot III. Row K. Grave 40.

Extract from Distinguished Service Order 1886-1915 published by Naval & Military Press:

HILL, HUGH, Major, was born 16 May, 1875, the only son of the late James Eardley Hill, Barrister-at-Law, and Mrs. Gerald Shepperson, of 45, Argyll Road, Kensington, W., and Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire ; and grandson of the late Sir Hugh Hill, Judge of the High Court, He was educated at Lockers Park, Rugby, and at Sandhurst. On passing out of Sandhurst he was gazetted to the Royal Welsh Fusiliers. He served in the South African War from 1899 to 1900, and was rewarded for his services in this campaign with the Queen's Medal with two clasps. He was promoted Captain in 1903, and was Adjutant of his Regiment from 1904 to 1907. In 1905 he was appointed an honorary Aide-de-Camp to the Prince of Wales during his tour in India, and was afterwards made an M.V.O. In 1906 he was Aide-de-Camp (extra) to Lord Minto, in connection with the visit to Agra of the Amir of Afghanistan. He passed the Staff College, Quetta, in 1909. As extra Aide-de-Camp, he was on the Staff of the King for the Durbar and the subsequent tour. He was promoted Major in 1913, and as Brigade Major to the Jullundur Brigade accompanied the Indian contingent to France at the outbreak of the European War. He subsequently became D.A.A. and Q.M.G., and later A.Q.M.G., with temporary rank of Lieutenant-Colonel. In 1915 he was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 23 June, 1915] : "Hugh Hill, M.V.O., Major, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. For distinguished service in the field." He was appointed G.S.O. (1st grade) in 1915, and given the Brevet of Lieutenant-Colonel in May, 1916. During the war Lieutenant-Colonel Hill was mentioned three times in Despatches. He fell in action 10 Sept. 1916. "He did not know what fear was. The men, too, recognized what a fine character his was, and the words of a Scottish sergeant, who was the first to go to him after he was hit, were: 'A fine soldier, sir.'" A touching memorial service for Colonel Hill was held at Christ Church, Lancaster Gate, W., among those present being Major-General Sir Francis Lloyd (Commanding the Home District), Colonel of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, attended by Lieut. the Earl of Stamford; General Hudson, to whose division Colonel Hill was Senior Staff Officer, and several officers of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers. He was a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society.

HILL

Richard Alexander

Lieutenant, 138th Heavy Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery. Killed in action 11th April 1917. Aged 40. Son of John and Florence Jameson Hill. Buried in AIX-NOULETTE COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Pas de Calais, France. Plot I. Row C. Grave 1.

HINE-HAYCOCK

Ralph Hugn

Captain, 1st Battalion attached 10th Battalion, King's Own (Yorkshire Light Infantry). Killed in action 3rd May 1917. Aged 35. Son of Ralph Watson Hine-Haycock and Margaret Emily Hine-Haycock, of Core Hill, Sidmouth. Buried in HENIN COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Pas de Calais, France. Plot I. Row B. Grave 4.

HOARE

Vincent Robertson

Major, 12th (County of London) Battalion (The Rangers), London Regiment. Killed in action by shrapnel 15th February 1915. Aged 41. Husband of E. F. Hoare, of Milton House, Berkhamsted. Buried in YPRES TOWN CEMETERY EXTENSION, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot III. Row A. Grave 7.

HODGSON

Maurice Kirkham

Captain, 1st Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Died of wounds 12th March 1915. Aged 34. Son of Robert Kirkman Hodgson and of Lady Norah Janet Hodgson, of 77, Eaton Square, London. Buried in ESTAIRES COMMUNAL CEMETERY AND EXTENSION, Nord, France. Plot II. Row H. Grave 7.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 2:

CAPTAIN MAURICE KIRKMAN HODGSON, 1st BATTN. THE SHERWOOD FORESTERS, (NOTTINGHAMSHIRE AND DERBYSHIRE REGIMENT), son of Robert Kirkman Hodgson and Lady Norah Hodgson, daughter of the ninth Earl of Cork, was born at 36, Dover Street, London, on the 23rd October, 1880.

He was educated at Radley College, and after serving with the embodied Militia for nearly a year was gazetted to the Sherwood Foresters (then the Derbyshire Regiment) in November, 1900. He served in the South African War, having been for three months, in 1901, Garrison Transport Officer. He was present at operations in the Transvaal in 1902, and was slightly wounded. He received the Queen's medal with three clasps and the King's medal with two clasps. He was promoted Lieutenant in April, 1902; from February, 1907, to January, 1910, was Adjutant of his battalion; and was promoted Captain in December, 1908. In the war with Germany he was wounded at La Bassée, but remained on duty, and was again wounded at Neuve Chapelle, France, from the effects of which he died on the 12th March, 1915.

His elder brother, Captain M. R. Kirkman Hodgson, 2nd Battalion, Royal Fusiliers, was killed in action on the 17th March, 1915.

HODGSON

Reginald Drury

Captain, 82nd Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Killed in action 21st March 1918. Aged 38. Brother of Mr. B. H. Hodgson, of 6, Keble Rd., Oxford. No known grave. Commemorated on POZIERES MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Panel 7 to 10.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

HODGSON, REGINALD DRURY, Capt., 82nd Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, yst. s. of the late Henry John Hodgson, Master of the Supreme Court of Judicature, by his wife, Amy Josephine (6, Keble Road, Oxford), dau. of the Venerable Archdeacon Drury; b. South Kensington, London, S.W., 18 Dec. 1879; educ. Bilton Grange, Rugby; Radley College, and University College, Oxford (Honours in Mods., Lit. Hum.); was a Barrister-at-Law; went to Vancouver, British Columbia, in 1911, and became a member of the Columbian Bar; volunteered for active service on the outbreak of war, and was gazetted 2nd Lieut. The Royal Field Artillery in Oct. 1914; promoted Lieut. 19 Dec. following, and Capt. 26 Feb. 1916; served with the Expeditionary Forces in Egypt, Serbia and Salonika from 1915; proceeded to France 16 Nov. 1917, being attached to the 82nd Brigade there, and was killed in action at the battle between Arras and Le Fire 21 March, 1918; unm.

HODGSON

Richard Eveleigh

Lieutenant, 204 Squadron, Royal Air Force formerly 4th Battalion, The King's (Liverpool Regiment). Died 15th September 1918. Aged 24. Son of Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Hodgson, of Flat 3, 4, Bodorgan Rd., Bournemouth. Resident of Sherborne, Dorset. Buried in COXYDE MILITARY CEMETERY, Koksijde, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot II. Row K. Grave 17.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

HODGSON, RICHARD EVELEIGH, Lieut., 4th (Extra Reserve) Battn. The Ring's Liverpool Regt., attd. Royal Air Force, elder s. of Charles Herbert Hodgson, of Wharton, Sherborne, Assistant Master of Sherborne School, by his wife, Leonora Mary Cecilia, dau. of the Rev. G. E. Saunders; and brother to Capt. F. H. Hodgson (q.v.); b. Sherborne, 11 March, 1894; educ. St. Christopher's, Eastbourne; Sherborne School, and New College, Oxford; gazetted 2nd Lieut. The King's (Liverpool Regt.) in Sept. 1914; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from the following May; was invalided to England in April, 1917, to undergo an operation for appendicitis; on recovery joined the Royal Air Force; obtained his Wings in July, 1918; returned to France the following Aug., and was killed in action near Dunkirk 16 Sept. 1918. Buried at Coxyde. Lieut. Hodgson won an Entrance Scholarship to Sherborne School in 1908; was head of the School and captain of the Cricket Eleven in 1912-13, and won a Leaving Exhibition in 1913; was also a Member of the M.C.C.

HOLBECH

William Hugh

Lieutenant, Reserve of Officers and 2nd Battalion, Scots Guards. Died 1st November 1914. Aged 32. Born 18th August 1882, Murray Bay, Quebec, Canada. Son of Mary Holbech, of The Cottage, Farnborough, Banbury, Oxon, and the late Lt. Col. W. H. Holbech (K.R.R.C.). Buried against the north side of the tower in ST. BOTOLPH CHURCHYARD, FARNBOROUGH, Warwickshire.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 2:

LIEUTENANT WILLIAM HUGH HOLBECH, 2nd BATTN. SCOTS GUARDS, RESERVE OF OFFICERS, who died in hospital at Woolwich on the 1st November, 1914, of wounds received in action on the 25th October near Ypres, was born in August, 1882, and was appointed 2nd Lieutenant to the Scots Guards in January, 1902, being promoted Lieutenant in March, 1904. He joined the Reserve of Officers in February, 1907.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

HOLBECH, WILLIAM HUGH, of Farnborough Hall, co. Warwick, Lieut., 2nd Battn. Scots Guards, elder s. of the late Lieut.-Col. Walter Henry Holbech, King's Royal Rifles, and one of H.M.'s Hon. Corps of Gentlemen at Arms (who served in Red River Expedition, 1870; was Brigade Major, Egyptian Campaign, 1882, and was mentioned in Despatches, and died v.p., 6 March, 1901), by his wife Mary Caroline (The Grange, Farnborough, Banbury), widow of Lieut.-Col. Sir George Clay, 3rd Bart., and 4th dau. of Sir John Walrond Walrond, 1st Bart.; b. Murray Bay, Canada, 18 Aug. 1882; educ. Eton and Sandhurst; sue. his grandfather in the family property, 20 March, 1901; gazetted 2nd Lieut. 2nd Scots Guards, 30 April, 1902, and promoted Lieut 7 March, 1904; retired 20 Feb. 1907; and passed into the Reserve of Officers; joined the 3rd Scots Guards on the outbreak of war in Aug. 1911, transferred to his old Battn., the 2nd, 2 Oct., and went to France with it as part of the Seventh Division, two days later; reached the firing line on the 18th, took part in the first Battle of Ypres; was severely wounded at Kruseid on the night of the 25th, and died in the Herbert Hospital, Woolwich, 1 Nov. 1914; unm. Col. Bolton wrote: "From the time Willie joined us at Southampton until be was mortally wounded, he was one of the most cheery, unselfish, capable, and keenest of the officers in my Battn. We all deplore his loss more than I can say. I look back on both him and poor young Cottrell Dormer as two of the best officers in every way." Major Cator wrote: "He defended his trench all night at Kruseik when the Germans got through our line. He and Capt. Paynter had the Germans all round them and defended their trenches most gallantly—I only wish I could tell you more; in him we have lost a gallant soldier and a great friend."

See his statistics on CricInfo

HOLLAND

William Francis Claude

Captain, General List and 4th Battalion, Durham Light Infantry. Died 8th November 1917. Aged 52. Son of William James and Lizzie Holland; husband of the late Kate Gilbey Holland. Buried in ST. MARY CHURCHYARD, BIRCHANGER, Essex

HOLLOWAY

Bernard Henry

Captain, 9th Battalion, Royal Sussex Regiment. Killed in action 27th September 1915. Aged 27. Born 13th January 1888, Burntwood Grange, Wandsworth Common, London. Son of Sir Henry Holloway and Lady Holloway, of Draxmont, Wimbledon Hill, London. No known grave. Commemorated on LOOS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 69 to 73.

See his statistics on CricInfo

HOPLEY

Geoffrey William Van Der Byl

Second Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, Grenadier Guards and Special Reserve. Died of wounds 18th May 1918. Born 9th September 1891, Kimberley, Cape Province, South Africa. Buried in HARROW CEMETERY, Middlesex. Grave reference 19. I. 3306.

Extract from Wisden Cricketers' Almanack

Second Lieut. Geoffrey William Vanderbyl Hopley (2nd Battalion Grenadier Guards) died at the age of 23 on May 12 in the Military Hospital at Boulogne-sur-Mer, having been severely wounded in Flanders on February 3. He was in the Harrow Eleven in 1909 and 1910, in the latter season being second in the batting averages with 27.18. In his two matches against Eton he scored 1 and 23, 35 and 8. Proceeding to Cambridge, he obtained his Blue in 1912, making 14 and 6 not out v Oxford, but was unable to keep his place in either of the two following years. In 1914 he gave every promise of regaining a position in the side, scoring 29 and 120 in the Seniors' Match and 86 and 68 in a Trial game, but later he was quite out of form. In 1912 he won the heavyweight boxing for Cambridge. He was brother of Mr. FJV Hopley, and had been a member of the MCC since 1911.

HORNER

Edward William

Lieutenant, 18th (Queen Mary's Own) Hussars. Died of wounds 21st November 1917. Aged 28. Son of Sir John Horner, K.C.V.O., of Mells, Frome, Somerset, and of Frances, his wife. Educated Summerfields, Eton and Balliol College, Oxford, called to the Bar. Joined North Somerset Yeomanry in 1914 and was transf. to the 18th Hussars, 1915. Severely wounded May, 1915. Rejoined 1916. Buried in ROCQUIGNY-EQUANCOURT ROAD BRITISH CEMETERY, MANANCOURT, Somme, France. Plot I. Row E. Grave 23.

HOWLEY, D.S.O.

Jasper Joseph

[SDGW states 1st Battalion] Major, commanding 2nd Battalion, Lincolnshire Regiment. Killed in action by a shell 11th March 1915. Aged 46. Son of the late Lt.-Col. John Howley, D.L. Served in the South African war. Awarded the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.). Buried in RUE-PETILLON MILITARY CEMETERY, FLEURBAIX, Pas de Calais, France. Plot III. Row A. Grave 3.

Extract from Distinguished Service Order 1886-1915 published by Naval & Military Press:

HOWLEY, JASPER JOSEPH, Capt., was born 5 Aug. 1868, son of the late Lieut.-Colonel John Howley, D.L., of Rich Hill, Lisnagry, County Limerick. He was educated at Oscott College, and at Sandhurst, and joined the Lincolnshire Regt. 11 Feb. 1888, being promoted Lieutenant 9 July, 1890, and Captain 19 Nov. 1897. He served in the South African War, taking part in the operations in the Orange Free State, Feb. to May, 1900, including operations at Paardeberg ; was present at the actions at Poplar Grove, Karee Siding, Vet River and Zand River ; was on active service in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg and Pretoria. He was severely wounded was mentioned in Despatches twice [London Gazette, 8 Feb. and 10 Sept. 1901] ; awarded the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 Sept. 1901] : " Jasper Joseph Howley, Capt., Lincolnshire Regt. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa." The Insignia were presented by the King 17 Dec. 1901. Capt. Howley was Adjutant, Volunteers, 19 Jan. 1902, to 10 March, 1900, and was promoted to Major 11 March, 1900. He served in the European War, in the Lincolnshire Regt., accompanying the British Expeditionary Force to France. He fell at Neuve Chapelle 11 March, 1915, being killed instantaneously by a shell in the trench in the early morning while writing orders. His Colonel, Colonel McAndrew, had been killed the day before at almost the same hour, and Major Howley had taken over the command of the Regiment. Major Howley was a good cricketer, a member of the M.C.C. and Incogniti, rode well to hounds, and was a good shot. He was unmarried.

HUGHES-ONSLOW

Arthur

Major, C.O. Remounts, 10th (Prince of Wales's Own Royal) Hussars. Died 17th August 1914. Husband of Mrs. Arthur Hughes-Onslow, of Linda Vista, Abergavenny, Mon. Native of Alton Albany, Girvan, Ayrshire. Served in the Sudan and South African campaigns. Buried in STE. MARIE CEMETERY, LE HAVRE, Seine-Maritime, France. Division 64. Plot VI. Row B. Grave 1.

HUME

Edward Archibald

Captain, 7th Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment. Died of wounds 27th August 1915. Aged 36. Son of Edward Hume, Barrister-at-Law, and Agnes Mary Hume; husband of Violet Mary Hume, of 9, St. Leonard's Terrace, Chelsea, London. No known grave. Commemorated on HELLES MEMORIAL, Turkey. Panel 134 to 136.

HUNT

John Henry Sneyd

Second Lieutenant, 23rd (County of London) Battalion, London Regiment. Killed in action 16th September 1916. Aged 42. Born 24th November 1874, Kensington, London. Son of the late R. P. Carew Hunt, of 56, Queen's Gardens, London. Served from August, 1914. A Clerk in the Probate and Divorce Registry. Educated Winchester College and Oxford University. Formerly London Regiment (Prince of Wales' Own Civil Service Rifles). No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 9 D 9 C 13 C and 12 C.

See his statistics on CricInfo and extrcat from Wisden Cricketers' Almanack

Details with regard to the death of Mr. Hunt have never been published. Place and date are unknown, but his friends have long given up hope that he is sill alive. Mr. Hunt was a very good all-round cricketer and so full of enthusiasm for the game that he was more valuable on a side than many players of greater natural gifts. He was a very plucky punishing bat, a useful change bowler - right hand fast - and a brilliant fieldsman wherever he was placed. He played his first match for Middlesex in 1902--a disastrous year for the county--making his first appearance in the Whit-Monday fixture against Somerset. After an interval of over 15 years one recalls his undisguised delight when on being tried as second change, he took a wicket with the first ball he bowled. In his second innings he hit up 60, but in his four subsequent matches for Middlesex in 1902 he did next to nothing with either bat or ball. In 1903, however, when Middlesex won the County Championship he proved his worth as a batsman, getting an average of 27 with 57 as his highest score. It cannot be said that during his connection with Middlesex he improved as a batsman on his early efforts, but he headed the bowling in 1908, taking thirteen wickets in five matches with an average of 19 runs a wicket. His highest innings in first-class cricket was 128 in the Gentlemen v. Players Match at the Oval in 1904--the very unsatisfactory match in which two changes were made in the Gentlemen's team after the first day.

HUNTER

Hugh Michael

Lieutenant, 3rd Battalion, attached 2nd Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire Regiment). Died of wounds 6th April 1915. Son of Robert Lewin Hunter and Mary Harriet Gertrude Hunter, of 39, South St., Mayfair, London. Buried in PUTNEY VALE CEMETERY AND CREMATORIUM, WANDSWORTH, London. Grave reference A. S. 53.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 2:

LIEUTENANT HUGH MICHAEL HUNTER, 3rd (RESERVE) attd. 2nd BATTN. THE DUKE OF EDINBURGH'S (WILTSHIRE REGIMENT), was the youngest surviving son of Robert L. Hunter and his wife Gertrude, and was in his twenty-third year. His elder brother, Captain Richard Hunter, 2nd Battalion, Scottish Rifles, has been twice wounded in the war.

Lieutenant Hunter was educated at Winchester College, where he was in the Cricket XI, afterwards becoming an undergraduate of University College, Oxford, where he was Captain of his College Cricket XI, and rowed in the College Torpid. At Oxford he was a member of the O.T.C., and when war broke out in August, 1914, he received a commission, as 2nd Lieutenant, in the Wiltshire Regiment. He joined the 3rd Battalion at Weymouth, where he remained till November, and then joined the 2nd Battalion, serving with the Expeditionary Force in France. Early in February he came home on a week's leave, but returned to the front on the 12th of that month. He was wounded at the Battle of Neuve Chapelle on the 12th March, 1915, and died on the 6th April in the 7th Stationary Hospital, Boulogne. Lieutenant Hunter's promotion to that rank, to date from the middle of February, 1915, was not gazetted until after his death.

The Officer Commanding the 2nd Battalion, Wiltshire Regiment, wrote of him: “Since I arrived here I have heard a great deal about him. He was a universal favourite in the Regiment, and was much beloved and respected by the men. The Captain who was in command at Neuve Chapelle, and is now on leave, told me your son behaved with conspicuous gallantry on that day, and many of the officers here have also stated the same."

The Captain who was in Command at Neuve Chapelle wrote: “It was a great grief to me to see the announcement of your son's death in the paper this morning. The Colonel told me that he was getting on well when he saw him on his way to the battalion. Your son's death will be a great loss to the Regiment, and we shall all feel it. He did remarkably well at the battle of Neuvc Chapelle, and his name has been forwarded to the higher authorities with my recommendations."

For his services in the war Lieutenant Hunter was mentioned in Sir John French's Despatch of the 31st May, 1915.

HUNTER

Richard Jocelyn

Captain, 5th (City of London) Battalion (London Rifle Brigade) attached 1st/21st Battalion (First Surrey Rifles), London Regiment. Died of wounds 25th August 1918. Aged 32. Son of Robert Lewin Hunter and Gertrude Devas Hunter; husband of Violet S. M. Neville (formerly Hunter), of Sloley Hall, Norwich. Buried in DIVE COPSE BRITISH CEMETERY, SAILLY-LE-SEC, Somme, France. Plot III. Row A. Grave 4.

HURLEY

Stanley George

Lieutenant, Royal Air Force. Died 1st March 1919. Aged 41. Son of the late George Frederick and Fanny E. Hurley; husband of Dorothy Hurley. Buried in RICHMOND CEMETERY, Surrey. Plot/Row/Section P. Grave 2780.

HUTCHINGS

Kenneth Lotheriongton

Lieutenant, 4th Battalion attached 12th Battalion, King's (Liverpool Regiment). Killed in action 3rd September 1916. Born 7th December 1882, Southborough, Kent. Amateur Cricketer, played for Kent and England. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 1 D 8 B and 8 C.

Extract from Wisden Cricketers' Almanack

Lieut. Kenneth Lotherington Hutchings (King's Liverpool Regiment, attached to Welsh Regiment) was killed in action during the first week in September. He was struck by a shell, death being instantaneous. Of all the cricketers who have fallen in the War he may fairly be described as the most famous.

Kenneth Lotherington Hutchings did not fulfil all the hopes formed of him, but at his best he was one of the most remarkable batsmen seen in this generation. Those who follow cricket will not need to be reminded of the sensation caused by his play in 1906--the year in which Kent, for the first time in modern days, came out as Champion County. To the triumph of the side no one contributed more than Hutchings. It is true that he fell a little below C. J. Burnup in the averages, but he played with amazing brilliancy, getting four 100's in county matches, and scoring 1,358 runs. His success astonished the public, but it was scarcely a surprise to those who had watched him from his school days. He had a great career at Tonbridge, being in the eleven for five years, and heading the batting for three seasons in succession. The first evidence of his ability in county cricket was given when, in 1903, he scored 106 for Kent against Somerset at Taunton. His batting in 1906 took him at once to the top of the tree, and on all hands he was regarded as an England cricketer. Unfortunately he never again reached quite the level of his great season. From time to time he did brilliant things, playing especially well in 1909 and 1910, but in 1912 he lost his form and dropped out of the Kent eleven.

In 1909 he was chosen twice for England against Australia, scoring nine at Manchester and 59 at the Oval. He paid one visit to Australia, being a member of the M.C.C.'s team in the winter of 1907-8. Taking the tour as a whole, he did not meet with the success expected, but at Melbourne, in the only Test match the Englishmen won, he played a very fine innings of 126. Hutchings was quite individual in his style of batting, recalling no predecessor. His driving power was tremendous, and when at his best he could score from good length balls wih wonderful facility. It was said in 1906 that when he played for Kent against Yorkshire, even George Hirst--most fearless of fieldsmen at mid-off--went back several yards for him, so terrific being the force of his hitting. Like most modern batsmen, Hutchings trusted for defence wholly to his back play. When he went forward it was always for the purpose of scoring. Playing the daring game that he did, he could only do himself full justice when physically very fit. His fielding was on a par with his batting. In the slips or in the deep field he was equally brilliant. He was born at Southborough, near Tunbridge Wells, on December 7, 1882.--S.H.P.

INGLIS

Rupert Edward

(The Reverend) Chaplain, Royal Army Chaplain's Department. Killed in action 18th September 1916. Aged 53. Son of the late Sir John Inglis, K.C.B., and the late Hon. Lady Inglis; husband of Helen Mary Inglis, of Cuttens, East Grinstead. Former England International Rugby Football player. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 4 C.

INMAN

Leslie Yardley

Second Lieutenant, 3rd Battalion, Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment) attached Wiltshire Regiment. Died of wounds 6th April 1916. Aged 27. Son of George Talfourd Inman and Amy Hope Inman, of 1, The Close, Hatfield, Herts. No known grave. Commemorated on BASRA MEMORIAL, Iraq. Panel 6. Member of the Stock Exchange. See also Stock Exchange Memorial

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

SECOND LIEUTENANT LESLIE YARDLEY INMAN, Royal Scots, attached 5th Wiltshire Regiment, was the younger son of G. Talfourd Inman, of Highmoor Hall, Oxon, and the Stock Exchange, and was born in 1888. Educated at Radley, where he was in the football eleven and captain of cricket, he proceeded to Hertford College, Oxford.

He became a member of the Stock Exchange, and a partner in the firm of Inman and Co. in 1914.

On the outbreak of war he enlisted in the Public Schools and University Corps, and obtained a commission in the Royal Scots in May Igus. In October he took out a draft of the 5th Wilts to Gallipoli, to which Regiment he was attached, and was present at the evacuation of Suvla and Helles.

Thence he went with the 5th Wilts to Mesopotamia. He was fatally wounded, being then in command of his company, in the attempt to relieve Kut, 6 April 1916.

“One of the gallant 13th Division."

ISAAC

Arthur Whitmore

Second Lieutenant, 5th Battalion attached 1st Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment. Killed in action 7th July 1916. Aged 42. Son of the late John Swinton Isaac, D.L., of Boughton Park, Worcester. His brother, John also fell (see below). No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 5 A and 6 C.

ISAAC, D.S.O., MiD

John Edmund Valentine

Captain, 2nd Battalion, Rifle Brigade (The Prince consort's Own). Killed in action 9th May 1915. Aged 35. Born 14th February 1880, Powick Court, Worcestershire. Served in the South African War. Son of the late John Swinton Isaac, D.L., of Boughton Park, Worcester. His brother, Arthur also fell (see above). Awarded the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.) and mentioned in Despatches (MiD). Buried in NEW IRISH FARM CEMETERY, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot XXXI. Row F. Grave 13. See also Worcestershire County Cricket Club World War 1 Memorial and Worcester Guildhall, and Worcester St John in Bedwardine memorials and Worcester Cathedral cloister windows.

Extract from Distinguished Service Order 1886-1915 published by Naval & Military Press:

ISAAC, JOHN EDMUND VALENTINE, Capt., was born 14 Feb. 1880, at Powyke Court, Worcestershire, son of John Swinton Isaac, D.L., of Boughton Park, Worcester, Banker, and Amelia Alicia Anne, daughter of Major-General R. H. Crofton, Royal Artillery. He was educated at Wixenford and Harrow, and was gazetted to the 5th Northumberland Fusiliers at York 9 May, 1900. He joined his Regiment in South Africa, on active service, leaving England on 28 June, 1900. He was dangerously wounded at Nooitgedacht (General Clements' action on the Mahaliesburg 13 Dec. 1900); and, after two years' sick leave, went back to duty. He had been gazetted Lieutenant 28 Nov. 1900, and became Captain 1 April, 1905. On the disbandment of his battalion he was gazetted to the Rifle Brigade 24 June, 1908, and subsequently served in Malta and Egypt. In the autumn of 1911 he sent in his papers, and went to Vancouver, British Columbia. On rumours of war he at once returned to England, and joined the Rifle Brigade, Reserve of Officers, 1 Sept. 1914. Capt. J. E. V. Isaac was appointed A.D.C. to Major-General Sir Thompson Capper, Commanding the 7th Division, and went to Flanders on his Staff in Oct. 1914. He was present at the First Battle of Ypres, where he was badly wounded in the left arm. For his services at that time he was mentioned in Despatches, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 1 Dec. 1914]: "John Edmund Valentine Isaac, Capt., Reserve of Officers, The Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own). He has shown conspicuous gallantry on all occasions, and has always obtained reliable and valuable information when required. On 24 Oct. he guided a unit to a critical point with great skill, which resulted in checking the enemy. He was wounded in the engagement." With his arm still rather useless, he returned to duty on 19 Dec. 1914, and obtained leave to rejoin his Regiment, 2nd Battn. Rifle Brigade, 5 May, 1915. Four days later he was killed, leading his men, on the Fromelles Ridge. The " Athletic News " of 6 Sept. 1915, says: "Capt. J. E. V. Isaac (Rifle Brigade), unofficially reported killed, was a member of the well-known Worcestershire cricketing family. Since 1903 lie had been a member of the M.C.C. In Nov. last he received the D.S.O." Capt. Isaac was a good cricketer; played for his county and his Regiment. He was a member of I Zingari and the Free Foresters' Club. He won the Cairo Grand National in 1911, while with his Regiment in Egypt. He was a keen huntsman and hunted with the Worcestershire, Pytchley, York and Ainsty, etc., etc.

See his statistics on CricInfo

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 2:

CAPTAIN JOHN EDMUND VALENTINI ISAAC, D.S.O., RESERVE OF OFFICERS attd. 2nd BATTN. RIFLE BRIGADE (THE PRINCE CONSORT'S OWN, third son of John Swinton Isaac, Esq., D.L., of Boughton Park, Worcester, was born at Powyke Court, near Worcester on the 14th February, 1880.

He was educated at Wixenford and at Harrow, and was gazetted to the Northumberland Fusiliers from the Militia in April, 1900, and, being posted to the 2nd Battalion, sailed in June to join it in South Africa. Thus he began his military career on active service in the Boer War, in the course of which he was severely wounded in December, 1900, at Nooitgedacht. He was present at operations in the Transvaal, Orange River Colony, and Cape Colony between May, 1900, and March, 1901. For his services he received the Queen's medal with four clasps. He was promoted Lieutenant in November, 1900, and Captain in April, 1905. On the disbandment of his battalion of the Northumberland Fusiliers he was transferred, in June, 1908, to the Rifle Brigade.

In 1911 Captain Isaac retired from the Army, and went to Vancouver, British Columbia, where he made many friends. On hearing rumours of war he returned to England in August, 1914, and in a fortnight joined the Special Reserve of Officers. Shortly afterwards he was appointed A.D.C. to Major-General Sir T. Capper, Commanding the VIIth Division, and proceeded to the front in October, 1914. He was wounded on the 24th October at the first Battle of Ypres. For his behaviour there he was awarded the D.S.O., receiving the decoration at the hands of the King on the 15th April, 1915.

The following is the official record of the award: “Has shown conspicuous gallantry on all occasions. Has always obtained reliable and valuable information when required. On October 24th he guided a unit to a critical point with great skill, which resulted in checking the enemy. He was wounded in the engagement."

He was also mentioned in Sir John French's Despatch of the 14th January, 1915. On recovering from his wound he returned to his duties on the Staff in December, 1914, rejoining his Regiment on the 7th May, 1915. He was killed on the 9th May near Fromelles while leading his men. He fell just after they took the German trench, but it was not possible to recover his body.

Captain Isaac, who was a member of the Bath Club, was a good cricketer, playing occasionally for his county, and belonging to the I Zingari, the Free Foresters, and the M.C.C. He was also a good rider, and won the Cairo Grand National in February, 1911.

JAQUES

Arthur

Captain, 12th Battalion, Prince of Wales's Own (West Yorkshire Regiment). Killed in action 27th September 1915. No known grave. Commemorated on LOOS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 39 and 40.

Details from CricInfo where his statistics can be found

Born at Shanghai on March 7, 1888. His death in the First World War robbed Hampshire of a talented fast bowler whose results in 1914 suggested he would have been a great player.

From 1905 to 1907 he was in the Aldenham XI, heading the bowling averages in his final year with 43 wickets at 10.74. He went on to Cambridge but did not play first-class cricket there, but in 1912/13 toured West Indies with the MCC, taking 5 wickets at 29. He first played for Hampshire in 1913, and then in 1914 in Championship matches alone he took 112 wickets at 18.26. He also played twice for the Gentlemen against Players in 1914, at Lord's and the Oval, but took only two wickets in the two games for 73 runs.

His best analyses for Hampshire in 1914 were 14 for 105 (including 8 for 67) v Derbyshire at Basingstoke; 14 for 54 (including 8 for 21) v Somerset at Bath when he and Kennedy bowled unchanged throughout, and 7 for 51 v Warwickshire at Southampton. In his total of 49 matches for Hampshire he took 168 wickets at 21.52. Wisden said: "Doubtless his unusual methods contributed much to his success, for, placing nearly all his field on the on-side, he pitched on the wicket or outside the leg-stump, and, swinging-in and getting on an off-break, cramped the batsmen so much that many of them lost patience and succumbed."

The year after his successful season of 1914 he was killed in action at Bois Hugo, Loos, France, on September 27, 1915, while serving as a Captain in the 12th West Yorkshire Regiment. He was 27.

KEKEWICH, MiD

Arthur St John Mackintosh

Captain, 8th Battalion, Devonshire Regiment. Killed in action 25th September 1915. Aged 28. Son of Charles Granville Kekewich and Mary Kekewich, The Hill House, Hatfield, Herts; husband of K. C. Turner (formerly Kekewich), of Bacton Rd., Felixstowe. Mentioned in Despatches (MiD). No known grave. Commemorated on LOOS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 35 to 37. See also Aldenham War Memorial

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

KEKEWICH, ARTHUR ST. JOHN MACKINTOSH, Capt., 8th (Service) Battn. The Devonshire Regt., eldest s. of Charles Granville. Kekewich, by his wife, Mary Marion, dau. of Æneas Mackintosh, of Inverness. J.P., D.L.; and gdson. of the late Right Hon. Sir Arthur Kekewich, P.C., M.A., Judge of High Court of Justice 24 June. 1887; educ. Eton and Christ Church, Oxford, where he graduated BA. In 1909, and M.A. in 1911, and while there was attached to the Seaforth Highlanders as a University Candidate 'for the Army, being gazetted 2nd Lieut. Devonshire Regt. 18 Sept. 1909; promoted Lient. 16 Aug. 1911, and on the formation of the 8th Battn. after the outbreak of war, was appointed Adjutant 20 Aug. 1914, and Capt. 20 Nov. following, and was killed in action at the Battle of Loos 25 Sept. 1915. Capt. Kekewich was mentioned in Despatches (London Gazette, 1 Jan. 1916] by F.M. Sir John (now Lord) French, for gallant and distinguished service in the field. He was a keen sportsman, and while at Oxford steered the Christ Church Eight in 1906, 1907 and 1908, being head of the river at Oxford for the last two years, and steered them at Henley Regatta when they won the Grand Challenge Cup in 1908; was also well known in the hunting field, and was the winner of several point-to-point races. He m. at St. David's, Exeter, 2 Aug. 1914, Kathleen Cecil, dam of General James Wilfrid Stirling, of Rochbeare, Devon, C.M.G.

KEKEWICH

Hanbury Lewis

[SDGW states Major] Captain, Sussex Yeomanry. Killed in action 6th November 1917. Aged 32. Husband of Dorothy Page-Turner (formerly Kekewich), of Old Place, Bicester, Oxon. Buried in BEERSHEBA WAR CEMETERY, Israel. Section M. Grave 38. Further notes on Hanbury Lewis KEKEWICH's family

KENNARD, D.S.O.

Willoughby Arthur

[SDGW states Captain] Major, 13th Hussars. Died 30th October 1918. Aged 37. Son of Howard John Kennard, and Elizabeth Kennard. Awarded the Distinuguished Service Order (D.S.O.). Buried in ETAPLES MILITARY CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot XLVIII. Row C. Grave 8.

Extract from Distinguished Service Order 1886-1915 published by Naval & Military Press:

KENNARD, WILLOUGHBY ARTHUR, Capt., was born 20 May, 1881. He joined the 13th Hussars 21 March, 1900, being promoted Lieutenant 22 Feb. 1902. He saw active service in South Africa from 1899 to 1902, during which he was present in operations in the Transvaal 30 Nov. 1900, to Sept. 1901; Oct. 1901, to April, 1902, and May, 1902; operations in Orange River Colony, April to May, 1902; operations on the Zululand Frontier of Natal in Sept. and Oct. 1901 (Queen's Medal with four clasps). He became Captain 13 Dec. 1906, and took an appointment as a Territorial Force Adjutant 9 April, 1912. Capt. Kennard served in the European War from 1914 to 1916. He was mentioned in Despatches, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 18 Feb. 1915] "Willoughby Arthur Kennard, Capt., 13th Hussars." He was severely wounded, and died in Oct. 1918. His D.S.O. was awarded" for services in connection with operations in the field."

KENNAWAY

Arthur Lewis

Lieutenant, 1st Battalion, Dorset Yeomanry (Queen's Own). Killed in action 21st August 1915. Aged 34. Son of The Rev. C. L. Kennaway, of Stephens Plot, Spettisbury, Blandford. Educated at Eton and Oriel College, Oxford. Land Agent. Took Commission in Dorset Yeomanry in 1911. Buried in GREEN HILL CEMETERY, Turkey. Special Memorial D. 7.

Note: There are now 2,971 servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in this cemetery. 2,472 of the burials are unidentified but special memorials commemorate a number of casualties known or believed to be buried among them.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

KENNAWAY, ARTHUR LEWIS, Lieut., 1st (Queen's Own) Dorset Yeomanry (T.F.), 2nd s. of the Rev. Charles Lewis Kennaway, of Stephens Plot, Spetisbury, Blandford, Vicar of Tarrant Crawford, by his wife, Edith Letitia, claw of Charles Joseph Parke, of Henbnry Honse, Wimborne, co. Dorset; b. Garboldisham, co. Norfolk. 16 June, 1881; educ. Eton, and Oriel College, Oxford; was a Land Agent; gazetted 2nd Lieut. 1st Dorset Yeomanry 12 June, 1910; promoted Lieut. 25 Nov. 1914; was called up on mobilization 5 Aug. 1914: served with the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force, in Gallipoli from April. 1915: was reported wonnded and missing after the attack on the Turkish trenches near Chocolate Hill and the heights beyond, near Sulva Bay, 21 Ang. following, and is now assnmed to have been killed in action on or about that date. A brother officer wrote: "Lieut. Kennaway was known to many friends as one, of those who combined strength of character with a great charm of personality, and a keenness in whatever work he took in hand," and a Trooper: "He was the bravest officer that ever walked." Unm.

KERRISON

Roger Orme

Lieutenant-Colonel, 6th Reserve Cavalry Regiment (Formerly Suffolk Yeomanry) attached 4th Brigade, Australian Field Artillery. Died 18th September 1917. Aged 44. Son of Roger and Florence Lucy Kerrison, of Tattingstone Place, Ipswich, Suffolk. Joined the Loyal Suffolk Hussars (Yeomanry) in 1896, subsequently commanded the Regiment. Buried in WIMEREUX COMMUNAL CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot IV. Row N. Grave 4.

KING, M.C.

Charles Eustace Dickson

Captain, 2nd Battalion, King's Own (Yorkshire Light Infantry). Killed in action 11th October 1916. Aged 28. Son of Col. Charles Dickson King, C.B.E. (late Royal Field Artillery), and Evelyn Marie King, of Notton House, Lacock, Chippenham, Wilts. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). Buried in CAMBRIN CHURCHYARD EXTENSION, Pas de Calais, France. Plot/Row/Section S. Grave 8.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

KING, CHARLES EUSTACE DICKSON, M.C., Capt., 2nd Battn. (105th Foot) The King's Own (Yorkshire Light Infantry), elder s. of Col. Charles Dickson King, late Royal Field Artillery, by his wife, Evelyn Marie, dau. of Ernest Alers Hankey, of Notton House, Lacock, co. Wilts; b. at the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, 1 April, 1888; educ. St. Michael's School, Westgate-on-Sea; Wellington College, and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst; joined the 2nd King's Own (Yorkshire Light Infantry) as 2nd Lieut. at Sheffield in Dec. 1906, successively moving to Aldershot in Dec. 1907, Cork in Oct. 1910, and to Dublin in Sept. 1913; was promoted Lieut. 1 Jan. 1912, and Capt. 14 Jan. 1915. The outbreak of war found him temporarily seconded as Second in Command of the 5th Divisional Cyclist Coy. at the Curragh; he requested permission to join his battalion, but this was not granted; landed at Havre 18 Aug. 1914; was present at the Battles of Mons, Le Cateau, the Marne, the Aisne, La Bassée, and the First Battle of Ypres, after which he took command of the 5th Divisional Cyclist Coy. On 10 March, 1915, he went as A.D.C. to Sir John Keir, but this was afterwards cancelled, and on 16 April he rejoined the Cyclist Coy., and four days later volunteered to temporarily rejoin the 2nd Battn. The King's Own (Yorkshire Light Infantry), which had suffered severely at Hill 60, and was badly in need of officers; was wounded 7 May, and invalided home; rejoined the 5th Divisional Cyclist Coy. at the end of June; returned to England in Feb. 1916, with a slipped cartilage, which kept him at home till 11 July, when he once more returned to France, this time rejoining the 2nd Battn. The King's Own (Yorkshire Light Infantry) on the Somme as Adjutant. He was again wounded 22 Sept., but remained on duty, and was killed in action near Bethune at 10.30 on the night of 11 Oct. 1916, by a stray shot, while jumping over the parapet to go out to a wiring party. Buried in a cemetery at Cambrin, four miles east of Bethune. Capt. King was three times mentioned in Despatches [London Gazettes, 19 Oct. 1914, 17 Feb. 1915, and 1 Jan. 1916] by F.M. Sir John (now Lord) French, for gallant and distinguished service in the field, and was awarded the Military Cross [London Gazette, 13 Jan. 1916] for services in the field. He was in the Wellington XI. and the Racquet VIII., also in the Sandhurst XI., and a member of the I.Z. Free Foresters and Yorkshire Gentlemen Cricket Clubs. In 1912 and 1914 lie and Capt. A. C. G. Luther won the Military Doubles Racquet Championship at Prince's Club. He was well known in the hunting field in Ireland; unm.

KINGTON, D.S.O.

William Miles

Captain, 1st Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Killed in action 20th October 1914. Aged 38. Son of Lt. Col. W. M. Kington (late 4th Hussars); husband of Edith Soames, of Bryn Estyn, Wrexham, Denbighshire. Awarded the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.). [SDGW gives a second entry for him in the Wlesh Regiment as well as Royal Welsh fusiliers.] No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 22.

Extract from Distinguished Service Order 1886-1915 published by Naval & Military Press:

KINGTON, WILLIAM MYLES, Lieut., was born at Cheltenham 25 April, 1876, son of the late Colonel M. Myles Nairne Kington, formerly of the 4th Hussars. He was educated at Glenalmond College and at Sandhurst, and joined the 1st Royal Welsh Fusiliers at Aden in Sept. 1896, and became Lieutenant in Jan. 1899. He served in the South African War of 1899-1902, on the Staff as Brigade Signalling Officer from Nov. 1899, to Dec. 1900. He was present at the Relief of Ladysmith and the Battle of Colenso; operations and action at Vaal Kranz; on the Tugela Heights and action at Pieter's Hill; in the Transvaal at the beginning and end of 1900, including the action at Frederickstad, and in Cape Colony, including the action at Ruidam. He was again in the Transvaal in 1901 and 1902, and in the Orange River Colony. He was four times mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette of 8 Feb., 9 July, and 10 Sept. 1901, and 29 July, 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 Oct. 1902] : "William Myles Kington, Lieut., The Royal Welsh Fusiliers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa." From Feb. 1902, to May, 1904, he was employed with the South African Constabulary, and front April, 1906, in which month he received his company, to Sept. 1910, he was an Adjutant of Volunteers and of the Territorial Force. He served in the European War, and was killed by a shell in the First Battle of Ypres on 28 Oct. 1914. He was a very popular officer, and a man in the battalion who was present said in an account of the engagement: “For three days we remained in the trenches, firing and being fired at, without food or water. Lieut. Hoskyns, who commanded my platoon, was killed by a sniper, and about three hours later Capt. Kington, D.S.O., was killed. He was a very fine officer, and would crack a joke in the trenches which would set us all laughing our sides out. It made us all mad to avenge his death." He was a well-known cricketer, a member of the M.C.C., the I Zingari and the Free Foresters, and was an excellent shot. Capt. Kington was very artistic, and has been described as a "musical genius." He married Edith, only daughter of Mr. F. W. Soames, of Bryn Estyn, Wrexham, and left one son.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

CAPTAIN WILLIAM MILES KINGTON D.S.O., 1st BATTN. ROYAL WELSH FUSILIERS, who was killed in action on the 21st October, 1914, was the eldest son of the late Colonel Kington, formerly of the 4th Hussars, and was born at Cheltenham on the 25th April, 1876.

He was educated at College, and joined the Royal Welsh Fusiliers in September, 1896, becoming Lieutenant in January, 1899. He took part in the South African War, in which he was on the Staff as Brigade Signalling Officer from November, 1899, to December, 1900. He was present at the relief of Ladysmith and the Battle of Colenso; operations and action at Vaal Krans; on the Tugela [eights and action at Pieter's Hill; in the Transvaal at the beginning and end of 1900, including the action at Frederickstad; and in the Cape Colony, including the action at Ruidam. He was again in the Transvaal in 1901 and 1902, and in the Orange River Colony. He was four times mentioned in Despatches ("London Gazette," 8th February, 9th July, and 10th September, 1901; and 29th July, 1902); was awarded the D.S.O., and received the Queen's medal with five clasps and the King's medal with four clasps. From February, 1902, to May, 1904, he was employed with the South African Constabulary, and from April, 1906, in which year he received his company, to September, 1910, he was an Adjutant of Volunteers and of the Territorial Force.

He was a well-known cricketer, member of the M.C.C., the I Zingari, and the Free Foresters, and was an excellent shot. He was also very artistic and a musical genius.

He was killed by a shell in the first Battle of Ypres, where his battalion was in the VIIth Division, near Zonnebeke, Belgium, and was buried on the field in a trench. Many of the officers of his battalion were killed or wounded in the same battle.
Captain Kington was a very popular officer, and a man in the battalion who was present said in an account of the engagement: “For three days we remained in the trenches firing and being fired at without food or water. Lieutenant Hoskyns, who commanded my platoon, was killed by a sniper, and about three hours later Captain Kington, D.S.O., was killed. He was a fine officer, and would crack a joke in the trenches, which would set us all laughing our sides out. It made us all mad to avenge his death."

Captain Kington married the only daughter of Mr. F. Soames, Bryn-Estyn, Wrexham, and left one son.

KINNAIRD

the Hon Douglas Arthur (Master of Kinnaid)

Captain, 1st Battalion, Scots Guards. Killed in action 24th October 1914. Aged 35. Master of Kinnaird. Son of 11th Baron Kinnaird, of Rossie Priory, Inchture, Perthshire. His brother The Hon Arthur Middleton also fell. Buried in GODEZONNE FARM CEMETERY, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot II. Row A. Grave 1.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

KINNAIRD, HON. DOUGLAS ARTHUR, Master of Kinnaird, Capt., 2nd Battn. Scots Guards, eldest s. of Arthur Fitzgerald, 11th Lord Kinnaird, K.T., by his wife, Mary Alma Victoria, dau. of Sir Andrew Agnew, of Lochnaw, 8th Baronet; b. Rossie Priory, Inchture, co. Perth, 20 Aug. 1879; educ. Cheam School. Surrey; Eton, and Trinity College, Cambridge (13.A. 1901, M.A. 1905); gazetted 2nd Lieut. 3rd Scots Guards, 22 May, 1901, and promoted Lieut. 1 Feb. 1904, and Capt. 3 Feb. 1 912; transferring to the 2nd Battn. when the 3rd was disbanded; went to Antwerp with his Battn. in the 7th Division; served through the retreat from that place and was killed in action, 23 Oct. 1914, during one of the numerous rearguard actions, to protect the retirement of the Belgian Army. Buried with another officer at Zonnebeke Farm, near Poligne, Belgium; unm. Capt. Kinnaird was in the Volunteer Corps at Eton and Cambridge, and travelled much on the Continent to study Art and Literature. In 1906, he went to East Africa for big game shooting, aud made a large collection of heads and trophies. lie also visited India for the Coronation Durbar at Delhi in 1911.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

CAPTAIN the Honble. DOUGLAS ARTHUR KINNAIRD, MASTER OF KINNAIRD, 2nd BATTN. SCOTS GUARDS, who was killed in action on the 24th October, 1914, near Ypres, was the eldest son of the eleventh Baron Kinnaird and the Baroness Kinnaird, of Rossie Priory, Inchture, Perthshire, and was born there on the 20th August, 1879. He was related to the Duke of Leinster, the Earl of Gainsborough, and Sir Andrew Agnew. Captain Kinnaird was educated at Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge, as Lord Kinnaird had been, taking his degree of M.A. at the University. He was a Lieutenant in the Eton College Volunteer Corps, and also in the Cambridge University Volunteer Corps. He subsequently joined the Forfar and Kincardine Artillery Militia, afterwards entering the Scots Guards in May, 1901, becoming Lieutenant in February, 1904.

The 2nd Battalion Scots Guards formed part of the VIIth Division, which left England for Belgium early in October, and in the severe fighting near Kruiseik, in which Captain Kinnaird was killed, the battalion lost many officers. The Master of Kinnaird, who obtained his company in February, 1912, was not married, and his next brother, the Hon. K. F. Kinnaird, becomes heir to the barony.

He was a member of the Guards' and Bachelors' Clubs, and among his recreations were polo and cricket.

KIRWAN

R M

[The Reverend] Chaplain 4th Class, Army Chaplains' Department. Died 23rd May 1916. Buried in HANWELL CEMETERY, KENSINGTON, Middlesex. Grave reference 166. 7 and 8.

LA COSTE, M.C.

Charles John Constable

Captain, General List attached 1/8th Battalion, Prince of Wales's Own (West Yorkshire Regiment). Killed in action 9th October 1917. Aged 36. Educated at Wellington College, Sandhurst. Commissioned Royal Warwickshire Regiment (retired, 1905). Rejoined from South America, September, 1914; Staff Captain, 57th Brigade, 1915; Brigade Major, Chisledon, November, 1916. Returned to France, June, 1917. Son of Col. Charles Frederick La Coste (R.M.L.I.) and Margaret Mary Ann Banks, his wife; husband of Grace La Coste (nee Neilson), of Philadelphia, U.S.A., and of Manor House, Shottermill, Haslemere, Surrey. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). No known grave. Commemorated on TYNE COT MEMORIAL, Zonnebeke, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 161.

LAGDEN

Ronald Owen

Captain, 6th Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Killed in action 3rd March 1915. Aged 26. Born 21 November 1889, Maseru, Basutoland. Son of Sir Godfrey Lagden, K.C.M.G., and Lady Lagden, of "Selwyn," Oatlands Chase, Weybridge. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 51 and 53.

See his statistics on CricInfo

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 2:

CAPTAIN RONALD OWEN LAGDEN, 6th (RESERVE), attd. 4th BATTN. THE KING'S ROYAL RIFLE CORPS, was reported wounded and missing, 1st March 1915, and is believed to have been killed on that occasion.

LANG

Arthur Horace

Second Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, Grenadier Guards attached Scots Guards. Killed in action between 25th and 26th January 1915. Aged 24. Born 25 October 1890, Malabar Hill, Bombay (now Mumbai), Maharashtra, India. Son of Basil and Alice S. Lang, of Royal Oak Hotel, Sevenoaks Kent. Buried in CANADIAN CEMETERY No.2, NEUVILLE-ST. VAAST, Pas de Calais, France. Plot 12. Row E. Grave 22.

See his statistics on CricInfo

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 2:

2nd LIEUTENANT ARTHUR HORACE LANG, SPECIAL RESERVE, GRENADIER GUARDS, attd. 1st BATTN. SCOTS GUARDS, the son of Basil Lang, late Advocate-General of Bombay, and Mrs. Lang, Westerham, Kent, was born in Bombay on the 25th October, 1890.

He was educated at Harrow and Trinity College, Cambridge. He was a member of the Pitt Club, at Cambridge, of the Conservative Club, London, and of I Zingari.

In August, 1914, he was gazetted 2nd Lieutenant in the Special Reserve of the Grenadier Guards, and for a short time was attached to the 2nd Battalion of that Regiment. Afterwards he was attached to the 1st Battalion, Scots Guards, and was serving with it when he was killed in action defending the front trench at Cuinchy, Flanders, on the 25th June, 1915.

LEATHAM

Edward Hubert

Lieutenant, 12th (Prince of Wales's Royal) Lancers. Killed in action 31st October 1914. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 5.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

LIEUTENANT EDWARD HUBERT LEATHAM, 12th (PRINCE OF WALES'S ROYAL) LANCERS, who was killed in action near Ypres on the 31st October, 1914, was the second and only surviving son of the late Mr. E. E. Leatham, of Wentbridge House, Pontefract.

He was born at Wentbridge, Yorkshire, on the 20th July, 1886, and was educated at Eton and the R.M.C., Sandhurst. He joined the 12th Lancers in October, 1906, becoming Lieutenant in August, 1908.

He played in his Regimental polo team when it won the Inter-Regimental Cup in 1914 and the Coronation Cup. He was also a successful gentleman jockey and point-to-point rider.

He was killed while helping to get a wounded man back into a trench into which he had safely got the rest of his men. While returning he was struck by a shell.

LEEKE

Ralph Henry

Major, Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own) attached 4th Battalion, King's African Rifles. Died 5th November 1915. Aged 31. Son of Col. and the Hon. Mrs. Ralph Leeke, of Aston, Newport, Salop. Born at Aston Hall, Salop. Buried in TAVETA MILITARY CEMETERY, Kenya. Plot III. Row B. Grave 2.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

LEEKE, RALPH HENRY, Major. The Prince. Consort's Own Rifle Brigade, and 2nd in Command 4th Battn. King's African Rifles, elder s. and h. of Col. Ralph Leeke, of Longford Hall, and Aston Hall, Shropshire, late Grenadier Guards, by his wife, Hon. Mary Teresa, née Manners, 2nd dau. of John Thomas, 2nd Lord Manners; and brother to Lieut. C. Leeke (q.v.): b. Aston Hall aforesaid, 8 Dec. 1883: educ. Eton, and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst; gazetted 2nd Lieut. Rifle Brigade 22 Oct. 1902: Lieut. 26 Sept. 1906; Capt. 1 Feb. 1913, and Temp. Major Sept. 1915 served with the 2nd Battn. at Cairo and with the 1st Battn. in Ireland and Malta: was seconded for service under the Colonial Office 30 Dec. 1909, and posted to the 4th King's African Rifles in Uganda; was given the local rank of Capt. 29 May. 1912, and the same year proceeded to the Northern Patrol and served in several punitive expeditions against the Turkana, Dodinga, and other tribes (mentioned in Despatches), and when the European War broke out was in charge of the Rudolph Province; was sent in Oct. 1914, to the Voi district. British East Africa, with four companies of the K.A.R. for the protection of the railway; was present at numerous patrol fights, and the unsuccessful attack on the German position at Mbuguni, and died at Mzima, on the Tsavo River, B.E.A., 5 Nov. 1915, of blackwater fever, contracted on active service. His Commanding Officer wrote: “He had very completely the confidence of officers and men under him; he had been since Oct. in command of four companies in the Voi district. The men have done splendidly there whenever they have met the Germans, and it is in a great measure due to his fine leading and command," and a brother officer: "He was by far the best soldier in the battalion: a really exceptional man and liked by everybody. His promotion just before his death was the finest thing that ever happened in the Regiment. It was an awful blow to me—I think I have told you before he was the one man I have ever met whom I would go anywhere for, and whose opinion I knew at all times to be really sound. In him the K.A.R. lost their best officer, and I my best friend. His work in the North was wonderful, but hidden under a bushel. He was writing an article at the time of his death to the journal of the Royal Geographical Society, and now I intend to finish it for him, as they want to publish it with his map." Unm.

LEFROY, D.S.O.

Bertrain Percival

Lieutenant-Colonel, 2nd Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Died of wounds 27th September 1915. Aged 37. Son of the late Thomas Charles Perceval and Isabella Napier Lefroy. Awarded the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.). Buried in FOUQUIERES CHURCHYARD EXTENSION, Pas de Calais, France. Plot/Row/Section I. Grave 40.

Extract from Distinguished Service Order 1886 to 1915 published by Naval & Military Press:

LEFROY, BERTRAM PERCEVAL, Lieut., was born 18 May, 1878, in London, son of the late Thomas Charles Perceval Lefroy, of 11, Ashburn Place, S.W., and Isabella Napier, daughter of the late Alexander Hastie, of Carnock, Fifeshire. He was educated at Harrow and Sandhurst, and joined the Royal Dublin Fusiliers 7 May, 1898; became Lieutenant 10 May, 1899. He served in the South African War, 1899-1901 (dangerously wounded); was present at the Relief of Ladysmith; took part in the operations in the Transvaal in June, 1900; in Natal, March to June, 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July, 1900; in Orange River Colony, June, 1900; in the Transvaal, Dec. 1900, to Aug. 1901; also during the operations on the Zululand Frontier of Natal in Sept. 1901, including defence of Fort Itala. He was mentioned in Despatches 11 Oct. 1901; received the Queen's South African Medal with five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 11 Oct. 1901]: “Bertram Perceval Lefroy, Lieut., The Royal Dublin Fusiliers.” The D.S.O. was awarded for “gallantry in the Defence of Forts Prospect and Itala.” The defence of the two forts, though so few were engaged, was considered one of the most brilliant affairs in the war, the attacking force being about four times the number of the defenders, and the Boer loss larger in proportion than in almost any other action. Major Chapman was in command at Fort Itala. Lieut. Lefroy (with Lieut. Kane, South Lancashire Regt., who was killed) commanded about 90 of the Mounted Infantry at the outpost on the top of Itala Hill. He himself shot Potgieter, the enemy commander, and was very severely wounded. Lord Kitchener himself sent in Lieut. Lefroy's name for the D.S.O., and for his promotion, in getting which he was transferred to the 3rd Battn. The Royal Warwickshire Regt. The latter eventually proved in some ways unfortunate, as this battalion was one of those subsequently done away with, and caused Capt. Lefroy a serious loss of seniority. The following is an extract from a letter written by Lieut. B. P. Lefroy while he was lying wounded after Itala (he had been wounded in four places, two of which just escaped being fatal): "When we heard that we were going to be attacked at Itala. I was sent right up to the top of the Itala Hill with about 90 men, to try and hold it, and prevent the Boers from attacking the camp from that direction. At about 2 a.m., 26 Sept., they attacked my post five or six hundred strong. It was fairly dark, and the ground was covered with little rocks, which made it very hard to distinguish people. We kept up a heavy fire on both sides. They worked right round our right, and then rushed the position. It was a very plucky rush, but as they were about five to one, we couldn't keep them out, and it ended in a sort of grand mêlée. I have a vivid recollection of popping off my revolver with Boers all round me, and then I got too full of lead to continue the operation. They took about 37 prisoners and held the position all day. We people with bullets in us had to lie all day on our backs in the sun, and we didn't get down again till 3 a.m. next morning, when the people in the camp, finding the Boers had cleared, sent up for us. It was bitterly cold during the night, and a damn mist. The camp held out splendidly all night and day, until the Boers didn't think it worth while losing any more men. There were about 1,500 Boers, and about 300 of us, so we didn't do so badly." He became Captain Aug. 1902. After the Boer War, he served in England, Gibraltar, again in South Africa, returned to England, and went through the Staff College. At the outbreak of the Great War he was holding an appointment as General Staff Officer at the War Office. In Aug. 1914, he went out on the Staff of the First Division. After seven months he returned to England to serve on the Staff of the 26th Division at Warminster until July, 1915, when he went out to command the 2nd Battn. Warwickshire Regt. He was Brevet Major in the King's Birthday Honours List, 1915; Major 8 Aug. and Lieutenant-Colonel 1 Sept. 1915. Lieut.-Colonel Lefroy was fatally wounded at the Battle of Loos 25 Sept. 1915, and died in the Field Ambulance on the 27th. He was three times mentioned in Despatches during the War (17 Sept. 1914; 14 Jan. 1915 and 31 May, 1915); received the Cross of the Legion of Honour. He was much beloved by his men, and they would have followed him anywhere. The dying message he left for them was made a battalion order, and will not be forgotten by those of the old Regiment who survive. It was: “Tell them my last thoughts are with them. I pray that their bravery in the hour of severe testing may win them through to success. Would to God I had been spared to serve and lead them a little longer. But as it is I trust that the men of the Warwickshire Regiment will pull together, work together and uphold the credit, the good name and the traditions that the Regiment has so nobly won. May God's blessing rest on them in their hour of danger or peace, and may heroic self-sacrifice of their officers, non-commissioned officers and men who have fallen inspire them to deeds of unfaltering and unfailing bravery?”

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

LEFROY, BERTRAM PERCEVAL, D.S.O., Lieut.-Col., 2nd Battn. (6th Foot). The Royal Warwickshire Regt., 2nd s. of the late Thomas Charles Perceval Lefroy, by his wife, Isabella Napier (11, Ashburn Place, Cromwell Road. S.W.). dau. of the late Alexander Mastic, of Carnock; and gdson. of the late Very Rev. Jeffry Lefroy, Dean of Dromore; b. London, 18 May, 1878; educ. The Grange. Folkestone; Harrow, and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst: was gazetted 2nd Lieut. The Royal Dublin Fusiliers 7 May, 1898; promoted Lieut. 10 May 1899, Capt. 2 Aug. 1902, and transferred to the 2nd Royal Warwickshire Regt.; Brev. Major 3 June, 1915, Major 24 July, 1915, and Lieut.-Col. 8 Aug. 1915; served in the South African War 1899-1901; took part in the Relief of Ladysmith; operations in the Transvaal in June, 1900; operations in Natal, March to June, 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July, 1900; operations in Orange River Colony June, 1900; operations in the Transvaal Dec. 1900, to Aug. 1901, and those on the Zulu Frontier of Natal in Sept. 1901, including Defence of Fort Itala. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 11 Oct. 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and was awarded the D.S.O. for gallantry in defence of Forts Prospect and Itala, where he was severely wounded. After the termination of the South African War he served with the 1st and 2nd Battns. at various English stations, at Gibraltar, and again in South Africa, returning to England and going through the Staff College in 1911-12, and was subsequently General Staff Officer. 3rd Grade, at the War Office from 14 April to 4 Aug. 1914. On the outbreak of war he went to France on the staff of the 1st Division, with which he served for seven months, subsequently returning to England to serve on the Staff of the 26th Division, going back to France early-in July, 1915, to command the 2nd Royal Warwickshires, and died in the Field Ambulance 27 Sept. following, from wounds received in action at the Battle of Loos on the 25th, while leading his battalion into action. Buried at Fouquiresles-Bethune. The Quarter Master wrote: "When we heard it was your gallant son who was coming to command the Regiment, it seemed to us who knew him almost too good to be true," and a N.C.O.: "The last I saw of the Colonel he was holding a German sap and calling for the Reserve to come up. That was after he was wounded; he was a very brave man." In his last message to his men he said "Tell them my last thoughts are with them. I pray that their bravery in the hour of severe testing may win them through to success. Would to God I had been spared to serve and lead them a little longer: but, as it is, I trust the men of the Warwicks will pull together, work together, and uphold the credit, the good name, and the traditions that the Regiment has so nobly won. May God's blessing rest on them in their hour of danger or peace, and may the heroic self-sacrifice of their officers, N.C. officers and men who have fallen inspire them to deeds of unfaltering and unfailing bravery." This was afterwards made a Battalion Order. Lieut.-Col. Lefroy was three times mentioned in Despatches by F.M. Sir John (now lord) French [London Gazettes. 19 Oct. 1914, 17 Feb. 1915. and 22 June, 1915], and was awarded the Legion of Honour by the President of the French Republic for gallantry during operations between 21-30 Aug. 1914 [London Gazette. 3 Nov. 1914].

LEGGE

the Hon Gerald

Captain, 7th Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment. Killed in action 9th August 1915. Aged 33. Son of the Rt. Hon. William Henage Legge, 6th Earl of Dartmouth. No known grave. Commemorated on HELLES MEMORIAL, Turkey. Panel 134 to 136.

LEIGH, D.S.O.

Chandos

Major, 2nd Battalion, King's OWn Scottish Borderers. Died 29th August 1914. Aged 41. Son of the Hon. Sir E. Chandos Leigh; husband of Winifred Leigh. Brother of Edward Henry (below). Awarded the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O). Buried in HAUTRAGE MILITARY CEMETERY, Saint-Ghislain, Hainaut, Belgium. Plot II. Row A. Grave 5.

Extract from Distinguished Service Order 1886 to 1915 published by Naval & Military Press:

LEIGH, CHANDOS, Lieut., was born in Aug. 1873, son of the Honourable Sir E. Chandos Leigh, K.C., of 45, Upper Grosvenor Street, W., and of Lady Leigh. He was educated at Harrow and Cambridge, and joined the King's Own Scottish Borderers, through the Warwickshire Militia, 29 May, 1895, becoming Lieutenant 22 Sept. 1897. He served in the South African War, 1900-2, employed with Mounted Infantry, and took part in the Relief of Kimberley; operations in Orange Free State, 1900, including operations at Paardeberg; actions at Poplar Grove, Houtnek (Thoba Mountain), Vet River and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg and Diamond Hill; operations in Orange River Colony in 1900, including actions at Wittebergen and Bothaville; operations in the Transvaal, Orange River Colony and Cape Colony 30 Nov. 1900, to 31 May, 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 Sept. 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 Sept. 1901]: "Chandos Leigh, Lieut., King's Own Scottish Borderers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa." The Insignia were presented to him by the King 29 Oct. 1901. He was promoted to Captain 1 April, 1901. Capt. Leigh then spent ten years in the Egyptian Army. He took part in the operations against the Nyam Nyam Tribes in the Bahr-el-Ghazal Province, and received the Orders of the Medjidie and Osmanieh, and the Bahr-el-Ghazal Medal and clasp. Major Leigh went to France with his Regiment, and was reported missing on the 23rd Aug. 1914, at Mons. When last seen he was, though wounded, waving his men on, and telling them not to mind about him. Six months later returned wounded prisoners reported that he died in Aug. 1914, of wounds received in action at Mons. He was the first Harrovian to fall in the war. His only brother, Lieut. E. H. Leigh, 2nd Battn. Rifle Brigade, was killed on the Aubers Ridge in May, 1915, and their grief-stricken father died three days later. Major Leigh was a fine steeple-chase rider and polo player, as well as a keen cricketer and rider to hounds. He married Winifred, daughter of the late Right Honourable A. F. Jeffreys, M.P., of Buckham, Hampshire.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

LEIGH, CHANDOS, D.S.O., Major, 2nd Battn. King's Own Scottish Borderers, elder s. of the late Hon. Sir Edward Chandos Leigh, K.C., K.C.B., by his wife, Katherine Fanny (Knuston Hall, Irchester, Northants; 45, Upper Grosvenor Street, W.), dau. of the late James Rigby, of Moss House, Lancashire, D.L., and gdson. of Chandos, 1st Lord Leigh; b. 29 Aug. 1873; educ. Harrow and Cambridge; gazetted 2nd Lieut., 2nd King's Own Scottish Borderers, from the Militia, 29 May, 1895, and promoted Lieut. 22 Sept. 1897, Capt. 1 April, 1901, and Major, 17 June, 1914; served (1) in the South African War, 1900-2, employed with the Mounted Infantry; took part in the advance on, and relief of, Kimberley; operations in Orange Free State, 1900, including actions at Paardeberg , Poplar Grove, Houtnek (Thoba Mountain), Vet River and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal, May-June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg and Diamond Hill; operations in Orange River Colony, 1900, including actions at Wittebergen and Bothaville; and in operations in the Transvaal, Orange River Colony and Cape Colony, 30 Nov. 1900 to 31 May, 1902 (mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 Sept. 1901], Queen's medal with five clasps, D.S.0.); (2) with the Egyptian Army, 17 April, 1902, to 1912; took part in Bahr-el-Ghazal Expedition against the Nyam-Nyam Tribes 1905-6 (Egyptian medal with clasp; Medijidieh and Osmanich Orders); and (3) with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from 13 Aug. 1914; was reported missing and wounded after the Battle of Mons, 23 Aug. 1914, and died at Boussu shortly afterwards. When last seen, though severely wounded, he told his men to go on and never mind him, as the enemy were in great strength, and it was imperative to get back to blow up the canal bridge against their advance. Major Leigh was a fine horseman and polo player, winning his Regimental cup the year he joined the Army. He was well known with the Meath, Pytchley and other packs, won honours in the open jumping at the Dublin Horse Show, and headed the winning record for steeplechase riders, both amateurs and professional, on the Cairo Turf. He m. 6 June, 1912, Winifred Madeline, dau. of the late Rt. Hon. Arthur Frederick Jeffreys, of Burkham, Hampshire, P.C., M.P.; s.p.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

MAJOR CHANDOS LEIGH, D.S.O., 2nd BATTN. KING'S OWN SCOTTISH BORDERERS, born on the 29th August, 1873, was the elder son of the Hon. Sir E. Chandos Leigh, K.C.B., K.C., of 45, Upper Grosvenor Street, London, W., and a cousin of Lord Leigh, of Stoneleigh.

He was educated at Harrow and Cambridge, and joined the K.O.S.B. from the Warwickshire Militia in May, 1895, becoming Lieutenant in September, 1897. He served in the South African War, being employed with the Mounted Infantry. He was present at the relief of Kimberley; at operations in the Orange Free State and Paardeberg, with actions at Poplar Grove, Houtnek (Thoba Mountain), Vet and Zand Rivers: in the Transvaal, May and June, 1900, with actions near Johannes- burg and at Diamond Hill; operations in the Orange River Colony, with actions at Wittebergen and Bothaville; and at operations in the Transvaal, Orange River and Cape Colonies from November, 1900, to July, 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches ("London Gazette," 10th September, 1901), was awarded the D.S.O., and received the Queen's medal with five clasps. He was promoted Captain in April, 1901, and in April, 1902, was detached from his Regiment for employment with the Egyptian Army. While with it he saw active service in the Soudan in 1905, taking part in the operations against the Nyam Nyam tribes in the Bahrel-Ghazal Province. For his services he received the Egyptian medal with clasp, and was awarded the Orders of the Osmanieh and Medjidieh.

He was a fine horseman and polo player, and was well known on the Cairo turf, where he more than once headed the winning list of steeplechase riders, both amateur and professional. He had hunted from his boyhood in Warwickshire and Northamptonshire, and more recently with the Meath and Ward Union packs, when he was quartered with his Regiment in Ireland. He also took honours in the open jumping at the horse show in Dublin.

He was with his battalion at Belfast during the troubled time of the riots at Harland and Wolff's shipyards in 1912, and through the many succeeding labour troubles in Dublin from the strikes in August, 1913.

He gave his life at Mons on or about the 24th August, 1914, where, although severely wounded and in the open, he ordered his men to leave him and retire across the Canal, so that there should be no delay in blowing up the bridge in the face of the advancing Germans.

After having been returned as “missing " for seven months, news was received in March, 1915, from a returned disabled prisoner of the K.O.S.B. that Major Leigh died and was buried at Boussu shortly after the action in which he was wounded. He married, in June, 1913, Winifred, daughter of the late Right Hon. A. F. Jeffreys, M.P., of Burkham House, Hampshire.

LEIGH

Edward Henry

Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own). Killed in action 9th May 1915. Aged 26. Son of the late Sir Chandos Leigh and Lady Leigh. Brother of Chandos (above). No known grave. Commemorated on PLOEGSTEERT MEMORIAL, Comines-Warneton, Hainaut, Belgium. Panel 10.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

LEIGH, EDWARD HENRY, Lieut., 2nd Battn. The Rifle Brigade, yr. s. of the late Hon. Sir Edward Chandos Leigh, K.C., K.C.B. (who died suddenly, 18 May, 1915, three days after hearing of the death of his last surviving son), by his wife, Katherine Fanny (Knuston Hall, Irchester, Northants; 45, Upper Grosvenor Street., W.), dau. of the late James Rigby, of Moss House, Lancashire, D.L., and grandson of Chandos, 1st Lord Leigh; b. 14 July, 1888; educ. Harrow and Cambridge; gazetted Lieut., 2nd Battn. The Rifle Brigade, 17 April, 1913; left with his regt. for France, Nov. 1914, and was killed in the attack upon the Aubers Ridge, 9 May, 1915; unm. Lieut. Leigh was mentioned in F.M. Sir John (now Lord) French's Despatch of 5 April [London Gazette, 22 June], 1915.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

LIEUTENANT EDWARD HENRY LEIGH, 2nd BATTN., RIFLE BRIGADE, (THE PRINCE CONSORT'S OWN), who was killed at Fromelles on the 9th May, 1915, from a bullet wound in the head, was the son of the Hon. Sir Chandos and Lady Leigh, of 45, Upper Grosvenor Street, London, and grandson of the first Lord Leigh, of Stoneleigh, Warwickshire.

He was educated at Harrow and at Pembroke College, Cambridge. He joined this Regiment in September, 1912, with antedate, by virtue of his University degree, to September, 1911. He served two years in India, and was promoted Lieutenant in April, 1013. On returning home from India he went straight out to the front. During the attack on Neuve Chapelle, Lieutenant Leigh was in command of his company, his Captain having been fatally wounded at the beginning of the engagement.

Lieutenant Leigh, who was a singularly handsome man, was a bold rider to hounds and a good shot.

For his services in the war he was mentioned in Sir John French's Despatches of the 31st May, 1915.

LEWIS

Richard Percy

Lieutenant-Colonel, Devonshire Regiment attached Manchester Regiment. Killed in action 7th September 1917. Born 10th March 1874, Kensington, London. Educated at Winchester College and Oxford University. Buried in YPRES RESERVOIR CEMETERY, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot I. Row A. Grave 57.

See his statistics on CricInfo, extract from Wisden Cricketers' Almanack

LEWIS, LIEUT.-COL. RICHARD PERCY (Manchester Regt.), born March 10, 1874 (according to the Winchester and Oxford Registers), died of wounds, September 9. Had previously been wounded. Winchester XI, 1891, 1892; Surrey XI, 1892: Middlesex XI, 1898; Oxford University XI, 1894-5-6. Went with Priestley's team to West Indies, 1897. Played much Military cricket, for Devon Regt., King's African Rifles, Egyptian Army, etc. Lewis seemed likely at one time to be a great wicket-keeper. At Winchester he was spoken of as a coming MacGregor, but it cannot be said that he quite fulfilled his early promise. His ability was beyond question, but his hands would not stand the hard work of first-class matches, and when they went wrong he had bad days. He had no pretensions as a batsman, and in the University match in 1894 he was very pleased that he managed to stay for a couple of overs, enabling Charles Fry to add seventeen runs and complete his hundred. Served in the South African War. Member of M.C.C. since 1893.

LODER

Robert Egerton

[Listed as LODGER on SDGW] Captain, 1st/4th Battalion (Territorial), Royal Sussex Regiment. Died of wounds 29th March 1917. Aged 30. Son of Sir Edmund and Lady Loder, of Leonardslie, Horsham, Sussex; husband of Muriel Rolls Loder, of Clock House, Cowfold, Sussex. Buried in DEIR EL BELAH WAR CEMETERY, Israel. Plot/Row/Section C. Grave 73. See also the Cowfold War Memorial

LOGAN

Hugh

Lieutenant, Leicestershire Yeomanry. Died 24th February 1919. Aged 33. Born 10th May 1885, East Langton Grange, Market Harborough, Leicestershire Son of Maud A. Logan and the late John W. Logan; husband of Phyllis Logan, of "Tresco", Hewlett Rd., Cheltenham, Glos. Buried in TOURNAI COMMUNAL CEMETERY ALLIED EXTENSION, Tournai, Hainaut, Belgium. Plot IV. Row G. Grave 10.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

LOGAN, HUGH, Lieut., 1st Battn. (Prince Albert's Own) Leicestershire Yeomanry (T.F.), attd. Royal Engineers, yr. s. of John William Logan, of East. Langton Grange, Market Harborough, J.P. (1891 to 1904 and 1910 to 1916), M.P. for Harborough Division of Leicestershire), by his wife, Maud Ansdall, dau. of the Rev. B. E. Watkins, Rector of Treeton, Rotherham; b. East Langton Grange, Market Harborough, co. Leicester, 10 May, 1885; educ. Westminster, and Trinity Hall, Cambridge; was a Railway Engineer gazetted 2nd Lieut. Leicestershire Yeomanry in 1915; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders; was subsequently attached to the 271st Railway Constructional Coy.. Royal Engineers, and died at a casualty clearing station 24 Feb. 1919, of pneumonia, contracted while on active service. Buried at Tournay. He m. Phyllis, dau. of C. R. Hemingway, of Doncaster, and had one child.

See his statistics at CricInfo

LONG, C.M.G., D.S.O.

Walter

Brigadier-General, 2nd Dragoons (Royal Scots Greys) and General Staff, commanding 56th Infantry Brigade. Killed in action 28th January 1917. Aged 37. Son of Rt. Hon. Walter Hume Long, P.C., M.P. Secretary of State for the Colonies (afterwards 1st Viscount Long of Wraxall) and of Lady Dorothy Blanche Long (now Viscountess Long of Wraxall) daughter of 9th Earl of Cork and Orrery; husband of Hon. Mrs. Walter Long, O.B.E. (now Hon. Mrs. Ralph Glyn). Awarded Companion of the Most Distinguished Order of St. Michael and St. George (C.M.G.) and Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.). Twice Mentioned in Despatches. Order of St. Stanislas 2nd Class, with swords. Buried in COUIN BRITISH CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot VI. Row C. Grave 19.

Extract from Distinguished Service Order 1886 to 1915 published by Naval & Military Press:

LONG, WALTER, Capt., was born 26 July, 1879, eldest son of the Right Honourable Walter Long, P.C., J.P., D.L., F.R.S., LL.D., M.P., First Lord of the Admiralty, and Lady Doreen, fourth daughter of the 9th Earl of Cork and Orrery. He was educated at Harrow (Moretens, March, 1893, to Feb. 1898); was commissioned in the Scots Greys, 20 May, 1899, from the Militia; became Lieutenant 10 July, 1900, and Captain 23 April, 1902. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, and was severely wounded after the Relief of Kimberley, having taken part in the famous ride of Sir John French; part of the time he served as A.D.C. to Sir John French. He was present during the operations in the Transvaal, May, 1901, to May, 1902; on the Zululand Frontier of Natal in Sept. and Oct. 1901, also in Cape Colony in May, 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 29 Aug. 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with two clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, Oct. 1902]: "Walter Long, Capt., 2nd Dragoons. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa." He was A.D.C. to Major-General General, 1st Cavalry Brigade, Aldershot, 1 April to 30 Sept. 1903, and 1 Oct. 1903, to 31 March. 1906; Adjutant, Scots Greys, 11 Oct. 1906, to 1909; A.D.C. to the Governor-General and Commander-in-Chief, Dominion of Canada, 6 Oct. 1911, to 5 Oct. 1913. He was for a time D.C. to Sir O'Moore Creagh, Commander-in-Chief in India; specially employed at the War Office 24 April to 31 May, 1912; Staff Captain, War Office, 1 June, 1912, to 25 Jan. 1915; D.A.A.G. 26 Jan. to 13 July, 1915 A.A.G. 14 July, 1915. He went to France in Aug. 1914, being then Captain in charge of a Squadron, and was shortly afterwards promoted Major (1 April, 1915), then Lieutenant-Colonel Commanding the 6th Battn. Wiltshire Regt. (from 14 Dec. 1915), and received the C.M.G. He was several times mentioned in Despatches, and promoted to Brigadier-General Commanding 56th Brigade, 19th Division, and made a Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel. He was killed in action when in the trenches at Hébuterne on 28 Jan. 1917.
His Majesty the King wrote: "The Queen and I are deeply grieved to hear that your son has been killed in action after such a distinguished career, and in the prime of youth. I regret that my Army has lost one of its promising young Generals."
H.R.H. the Duke of Connaught wrote: "In Toby the Army and the Scots Greys have lost a splendid officer, who has always set the finest example and whose name will long be remembered. His has been a glorious death, falling in action in command of his Brigade."
Field-Marshal Sir Douglas Haig wrote: "As the General under whom he was directly serving will have told you, his death deprives the Army of one of our best Brigadiers. As a soldier he was so practical, and thoroughly up to his work. I always felt he was sure to attain high rank, and, as a man, he was loved and admired by us all for his manly straightforward ways."
At a meeting held in furtherance of the War Loan in the City Town Hall, Mr. Walter Long was the chief speaker. "The Colonial Secretary, who had a very sympathetic reception, said it was no secret that an event. which had occurred this week in his domestic circle would in ordinary circumstances have led him to choose seclusion rather than appearance on a public platform; but he felt that it was his duty to come to the meeting in order to spread the lesson that they must all put their backs into the war in order to bring it to a triumphal conclusion. He had this further incentive that his wife and daughter-in-law desired him to come in order to say that their one thought was that the people of this country should not hesitate to do their duty. A still stronger incentive was the knowledge that there had come to him from the son whose loss he should deplore as long as he lived a message, silently given, that nothing should prevent him doing his duty. Until we at home realized the issue of this war, depended on ourselves and. on the sacrifices that we were prepared to make, we should not have the determination that was necessary to make our cause triumphant. It. was pitiful and almost incredible that at a time like the present men should have to be searched for and dug out in order to obtain their services. It was not because they were not patriotic or ready to serve, but because of the widespread prevalence of the idea that everything that was necessary was being done. Since he had been at the Colonial Office he had been very much struck by the liberality and spontaneity of the contributions from various parts of the Empire where money was none too plentiful. Recently separate contributions of £800, £200 and £20 had been received from three native treasury chests in Northern Nigeria, accompanied by expressions of fervent hope for our victory over Germany. With such examples before us, surely we, who had taken real liberty and real freedom into the countries over which we ruled, would give our last penny in order that these priceless assets might not only remain with us, but might be handed down unimpaired to those who came after. We were profiting by what our forefathers had done. Let us take care that our children should profit by what we were doing to-day. It was the duty of all to give to the Government every penny they could possibly spare, in order that our sailors and soldiers might have the reward they so much desired, namely, the winning of this war speedily. In talking matters over with a dear old friend, he had come to the conclusion that he might help those whom he was addressing to realize what duty really was if he referred to the example of the son whom he had lost. He was a very true Knight, sans peer et saes reproche; he lived his whole life for one thing, and one thing alone—duty—and he died as he had lived. The General Officer Commanding his son's division and written of him: And now he is gone to join that gallant band to which we have all contributed, and will contribute without fear. They are never far from us out here—the gallant dead—they watch our progress keenly and cheer us by their memory and example.' A fine thought for all of us to-day! That as the gallant, dead are not gone but are cheering on their comrades to victory, so must they be cheering us on here to still greater effort, not blaming us, not reproaching us, but telling us, in voices to which our ears cannot be deaf, that it is our bounden and sacred duty to do our utmost to help our country in her time of difficulty and trial." Lieut.-Colonel Long was Champion Light Weight Boxer, and twice won the Middle Weight, Boxing Championship of the British Army. He married, in 1910, the Hon. Sibell Johnstone, eldest daughter of Lord Derwent and Ethel (who died in 1901), eldest daughter of Capt. H. Strickland, late of the Life Guards, and there is one son.

LUCAS-TOOTH

Sir Archibald Leonard, Baronet

Major, 2nd/1st "B" Battery, Honourable Artillery Company (Territorial Force) attached 126th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Died 12th July 1918. Aged 34. 2nd Baronet. Son of Sir Robert Lucas Lucas-Tooth and Helen, Lady Lucas-Tooth; husband of Rosa Mary, Lady Lucas-Tooth, of 30, Princes Gardens, London. Buried in AUBIGNY COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Pas de Calais, France. Plot V. Row B. Grave 4.

LYNCH, D.S.O.

Colmer William Ddonald

Lieutenant-Colonel, 9th Battalion, King's Own (Yorkshire Light Infantry). Killed in action 2nd July 1916. Aged 35. Son of Mrs. M. Florence Lynch, of "Pareora," Stoke, Guildford, and the late Maj. Gen. William Wiltshire Lynch. Awarded the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.). Buried in NORFOLK CEMETERY, BECORDEL-BECOURT, Somme, France. Plot I. Row B. Grave 87.

Extract from The Distinguished Service Order 1916-1923 published by Naval & Military Press

LYNCH, C.W.D. (D.S.O. L.G. 3.6.16), T/Lt.-Col., The King's Own (Yorks. L.I.). He was killed in action 2.7.1916.

London Gazette, 3 June 1916.-"War Office, 3 June 1916. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the undermentioned rewards for Distinguished Service in the field, dated 3 June 1916. Awarded the Distinguished Service Order."

LYNCH, COLMER WILLIAM DONALD, Capt. (Temporary Lieut.-Colonel), Reserve of Officers, Commanding Service Battn. Yorkshire Light Infantry.

LYON, C.B.

Herbert

Commodore - Admiral (Retired), Royal Navy. Died 15th March 1919. Companion of the Order of Bath (C.B.). 3rd Class Order of Merit (Spain); 2nd and 3rd Class Orders of the Nichau-Imtiaz (Turkey); Collar Order of Commander of the Order of Redeemer (Greece). Son of A. W. Lyon, J.P., of Abbotsclownholme, Rocester, Stafford; husband of Frances Violet Lyon (nee Inglis), of Stoke Cottage, Stoke, Devonport. Educated at Windlesham House, Brighton and the Rev. H. Burney's, Royal Academy, Gosport. Served in Charybdis in the Lingi and Lukut River Expeditions, Straits of Malacca and Perak; in Zulu War; as Captain of Retribution, at the blockade of Venezuela, and as Commodore at Hong Kong. Returned to active service afloat during the Great War as Captain, R.N.R., H.M. Yacht Safa el Bahr, on Patrol duty in the Mediterranean and later as Commodore, R.N.R., of Patrols at Malta. His son, Lieut. Comdr. H. I. N. Lyon, R.N., also fell in the Great War.

MacANDREW

Ronald

Lieutenant, 5th Battalion, Royal Irish Regiment. Killed in action 16th August 1915. No known grave. Commemorated on HELLES MEMORIAL, Turkey. Panel 55.

MACKENZIE

Mark Kincaid

Lieutenant, 4th Battallion attached 3rd Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Killed in action 1st February 1916. Aged 26. Born 22nd August 1888, New Town, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland. Son of the Hon. Lord Charles Kincaid Mackenzie, LL.D. and Lady Mackenzie (nee Young), of Edinburgh; brother of Mr. A. D. Mackenzie, of Wester Shian, Gullane, East Lothian. Buried in MONTCORNET MILITARY CEMETERY, Aisne, France. Plot/Row/Section H. Grave 6.

See his statistics on CricInfo

MALCOLMSON

James Grant

Captain, 27th Company, 18th (County of London) Battalion (London Irish Rifles), London Regiment. Died 22nd December 1914. Born in Bombay. Son of the late Capt. John Grant Malcolmson, V.C., M.V.O. (Royal Body Guards), and the late Mrs. A. E. Malcolmson (nee Grimble); husband of Helen Elizabeth Malcolmson, of 2, Salisbury House, St. Aubyns, Hove, Sussex. Buried in ALL SOULS' CEMETERY, KENSAL GREEN, London. Grave reference 99. 14117. Roadside.

MANNERS

the Hon John Neville

Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, Grenadier Guards. Killed in action 1st September 1914. Aged 22. Son of John Thomas Manners, 3rd Baron Manners, of Avon Tyrrell, Christchurch, Hants. No known grave. Commemorated on LA FERTE-SOUS-JOUARRE MEMORIAL, Seine-et-Marne, France.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

LIEUTENANT the Honble. JOHN NEVILLE MANNERS, 2nd BATTN. GRENADIER GUARDS, eldest son of the third Baron Manners, of Avon Tyre11, Christchurch, Hants, was born on the 6th January, 1892. He joined the Grenadier Guards in 1912, becoming Lieutenant in September, 1913, and was killed in action on the 1st September, 1914, near Villers Cotterets, France.

MARKER, D.S.O.

Raymond John

Colonel, Assistant Adjutant and Q.M.G. (Aldershot), 1 Army Corps H.Q., General Staff formerly Coldstream Guards. Died 13th November 1914. Aged 47. Officer of the Legion of Honour. Son of Richard Marker and the Hon. Mrs. Richard Marker, of Combe; husband of Mrs. R. J. Marker, of Combe, Honiton, Devon. Awarded the Distinguished Service order (D.S.O.). Buried east of the church in ST. MICHAEL CHURCHYARD, GITTISHAM, Devon.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

MARKER, RAYMOND JOHN, D.S.O., Col., Coldstream Guards 1888-1913, Staff Officer, eldest s. of Richard Marker, of Combe, Honiton, Co. Devon, J.P., D.L., late Capt. 1st Devon Yeomanry, by his wife, the Hon. Victoria Alexandrina, née Digby, eldest dau. of Edward, 9th Baron Digby; b. Upcerne Manor, Dorchester, 18 April, 1867; educ. Evelyns Preparatory School, Eton, and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst; gazetted 2nd Lieut. Coldstream Guards, 15 Nov. 1888, and promoted Lieut., 29 Sept. 1890; Capt. 1st Battn. 24 Jan. 1898; Brevet Major, 26 June, 1902; Major, 29 Nov. 1903; Lieut.-¬Col. 2nd Battn. 11 March, 1911, and Col. 5 Aug. 1914; was Adjutant, Coldstream Guards, 7 March, 1892, to 6 March, 1896; A.D.C. to Gov. and Com-in-Chief (Sir Joseph West Ridgway), Ceylon, 7 March, 1896, to 5 Dec., 1897; A.D.C. to Viceroy of India, 6 Jan. 1899 to 9 March, 1900; on special service in South Africa, 7 April, 1900, to 8 March, 1901; and A.D.C. to General Officer, Com- in-Chief the Forces, South Africa, 9 March, 1901, to Sept. 1902; served through that campaign; took part in the operations in the Orange Free State, April to May, 1900, including actions at Vet River and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal, May to June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria, and Diamond Hill; operations in the Transvaal, East of Pretoria, July to Aug. 1900, including action at Belfast; operations in Orange River Colony, Sept. to 29 Nov. 1900 and 30 Nov. to Dec. 1900; operations in Cape Colony, Dec. 1900 to March 1901, and operations in the Transvaal, March, 1901, to 31 May, 1902 (three times mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 23 April, 7 May, and 10 Sept. 1901]; Brevet of Major, Queen’s medal with five clasps, King’s medal with two clasps, D.S.O., placed on list of officers concerned qualified for Staff employment, in consequence of services on the Staff in the Field); was in charge at Vereenigen during deliberations of Boer Generals and with Col. (afterwards Major-Gen.) Hubert Hamilton brought home peace despatches to Windsor, June, 1902; A.D.C. to Com.-in-Chief, East Indies, 28 Nov. 1902 to 30 April, 1904; Private Secretary of State for War (Mr. Arnold Foster), 1 Jan. 1905 to 18 Oct. 1905; A.D.C. to Com.-in-Chief East Indies, 5 Nov. 1905 to 27 Oct. 1906; General Staff Officer, 2nd Grade, Home Counties Division, E. Command, 1 April, 1908 to 12 June, 1910; in command of 2nd Battn. Coldstream Guards, March 1912 to Nov. 1913; A.Q.M.G. Aldershot Command, 29 Nov. 1913 to Aug. 1914; A.A. and Q.M.G. 1st Army Corps, British Expeditionary Force, in France; served through the retreat from Mons, the Battles of the Aisne and the Marne (twice mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 19 Oct. 1914, and 17 Feb. 1915] Cross of Officer of the Legion of Honour); was wounded at Ypres, 4 Nov. 1914, and died at Boulogne on the 13th. Buried at Gittisham, Honiton. He m. at the Guards Chapel, Wellington Barracks, 21 Nov. 1906, Beatrice Minnie Shrieve, 3rd dau. of Sir Thomas Jackson, of Stansted House, Essex, 1st Bart., and had a son: Richard Raymond Kitchener, b. 18 June, 1908.

Extract from The Distinguished Service Order 1886-1915 published by Naval & Military Press:

MARKER, RAYMOND JOHN, Capt., was the son of Richard Marker, Esq., J.P., of Combe, Honiton, and the Hon. Venetia Alexandrina (née Digby), eldest daughter of Edward, 9th Baron Digby. He was born at Upcerne Manor, Dorchester, 18 April, 1867; was educated at Evelyn's Pre- paratory School, Eton, and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, and was gazetted Second Lieutenant, Coldstream Guards, 15 Nov. 1888, becoming Lieutenant 29 Sept. 1890. From 1892 to 1896 he was Adjutant of the 1st Battn. Coldstream Guards, and from 1896 to 1897 A.D.C. to Sir J. West Ridgeway, Governor and Commander-in-Chief in Ceylon, and from 1899 to 1900 A.D.C. to Lord Curzon, Viceroy of India. He was on Special Service in South Africa 7 April, 1900, to S March, 1901, and A.D.C. to Lord Kitchener, Commander-in-Chief of the Forces in South Africa, 9 March, 1901, to Sept. 1902. He served throughout the campaign, taking part in the operations in the Orange Free State, April to May, 1900, including actions at Vet River and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal, May to June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill. Operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to Aug. 1900, including the action at Belfast; operations in Orange River Colony, Sept. to 29 Nov. 1900, and 30 Nov. to Dec. 1900. Operations in Cape Colony, Dec. 1900, to March, 1901, and operations in the Transvaal, March, 1901, to 31 May, 1902. He was three times mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 23 April, 7 May and 10 Sept. 1901]; was given the Brevet of Major 26 June, 1902; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps; was placed on the list of officers considered qualified for Staff employment in consequence of services on the Staff in the Field, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 23 April, 1901] : "Raymond John Marker, Capt., Coldstream Guards. For the capture of De Wet's gun and pom-pom in Cape Colony. Dated 23 April, 1901." The Insignia were presented to him by the Duke of Cornwall and York 14 Aug. 1901. Capt. Marker and the then Colonel Hubert Hamilton brought home Peace Despatches to the King at Windsor in June, 1902. He accompanied Lord Kitchener to India as A.D.C. (28 Nov. 1902, to 30 April, 1904); became Major 29 Nov. 1903, and in 1904 proceeded to the Staff College, qualifying in the following year. For part of 1905 he was Private Secretary to Mr. Arnold Forster, Secretary of State for War, and he was later appointed A.D.C. to the Commander-in-Chief in India (5 Nov. 1905, to 27 Oct. 1906). From 1 April, 1908, to 12 June, 1910, he was G.S.O.2, Home Counties Division, Eastern Command; became Lieutenant-Colonel 11 March, 1911, and from March, 1912, to Nov. 1913, was in command of the 1st Battn. Coldstream Guards. He was A.Q.M.G., Aldershot Command, 29 Nov. 1913, to Aug. 1914; was promoted to Colonel 5 Aug. 1914, and accompanied the British Expeditionary Force to France as A.A. and Q.M.G., 1st Army Corps; served through the Retreat from Mons, the battles of the Aisne and the Marne; was twice mentioned in Sir John French's Despatches [London Gazette, 19 Oct. 1914, and 17 Feb. 1915], and was made an Officer of the Legion of Honour for his services during the retirement from Mons. Colonel Marker was hit by a shell on the 4th Nov. 1914, outside the reporting centre of the 1st Army Corps at Ypres, and died of his wounds at Boulogne on the 13th of the same month. He was buried at Gittisham, Honiton. He had married, on 21 Nov. 1906, at the Guards' Chapel, Wellington Barracks, Beatrice Minnie Shrieve, third daughter of Sir Thomas Jackson, Bart., and Amelia Lydia Dare, and they had one son, Richard Raymond Kitchener, born 18 June, 1908.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

COLONEL RAYMOND JOHN MARKER, D.S.O., p.s.c., LATE COLD-STREAM GUARDS, A.A., AND Q.M.G., was the son of Richard Marker, Esq., J.P., of Combe, Honiton, and the Hon. Mrs. Marker, daughter of the ninth Lord Digby, and was born on the 18th April, 1867, at Upcerne Manor, Dorset. He was educated at Evelyns, Eton, and the R.M.C., Sandhurst, joining the Coldstream Guards in 1888, becoming Captain in 1898, and obtaining his substantive Majority in 1903.

From 1892 to 1896 he was Adjutant of the 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards, and 1896-97 A.D.C. to Sir W. Ridgeway, Governor and Commander-in-Chief in Ceylon; and from 1899 to 1900 A.D.C. to Lord Curzon,Viceroy of India. In the latter year he went to South Africa on special service for the Boer War, and in 1901 became A.D.C. to Lord Kitchener, Commander-in-Chief of the Forces in South Africa, and accompanied him to India in a similar position, retaining it until 1904. In the South African War Colonel Marker was present at the actions at Vet River, Zand River, Johannesburg, near Pretoria, Diamond Hill, and Belfast. He was mentioned three times in Despatches, and with the then Colonel Hubert Hamilton brought home peace despatches to the King at Windsor; for these services he was given the Brevet-rank of Major, June, 1902, the D.S.O. for taking De Wet's guns, the Queen's medal with five clasps, and the King's medal with two clasps. He was also placed on the list of officers qualified for the Staff through Staff service in the field. In 1904 Colonel Marker proceeded to the Staff College, qualifying in the following year, for part of which he was Private Secretary to the Secretary of State for War, and was later appointed A.D.C. to the Commander-in-Chief in India, where he remained until 1906. From 1907 to 1910 he was General Staff Officer, Home Counties, and in 1912 he succeeded to the command of the 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards, being in November, 1913, appointed A.Q.M.G. on the headquarters of the Aldershot Command. He accompanied the British Expeditionary Force to France as A.A. and Q.M.G. of the 1st Army Corps.

For his services in the Great War Colonel Marker was mentioned in Sir John French's Despatches of the 8th October, 1914, and the 14th January, 1915; and was made an Officer of the Legion of Honour for his services during the retirement from Mons. He was hit by a shell on the 4th November, 1914, outside the reporting centre of the 1st Army Corps at Ypres, and died of his wounds on the 13th of that month.

Colonel Marker was a member of the Guards', Travellers', Carlton, Turf, and Pratt's Clubs. He married, in 1906, Beatrice Minnie Shrieve, third daughter of Sir Thomas Jackson, Bart., and Lady Jackson, and left a son, Richard Raymond Kitchener, born on the 18th June, 1908.

MARKHAM

Ronald Anthony

Major, 2nd Battalion, Coldstream Guards. Died of wounds 26th October 1914. Aged 44. Son of Col. William Thomas Markham, of The House, Melton Mowbray. Twice Mentioned in Despatches. Buried in SYSONBY CHURCHYARD, Leicestershire. See also Morland War Memorial, Westmorland

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

MAJOR RONALD ANTHONY MARKHAM, 2nd BATTALION COLDSTREAM GUARDS, was the only surviving son of the late Colonel W. T. Markham, of Becca Hall, Yorkshire, who served in the Crimean War in the Rifle Brigade and Coldstream Guards, and grandson of Sir Francis Grant, P.R.A.

He was born on the 15th October, 1870; educated at Charterhouse; and joined the Coldstream Guards from the Militia in December, 1890, becoming Lieutenant in August, 1896, and Captain in December, 1899.

He served with the first advance against the Khalifa in the Nile Expedition of 1899, for which he received the Egyptian medal and clasp. From August, 1899, to August, 1903, he was employed with the Egyptian Army, acting as A.D.C. to the Sirdar from April, 1900, to December, 1902, for which he received the Insignia of the 4th Class of the Imperial Order of the Medjidieh. He was promoted Major in 1907.

He was shot through the head at St. Julien, France, on the 25th October, 1914, and, at the time of his death was Second in Command of his battalion. He was mentioned in Sir John French's Despatches of the 8th October, 1914, and the 14th January, 1915.

He was a member of the Guards', Nulli Secundus, and the Turf Clubs; also of the M.C.C. and I Zingari. He was fond of cricket and shooting, and was a very keen and hard rider to hounds. He was born at Melton Mowbray, from which place he had hunted all his life, and where his interment took place.

MARSHAM-TOWNSHEND

Ferdinand

[Listed as MARSHAM-TOWNSEND on SDGW] Second Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, Scots Guards. Killed in action 16th May 1915. Aged 35. Son of The Hon. Robert and Mrs. Marsham-Townshend, of 5, Chesterfield St., Mayfair, London. Buried in GUARDS CEMETERY, WINDY CORNER, CUINCHY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot IV. Row K. Grave 20.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

MARSHAM-TOWNSHEND, FERDINAND, 2nd Lieut., Scots Guards, yr. s. of the late Hon. Robert Marsham-Townshend, J.P., D.L., by his wife, Clara Catherine (Frognal,. Sidcup, Kent, and 5, Chesterfield Street, Mayfair, W.), 2nd dau. of the Rev. George Barber Paley, Rector of Freckenham, co. Suffolk; and gdson. of Charles, 2nd Earl of Romney; b. Chesterfield Street, Mayfair, W., 17 April, 1880; educ. Mortimer, co. Berks; Eton, and Christ College, Oxford; joined the Scots Guards, Special Reserve, as 2nd Lieut. 3 Feb. 1915; went to France 18 March, and was killed in action in Rue du Bois, near Festubert, 16 May following. Buried at La Quinque Rue there. He was one of the two officers, who with 80 Scots Guardsmen, were found dead in the Rue du Bois, surrounded by 200 German corpses; they had fought to the last cartridge. He was a keen steeplechase rider and owned many racehorses; unm.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 2:

2nd LIEUTENANT FERDINAND MARSHAM-TOWNSHEND, SPECIAL RESERVE (attd. 2nd BATTN.) SCOTS GUARDS, who was killed in action on the 16th May, 1915, near Festubert, France, and was buried there, was the second son of the Hon. Robert Marsham - Townshend, J.P., D.L., M.A. Oxon, F.S.A., formerly in the Diplomatic Service, son of the 3rd Earl of Romney, of Frognal, Sidcup, Kent, and his wife, the Hon. Mrs. Marsham-Townshend, daughter of the Rev. George Barber Paley, Rector of Freckenham, Suffolk.

2nd Lieutenant F. Marsham-Townshend was born at 5, Chesterfield Street, Mayfair, London, on the 17th April, 1880, and was educated at Eton and at Christ Church, Oxford, where he took his degree of B.A. in 1903. He received his commission on probation in the Special Reserve of Scots Guards in February, 1915, and for active service was attached to the 2nd Battalion of his Regiment. 2nd Lieutenant P. Marsham-Townshend had been at the front for about two months when he was killed.

The following account of the fighting on the 16th pay, 1915, was published in a weekly paper: “Another episode which sent my mind back to the early days of the War was the heroic stand of the officers and men of the Scots Guards in the sanguinary fighting in the Rue du Bois. Two officers and eighty men of the Scots Guards fought to the last cartridge, and were found dead in the Rue du Bois, surrounded by heaps of German corpses. This was during the fighting at Festubert. This is what Mr. Valentine Williams says of these brave fellows: 'Soaked by the rain, blackened by the sun, their bodies were not beautiful to look upon ; but the German dead spread plentifully around, the empty cartridge cases scattered about, the twisted bayonets and the broken rifles showed the price a Scots Guard sets upon his honour. No monarch ever had a finer lying in state than those eighty guardsmen dead amid the long coarse grass of this dreary Flanders plain.'”

2nd Lieutenant Marsham-Townshend was one of the two officers referred to. He was a member of the Bachelors' and Bath Clubs.

MAXWELL

Aymer Edward

Lieutenant-Colonel, temporarily Lovat Scouts formerly (late Grenadier Guards), commanding Collingwood Battalion, Royal Naval Division, commissioned to Captain 1st, Lovat Scouts. Died 9th October 1914. Aged 36. Son of the Rt. Hon. Sir Herbert Maxwell, 7th Bart., of Monreith, Wigtownshire, and Lady Maxwell; husband of Lady Mary Maxwell, of House of Elrig, Portwilliam, Wigtownshire. Served in the South African Campaign with Grenadier Guards. Buried in SCHOONSELHOF CEMETERY, Antwerpen, Belgium. Plot IIa. Grave 69. See also Port William War Memorial

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

MAXWELL, AYMER EDWARD, Younger of Monreith, Lieut.-Col. Commanding 4th (Collingwood) Battn. 1st Brigade, R.N. Division, only surviving s. of the Rt. Hon. Sir Herbert Maxwell, 7th Bart, P.C., F.R.S.; b. Edinburgh, 26 Oct. 1877: educ. Eton and Sandhurst; gazetted to the Grenadier Guards, 8 Sept. 1897; served in South African War 1899-1900; took part in the advance on Kimberley, including the actions at Belmont and Enslin (Queen’s medal with clasp); invalided home, 1900; and retired with rank of Captain, 4 Sept. 1907, joining the Reserve of Officers; Capt. Lovat’s Scouts (Yeo.), 1911. On mobilisation, Aug. 1914, he immediately rejoined the Grenadier Guards, and subsequently volunteered for service as Adjutant and second in command in the newly-formed Royal Naval Division. He received command, with the rank of Lieut.-Col. of the Collingwood Battn. then in camp at Walmer, and with it accompanied the expedition to Antwerp. He was wounded in the head by the first shell of the bombardment of 8 Oct. after four days and nights of ceaseless exertion, almost entirely without sleep or rest, and died the following day in the Military Hospital there, being burled in the garden. The officer commanding the Brigade, wrote: “His death is a severe loss to my brigade. I personally have lost a friend, the whole brigade has lost one of its finest officers. His energy, earnestness and singleness of purpose inspired his whole Battn., and both his officers and men were animated by his fine spirit from the moment he assumed command of them.” He was gazetted temporary Lieut.-Col. Royal Marines (10 Nov.) after his death. Colonel Maxwell was a J.P., D.T. and County Councillor for Wigtownshire, a Director of the Crlchton Royal Institution and author of various works and articles on sporting subjects. He m., London, 20 Oct. 1909, Lady Mary Percy dau. of Henry George, 7th Duke of Northumberland, K.G., P.C., by his wife, Lady Edith Campbell, eldest dau. of George, 8th Duke of Argyll, K.G., K.T., P.C., and had issue three sons and a dau.: Aymer, b. 7 Dec. 1011; Eustace, b. 24 Feb. 1913; Gavin, b. 15 July, 1914; and Christian, b. 31 July, 1910.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

LIEUT.-COLONEL AYMER EDWARD MAXWELL, CAPTAIN 1st LOVAT'S SCOUTS YEOMANRY, LATE CAPTAIN GRENADIER GUARDS (CAPTAIN RESERVE OF OFFICERS), was the only surviving son of the Right Hon. Sir Herbert Eustace Maxwell, P.C., seventh Baronet, and was born on the 26th October,1877.

He was educated at Eton and the R.M.C., Sandhurst, from which he entered the Grenadier Guards in September, 1897, being promoted Lieutenant in 1899 and Captain in June, 1904. He served in the South African War, taking part in the advance on Kimberley, including actions at Belmont and Enslin, for which he received the Queen's medal with clasp. He retired from the active list, entered the Reserve of Officers, Grenadier Guards, in September, 1907, and was appointed Captain in Lovat's Scouts Yeomanry in November, 1910.

He received a temporary commission as Lieutenant-Colonel in the Royal Marines ("London Gazette," 10th November, 1914), in September, 1914, with command of the “Collingwood" Battalion of the Royal Naval Division. He was mortally wounded in the trenches at Antwerp on the 8th October, and died in the Military Hospital there on the following day.

Lieutenant-Colonel Maxwell married, in 1909, Lady Mary Percy, fifth daughter of the seventh Duke of Northumberland, and left four children : Christian, born July, 1910; Aymer, born December, 1911; Eustace, born February, 1913; and Gavin, born July, 1914.

McCLOUGHIN, MiD

Kenelm Rees

Major, 14th King George's Own Ferozepore Sikhs formerly Royal Garrison Artillery, attached 11th Battalion, Royal Scots. Died 25th September 1915. Aged 31. Son of Thomas John and Mary Kathleen McCloughin. Mentioned in Despatches (MiD). No known grave. Commemorated on NEUVE-CHAPELLE MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 18.

McCONNEL, MiD

Merrick Hugh

Major, "B" Battery, 295th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Died of wounds 14th September 1917. Educated at Winchester. Son of William Houldsworth McConnel and Florence McConnel, of Heath End House, Basingstoke; husband of M. C. McConnel, of Polydores, Holmer Green, Amersham, Bucks. Mentioned in Despatches (MiD). Buried in LIJSSENTHOEK MILITARY CEMETERY, Poperinge, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot XIX. Row B. Grave 3

McCORMICK

Gregory Day

Lieutenant-Colonel, 72nd Punjabis attached 2nd Battalion, 122nd Rajputana Infantry. Died 21st December 1919. Buried Jandola Cemetery, India. Grave 7. Commemorated on DELHI MEMORIAL (INDIA GATE), India. Face 26.

McDONNELL, G.C.V.O., K.C.B.

the Hon Sir Schomberg Kerr

Major, 5th Battalion, Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders. Died of wounds 23rd November 1916. Aged 54. Awarded Knight Grand Cross in The Royal Victoria Order (G.C.V.O.) and Knights Commander of the Order of the Bath (K.C.B.). Fifth son of Mark, 5th Earl of Antrim, and Jane, his wife, of Glenarm, Co. Antrim. Buried in LIJSSENTHOEK MILITARY CEMETERY, Poperinge, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot II. Row A. Grave 7.

McNEILE

John

Lieutenant-Colonel, 1st/4th (The Border) Battalion (Territorial), King's Own Scottish Borderers. Killed in action 12th July 1915. No known grave. Commemorated on HELLES MEMORIAL, Turkey. Panel 84 to 92 or 220 to 222.

MELVILLE

William Woodfall

Lieutenant, "C" Company, 6th Battalion attached 2nd Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Killed in action 9th May 1915. Son of the late Robert Melville (County Court Judge of Hereford and Shropshire), and the late Mrs. Melville, of Hartfield Grove, Sussex; husband of Violet S. Melville, of Maypool, Galmpton, Brixham, Devon. No known grave. Commemorated on LE TOURET MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 32 and 33.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 2:

LIEUTENANT WILLIAM WOODFALL MELVILLE, 6th (RESERVE) attd. 2nd BATTN. THE KING'S ROYAL RIFLE CORPS, was the son of the late Robert Melville, of Hartfield Grove, Sussex, County Court Judge for Hereford and Shropshire, and of Mrs. Melville.

He was born on the 2nd April, 1877, at Hartfield Grove, Sussex, and served in the South African War with the C.I.V. Mounted Infantry, receiving the Queen's medal with six clasps, and being given the freedom of the City of London on his return. He was called to the Bar at Lincoln's Inn in 1905, and was one of the Principal Clerks in the Chancery Registrar's Office, Royal Courts of Justice. He volunteered at the outbreak of the war, and was given a commission, as Lieutenant, in the 60th Rifles on the 1st November, 1914. He was killed at Richebourg, St. Vaast, Flanders, whilst leading his men in the attack near Festubert on Sunday, the 9th May, 1915.

Lieutenant Melville was a member of the Caledonian, the M.C.C., and Queen's Clubs, was a keen cricketer and football player, and fond of shooting, tennis, and all sports. He married, in 1910, Violet, widow of Lieutenant R. J. Jell, R.E., and daughter of General Sir Richard Harrison, G.C.B., of Ashton Manor, Devon.

MILES

John Harris

Second Lieutenant, 7th Battalion attached 4th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Killed in action 27th September 1915. Aged 30. Son of Frederick and Frances Miles, of London. Buried in BRANDHOEK MILITARY CEMETERY, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot I. Row G. Grave 5.

MILLER-HALLETT

Stewart Alexander

Second Lieutenant, 11th Battalion, South Wales Borderers. Killed in action 11th July 1916. Aged 25. Son of Alexander and Amy Frances Miller-Hallett, of Goddington, Chelsfield, Kent; husband of Amy F. Miller-Hallett. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 4 A.

MILLS

the Hon Charles Thomas

Second Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, Scots Guards. Killed in action 6th October 1915. Aged 28. Son of 2nd Baron Hillingdon and Baroness Hillingdon, of Temple House, Waltham Cross, Herts. Member of Parliament for Uxbridge. No known grave. Commemorated on LOOS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 8 and 9.

MITCHELL

Charles Richard Gerald

Lieutenant, 6th Dragoon Guards (Carabiniers). Killed in action 1st April 1918. Aged 33. Son of Mary H. Mitchell, of Green Hedges, Rye, Sussex, and the late R. A. H. Mitchell. Brother of Ronald Walter Mitchell (below) who also died. No known grave. Commemorated on POZIERES MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Panel 2.

MITCHELL

Ronald Walter

Lieutenant, 10th (Royal East Kent and West Kent Yeomanry) Battalion, The Buffs (East Kent Regiment). Died of wounds 19th November 1917. Aged 41. Son of Mrs. Mary H. Mitchell, of Green Hedges, Rye, Sussex. Brother of Charles Richard Gerald Mitchell (above) who also died. Buried in PORT SAID WAR MEMORIAL CEMETERY, Egypt. Section F. Grave 45.

MOLINEUX

George King

Captain, 2nd Battalion, Northumberland Fusiliers. Killed in action 5th May 1915 near Frenzenberg, Belgium. Aged 28. Born 15 April 1887, Meads, Eastbourne, Sussex. Son of Major Harold Parminter Molineux and Rose Eugenie K. Molineux (nee King), of Isfield Place, Sussex. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 8 and 12.

See his statistics on Cricinfo

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

MOLINEUX, GEORGE KING, Capt., 2nd Battn. Northumberland Fusiliers, elder s. of Major Harold Parminter Molineux, of The Cottage, Isfield, Sussex, late Essex (56th) Regt., by his wife, Ross Eugenie Katherine, 2nd dau. of the late Henry King, of lsfield Place, Sussex; b. Eastbourne, co. Sussex, 15 April, 1887; educ. Winchester College and Magdalen College, Oxford; after serving two years in the 3rd Battn. South Staffordshire Regt. he was gazetted 2nd Lieut. 2nd Battn. Northumberland Fusiliers, 11 Dec. 1909, and served in England with his Regt. until Sept. 1913, when he proceeded with it to India, being promoted Lieut. 1 Nov. 1913, and Capt. 16 Jan. 1915. He was appointed Aide-dc-Camp to Lord Hardinge of Penshurst, then Viceroy of India, in Aug. 1914, but resigned this appointment in Nov. 1914 in order to accompany his regt. to France on active service. He landed in France in Jan. 1915, and was engaged in transport work for a short time previous to going into the trenches in the Ypres district. On the 7 and 8 May, the Germans concentrated their guns on the salient held by the Brigade in advance of Ypres, the bombardment of the trenches being exceptionally severe. In the assault by the enemy which followed, owing to the giving way of a unit on the right of the Northumberland Fusiliers, the right flank of that regt. was overwhelmed, and Capt. Molineux was last seen wounded and unconscious in his trench, between Wieltje and Frezenberg, by the survivors who retired. He was most popular in his regt. and was beloved by all who knew him. He was unm. At Winchester he was in the cricket eleven in 1906, and was captain of Commoner Football. He gained his Harlequin colours at Oxford, and played in several matches for the University, also for Gentlemen of England against Oxford University and for the M.C.C. He was a first-class cricketer, shot, horseman, fisherman, and a good naturalist.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 2:

LIEUTENANT (temp. CAPTAIN) GEORGE KING MOLINEUX, 2nd BATTN. NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS, the elder son of Major Harold Par-minter Molineux, late Essex Regiment (56th), of Morning-ton, Eastbourne, and The Cottage, Isfield, Sussex, and of Rosa Eugenie Katharine, second daughter of the late Henry King, of Isfield Place, was born on the 15th April, 1887, at 43, Carlisle Road, Eastbourne.

Captain Molineux was educated at Winchester College, where he was in both the Cricket XI and the Football Team, and was the winner in throwing the hammer and putting the weight in 1900. Afterwards he went to Magdalen College, Oxford, where he was a member of the Oxford Harlequins. He played cricket for Oxford University on several occasions, also for the Gentlemen of England at Eastbourne, and at Oxford.

In December, 1909, he was gazetted. 2nd Lieutenant from the Special Reserve to the Northumberland Fusiliers, and in September, 1913, he accompanied his battalion to India, being promoted Lieutenant in November that year. In August, 1914, he was appointed A.D.C. to Lord Hardinge of Penshurst, Viceroy of India, but he resigned his appointment to rejoin his battalion when ordered on active service to France in November, 1914. Captain Molineux, who was temporarily promoted to that rank in January, 1915, was first reported as "missing," and then, unofficially, as killed, after the third Rattle of Ypres on the 8th May, 1915. After the prolonged heavy bombardment by the Germans of the Ypres salient, he was last seen lying unconscious in his trench when it was taken by the enemy on the evening of the 8th May.

Captain Molineux was a member of the M.C.C., of the Oxford Harlequins, and of the United Service Club, Pall Mall. A first-rate cricketer, shot, rider, and fisherman, and a good naturalist, he was very popular in his Regiment, and was beloved by all who knew him.

MOLLOY

Brian Charles Baskerville

Captain, Queen's Own Oxfordshire Hussars (Oxfordshire Yeomanry). Killed in action 1st November 1914. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 5.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

CAPTAIN BRIAN C. B. MOLLOY, OXFORDSHIRE YEOMANRY, (QUEEN'S OWN OXFORDSHIRE HUSSARS), T.F., Honorary Lieutenant in the Army, May, 1910, was killed in action on the 1st November, 1914.

The son of James Molloy of Cornolare, King's County, he was born on the 1st June, 1875, and was educated at The Oratory School, Birmingham. He entered the Yeomanry in May, 1901, and served in the South African War, in which he was severely wounded, taking part in operations in the Orange River Colony and in the Transvaal in 1900-01, including actions at Lindley, Rhenoster River, and Venterskroon. He received the Queen's medal with four clasps. He retired from the Oxfordshire Yeomanry in February, 1905, and joined the reserve of that Regiment in the same year, when he was also promoted Captain. He was a King's Foreign Service Messenger from 1901-13.

Captain Molloy, who was a member of the St. James's and the Cavalry Clubs, married May, widow of Major Harry Pakenham, 60th Rifles, and daughter of Colonel Markham, of Becca Hall, Yorks, and left one daughter, Mary Elizabeth, born January, 1912.

MOLYNEUX-MONTGOMERIE

George Frederick

Major, Reserve Officer attached 3rd Battalion, Grenadier Guards. Killed in action 22nd October 1915. Aged 46. Son of Cecil Molyneux-Montgomerie, of Garboldisham; husband of Sybil Molyneux-Montgomerie, of Garboldisham Old Hall, Norfolk. Buried in VERMELLES BRITISH CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot VI. Row D. Grave 22.

MONCK

the Hon Charles Henry Stanley

Captain, Coldstream Guards. Killed in action 21st October 1914. Aged 37. Son of 5th Viscount Monck and Viscountess Monck; husband of the Hon. Mrs. C. H. Monck, daughter of Sir William Portal, 2nd Bart. Served in the South African Campaign, 1899-1902. Grave lost. Commemorated in PERTH CEMETERY (CHINA WALL), Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. St. Julien East German Cemetery Memorial 107.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

MONCK, THE HON. CHARLES HENRY STANLEY, Capt., 3rd Battn. Coldstream Guards, elder and only surviving s. of Henry Power Charles Stanley. 5th Viscount Monck, late Capt., Coldstream Guards, by his wife, Lady Edith Caroline Sophia, née Scott, dau. of John, 3rd Earl of Clonmell; b. London, S.W., 9 Nov. 1876; educ. Eton; gazetted 2nd Lieut. to the Coldstream Guards from the Militia, 15 May, 1897, and promoted Lieut., 9 Nov. 1898, and Capt., 21 Nov. 1903; served in the South African War, 1899-1902; took part in the advance on, and relief of, Kimberley, including actions at Belmont, Enslin, Modder River and Magersfontein; operations in the Orange Free State, Feb.-May, 1900, including actions at Paardeberg, Poplar Grove, Dreifontein, Vet River and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill; operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to Oct. 1900, including action at Belfast; operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, Nov. 1900; in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1900; in the Transvaal, Nov. to Dec. 1900; and those in Cape Colony, Dec. 1900, to 31 May, 1902; receiving the Queen's medal with seven clasps and the King's medal with two clasps; went to France with the British Expeditionary Force, 12 Aug. 1914; was wounded in the thigh, 8 Sept., but rejoined his regt. on the 24th, and was killed in action at St. Julien, 21 Oct. 1914. Buried there. He m. at Wellington Barracks Chapel, London, 16 Feb. 1904, Mary Florence, 2nd dau. of Sir William Wyndham Portal, of Laverstoke, 2nd Bart., and had three children: Henry Wyndham Stanley, b. 11 Dec. 1905; Elizabeth Noel, b. 25 Dec. 1908; and Mary Patricia, b. 22 June, 1911.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

CAPTAIN the Honble. CHARLES HENRY STANLEY MONCK, 3rd BATTN. COLDSTREAM GUARDS, was the eldest son of H. P. C. S., fifth Viscount Monck, and Viscountess Monck, daughter of the third Earl of Clonmel. He was born at 78, Belgrave Road, London, S.W., on the 9th November, 1876, and was educated at Eton.

He joined the Coldstream Guards as 2nd Lieutenant from the Militia in May, 1897, becoming Lieutenant in November, 1898, and Captain in November, 1903. He served with the 2nd Battalion through the South African War from 1899 to 1902, and was present at the advance on Kimberley, including actions at Belmont, Enslin, Modder River, and Magersfontein; and also at operations in the Orange Free State in November, 1900. At the conclusion of that war he received the Queen's medal with seven clasps and the King's medal with two clasps.

In the Great War he was shot through the heart at St. Julien, France, on the 21st October, 1914, and at the time of his death he was the Senior Captain of his battalion.

Captain Monck married Mary Florence, daughter of Sir W. W. Portal, second Bart., and left three children: Henry W. S., born the 11th December, 1905; Elizabeth Noel, born in 1908; and Mary Patricia, born in 1911. He was a member of the Guards' Club, the Kildare Street Club, Dublin; and the M.C.C. His recreations were polo, cricket, hunting, and shooting.

MOODY

Rowland Harry Mainwaring

Captain, 2nd Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers. Killed in action 31st August 1914. Aged 39. Husband of Sybil Marie Moody (nee Bishop). No known grave. Commemorated on LA FERTE-SOUS-JOUARRE MEMORIAL, Seine-et-Marne, France. See also Charterhouse School Memorial

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

CAPTAIN ROWLAND HARRY MAINWARING MOODY, 2nd BATTN. LANCASHIRE FUSILIERS, who was reported wounded and missing after the Battle of Cambrai, has since been reported as killed in that engagement on the 26th August, 1914.

He was born on the 1st May, 1875, and was educated at Charterhouse. In December, 1896, he joined the Royal Fusiliers from the Militia, becoming Lieutenant in May, 1898, and being transferred in August of the latter year to the Lancashire Fusiliers, in which Regiment he was promoted Captain in October, 1900.

He took part in the South African War, being present at the relief of Ladysmith, including operations on the Tugela Heights and action at Pieter's Hill; at operations in Natal and in the Transvaal, and received the Queen's medal with three clasps. From February, 1904, to July, 1907, he was Adjutant of the 5th Battalion (Militia) Rifle Brigade.

Captain Moody, who was a keen cricketer and frequently played in the M.C.C., married, in 1910, Sybil Marie, daughter of Lieutenant-Colonel and Mrs. Conway Bishop, of Rutland Gate, London, S.W., and left one son.

MOON

Leonard James

Lieutenant, 10th Battalion, Devonshire Regiment. Died 23rd November 1916 near Karasouli, Salonica, Greece. Born 9th February 1878, Kensington, London. Brother of W R Moon. Buried in KARASOULI MILITARY CEMETERY, Greece. Plot/Row/Section A. Grave 189.

Extract from Wisden's Cricketer's Almanac

Second Lieutenant Leonard James Moon died of wounds on November 23. He was in the Westminster XI in 1894 and two following seasons, heading the averages with 25.71 in 1895 and being second in 1896 with 46.69. In the last-mentioned year he played an innings of 57 against Charterhouse. Proceeding to Cambridge, he obtained his blue and both in 1899 and 1900 played against Oxford. In the former year, when he scored 138 v. the Australians, he was second in the averages with 28.07, and in the latter fifth with 27.09. In his two matches against Oxford he made 154 runs in four innings, and in 1900 (when his scores were 58 and 60) scored 101 for the first wicket in the second innings with J. Stanning (60). In 1898 he had become a member of the M.C.C. and in the following season began to play for Middlesex. Against Gloucestershire at Lord's in 1903 he and P. F. Warner made 248 together for the first wicket, and five years later the same pair scored 212 for the opening partnership v. Sussex on the same ground. In the autumn of 1905 he was second in the averages for the M.C.C.'s team in America with 33.00, and before the next season opened toured South Africa with another M.C.C. side. During the latter tour he made 826 runs with an average of 27.33. He was a vigorous batsman who could cut well, and a useful wicket-keeper. At association football he gained high honours, obtaining his blue for Cambridge and playing for the Corinthians.

MULHOLLAND

the Hon Andrew Edward Somerset

Captain, 1st Battalion, Irish Guards. Died of wounds 1st November 1914. Aged 32. Son of 2nd Baron Dunleath and Baroness Dunleath, of Ballywater Park, Co. Down, Ireland; husband of Lady Joan Mulholland (now Countess of Cavan), of 22, Great Cumberland Place, London, W. Buried in YPRES TOWN CEMETERY, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot/Row/Section E2. Grave 3.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

CAPTAIN the Honble. ANDREW EDWARD SOMERSET MULHOLLAND, 1st BATTN. IRISH GUARDS, born on the 20th September, 1882, at Drayton Lodge, Monkstown, County Dublin, was the eldest son of the second Baron Dunleath, of Ballywaiter, County Down, J.P., High Sheriff, 1884, M.P. for North Londonderry, 1885-95, some time in the Royal Engineers and in the 5th Battalion Royal Irish Rifles.

Captain Mulholland was educated at Eton, where he was in the XI, and at Christ Church, Oxford. He joined the Irish Guards in 1906, becoming Lieutenant in January, 1909, and Captain in July, 1913. He went to France with the Expeditionary Force on the 12th August, 1914, and was present at the Battles of Mons, the Aisne, and Ypres. On the 1st November, at about 2 p.m., he was hit by a bullet while rallying his men in the trenches near Ypres, and died at 9 p.m. He was buried in the cemetery at Ypres.

Captain Mulholland was a member of the Bachelors' and Guards' Clubs. He played cricket and golf for the Army and the Household Brigade. In June, 1913, he married Lady Hester Joan Byng, youngest daughter of the fifth Earl of Strafford, and left one daughter, born March, 1915.

MURRAY, D.S.O.

James Thomas Crockatt

Major, 1st Battalion, Black Watch (Royal Highlanders). Died of wounds 16th February 1915. Aged 39. Brother of Mrs. Hugh Collingridge, of 70A, Lansdowne Place, Hove, Brighton. Served in the South African Campaign and North-West Frontier of India (1908). Awarded the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.). Buried in LILLERS COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Pas de Calais, France. Plot/Row/Section C. Grave 2.

Extract from The Distinguished Service Order 1886-1915 published by Naval & Military Press:

MURRAY, JAMES THOMAS CROKATT, Major, was born 25 July, 1873. He entered the Army as a Second Lieutenant in the Black Watch (Royal Highlanders) 21 Oct. 1893, in which he became Lieutenant 1 April. 1898, and Captain 16 Feb. 1901. He first saw active service in the South African War, taking part in operations in Orange River Colony, Dec. 1901, to May, 1902, for which he received the Queen's Medal with five clasps. In 1908 he was engaged in fighting on the North-West Frontier of India. in the Mohmand country, and received the Medal and clasp. He was from 28 Jan. 1910, to 15 Feb. 1911, Adjutant, Territorial Force. He was promoted Major 25 Feb. 1911. Major Murray served in the European War from 1914. He was mentioned in Despatches 19 Oct. 1914, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 18 Feb. 1915]: “James Thomas Crokatt Murray, Major, Royal Highlanders." Major Murray was killed accidentally on 16 Feb. 1915, two days before the award of his D.S.O. was gazetted. His D.S.O. was awarded “for services in connection with operations in the field."

NAPIER

Guy Greville

Captain, 35th Sikhs attached 47th Sikhs, Indian Army. Died 25th September 1915. Aged 31. Born 26th January 1884, City of London. Son of Thomas Bateman Napier and Florence Emily Napier, of 7, New Square, Lincoln's Inn, London; husband of Constance May Napier, of La Querriere, St. Martin's, Guernsey. Educated at Marlborough College and Cambridge University. Buried in CABARET-ROUGE BRITISH CEMETERY, SOUCHEZ, Pas de Calais, France. Plot XVII. Row A Grave 40.

Extract from Wisden's Cricketer's Almanac, follow the link for a photograph

Lieut. Guy Greville Napier (35th Sikhs) born on the 26th of January, 1884, died in France on September 25, of wounds received earlier that day. Mr. Napier will live in cricket history as one of the best medium pace bowlers seen in the University match in his own generation. Playing four times for Cambridge -1904 to 1907 - he took 31 wickets for 544 runs. Considering the excellent condition of the ground in the first three of these matches his figures will bear comparison with the finest records of old days when scores were far smaller than they are now. He was nearly always seen to great advantage at Lord's, the slope of the ground no doubt helping him. At Lord's for the Gentlemen in 1907 he took six wickets for 39 runs in the Players' second innings, this, having regard to the class of the batsmen opposed to him, being the best performance of his life. It is scarcely an exaggeration to say that he did not bowl a bad ball in the innings. He fully retained his skill after his Cambridge days were over. When home from India, where he held a Government appointment at Quetta, he bowled with marked success for the M.C.C. against Yorkshire at Scarborough in 1913 taking eight Yorkshire wickets in one innings for 44 runs. Bowling with a fairly high and very easy action he had great command of length and made the ball go with his arm. Quick off the ground he nearly always looked hard to play. He was in the Marlborough eleven for three years - 1899, 1900 and 1901 - taking nine wickets in his last match against Rugby. For Cambridge in first-class matches he took sixty-seven wickets in 1904, sixty-four in 1905, seventy-seven in 1906, and seventy-five in 1907. He was thus consistently successful for four seasons, but most of his best work was done at Lord's. In 1904 he played for the Gentlemen for the first time and made his first appearance for Middlesex. He was on the winning side three times, the match in 1904 being drawn. In 1905 he helped A. F. Morcom to get Oxford out in the last innings for 123, Cambridge gaining a sensational victory by 40 runs.

NEALE, MiD

George Henry

Lieutenant-Colonel, 3rd Battalion, Duke of Cambridge's Own (Middlesex Regiment). Killed in action 28th September 1915. Aged 46. Born 31st January 1869, Reigate, Surrey. Son of Sisson and Mary Neale; husband of Alice A. D. Neale, of 57, The Pryors, Hampstead, London. Served with the Niger Expedition (1897); Tirah Expedition (1897-8); Waziristan (1902); and in Tibet (1903-4. Mentioned in Despatches). Mentioned in Despatches WW1 (MiD). No known grave. Commemorated on LOOS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 99 to 101.

See his statistics on CricInfo

NICKALLS

Norman Tom

Brigadier-General, Brigade Staff commanding 63rd Infantry Brigade formerly 17th Lancers (Duke of Cambridge's Own). Killed in action 26th September 1915. Aged 51. Son of the late Tom Nickalls, of Patterson Court, Red Hill, Surrey; husband of Everild Nickalls, of 61, Elm Park Gardens, West Brompton, London. No known grave. Commemorated on LOOS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 1.

NISBET, MiD

Frank Scobell

Captain (Adjutant), 2nd Battalion, Manchester Regiment. Killed in action 26th August 1914. Aged 36. Son of the Rev. Canon and Mrs. Nisbet, of Ickham Rectory, Canterbury. Mentioned in Despatches. Served in the South African War. No known grave. Commemorated on LA FERTE-SOUS-JOUARRE MEMORIAL, Seine-et-Marne, France.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

CAPTAIN FRANK SCOBELL NISBET, ADJUTANT 2nd BATTN. MANCHESTER REGT., was born at St. Luke's Vicarage, Gloucester, on the 22nd November, 1878, the son of Canon Nisbet, of Ickham Rectory, Canterbury, and nephew of the Venerable E. C. Scobell, Archdeacon of Gloucester.

He was educated at The Grange, Folkestone, at Winchester College, and at the R.M.C., Sandhurst, where he was Captain of the Association football team, and was also in the Cricket XI. He was a member of the M.C.C., the Free Foresters, and B.B. Clubs. He played for the Aldershot Command XI, United Services XI at Portsmouth, and Channel Islands XI while quartered at these places. In 1896 he won the Singles Tournament of the Royal Cinque Ports Golf Club, Deal.

Captain Nisbet joined the Manchester Regiment in 1898, becoming Lieutenant in July, 1899, and Captain in July, 1901. He served in the South African War in charge of the Ammunition Column of the 17th Brigade, and took part in the operations resulting in the surrender of the Boer forces in the Caledon Valley on the 1st August, 1900. He was with the 2nd Battalion of his Regiment in the subsequent operations in the north-east of the Orange River Colony. On the conclusion of the war he was awarded the Queen's medal with three clasps and the King's medal with two clasps.

He was appointed Adjutant of his battalion in December, 1912, and in that capacity accompanied it to the front. He was killed on the 26th August, 1914, at Le Cateau, while leading a company whose Captain had been put out of action. He was mentioned in Field-Marshal Sir John French's Despatch of the 8th October, 1914.

Captain Nisbet was a member of the Junior United Service Club.

OLIVER

Roderic Magrath

Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, Grenadier Guards. Killed in action 27th August 1918. Aged 36. Son of Roderic and Emily Mary Oliver, of Burnt Oak, Orlestone, Ashford, Kent. Born in London. Educated at Winchester and New College, Oxford. Solicitor in London. Buried in MORY ABBEY MILITARY CEMETERY, MORY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot V. Row C. Grave 16.

OLIVER

Thomas Frederick

Lieutenant, 12th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Died 26th October 1918. Aged 32. Son of Thomas William Neme Oliver and Florence Charlotte Oliver, of 26 Brunswick Terrace, Hove. Cremated in ST. JOHN'S CREMATORIUM, WOKING, Surrey. See also Hove Library Memorial

ORMSBY, C.B.

Vincent Alexander

Brigadier-General, General Staff commanding 127th Infantry Brigade, late 3rd Queen Alexandra's Own Gurkha Rifles. Died 1st May 1917. Aged 51. Son of Capt. G. F. Ormsby (late Queen's Bays), and Mrs. Ormsby; husband of Agnes Ormsby, of 16, Glazbury Rd., West Kensington, London. Buried in VILLERS-FAUCON COMMUNAL CEMETERY, Somme, France. Plot/Row/Section D. Grave 41.

OSBORNE

Brian

[Spelt OSBOURNE on CWGC] Lieutenant, 15th (The King's) Hussars. Killed in action 11th November 1914. Aged 25. Son of Capt. Frank Osbourne (late 13th Hussars), of Harbury Hall, Leamington. Buried in BEDFORD HOUSE CEMETERY, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Enclosure No.4 Plot IV. Row A. Grave 1.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

OSBORNE, BRIAN, Capt., 15th (The King's) Hussars, yr. s. of the late Capt. Frank Osborne, of Harbury Hall, near Leamington, 13th Hussars, by his wife, Helen, dau. of Thomas Lever Rushton ; b. Sydney, N.S.W., 18 Nov. 1888; educ. Harrow, and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst ; gazetted 2nd Lieut. in the 15th Hussars, 8 Feb. 1908, and promoted Lieut. 22 Jan. 1909, and Capt. 15 Nov. 1914 ; went to France, 23 Aug. 1914, and was killed in action, 11 Nov. 1914, during the assault on the trenches near Herenthaze Château by the Prussian Guard. He had been sent with his machine gun to support the Duke of Wellington's Regt. He was at first reported missing, and it was not until the following March that confirmation of his death was received in a letter from one of his machine gun section, prisoner of war in Germany ; unm. At Harrow he was successful in both cricket and football, and was first string at racquets ; at Sandhurst he won the sword of honour ; and in 1908, after joining the 15th Hussars, he attained a great record of first-spears in pig-sticking when quartered at Muttra. As a polo player he came to the front with amazing rapidity, playing for his Regimental team and winning the South African Inter-Regimental Tournament in 1911, and repeating the event against more powerful opponents in the English Inter-Regimental Tournament at Hurlingham in 1913. As a member of the Cavalry School team and the Cavalry Club team he lent his aid successfully, and was invited by Lord Ashby St. Ledger, now Lord Wimborne, to practise in tile international team of 1914, as choice for the American Expedition. He was a fine rider to hounds, and well known in the Warwickshire country.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

LIEUTENANT BRIAN OSBORNE, 15th (THE KING'S) HUSSARS, son of Captain Frank Osborne, late 13th Hussars, and Mrs. Osborne, Harbury Hall, Leamington, was born in Sydney, N.S.W., on the 18th November, 1888.

He was educated at Harrow, where he was in the Cricket and Football XI's, was 1st String at Racquets in 1906, and won the Ebrington Cup two years in succession. From Harrow he went direct to the R.M.C., Sandhurst, where his first promotion was to Colour-Sergeant, and on passing out was awarded the Sword of Honour. He was gazetted to the 15th Hussars in February, 1908, and joined them at Muttra, India. While there he had the record number of “first spears" for pig-sticking. He also played polo for his Regiment, and formed one of the Regimental team that won the Inter-Regimental Tournament in South Africa in 1911.

In 1912 he was at the Cavalry School, Netheravon, and played Number 1 in the 15th Hussars polo team that won the Inter-Regimental at Hurlingham in 1913, the year the Regiment returned to England. He also played in the Cavalry Club team that won the Ranelagh Open Cup in 1914, being handicapped at seven points. He was a very fine horseman, and a well-known rider to hounds, especially in Warwickshire, where his home was; and was a member of the Cavalry Club, the M.C.C., and Ranelagh.

Lieutenant Osborne was reported missing from the 11th November, 1914, when he was supporting the Duke of Wellington's Regiment with his machine gun in trenches near Herenthage Château, east of Ypres. One of the men of his machine-gun section, taken prisoner that day when the Prussian Guard made their last big attack, wrote in March, 1915, saying that Lieutenant Osborne was shot through the head about 7.30 on the morning of the 11th November.

PAGE

Lionel

Second Lieutenant, 1st Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment. Killed in action 27th May 1918. Aged 24. Son of George and Rebecca Page, of Rose Cottage, Springfield, Linslade, Leighton Buzzard. Enlisted September, 1914, in Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry. No known grave. Commemorated on SOISSONS MEMORIAL, Aisne, France. See also Linslade War Memorial

PAGET, M.V.O.

Albert Edward S L

Lieutenant-Colonel, 11th (Prince Albert's Own) Hussars. Died 2nd August 1917. Member of the Royal Victorian Order (M.V.O.). Buried in PUTNEY VALE CEMETERY AND CREMATORIUM, WANDSWORTH, London. Plot D. Row 3. Grave 3.

PARKER

William Mackworth

Captain (Adjutant), 8th Battalion, Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own). Killed in action 30th July 1915 at Hooge, Belgium. Aged 28. Born 1st September 1886, Belgaum, India. Son of Lt. Col. W. F. Parker (late Rifle Brigade), of Delamore, Devon; husband of Lilian Ursula Hardman-Jones (formerly Parker), of 51, Thurloe Square, South Kensington, London. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 46 - 48 and 50.

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PARR

Bertram Chambre

Major, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry attached 2nd Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment. Killed in action 3rd September 1918. Buried in VAULX HILL CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot III. Row K. Grave 17.

PAYNE-GALLWEY, M.V.O.

William Thomas

Captain, 2nd Battalion, Grenadier Guards. Killed in action 14th September 1914 at Vendresse, Troyon, France. Born 25th March 1881, Blackrock, Co Dublin, Ireland. Member of the Royal Victorian Order (M.V.O.). No known grave. Commemorated on LA FERTE-SOUS-JOUARRE MEMORIAL, Seine-et-Marne, France.

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PEARSON

Evelyn Henry Malcolm

Captain, 12th Battalion The KIng's (Liverpool Regiment). Killed 8th January 1916. Aged 41. Son of the late Albert Harford Pearson and Rosetta Mary Bennett-Poe (formerly Pearson). Buried in BETHUNE TOWN CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot II. Row M. Grave 2.

PEMBERTON

Francis Percy Campbell

Captain, "C" Squadron, 2nd Life Guards, Houshold Cavalry. Killed in action 19th October 1914. Aged 29. Only son of Canon and Mrs. Pemberton, of Trumpington Hall, Cambridge; husband of Winifred Mary Colegate (formerly Pemberton), of 16, Prince's Gardens, London. Buried in DADIZEELE NEW BRITISH CEMETERY, Moorslede, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot VI. Row D. Grave 17. See also Trumpington War Memorial

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

PEMBERTON, FRANCIS PERCY CAMPBELL, Capt., 2nd Life Guards, only s. of the. Rev. Thomas Percy Pemberton (R.L. 26 Feb. 1900, formerly Hudson), of Trumpington Hall, Cambridge, M.A., late Fellow and Tutor of Trinity College, Cambridge, Canon and "Sueeentor Canonicorum" of York Minster, by his wife, Patience Frances Sophia, only dau. of Capt. William Huntly Campbell, 20th Regiment [by his wife, Frances Maria Sophia, dau. and h. of Col. Francis Charles James Pemberton, of Trumpington Hall, and of Pembrey, Carmarthenshire]; b. Gilling East, co. York, 4 April, 1885; educ. Ludgrove, and Trinity College, Cambridge; gazetted 2nd Lieut. 2nd Life Guards 12 Feb. 1907; promoted Limit. 21 Feb. 1909, and Capt. 4 Aug. 1914; took his course at the Cavalry School at Netheravon 1911-12, and in May of the latter year was seconded as Cavalry Instructor to the Oxford and Cambridge O.T.C., but on the outbreak of the European War was recalled to his Regiment; went to France with the Household Cavalry Brigade, 3rd Cavalry Division, Expeditionary Force, on 6 Oct. 1914, and was killed in action near Moorslede (between Routers and Staden) 19 Oct. following. The force against them being tremendous, the order to retire was given. They tried to bring Capt. Pemberton with them, but were unable to do so, and his body was never recovered. A Corporal of Horse in his Regiment wrote: "It is unnecessary to say how much we boys regretted his death, for always he had proved himself one of the best, an excellent soldier and a grand leader, always thinking of others before himself and was always in the van. He was a One all-round sportsman, a splendid cricketer, a keen huntsman, and a very good shot, and had a great natural and charming gift for music. He was a playing member of the M.C.C., also of the Cambridgeshire County Cricket Club, a vice-president and member of the Trumpington Cricket Club. He m. at Hovingham Parish Church. 30 April, 1912, Winifred Mary (Hovingham Hall, Malton), eldest dau. of Sir William Henry Arthington Worsley, of Hovingham Hall, 3rd Bart.; s.p.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

CAPTAIN FRANCIS PERCY CAMPBELL PEMBERTON, 2nd LIFE GUARDS, was the son of Canon T. Percy Pemberton, Prebendary of York Minster, and of Mrs. Pemberton, Trumpington Hall, Cambridge. He was born at Gilling East Rectory, Yorks, on the 4th April, 1885. He was educated at St. Faith's, Cambridge, Mr. Arthur Dunn's, Ludgrove, Malvern (one term), by private tuition, and at Trinity College, Cambridge.

Captain Pemberton joined the 2nd Life Guards on probation in February, 1907, being gazetted 2nd Lieutenant on the 20th February, and Lieutenant on the 21st February, 1909. In 1912 he was seconded as Cavalry Instructor to the Officers' Training Corps of Oxford and Cambridge Universities. He rejoined his Regiment on the outbreak of the war, being promoted Captain on the 5th August, 1914.

He was serving in "C" Squadron when he was killed on the 19th October, 1914, at Moorslede, near Roulers, Belgium. He was a member of the Marlborough, Bachelors', White's, the M.C.C., Pitt Club and County Club, Cambridge, etc. His recreations included music, hunting, polo, golf, cricket, lawn tennis, and billiards.

Captain Pemberton married Winifred Mary, daughter of Sir William Worsley, Bart., and Lady Worsley, of Hovingham Hall, Yorks.

PENN

Eric Frank

Captain, 4th Battalion, Grenadier Guards. Killed in action 18th October 1915 at Hohenzollern, near Loos, France. Aged 33. Born 17th April 1878, Westminster, London. Son of William and Constance Penn, of London; husband of Gladys Penn, of Baldslow Place, Baldslow, Sussex; his uncle was J F Green and his brother-in-law C H M Ebden. Buried in VERMELLES BRITISH CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot I. Row K. Grave 11. Member of the Stock Exchange. See also Stock Exchange Memorial

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Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN ERIC FRANK PENN, Grenadier Guards, was the son of Mr. and Mrs. William Penn, and was born in 1878.

He was educated at Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge. Captain Penn was a distinguished and versatile sportsman. He played cricket and football for Eton, and he won the School Quarter Mile and two other events. He gained his Blue for cricket in 1899.

When the South African war began he went to the front with the 3rd Battalion of the Royal Scots, which he had joined while still at Eton. He was invalided home in 1901 with the rank of Captain.

He went back to Cambridge and again played against Oxford at cricket. Later on he played brilliantly for Norfolk County.

On leaving the University he went into the City and became a partner in the firm of Sir R. W. Carden and Co, and a member of the Stock Exchange in 1905.

On the outbreak of war Captain Penn joined the Norfolk Yeomanry, but in his impatience to get into action transferred to the Grenadier Guards and went to the front with the 4th Battalion as a subaltern.

After the battle of Loos he was promoted to Captain and mentioned in despatches for distinguished gallantry in the field.

He was killed on 18 October 1915 at the Hohenzollern Redoubt.

Captain Penn during his service in the Army gained the same golden reputation as an ideal English gentleman, which he had earned all through his life from his schooldays.

A writer in the “Eton Chronicle” said of him: “Prominent in games and with a stainless record, always cheerful and full of grit, he attracted to himself all that was best at Eton. No one could fail to love and honour him for his noble qualities."

One of his brother officers wrote: “I can never forget what his example has been to me, and I know that it has helped many along the road."

Another wrote “He was an exceptionally fine company commander and his men would have done anything for him."

He married, in 1906, Gladys, daughter of Mr. Charles Ebden of Baldstow Place, Sussex, by whom he had one son, born posthumously.

PENN

Geoffrey Mark

Second Lieutenant, 6th Battalion, Rifle brigade (The Prince Consort's Own) attached Somerset Light Infantry. Killed in action 11th February 1915. Aged 28. Son of William and Constance Penn, of 34, Wilton Crescent, Victoria, London. Buried in RIFLE HOUSE CEMETERY, Comines-Warneton, Hainaut, Belgium. Plot IV. Row H. Grave 6.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 2:

2nd LIEUTENANT GEOFFREY MARK PENN, 6th BATTN. (RESERVE) THE RIFLE BRIGADE (THE PRINCE CONSORTS OWN), attd. 1st BATTN. PRINCE ALBERT'S (SOMERSET LIGHT INFANTRY), was the youngest son of William and Constance Penn, of St. Alban's Court, Dover.
2nd Lieutenant Penn was born on the 20th April, 1886, and was educated at Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge. He obtained his commission shortly after the outbreak of the war in August, 1914, and was killed instantaneously by a sniper while directing trench works near Pleogsteert, Flanders, on the 11th February, 1915.

PEPYS, D.S.O.

Francis

Second Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry. Killed in action 12th November 1914. Aged 23. Son of Capt. Arthur Pepys and Mrs. Pepys, of Knowle House, Budleigh Salterton, Devon. Awarded the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.). No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 37 and 39. See also Charterhouse School War Memorial

Extract from The Distinguished Service Order 1886-1915 published by Naval & Military Press:

PEPYS, FRANCIS, Second Lieut., was born at Budleigh Salterton, Devonshire, 2 April, 1891, son of Colonel Arthur Pepys, late 60th Rifles. He was educated at Charterhouse, where he was in the Cricket Eleven, and he subsequently joined the Special Reserve, attached to the Devonshire Regt. He was gazetted to the 2nd Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, as Second Lieutenant, in May, 1913. He served in the European War, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 1 Dec. 1914] “Francis Pepys, Second Lieut., 2nd Battn. The Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry. On 3 Nov., for conspicuous good work in advancing from his trench and assisting in driving away a party of the enemy who were commencing to dig a new trench within 30 yards of his own; 30 of the enemy were shot down on the occasion. (Since killed in action)." His Commanding Officer wrote: “He most thoroughly earned it for the splendid way he, with three others, turned 30 or 40 Germans out of a trench, and for his splendid leading on other occasions." He was killed on 12 Nov. 1914, while stepping out of his trench the morning after his battalion had materially contributed to the rout of the Prussian Guard. He was mentioned in Sir John French's Despatch of the 14th Jan. 1915. Second Lieut. F. Pepys was fond of shooting, steeplechasing, cricket, golf, fishing and ski-ing. He played cricket for the Aldershot Command in 1913 and 1914, and won the Officers' Race in the Vim Hunt Point-to-Point in 1914.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

PEPYS, FRANCIS, D.S.O., 2nd Lieut., 2nd Battn. Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, 2nd 8. of Capt. Arthur Pepys, of Knowle House. Budleigh Salterton, late 60th Rifles, by his wife, Margaret, dau. of the Rev. John Lomax ; b. Budleigh Salterton, co. Devon, 2 April, 1891 ; educ. Charterhouse ; gazetted 2nd Lieut. in the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire 24 May, 1913 ; went to France with the Expeditionary Force, 13 Aug. 1914 ; took part in the retreat from Mons, the Battles of the Marne and the Aisne, and the repulse of the Prussian Guards at Ypres, 11 Nov. and was killed in action the following day by the bursting of a shell ; unm. Buried at Zonnebeke. 2nd Lieut. Pepys was awarded the D.S.O. for conspicuous good work on 3 Nov. "in advancing from his trench and assisting in driving away a party of the enemy who were commencing to dig a new trench within thirty yards of his own. Thirty of the enemy were shot down on the occasion." He was also mentioned in F.M. Sir John (now Lord) French's Despatch of 14 Jan. 1915. His elder brother, 2nd Lieut. John Pepys, was killed in action at Mons, 23 Aug. 1914.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

2nd LIEUTENANT FRANCIS PEPYS, D.S.O., 2nd BATTN. OXFORDSHIRE AND BUCKINGHAMSHIRE LIGHT INFANTRY, son of Captain Arthur Pepys, late 60th Rifles, was born at Budleigh Salterton, Devonshire, on the 2nd April, 1891.

He was educated at Charterhouse, where he was in the Cricket XI, subsequently joining the Special Reserve, attached to the Devonshire Regiment. He was gazetted to the 2nd Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry as 2nd Lieutenant in May, 1913.

For his services in the Great War he was awarded the D.S.O., the following being the official record of the occasion:-

"For conspicuous good work on November 3rd in advancing from his trench and assisting in driving away a party of the enemy who were commencing to dig a new trench within thirty yards of his own. Thirty Germans were shot." His Commanding Officer wrote of him as follows: “He most thoroughly earned it for the splendid way he, with three others, turned thirty or forty Germans out of a trench, and for his splendid leading on other occasions."

He was killed on the 12th November, 1911, while stepping out of his trench, the morning after his battalion had materially helped in the rout of the Prussian Guard. He was mentioned in Sir John French's Despatch of the 14th January, 1915.

2nd Lieutenant Pepys was fond of hunting, steeple-chasing, cricket, rackets, golf, shooting, fishing, and ski-ing.

PHILLIPS

Edward Stone

Lieutenant, 1st Battalion (Territorial), Monmouthshire Regiment. Killed in action 8th May 1915. Born 18th January 1883, Ffrwd Vale, Newport, Monmouthshire. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 50.

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Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

PHILLIPS, EDWARD STONE, Lieut., 1st Battn. The Monmouthshire Regt. (T.F.), eldest s. of Edward Phillips, of Ffrwd Vale, Newport, co. Monmouth, M.P.H., by his wife, Elisabeth, dau. of J. S. Stone, of Newport, Mon., J.P. ; and brother to Capt. L. Phillips (q.v.); b. Newport aforesaid, 18 Jan. 1883 ; ethic. Malvern Link ; Marlborough, and Pembroke College, Cambridge ; subsequently became a Director of Messrs. Phillips & Sons, Ltd., Brewers at Newport, of which firm his father was Senior Director ; obtained a commission as 2nd Lieut. in the Monmouthshire Territorials Aug. 1914, being promoted Lieut. 2 Oct. following ; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from Feb. 1915, and was killed in action at Ypres 8 May, 1915. Buried near St. Julien. He was a well known cricketer, winning his Blue at Cambridge in 1904, and played against Oxford in 1904 ; unm.

PICKERING, D.S.O.

Francis Alexander Umfreville

Lieutenant-Colonel, 2nd Dragoons (Royal Scots Greys) attached to, and commanding, 9th Battalion, Rifle brigade (The Price Consort's Own). Killed in action 23rd December 1917. Awarded the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.). Buried in WHITE HOUSE CEMETERY, ST. JEAN-LES-YPRES, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot II. Row F. Grave 3.

Extract from The Distinguished Service Order 1916-1923 published by Naval & Military Press:

PICKERING, F.A.U. (D.S.O. L.G. 1.1.17); b. 2.8.81: 2nd Lt., 2nd Dragoons. 5.1.01; Lt. 15.11.01; Capt. 10.4.11; S. African War, 1901-2; Queen's Medal, 4 clasps: Europ. War. He was killed in action when commanding a battalion of the Rifle Brigade 23.12.17.

PILLEAU, D.S.O.

Henry Charles

Lieutenant-Colonel, 1st Battalion, The Queen's (Royal West Surrey Regiment). Died of wounds 21st September 1914. Aged 48. Son of Col. Henry George Pilleau, R.E. and Caroline Fitz Ray Pilleau; husband of Edith Maud Pilleau, of 21, Aymer Rd., Hove, Sussex. Served in the South African War (Twice mentioned in despatches). Awarded the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.). Buried in NEUILLY-SUR-SEINE NEW COMMUNAL CEMETERY, Hauts-de-Seine, France. Plot 4. Row 23. Grave 1.

Extract from The Distinguished Service Order 1886-1915 published by Naval & Military Press:

PILLEAU, HENRY CHARLES, Capt., was born at Bermuda 17 Feb. 1866, only child of Colonel H. G. Pilleau, R.E., and a great-nephew of the late General Thomas Addison, C.B., Colonel Commanding the Queen's Regt. He was educated at Wellington College, and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, where he was Senior Under-Officer, and passed out with honours, taking the prize for military topography. He was gazetted to the Royal West Surrey Regt. in Feb. 1887; became Lieutenant in July, 1889, and Capt. in March, 1896. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, and was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, and actions of Colenso, Spion hop, Vaal Kranz and Pieter's Hill ; operations on Tugela Heights, also in Natal, including Laing's Nek. He was twice mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 Feb. and 10 Sept. 1901] ; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps ; King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 Sept. 1901] "Henry Charles Pilleau, Capt., Royal West Surrey Regt. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa." He was invested by the King 24 Oct. 1902. Major Pilleau served in the European War; was promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel on the 18th of Sept. 1914, and was mortally wounded in the Battle of the Aisne. Notwithstanding his dying condition, Lieut.-Colonel Pilleau continued for four hours to direct his men. It was not known till dark, when retiring, that, he had been wounded. He died a week afterwards, on the 21st of Sept. 1914, in the American Ambulance of Neuilly. In July, 1904, he had married Edith Maud, daughter of the late Lieut.-Colonel W. E. Mockler, 4th Battn. West India Regt.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

LIEUT.-COLONEL HENRY CHARLES PILLEAU, D.S.O., 1st BATTN. THE QUEEN'S (ROYAL WEST SURREY REGIMENT), born at Bermuda on the 17th February, 1866, was the only child of Colonel H. G. Pilleau, R.E., and a great-nephew of the late General Thomas Addison, C.B., Colonel Commanding the Queen's Regiment.

He was educated at Wellington College, and the R.M.C., Sandhurst, where he was Senior Under Officer and passed out with honours, taking the prize for military topography. He received his commission in the Royal West Surrey Regiment in February, 1887, becoming Lieutenant in July, 1889, and Captain in March, 1896. He served in the South African War from 1899-1902, being present at the relief of Ladysmith, and the actions at Colenso, Spion Kop, Vaal Krans, Pieter's Hill, and operations on Tugela Heights ; also in Natal, including Laing's Nek. He was twice mentioned in despatches (" London Gazette," 8th February and 10th September, 1901) ; was awarded the D.S.O. ; and received the Queen's medal with five clasps and the King's medal with two clasps.

In the Great War Lieutenant-Colonel Pilleau, who was promoted to that rank on the 18th September, 1914, was mortally wounded in the Battle of the Aisne, but continued for four hours to direct his men. It was not known till dark, when retiring, that he had been wounded. He died a week afterwards on the 21st September, 1914, in the American Ambulance of Neuilly.

Lieutenant-Colonel Pilleau married, in July, 1904, Edith Maud, daughter of the late Lieutenant-Colonel W. E. Mockler, 4th Battalion, West India Regiment. He was a member of the M.C.C. and the Queen's Club, West Kensington, being a good cricketer and lawn tennis player.

POWELL

Leonard Maurice

Second Lieutenant, 3rd Battalion attached 1st Battalion, Gordon Highlanders. Killed in action 17th June 1915. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 38.

POWELL

Richard Henry

Second Lieutenant, "C" Company, 5th Battalion, Royal Sussex Regiment. Killed in action 9th May 1915. Aged 31. Son of Helena M. Powell, of The Rectory, Penvorth, Sussex, and the late Henry Pryor Powell; husband of Barbara Frances Powell, of 17, Tite St., Chelsea, London. On Editorial Staff of "The Times" newspaper. No known grave. Commemorated on LE TOURET MEMORIAL , Pas de Calais, France. Panel 20 and 21.

PRATT-BARLOW

Bernard Alexander

Commander, HMS Hawke, Royal Navy. Lost with his ship 15th October 1914. No known grave. Commemorated on CHATHAM NAVAL MEMORIAL, Kent. Panel 1.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

PRATT-BARLOW, BERNHARD ALEXANDER, Commander RN., elder s. of Charles James Pratt-Barlow, of Roxby, The Hoe, Plymouth, by his wife, Rosa Caroline, yr. dau. of the late William Gladstone, D.L., J.P., of 58, Queen's Gate, London, S.W.; b. St. George's Road, London, S.W., 10 Sept. 1874; educ. Brighton (Mr. W. R. Lee, of Norfolk Terrace), and Royal Naval College, Gosport; joined H.M.S. Britannia as a Naval Cadet in Jan. 1889, being rated midshipman three years later. He was promoted Sub-Lieut. 31 May, 1896, Lieut. 31 Aug. 1897, and Commander 31 Dec. 1908. As a naval cadet he served in the Trafalgar, flagship of Rear-Admirals Lord Walter Kerr, A. H. Markham, and C. G. Domvile, on the Mediterranean Station, July, 1891; the Warspite, flagship of Rear-Admiral Drummond, commanding "D" Fleet in the Naval Manoeuvres of July, 1894; and the Active, flying the broad pennant of Commodore R. H. Harris, in the Training Squadron, Sept. 1894. He was Sub-Lieut. of the last-named ship, flying the broad pendant of Commodore G. L. Atkinson from May, 1896, to June, 1897, when he was appointed to the Royal yacht Victoria and Albert, in which he was present at the Diamond Jubilee Review at Spithead the same month. At the end of August following he was promoted to Lieut. and appointed to the Majestic flagship of Admiral Sir Henry Stephenson in the Channel Squadron—the flag Capt. being Admiral Prince Louis of Battenberg, G.C.B. He was flag Lieut. to Admiral Sir Lewis Beaumont on the Pacific station, March, 1899, and on the Australian station to January, 1903. He commanded the destroyers Sturgeon, Contest and Osprey, all at Devonport, and in June, 1903, was appointed 1st Lieut. of H.M.S. Antrim. He was 1st Lieut. at the R.N. Barracks, Devonport, from July, 1907, to the end of 1908, when he was advanced to Commander. In that rank he commanded the destroyers Kale and Rattlesnake, both in the second Destroyer Flotilla, and was commander of H.M.S. Irresistible and of MKS Centurion. He commanded H.M.S. Hawke in the Training Squadron at Queenstown from Jan. 1914, until she was commissioned for war service. Commander Pratt-Barlow lost his life in the North Sea, 15 Oct. 1915, when H.M.S. Hawke was torpedoed by a German submarine. After the sinking of H.M.S. Hawke, Capt. Charles J. Wintour, of H.M.S. Swift, wrote the following letter: “I was instrumental in picking up the survivors of the Hawke from the rafts, and I took them in the Swift to harbour. I at once asked one of the survivors as to the commander, and he told me that he had been on his (the survivor's) raft and seeing that there were too many men on the raft said: ‘There are too many men on the raft, I will swim to another.’ He was never seen again, but his self-sacrificing action was undoubtedly the means of saving others. I would like you to know how deeply I grieve at his loss, and also that you should know that his very last act was one of unselfish bravery." He m. at Canon Ffrome, co. Hereford, 17 June, 1903, Dorothy Nesta, yr. dau. of the late Walter Baskerville, D.L., J.P., of Clyro Court, co. Radnor, and left a dau., Mary Pamela, b. 17 June, 1905.

Note: HMS Hawke, launched in 1891, was the sixth British warship to be named Hawke. She was an Edgar class cruiser, a 12-gun twin-screw protected cruiser displacing 7,350 tons. The twin screws delivered 12,000 horsepower giving a top speed of 20 kt (37 km/h). During 1914, at the start of the First World War, the Hawke, commanded by Captain Hugh P.E.T. Williams, was engaged in various operations in the North Sea. On 15 October, out on patrol Hawke was torpedoed by a German submarine U 9. Her sister ship HMS Theseus, which was in company, was attacked at the same time but was undamaged. The Hawke sank in a few minutes, with the loss of her Captain, 26 officers and 500 men - only 4 officers and about 60 men were saved. [Source: Wikipedia - HMS Hawke]

PRIAULX, D.S.O.

George Kendall

Lieutenant-Colonel, 11th Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Killed in action 24th March 1918. Aged 40. Awarded the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.). Son of O. de L. Priaulx. Served in the South African War. No known grave. Commemorated on POZIERES MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Panel 61 to 64.

Extract from The Distinguished Service Order 1916-1923 published by Naval & Military Press:

PRIAULX, G. K. (D.S.O. L.G. 18.6.17); b. 15.9.77 ; 2nd s. of O. de L. Priaulx; educ. at Harrow and Sandhurst ; commissioned 60th Rifles 23.2.98; Lt. 11.10.99; Capt. 22.1.02. He fought through the S. African War, 1899-1902 (Despatches twice; Queen's Medal, 6 clasps; King's Medal, 2 clasps). He went to France in Aug. 1914, and was dangerously wounded in Sept. of that year, and again in Sept. 1915, at Loos, when he was in command of his battalion. After his recovery he was appointed to the command of another battalion, and in March, 1917, won the D.S.O. Lt.-Col. Priaulx was killed in action on 25.3.18.

London Gazette 18th June 1917 - PRIAULX, GEORGE KENDALL, Major (Acting Lieut.-Colonel), King's Royal Ride Corps. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty when in command of his battalion. With the utmost confidence and determination he fought his battalion through the village, overcoming all obstacles and gaining his objectives. He set a magnificent example throughout.

PRICE

Harold Strachan

Lieutenant, 3rd Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Killed in action 24th May 1915. Aged 33. Son of Mr. and Mrs. E. G. Price, of Broadwater, Godalming, Surrey. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 6 and 8. See also Charterhouse School War Memorial

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 2:

2nd LIEUTENANT (temp.) HAROLD STRACHAN PRICE, 3rd BATTN. THE ROYAL FUSILIERS, (CITY OF LONDON REGIMENT), born in 1881, was the second son of Edward G. Price and Henriette K. Price, of No. 1, Craven Hill, W., and Broad-water, Godalming.

He was educated at Charterhouse, and had served in the Artists' Rifles for twelve years before the war broke out. He went to France with this corps in October, 1914, and accepted a commission, as 2nd Lieutenant (temp.), on the General List, being attached to the Royal Fusiliers in April, 1915. He was killed on the 24th May, 1915, while in command of a platoon holding an advanced position. They were badly gassed, and were ordered to retire, the greater number—Mr. Price amongst them—being killed during the retirement.

2nd Lieutenant Price was a tennis and golf player, and cricket and shooting were also among the sports in which he took part.

PROTHERO

Rowland John

Lieutenant, 7th (Queen's Own) Hussars. Died of wounds 8th November 1918. Aged 24. Son of the Rt. Hon. Rowland Edmund Prothero, 1st Baron Ernle, of 3, Cheyne Walk, Chelsea, London and Oakley House, Oakley, Beds. Buried in BAGHDAD (NORTH GATE) WAR CEMETERY, Iraq. Plot IX. Row C. Grave 6. Also listed on the Oakley War Memorial, Bedfordshire

PURCELL, M.C.

Richard Guy

Major, 31st Heavy Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery. Died of wounds 28th March 1918. Aged 30. Son of Col. M. H. Purcell and Mrs. C. M. Purcell, of "White House," Ferring, Worthing; husband of Dorothy Davenport (formerly Purcell); of Damerham, Salisbury. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). Buried in FAUBOURG D'AMIENS CEMETERY, ARRAS, Pas de Calais, France. Plot VI. Row D. Grave 31.

QUILTER

John Arnold Cuthbert

Lieutenant-Colonel, Grenadier Guards commanding Hood Battalion, Royal Naval Division. Died 6th May 1915. Aged 40. Son of Sir Cuthbert Quilter, Bart., and Lady Quilter, of Bawdsey Manor, Woodbridge, Suffolk. Served in the South African War. Buried in SKEW BRIDGE CEMETERY, Turkey. Plot II. Row B. Grave 4.

RAPHAEL

John Edward

Lieutenant, General List and 18th Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Died of wounds 11th June 1917 at Remy, Belgium. Aged 35. Born 30th April 1882, Brussels, Belgium. Son of Harriette Raphael, of 5, Wild Hatch, Hendon, London, and the late Albert Raphael. Former England International Rugby Football player. Buried in LIJSSENTHOEK MILITARY CEMETERY, Poperinge, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot XIII. Row A. Grave 30.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

RAPHAEL, JOHN EDWARD, Lieut., A.D.C. and Camp Commandant, 41st Division. only s. of the late Albert Raphael, of Wild Hatch, Hendon; b. Brussels, 30 April, 1882; educ. Streatham School, and Merchant Taylors', and at St. John's College. Oxford: was a Barrister; gazetted 2nd Lieut. 9th (Service) Battn. The Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regt.) Sept. 1914: subsequently transferred to the 18th (Service) Battn. The King's Royal Rifle Corps, raised by his cousin, Sir Herbert Raphael; promoted Lieut. Dec. 1914; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from May, 1916; appointed A.D.C. to Major-General Sir Sydney Lawford, K.C.B., 41st Division, in Oct. 1915, and died at No. 10 Casualty Clearing Station 11 June, 1917, from wounds received in action at Messina on the 7th of that month. Buried in the Military Cemetery, Lljssenthoek, near Poperinghe. A Staff Officer, who was with him when wounded, wrote: “I have seen many men in many parts of the world under all sorts of conditions, but never in my experience have I been so impressed by such a magnificent display of sheer pluck and unselfishness. During the three days he lived he was bright and cheerful, never talked about himself, but was very concerned about his servant. his groom, his horses, and everything but himself.” In 1909 he contested the Croydon Division in the Liberal interest, but without success, although his charm and characteristic straightforwardness won the admiration of his mast decided opponents. Lieut. Raphael achieved a high reputation as a cricketer and a Rugby Union International three-quarter buck. He was captain of the Merchant Taylors' Cricket XL, establishing a public school record for the runs he made. At Oxford he played in the University XI and Rugby XV from 1903-6. In 1904 he accomplished his best performance with the bat against the Yorkshire XI. at Oxford, scoring 201 out of a total of 374. He was a member of the Surrey County Xl. for four seasons, commencing in 1903, and in 1904 acted as captain. Lieut. Raphael's last cricket appearance in Yorkshire was for an England XI against the county at Harrogate in Aug. 1913, when he and Mr. H. D. G. Leveson-Gower saved the Englanders from defeat by a plucky stand in the last half-hour of the match. Between 1902 and 1906 Lieut. Raphael played in nine international matches for England as a Rugby centre three-quarter back, distinguishing himself by powerful running. He also captained in 1910 an English team on a visit to the Argentine. Besides cricket and football, John Raphael was an expert fencer and swimmer, being president of the Oxford University Swimming Club in 1904. Under his leadership the Old Merchant Taylors' Football Club became one of the most renowned sides in the country. It was often said of him that he was the most versatile and one of the best sportsmen who have come down from Oxford in the present century. He found, however, his vocation in the Army, where his gift for dealing with men came into play. All his energies were given to promoting their sports, organizing canteens, seeing to the catering and cooking for his units; the men wrote of him: "He was to us as a father." He was very often to be found in the front-line trenches, where his cheery presence heartened the men; it was thus he got his death wound. A rising young politician, a writer for the Press, a traveller, sportsman and soldier, one of the most chivalrous and devoted of sons, an ardent worker for social reform, a loyal friend, of him it may be said: "If character be destiny, then is his assured."

Details from Wisden Cricketers' Almanack

Lieut John Edward Raphael (King's Royal Rifles and A.D.C. to the G.O.C. of a Division), born at Brussels April 30, 1882; died of wounds June 11. Merchant Taylors, 1898, etc.: captain two years; Oxford v Cambridge 1903-4-5. Surrey XI, 1903, etc., and captain for a time in 1904. Member of M.C.C., since 1906.

The news that John Raphael was dead caused sorrow to a very wide circle of friends. Though he never gained quite the place as a batsman that his deeds as a school-boy had suggested, he was in the cricket field and still more in the world of Rugby football a distinct personality. Everything he did created more than ordinary interest, his popularity as a man, apart from his ability, counting for much. At Merchant Taylors he had a brilliant record. He was in the eleven for five years-- 1897 to 1901. In 1898 as a boy of sixteen he headed the batting with an average of 23 and, being quite a good school bowler, took 32 wickets at a cost of less than nine runs each. Thenceforward his school career was one long success. He was third in batting in 1899 - average 27 - and first in bowling with 51 wickets for just under 15 runs each. Then in 1900 he had a great season. At the top of the list both in batting and bowling he scored 962 runs with an average of 43, and took 68 wickets. His highest innings was 152 not out. He finished up at school in 1901 with nothing short of a triumph. Again first in batting he scored 1,397 runs with an average of 69, and as a bowler he was second, 76 wickets falling to him. He and J. Dennis made 326 together without being parted against Kennington Park, their scores being 175 not out and 135 not out respectively. Naturally great things were expected of Raphael when he went up to Oxford, but as a cricketer he began with a set-back. From some cause, after making 47 not out in the Freshmen's match, in 1902, he showed such poor form that he never had any chance of gaining his blue. As a matter of fact he was not tried in a single first-class match. In 1903 his prospects while Oxford played at home were equally dismal. However he got on well for Surrey against Oxford at the Oval, and was given a trial for the University against Sussex at Brighton. Seizing his opportunity he played a fine innings of 65, when no one else could do much against the Sussex bowlers, and two days before the match with Cambridge at Lord's Mr. Findlay gave him his colours. As in the case of Lord George Scott for Oxford and late Eustace Crawley for Cambridge in 1887, the last choice proved the batting success of his side. Raphael scored 130 on the first day and laid the foundation of Oxford's victory. His innings did not start well, but it was brilliant in its later stages. In the drawnmatchof 1904 Raphael only made 12 and 25 against Cambridge, but in the sensational match the following year--won in brilliant style by Cambridge after it had at one point seemed any odds against them--he played perhaps the best innings of his life. With a score of 99 he only failed by a single run to rival Yardley's feat of getting two hundreds in the University match. In Surrey cricket Raphael never became a power, but he often played well for the county and when--as the last of various captains--he took charge of the team in 1904 he proved quite a capable leader. Raphael's weakness as a batsman was that he relied too exclusively upon forward play. His method - at any rate when he had to contend against first-rate bowling - demanded an easy wicket. His bowling seemed to leave him after his school days.

At the game of Rugby football Raphael earned much distinction as a three-quarter back, playing for England in nine matches - against Scotland and against Wales in 1902, 1905, and 1906; against Ireland in 1902; and against New Zealand and France in 1906. A beautiful kick, a brilliant field, and possessed of a good turn of speed, he was a fine natural player, even if his special qualities did not always make for success as one of a line of four three-quarters in international encounters. He accomplished great things for the Old Merchant Taylors, and gaining his blue as a Freshman at Oxford in 1901, not only appeared for his University against Cambridge on four occasions, but only once failed to secure a try.

In a bye-election at Croydon he stood as Liberal candidate but did not succeed in entering Parliament.

RATTIGAN

Cyril Stanley

Captain, "D" Company, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Killed in action 13th November 1916 near Beaucourt, France. Aged 32. Born 5th August 1884, Camberwell, London. Son of the late Sir William Rattigan, K.C., M.P., and of Lady Rattigan, of "Lanarkslea", Cornwall Gardens, London. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 8 C 9 A and 16 A.

See his statistics on CricInfo

READ

Arthur Bedomme

Second Lieutenant, 1st Battalion, Prince Albert;s (Somerset Light Infantry). Killed in action 16th September 1914. Aged 23. Son of Maud E. Read, of "Avalon," Grange Rd., Sutton, Surrey, and the late Robert Arthur Read. Buried in VAILLY BRITISH CEMETERY, Aisne, France. Plot IV. Row G. Grave 12.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

2nd LIEUT. ARTHUR BEDDOME READ, 1st BATTN. PRINCE ALBERT'S (SOMERSET LIGHT INFANTRY), was born at Surbiton, Surrey, on the 20th January, 1891, having been the son of the late Robert Arthur Read, Esq., and grandson of the late Colonel R. H. Beddoine, Madras Staff Corps, and of the late Robert Arthur Read.

He was educated at Sherborne School, Dorset, where he was a Colour-Sergeant in the Officers' Training Corps. He was gazetted to the Special Reserve in April, 1912, and was commissioned 2nd Lieutenant in the Somerset Light Infantry in December, 1913, joining the 1st Battalion at Colchester the following month.

2nd Lieutenant Read was killed by shrapnel in the Battle of the Aisne, France, on the 16th September, 1914.

He was a member of the M.C.C. and was also a fine Rugby forward, most of his work being done for the Richmond Club until the 1913-14 season, when he played for the Army against Sandhurst and Woolwich at Queen's Club.

REID

G E H

Lieutenant, Special List attached 4th Battalion, King's African Rifles. Died 9th March 1915. Buried in DAR ES SALAAM WAR CEMETERY, Tanzania. Plot 8. Row D. Grave 11.

RICHARDSON, D.S.O.

Francis James

Major, 4th Battalion, Princess Louise's (Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders). Died 11th December 1917. Aged 51. Son of Francis Richardson, of Juniper Hill, Dorking; husband of Rhoda Dagmar Richardson. Served in the South African war. Awarded the Distinguished Service order (D.S.O.). Buried in DORKING CEMETERY, Surrey. Grave reference P. 2755. See also Charterhourse School memorial

Extract from The Distinguished Service Order 1886-1915 published by Naval & Military Press:

RICHARDSON, FRANCIS JAMES, Capt., was born 8 March, 1866, son of Francis Richardson, of Juniper Hall, Dorking. He was educated at Cheam; Charterhouse, and Jesus College, Cambridge. He was gazetted to the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders 9 May, 1888; became Lieutenant 26 Feb. 1890, and Captain 1 July, 1897. Capt. Richardson served in the South African War, 1899-1901, as Adjutant, 4th Battn. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders (1 May to 5 Aug. 1901). He took part in the advance on Kimberley, including the actions at Modder River and Magersfontein ; operations in Orange Free State, Feb. to May, 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 Feb.); actions at Poplar Grove, Dreifontein, Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River ; operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June) ; operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 29 Nov. 1900, including action at Zilikat's Nek ; operations in the Transvaal 30 Nov. 1900, to May, 1901 ; operations in Orange River Colony, May to July, 1901 ; operations in Cape Colony, July, 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 Sept. 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 Sept. 1901]: “Francis James Richardson, Capt., Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa.” The Insigina were presented by the King 29 Oct. 1901. He retired 16 June, 1906, and became Major, Special Reserve Battn. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, and in 1912, D.A.D. Remounts, Eastern Command. He married, 19 July, 1899, in Ireland, Rhoda Dagmar Richardson, daughter of Restell R. Bevis, and their children are Francis Desmond, born in 1902, and Elspeth Rhoda. Major Richardson died 11 Dec. 1917, of wounds received in action.

ROBERTSON-WALKER, MiD

Arthur Murdoch Maxwell

Captain, Adjutant 8th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Killed in action 7th July 1916. Aged 36. Son of the late James and Emily Robertson-Walker, of Gilgarran, Distington, Cumberland; husband of Madge Robertson-Walker. Mentioned in Despatches (MiD). No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Pier and Face 8 C 9 A and 16 A. Member of the Stock Exchange. See also Stock Exchange Memorial

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

CAPTAIN ARTHUR MURDO MAXWELL ROBERTSON-WALKER, Royal Fusiliers, was the son of James Robertson-Walker and was born in 1881. He was educated at Harrow and University College, Oxford, was a good golfer and cricketer and an all-round sportsman.

He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1905 and was associated with the firm of Buckley, Hartopp, and Co.

In December 1914 he obtained his commission in the 8th Royal Fusiliers and went out to France in the following May. He was promoted Captain and made Adjutant of his battalion, being subsequently mentioned in dispatches.

He was killed on 7 July 1976 in the attack on Ovillers during the opening phase of the battle of the Somme.

A brother officer wrote: “I cannot help testifying what a vast loss the Regiment has suffered in his death. As adjutant his energy and coolness always surprised me even through the many trying times we went through in France. Thanks to such as 'Bobby' the battalion earned a name of which any Fusilier may be proud."

Captain Robertson-Walker married a daughter of the late Mr. Alexander McIver.

ROLPH

George William

Captain, 9th Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment. Killed in action 10th August 1915. Aged 37. Son of Emily Stratford Rolph, of "Claremont," 37, Knighton Drive, Leicester, and the late Col. W. M. Rolph (Leicestershire Regt.). Gazetted 7th November 1900, to 1st Battalion, West India Regiment, and on disbandment appointed to Leicestershire Regiment 17th January 1907, afterwards transferred to Worcestershire Regiment. No known grave. Commemorated on HELLES MEMORIAL, Turkey. Panel 104 and 113.

ROMER, C.B., C.M.G.

Frederick Charles

Lieutenant-Colonel commanding 8th Battalion, The Buffs (East Kent Regiment) formerly Lancashire Fusiliers. Killed in action 26th September 1915. Awarded Companion of the Most Distinguished Order of St. Michael and St. George (C.M.G.). No known grave. Commemorated on LOOS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 15 to 19.

ROOKE

Douglas Giles

Captain, Coldstream Guards. Died 2nd November 1918. Aged 35. Husband of Blanch Rooke, of 14A, Great Cumberland Place, London. Buried in STAGLIENO CEMETERY, GENOA, Italy. Plot I. Row D. Grave 36.

ROSE, Baronet

Sir Frank Stanley Day

[Date of death listed as 26th January 1915 on SDGW] Captain, 10th (Prince of Wales's Own Royal) Hussars. Killed in action or 26th October 1914 (CWGC). Aged 27. 2nd Bart. Son of Sir Charles Day Rose, 1st Bart.; husband of Lady Daphne Rose, of Hardwick House, Whitchurch, Oxon. Served in the South African Campaign. Buried in ZANDVOORDE CHURCHYARD, Zonnebeke, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Grave 1.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

CAPTAIN SIR FRANK STANLEY ROSE, BART., Xth (PRINCE OF WALES'S OWN ROYAL) HUSSARS, was born on the 27th April, 1877. He succeeded his father—Sir Charles Day Rose—as second Baronet in 1913, and he was a grandson of the Right Hon. Sir John Rose, P.C., G.C.M.G. Sir Frank Rose was educated at Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge, joining the 10th Hussars in May, 1900, becoming Lieutenant in June, 1904.

He served with his Regiment in the South African War, being present at operations in the Transvaal and Cape Colony. For his services he was mentioned in Despatches ("London Gazette," 17th January, 1902), and received the Queen's medal with four clasps.

One of the characteristics of the Great War has been the liability of the cavalry to be employed on dismounted duties, and Sir Frank Rose was so employed when he was killed, on the 26th October, 1914, while fighting with his Regiment in the trenches, near Zandvoorde, where he is buried. These trenches were under heavy shell fire all day and the casualties were very severe, Lieutenant Turner also being killed. Sir F. Rose married Daphne, daughter of the late Captain Henry Brooks Gaskell, of Kiddington Hall, Oxfordshire, and left three children: Charles Henry, who succeeds him in the Baronetcy, born October, 1912; Amy, born May, 1911; and Helen Briar, born June, 1915.

He was a member of the Army and Navy Club, Boodle's, and the Royal Automobile Club, while his chief recreations were music and hunting.

RUTTER, MiD

Eustace Frederick

Major, 1st Battalion, East Lancashire Regiment. Killed in action 13th May 1915. Aged 44. Son of Elizabeth Rutter, of Coal House, Martock, Somerset, and the late F. T. Rutter. Served on the North West Frontier of India, and in the South African Campaign. Mentioned in Despatches (Mid). No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 34.

SAMUDA

Cecil Markham Annesley

Major, Prince Albert's (Someset Light Infantry). Died of wounds 2nd July 1917. Aged 38. Son of Cecil and the late Mrs. Samuda, of Bruern Abbey, Kingham, Oxford; husband of Phyllis G. J. Samuda, of "The Copse," Burnham-on-Sea, Somerset. Buried in BAILLEUL COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION (NORD), Nord, France. Plot III. Row D. Grave 147.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

SAMUDA, CECIL MARKHAM ANNESLEY, 2nd Battn. (13th Foot) Prince Albert’s (Somerset Light Infantry), only s. of Cecil Samuda, of Bruern Abbey, Chipping Norton, co. Oxford, J.P., D.L. and C.C. Oxon, by his wife, Cécile Mary Isabella, dau. of Colonel Markham; b. Cowes, Isle of Wight, 9 Sept. 1878; educ. Eton, and Christ Church Oxford ; obtained a commission as 2nd Lieut. The Somerset Light Infantry from the Militia 21 April, 1900; promoted. Lieut. 30 May, 1903, Captain 22 Dec. 1909, and Major 1 Sept. 1915; served in the South African War 1899 -1902 (Queen's Medal with clasps and King's Medal with two clasps); also with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from Feb. 1915, and died near Messines 2 June, 1917, of wounds received in action. He m. at Burnham, co. Somerset, 22 July, 1914, Phyllis, dau. of Colonel Caulfield Stoker, and had a son, Anthony Ward, b. 22 June, 1917.

SANDEMAN

George Amelius Crawshay

Captain, 3rd Battalion attached 1st Battalion, Hampshire Regiment. Killed in action 26th April 1915 at Zonnebeke, Belgium. Aged 32. Born 18th April 1883, Westminster, London. Son of Lt. Col. George G. and Amy Sandeman. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 35.

His details from CricInfo

Born on April 18, 1883, in London. As a slow left-arm bowler he was in the Eton XI in 1901 and 1902. In his last year he took all 10 wickets for 22 in the first innings of Winchester and 16 for 46 in the match, when, bowling against the wind, he made the ball swerve and was almost unplayable. His 35 wickets for Eton in 1902 cost 11.62 runs each. At Oxford he was chosen for the Freshmen's match, but did not obtain his blue. He played three matches for Hampshire in 1913, taking only 3 wickets at 41.33. He also played for the Eton Ramblers and Free Foresters. He was Squire of Fonab, Perthshire. Serving as a Captain in the 3rd Battalion, Hampshire Regiment, he was killed in action at Zonnebeke, Belgium, on April 26, 1915, aged 32.

SANDERSON

Ronald Harcourt

Lieutenant-Colonel, 148th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Killed in action 17th April 1918. Aged 41. Son of the Rev. Prebendary Edward and Mary Jane Sanderson, of The Rectory, Uckfield, Sussex. Born Dec. 11, 1876, at the Vicarage, High Hurstwood, Uckfield. Buried in LIJSSENTHOEK MILITARY CEMETERY, Poperinge, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot XXVII. Row G. Grave 3. See also Uckfield War Memorial

SCHWARZ, M.C.

Reginald Oscar

Captain Temporary Major, 6th Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps attached to H.Q. 1st Echelon, Staff Con. of Salvage. Died in the Spanish flu epidemic 18th November 1918. Aged 43. Born 4th May 1875, Lee, London. South African Cricketer, played in twenty test matches and international rugby footballer. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). Buried in ETAPLES MILITARY CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot XLV. Row A Grave 4. Member of the Stock Exchange. See also Stock Exchange Memorial

Sporting career: Schwarz won three caps for England at rugby against Scotland in 1899, and Wales and Ireland in 1901.

Schwarz played a handful of games for Middlesex in 1901 and 1902 before emigrating to South Africa and joining Transvaal; but it was on his return to England with the South African cricket team in 1904 that he made his mark, having learning from Bosanquet how to bowl the googly. Unusually, he bowled it as his stock delivery, with considerable success: in 1904 and 1907 he topped the bowling averages, in the latter year taking 137 wickets at just 11.70 apiece, and he was named as a Wisden Cricketer of the Year in 1908. On that 1907 tour, the first on which South Africa played Tests in England, they had no fewer than four leg-break and googly bowlers, Schwarz having passed on the secret of the googly to Aubrey Faulkner, Bert Vogler and Gordon White.

Schwarz retired from regular playing after the 1912 season, though he appeared thrice more for L Robinson's XI over the next two seasons. In all he took 398 wickets at a fine 17.58 average, and in Tests he took 55 at 22.60. Despite his poor batting -- he passed fifty only twice in first-class cricket -- Schwarz did make a century: 102 in a non-Test game against an England XI at Lord's in 1904.

See Wikipedia, Reggie Shwarz for more information

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

MAJOR REGINALD OSCAR SCHWARZ, M.C., King's Royal Rifle Corps, was born in 1875, and educated at St. Paul's School and Christ's College, Cambridge.

He was a brilliant athlete. He was the best cricketer at St. Paul's, but it was many years later that he became one of the most famous slow bowlers in the history of the game, for to him was due, as much as to anyone, the development of that method of concealing the break on a ball, known as "Googly" bowling. When at his best he was the most consistent and least punished of all the bowlers of his type. He played as a regular member of the South African Test Match team for many seasons.

At Rugby football he was one of the great half-backs of his time, playing for his school, University, and England.

He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1911 and a partner in the firm of Parsons and Henderson.

During the war he served in German South-west Africa for a year as a Staff Captain, being mentioned in despatches, and in January 1916 went to France, where he served on the staff of a division. Early in 1918 he was transferred to the Salvage Corps through ill health, and he died on 18 November of that year.

For his services in France he was awarded the Military Cross and again mentioned in despatches.

One of his Commanding Officers wrote: “Combined with far more than his share of good looks, and the lithe figure of the trained athlete, he possessed the most supreme modesty and self-effacement. Tremendously cheerful, bubbling over with fun and good spirits, and possessing a real sense of humour, it was small wonder that he owned such a host of friends. If one were asked to sum him up in a sentence, one would say that it is inconceivable that he could ever have had an enemy.”

SILLS

Charles Caldwell

Second Lieutenant, 1st Battalion, South Wales Borderers. Killed in action 26th September 1914. Aged 20. Son of George Turner Sills and Alice Sills, of Coed Maes, Oakham, Rutland. Educated at Oakham School and Sandhurst. A member of M.C.C. No known grave. Commemorated on LA FERTE-SOUS-JOUARRE MEMORIAL, Seine-et-Marne, France.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

SILLS, CHARLES CALDWELL, 2nd Lieut., 1st Battn. (24th Foot) The South Wales Borderers, only surv. s. of George Turner Sills, of Coet Maes, Oakham, Barrister-at-Law, H.B.M. Magistrate, Zanzibar, by his wife, Alice, dau. of Charles Silverlock; gdson. of the late George Sills, Recorder of Lincoln and great-nephew of the late Col. John Fletcher Caldwell, 24th Regt.; b. London, 24 Dec. 1893; educ. Oakham School, and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst; gazetted 2nd Lieut. 1st South Wales Borderers, 17 Sept. 1913; went to the front with the Expeditionary Force in Aug. 1914; served through the Retreat from Mons, the Battle of the Marne, and the advance to the Aisne, and was killed in action during the latter 26 Sept. 1914. At Oakham he was five years in the Cricket XI., being captain in 1911 and 1912, and was in the Rugby XV. for two years. He won his double Blue at Sandhurst for athletics (the High Jump), and for cricket, scoring 103 for Sandhurst v. Woolwich in 1913. In 1913-14 he played both Rugby and Cricket for the Aldershot command, and he was a member of the M.C.C.; unm.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

2nd LIEUTENANT CHARLES CALDWELL SILLS, 1st BATTN. SOUTH WALES BORDERERS, was born in London on the 24th December, 1893, the son of George Turner Sills, Barrister - at - L a w , B. M.' s Magistrate at Zanzibar from 1909-14; the grand- son of George Sills, Recorder of Lincoln, and great-nephew of Colonel J. F. Caldwell, of the 24th Regiment.

He was educated at Oakham from 1905-12, and entered the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, in 1912, being gazetted thence to a 2nd Lieutenancy in the South Wales Borderers in September, 1913. He proceeded to France with the 1st Division of the Expeditionary Force, and was present at the Battles of Mons, the Marne, and the Aisne. In the latter he was killed on the 26th September, 1914, near Vendresse, while his battalion was engaged in repelling a German attack in force on the trenches.

At school he was captain of the cricket XI in 1911 and 1912, and was also in the Rugby XV. He was a successful athlete, having been a Double Blue at Sandhurst in 1913 for the high-jump and cricket, having scored in the same year 103 for Sandhurst v. Woolwich. When at Aldershot he played regularly at cricket and football for the Aldershot Command. He was a member of the M.C.C.

SIMPSON

Ernest Herbert

Second Lieutenant, "G" Anti-Aircraft Battery, Anzac Section, Royal Garrison Artillery. Died of wounds 2nd October 1917. Aged 41. Husband of Violet A. Gerry (formerly Simpson), of 3, Belle Vue, Sunderland. Buried in LONGUENESSE (ST. OMER) SOUVENIR CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot IV. Row E. Grave 21. Member of the Stock Exchange. See also Stock Exchange Memorial

See his statistics on CricInfo

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

SECOND LIEUTENANT ERNEST HERBERT SIMPSON, Royal Garrison Artillery, was the second son of F. H. Simpson of Beckenham and the Stock Exchange.

Born in 1875, he was educated at Malvern College. He was in his school cricket eleven for three years, was captain in 1895, and played for Kent in 1896.

He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1900 and subsequently started as a dealer in the American market.

In June 1916 he joined the 29th A.A. section of the Royal Garrison Artillery. Later he was given his commission and went to France.

He was mortally wounded on 27 September 1917 near Vlamertinghe by an aeroplane bomb and died at St. Omer in October. In 1913 he married a daughter of W. B. Bishop of Beckenham.

SIMPSON

Roger Cordy

Major, 10th (R. East Kent and West Kent Yeomanry) Battalion, The Buffs (East Kent Regiment). Died 27th February 1919. Aged 36. Son of George and Emma Simpson, of Wray Park, Reigate, Surrey; husband of Finovola, daughter of Sir Fitzroy Maclean, 10th Bart. of Duart, K.C.B. (now Mrs. F. W. Marsham, of Hope Court, Crowborough, Sussex). Buried in REIGATE CEMETERY, Surrey. Grave reference C. 1556/6B and 1586/7.

SMITH, M.C.

Geoffrey H

Lieutenant Acting Captain, 1st Battalion, Coldstream Guards. Died 16th October 1918 (SDGW) or 22nd October 1918 (CWGC). Aged 21. Son of Francis Hubert and Ethel Rose Smith, of Bank of England, Plymouth. Born at Sutton Coldfield, Birmingham. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). Buried in ST. SYMPHORIEN MILITARY CEMETERY, Mons, Hainaut, Belgium. Plot I. Row B. Grave 3.

SOAMES

Gilbert Horsman

Major, 1st Battalion, Prince Of Wales's Own (West Yorkshire Regiment). Killed in action 9th June 1917. Aged 37. Served in South African War in Lancashire Fusiliers. Mentioned in Despatches. Second son of Arthur W. Soames, M.P., of 18, Park Crescent, Portland Place, London; husband of Rose Eveline Soames, of 2, Petersham Terrace, Gloucester Rd., South Kensington, London. Buried in CAMBRIN CHURCHYARD EXTENSION, Pas de Calais, France. Plot/Row/Section T. Grave 18.

SOAMES

Maurice Gordon

Major, "A" Battery, 48th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Died of wounds 24th September 1916. Aged 32. Son of Arthur Wellesley Soames and Eveline Soames, of 18, Park Crescent, Portland Place, London. Buried in HEILLY STATION CEMETERY, MERICOURT-L'ABBE, Somme, France. Plot IV. Row G. Grave 30.

SPARKS, C.B.E., R.N.

John Barnes

Captain, Royal Navy. Died 29th March 1920 at Marylebone, London. Born 31st May 1873, Morar, India. Buried in BROMPTON CEMETERY, London. Grave reference W.1. 175640.

See his statistics on CricInfo

SPROT

Ivan Boyd

Lieutenant, 1st Battalion, Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders. Killed in action 23rd October 1914. Aged 25. Son of the late Edward W. Sprot, of Drygrange, Roxburghshire; husband of Nancy Sprot. His brother, Capt. J.W. Sprot, also fell. Buried in PERTH CEMETERY (CHINA WALL), Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot XII. Row B. Grave 6.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

LIEUTENANT IVAN BOYD SPROT, 1st BATTN. THE QUEEN'S OWN CAMERON HIGHLANDERS, who was killed in action on the 22nd October, 1914, near Langemarck, in Belgium, was the youngest son of the late Mr. Edward W. Sprot and of Mrs. Sprot, of Drygrange, Roxburghshire.

He was born on the 14th September, 1889, and was educated at Stanmore Park, Middlesex; and Eton, for which school he played cricket. He was also a member of the Middlesex Cricket Club, and was a fine athlete. He received his commission in the Cameron Highlanders from the Special Reserve in May, 1911, becoming Lieutenant in September, 1914.

He was shot in the temple by a sniper while leading his men on. His last words were, “Come on, boys, come on! Let's at them!” A brother of Lieutenant Sprot's is in the Black Watch, and another in the Gordon Highlanders. The former has been “missing" since November, 1914, and the latter has been wounded in the war.

Lieutenant Sprot married, in March, 1914, Agnes Mary Gordon (Nancy), youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Berry, 31, Drumsheugh Gardens, Edinburgh, and a granddaughter of the late Sir William Muir, of Dean Park House, Edinburgh.

STEEL

Allan Ivo

Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, Coldstream Guards. Killed in action 8th October 1917 at Langemark, Belgium. Aged 25. Born 27th September 1892, Toxteth Park, Liverpool, Lancashire. Son of Georgina D. Steel, of 12, Cleveland Gardens, Hyde Park, London, and the late Allan G. Steel, K.C. Educated at Eton College. No known grave. Commemorated on TYNE COT MEMORIAL, Zonnebeke, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 9 to 10.

Details from Wisden Cricketer's Almanack

Lieut. Allan Ivo Steel (Coldstream Guards), son of A. G. Steel; killed October 8, aged 25. Eton XI, 1910-1911; Middlesex, 1912. Calcutta C.C. Member of M.C.C. since 1912. A good slow bowler at Eton, Steel had obviously modelled his style on that of his famous father. His school records were excellent -- 42 wickets with an average of 12.71 in 1910, and 47 wickets with an average of 14.53 in 1911. He fairly divided honours with Fowler in 1910 on the whole season's work, and took the other two wickets when Fowler, with eight wickets for 23 runs, beat Harrow in such sensational fashion at Lord's. Steel was improving fast as a batsman when he left Eton, and would no doubt have developed considerably if he had gone to Cambridge instead of taking up a business appointment in India.

STEEL

John Haythorne

Lieutenant, HMS Munster, Royal Navy. Died 18th April 1918. Aged 28. Son of A. G. Steel, K.C., (Recorder of Oldham), and Georgiana D. Steel, of 12, Cleveland Gardens, Hyde Park, London. No known grave. Commemorated on PORTSMOUTH NAVAL MEMORIAL, Hampshire. Panel 28.

Note: HMS Munster was a Moon Class Destroyer. Launched 24th November 1915. One of four Thornycroft specials. Sold for scrapping in November 1921.

STEELE, C.M.G.

George Frederick

Lieutenant-Colonel, 1st (Royal) Dragoons. Died of wounds 22nd May 1915. Awarded Companion of the Most Distinguished Order of St. Michael and St. George (C.M.G.). Buried in BAILLEUL COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION (NORD), Nord, France. Plot I. Row C. Grave 141.

STEPHENSON, D.S.O., M.C.

Derek Charles

Major commanding "ZS" Battery, 5th Brigade, Royal Horse Artillery. Killed in action 23rd March 1918. Aged 30. Son of the late Lt. Col. Keppel Stephenson and of Helena M. Stephenson, of Langham Hall, Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk. Awarded the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.) and the Military Cross (M.C.). Buried in CHAUNY COMMUNAL CEMETERY BRITISH EXTENSION, Aisne, France. Plot 3. Row H. Grave 8.

Extract from The Distinguished Service Order 1916-1923 published by Naval & Military Press:

STEPHENSON, D. C. (D.S.O. L.G. 4.6.17); b. 11.10.87; S. of late Lt.-Col. K. Stephenson, R.H.A.; educ. at Ludgrove; Eton; R.M.A., Woolwich; 2nd Lt., R.F.A., 18.12.07; Lt. 18.12.10; Capt. 30.10.14; Major, R.H.A., Dee. 1917. He went to France in Aug. 1914, and served there till the day of his death. In June, 1917, he was blown up in his dug-out at night, and had severe concussion, but insisted on returning to his battery before he was really recovered. Except for this two months at home he served continuously at the front. He was all through the Retreat from Mons, battles of the Marne and Aisne, the First Battle of Ypres, and took part in almost every important action of the war. Major Stephenson (Z Battery, R.H.A.) was killed instantaneously by a shell on 23.3.18; Despatches twice; M.C.

STEWART, D.S.O., M.C.

Walter Robert

Lieutenant-Colonel, 13th Battalion, Rifle brigade (The Prince Consort's Own). Killed in action 8th April 1918. Aged 30. Son of Gen. The Hon. Alexander Stewart and Adela M. Stewart; husband of Mollie Stewart, of 36, Lennox Gardens, London, S.W.1. Awarded the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.) and the Military Cross (M.C.). Buried in COUIN BRITISH CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot VI. Row C. Grave 3.

Extract from The Distinguished Service Order 1916-1923 published by Naval & Military Press:

STEWART, W. R. (D.S.O. L.G. 1.1.18); b. 7.2.88; 2nd Lt., Rif. Brig., 24.6.08; Lt. 3.3.11; Capt. and Bt. Major (T/Lt.-Col.), Rif. Brig.; M.C. He was killed in action on 8.4.18.

STOPFORD

Heneage Frank

Major, Royal Field Artillery. Killed in action 15th September 1916. Aged 39. Son of James Sydney and Katherine Mary Stopford (nee Waller); husband of Margaret A. Stopford, of Deanyers, Alton, Hants. Buried in BULLS ROAD CEMETERY, FLERS, Somme, France. Plot III. Row L. Grave 13.

the Earl of SUFFOLK AND BERKSHIRE, HOWARD

Henry Molyneux Paget

Major, commanding 1st Wiltshire Battery (Territorial), Royal Field Artillery. Killed in action 21st April 1917. Aged 39. 19th Earl of Suffolk and 12th Earl of Berkshire. Son of Henry Charles Howard, 18th Earl of Suffolk and 11th Earl of Berkshire; husband of Marguerite Hyde, Countess of Suffolk and Berkshire, of Charlton Park, Malmesbury, Wilts. Buried in BASRA WAR CEMETERY, Iraq. Killed in action 21st April 1917. Plot III. Row S. Grave 1.

SWINBURNE, D.S.O., MiD

Thomas Anthony Stewart

Major, 2nd Field Company, Royal Engineers. Killed in action 1st April 1918. Aged 31. Son of Col. Swinburne, of Pontop, and Louise Gertrude Stewart. Born at Ingliston, Midlothian. Awarded the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.), 3 times Mentioned in Despatches (MiD). Legion of Honour (France). Buried in BOVES WEST COMMUNAL CEMETERY, Somme, France. PLot/Row/Section B. Grave 12.

Extract from The Distinguished Service Order 1916-1923 published by Naval & Military Press:

SWINBURNE, T. A. S. (D.S.O. L.G. 15.3.16); b. 20.12.86; s. of Lt.-Col.. Swinburne, RICA., and Mrs. Swinburne, of Pontop Hall, Durham, and 23, Eaton Place, S.W.; educ. Rugby and Woolwich; 2nd Lt., 11.E., 20.12.05; Lt. 25.6.08; Capt. (A/Major) (2 Field Co.), R.E. He served for six years in the 3rd Sappers and Miners in India, and saw service in the Persian Gulf. Reverting to home service, he was quartered at the Curragh during the spring at 1914, and was one of the officers who chose to risk his commission rather than coerce Ulster. On the outbreak of war he sailed with the first Exp. Force, and had nearly four years' fighting from the Retreat from Mons up till nearly the end of the war. He was killed in action on 1.4.18.

London Gazette 15th March 1916 - SWINBURNE, THOMAS ANTHONY STEWART, Capt., Royal Engineers. For conspicuous gallantry and continuous good work in action, notably when a mine was exploded by us in close proximity to the enemy. Directly our bombers had made good the near edge of crater, Capt. Swinburne organized and controlled the digging parties to consolidate it. This work was carried out under heavy fire. Later lie explored the far edge of the crater and descended the mine shaft, as it appeared that some of the enemy had been entombed by the explosion.

TEMPEST-HICKS, M.C., MiD

Charles Edward Henry

Captain, 16th (The Queen's) Lancers. Died of wounds 9th August 1918. Aged 30. Son of Brig. Gen. and Mrs. Tempest Hicks, of Gladsmuir House, Monken Hadley, Herts, and Hillgrove Wells, Somerset. Served in France from Aug., 1914. Three times wounded. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.), Mentioned in Despatches (Mid), Croix de Guerre (France). Buried in LONGUEAU BRITISH CEMETERY, Somme, France. Plot III. Row B. Grave 2.

TENNYSON

the Hon Alfred Aubrey

Captain, 4th Battalion attached (th Battalion (CWGC) or 12th Battalion (SDGW), Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own). Killed in action 21st march 1916 (SDGW) or 23rd March 1918 (CWGC). Aged 26. Son of 2nd Baron Tennyson and Lady Tennyson, of Farringford, Freshwater, Isle of Wight. No known grave. Commemorated on POZIERES MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Panel 81 to 84.

THESIGER, C.B., C.M.G.

George Handcock

Major-General, General Staff commanding 9th (Scottish) Division formerly Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own). Killed in action 26th September 1915. Aged 47. Son of Lt. Gen. The Hon. Charles Wemyss Thesiger, and The Hon. Mrs. C. W. Thesiger; husband of Frances Thesiger, of 13, St. Leonard's Terrace, Chelsea, London.. Awarded Companion of the Most Distinguished Order of St. Michael and St. George (C.M.G.). No known grave. Commemorated on LOOS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 1.

THOMAS

Alec Vaughan

Captain, 11th Battalion,East Surrey Regiment attached 2nd Battalion, Hampshire Regiment. Killed in action 6th August 1915. Aged 22. Son of John Alick and Kate Edith Florence Thomas, of The Croft, Worcester Park, Surrey. Educated. at Repton School; an Undergraduate of Oriel College, Oxford. No known grave. Commemorated on HELLES MEMORIAL, Turkey. Panel 117.

THOMAS, M.C. & Bar, MiD

William Humphrey

Captain, 1st/1st Battalion, Berkshire Yeomanry. Died of wounds 28th November 1917. Aged 28. Son of William Lloyd Thomas and Ada Margaret Thomas, of Tredilwn Park, Abergavenny, Mon. Returned from Calcutta to join. Awarded the Military Medal (M.C.) and Bar, Mentioned in Despatches (MiD). Buried in KANTARA WAR MEMORIAL CEMETERY, Egypt. Section C. Grave 115.

THOMSON

Edmund Peel

Major, 2nd Battalion, Royal Munster Fusiliers attached Royal irish Regiment. Killed in action 21st December 1914 at Festubert, near La Bassee, France. Aged 40. Born 22th April 1874, Moss Side, Manchester, Lancashire. No known grave. Commemorated on LE TOURET MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France.Panel 43 and 44.

See his statistics on CricInfo

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

THOMSON, EDMUND PEEL, Major, 2nd Battn. (194th Foot) The Royal Munster Fusiliers, yst. s. of the late William Thomson, of Manchester, by his wife (--) (80, Saunders Street, Southport, co. Lancaster) b. 22 April, 1874: gazetted 2nd. Lieut. Thu Royal Munster Fusiliers 21. Oct. 1893; promoted Lieut. 1 Feb. 1896; Captain 23 July, 1901, and Major 17 Feb. 1912; was Adjutant of his Regt. from 17 May 1899, to 17 May, 1903; served in the South African War 1902, taking part in the operations in the Transvaal in April, 1902 mentioned in Despatches, [London Gazette, 29 July 1902]; Queen's Medal with two clasps); was appointed Staff Captain, Pretoria Sub-District, South Africa, 15 March 1906, and Brigade Major, Middlesex Infantry Brigade Eastern Command, 29 April, 1912 ; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders, and was killed in action 22-23. Dec. 1914.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

MAJOR EDMUND PEEL THOMSON, 2nd BATTN. ROYAL MUNSTER FUSILIERS, son of William Thomson, of Manchester, was born on the 22nd April, 1874. He was educated at the Rev. E. W. Hob-son's private school in Southport, Fettes College (Carrington House), and the R.M.C., Sandhurst.

He joined the Royal Munster Fusiliers in October, 1893, becoming Lieutenant in February, 1896; from May, 1899, to May, 1903, he was Adjutant of his battalion; and was promoted Captain in July, 1901.

He took part in the South African War, being present at operations in the Transvaal in 1902. He was mentioned in despatches ("London Gazette," 29th July, 1902), and received the Queen's medal with two clasps. From March, 1906, to June, 1909, he was Staff Captain, Pretoria Sub-district, South Africa, and he was promoted Major in February, 1912.

He was appointed Brigade-Major, Middlesex Infantry Brigade, Eastern Command, in April, 1912, which appointment he held till October, 1914, when he rejoined the 2nd Royal Munsters in France.

Major Thomson was killed on the 22nd December, 1914, at Festubert, when as Senior Major of his battalion he was gallantly leading an attack on the German trenches.

He excelled in all sports and games, having learnt cricket at Southport and at Fettes College, Edinburgh, where he was captain of the XI for two years. Later he played for his corps in the Inter-Regimental Racquet's Tournament in 1913, and became prominent among soldier cricketers. He was a member of the Army and Navy Club, the Free Foresters, and the M.C.C.

THURSBY

Audley Delves

[Lords list him as Arthur Davies, the SDGW as Arthur Delves and the CWGC and Bond of Sacrifice as Audley Delves] Captain, 3rd Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Killed in action 15th February 1915. Son of Neville Thursby, of Harlestone. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 51 and 53.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 2:

LIEUTENANT (temp. CAPTAIN) AUDLEY DELVES THURSBY, 3rd BATTN. KING'S ROYAL RIFLE CORPS, only son of Neville Thursby, of Harlestone, Northampton, was born at 16, Queen Street, Mayfair, London, W.

He was educated at Farnborough School, Eton, Cheltenham, and the R M.C., Sandhurst, from which he was gazetted to the K.R.R.C. in February 1908, joining his Battalion in Crete, and serving with it in Malta and India. He was promoted Lieutenant in April, 1911. In December, 1914, he was promoted temporarily (supern.) to the rank of Captain. He was killed on the 15th February, 1915, while acting as a guide in a night attack to retake trenches at St. Eloi.

The following memoir appeared in The Field of the 20th February, 1915: “Capt. Thursby was well known in the world of sport, more especially as far as military races are concerned. Of him it was once remarked in The Pioneer: I thought I was coming to the Quetta races, but I have made a mistake, and attended Thursby's benefit instead.'

These words were written in connection with the Quetta Meeting held on September 19th, 1912, when on the second day Mr. Thursby rode in six of the seven races on the card and won them all. Previously he had scored eight wins in twenty-two mounts at Malta, and in the following season (at the same place) eighteen wins in forty mounts. He headed the amateur riders in the matter of average while he was in India, and had it not been that he was so long on foreign service he would doubtless have made a big mark as a race rider in this country. As an athlete, too, Captain Thursby held no mean place, and in the Malta Garrison Marathon of 1909 he was eleventh man home in a field of 700, his own Battalion (of which he was the trainer) taking second honours in the team competition. In the following year the Battalion won first place, and Captain Thursby was the first officer home, and in the same year the Battalion was first in polo, cricket, football, and gymnastics, Captain Thursby being one of its representatives in each event.

TOMPSON

Alan Hawtin

Second Lieutenant, Special Reserve attached 4th Battalion, Grenadier Guards. Killed in action 27th September 1915. Aged 35. Son of John Alfred and Marie Louise Tompson; husband of Gladys Tompson (nee Bullough). No known grave. Commemorated on LOOS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 5 to 7.

TORRENS

Attwood Alfred

Major, Royal Field Artillery (Territorial). Killed in action 8th December 1916. Aged 42. Born 13th February 1874, Baston Manor, Hayes, Kent. Son of Capt. Alfred and Mrs. Torrens, of "The Grove", Hayes, Kent. Buried in POZIERES BRITISH CEMETERY, OVILLERS-LA BOISSELLE, Somme, France. Plot II. Row F. Grave 4.

See his statistics on CricInfo

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

TORRENS, ATTWOOD ALFRED, Major, Royal Field Artillery, 4th South Midland Howitzer Brigade, 3rd N. of the late Alfred Torrens, Capt. Rentz by his wife, Ann Ommanney, dau. of Sir Claude Edward Scott. Bart.: b. Heston Manor, Hayes, co. Kent, 13 Feb. 1874 educ. at Harrow; was on the Stock Exchange; obtained a commission 12 Fob. 1913; promoted Major the following Dec.: served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from 24 May, 1916, and was killed in action at Pozières 8 Dec. following. Buried there. Brigadier-General R. C. Coates wrote: "The whole of the artillery of the division much feel his loss. He was an exceptionally popular officer, both with his brother officers and the men." The Rev. Bainbridge. Bell wrote "In every sense a fine soldier. Much beloved and much lamented by us all." Lieut. Kobel wrote: “His battery was being shelled. and being uneasy about the safety of his men, he went out to move them, and was struck and killed instantaneously by a piece of shell. He was an excellent officer and very popular in the brigade. We all deplore his loss." One of his subalterns wrote: " He was such a favourite with us all, I feel his loss very deeply. I have only been in his battery three months, but they have boon quite the happiest three mouths of my Army life:" Unm.

TOSETTI, M.C.

Douglas

Major, 8th Battalion, Princess Charlotte of Wales's (Royal Berkshire Regiment). Killed in action 21st March 1918. Aged 40. Son of the late Max and Julia Tosetti. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). No known grave. Commemorated on POZIERES MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Panel 56 and 57.

TOWER

Christopher Cecil

Lieutenant, Essex yeomanry attached as A.D.C. to Major General Wing, 12th Division. Killed in action 4tth [SDGW] or 2nd [CWGC] October 1915. Aged 30. Son of Christopher J. H. and Cecilia Tower of Wealdside, Essex; husband of Cynthia (daughter of Brig. Gen. Herbert Conyers Surtees, of Mainsforth Hall, Co. Durham), of Weald Hall, Brentwood, Essex. Buried in NOEUX-LES-MINES COMMUNAL CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot I. Row K. Grave 16.

TOYNBEE

Geoffrey Percy Robert

Captain, 1st Battalion, Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own). Killed in action 15th November 1914 at Ploegstraete, Armentieres, France. Born 18th May 1885, Paddington, London. Son of the late Percy Toynbee. No known grave. Commemorated on PLOEGSTEERT MEMORIAL, Comines-Warneton, Hainaut, Belgium. Panel 10.

Details from CricInfo

Born on May 18, 1885, at Paddington, London. An opening right-hand bat, he was in the Winchester XI in 1902 and 1903, averaging 18.25 in the former year and 24.30 in the latter. He scored heavily at Sandhurst, heading the averages in 1904 with 70.71, and being third the following season with 42.33. He made many large scores in military matches. Playing for Green Jackets v Aldershot Command in July, 1911, he it 115 and 101*. He played in two matches for Hampshire in 1912, scoring 14 in his one innings. Serving as a Captain in the Rifle Brigade, he was killed in action at Ploegstraete, Armentieres, France, on November 15, 1914, aged 29.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

TOYNBEE, GEOFFREY PERCY ROBERT, Capt.. The Rifle Brigade (The Prince (Consort's Own). only s. of the late Percy Toynbee, of 92, Westbourne Terrace, London. W., and of Mrs. Francis Raitt, of Brookfield Hall, co. York; b. 18 May, 1885 gazetted 2nd Lieut. The Rifle Brigade 10 Aug. 1905 Promoted Limit. IT May. 1909; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders, and was killed in action 15 Nov. 1914.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

CAPTAIN GEOFFREY PERCY ROBERT TOYNBEE, 1st BATTN. THE RIFLE BRIGADE (THE PRINCE CONSORT'S OWN), who was killed in action near Armentieres on the 15th November, 1914, was the only son of the late Percy Toynbee, 92, Westbourne Terrace, and of Mrs. Francis Raitt, Brockfield Hall, York.

He was born on the 18th May, 1885, and was educated at Winchester and the R.M.C., Sandhurst. At Winchester he was in the XI in 1903, and also in the Football XV and in Sixes. At Sandhurst he was captain of the cricket, and represented the R.M.C. at golf. He joined the Rifle Brigade in August, 1905, becoming Lieutenant in May, 1909, and captain in February, 1914.

Captain Toynbee was a member of the United Service Club, Pall Mall, and of I Zingari and the M.C.C. His recreations were hunting, shooting, fishing, cricket, and golf. He played cricket for Hampshire in 1912. He was unmarried.

TRYON

Richard

Captain, 6th Battalion, Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own). Killed in action 10th January 1915. No known grave. Commemorated on LE TOURET MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 44.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

TRYON, R., Capt., The Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort’s Own), attd. 2nd Battn. (69th Foot) The King's Royal Rifle Corps, eldest s. of the late Capt. R. Tryon, Rifle Brigade, of The Lodge, Oakham, by his wife (—) (79, Eaton Place S.W.); served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders, and was Killed in action 10 Jan. 1915. He m. Edith (-) (40, Cadogan Place, S.W.)

TUDWAY

Hervey Robert Charles

Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, Grenadier Guards. Died of wounds 18th November 1914. Aged 26. Born 23rd September 1888, Westminster, London. Son of Charles Clement Tudway and Alice Constance Tudway (nee Hervey-Bathurst), of Milton Lodge, Wells, Somerset. Buried in BOULOGNE EASTERN CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot II. Row B. Grave 13.

See his statistics on CricInfo

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

TUDWAY, HERVEY ROBERT CHARLES, Lieut., 2nd Battn. Grenadier Guards, eldest s. of Charles Clement Tudway, of The Cedars, Stoberry Park, and Milton Lodge, Wells, Somerset, J.P., D.L., by his 2nd wife, Alice Constance, yst. dau. of Sir Frederick Hutchinson Hervey-Bathurst, 3rd Bart.; b. 17. Lower Berkeley Street, W., 23 Sept. 1888; educ. Evelyns and Eton, where he was in the sixth form and Eton Society; gazetted 2nd Lieut. Grenadier Guards, 1 Feb. 1910, and promoted Lieut. 29 Sept. Following appointed A.D.C. to Lord Buxton, and sailed for South Africa, 25 July, 1914, but hearing of the outbreak of war on his arrival there, cabled to Lord Buxton, who was in England, for leave; returned immediately and rejoined his regt.; went to the Front ; joined the 2nd Battn. at Ypres, 2 Nov. 1914, and died in hospital at Boulogne, 18 Nov. following, of wounds in the head received at the 1st Battle of Ypres on the 9th; unm. He was buried in the cemetery at Boulogne. A brass tablet was erected to his memory in the North Choir Aisle of Wells Cathedral, the inscription concluding with: “His life for his country, his soul to God.” Lieut. Tudway was a keen sportsman end cricketer, and played for the Brigade, I.Z. and M.C.C. His brother, Lieut. Lionel C. P. Tudway, R.N., D.S.O., was taken prisoner at Kut when in command of H.M.S. Sumara.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

LIEUTENANT HERVEY ROBERT CHARLES TUDWAY, 2nd BATTN. GRENADIER GUARDS, died in hospital at Boulogne on the 18th November, 1914, from wounds received in action at Ypres on the 9th of that month. He was the eldest son of Charles Clement Tudway, of Wells, by his second marriage with Alice, daughter of the late Sir Frederick Hervey Bathurst, third Bart., whose ancestor, the Hon. Felton Hervey, eighth son of the first Earl of Bristol, fought at Waterloo and lost one arm there. Lieutenant Tudway's grandfather, uncle, and cousin on the maternal side all served in the Grenadier Guards.

Lieutenant Tudway was born on the 23rd September, 1888, at 17, Lower Berkeley Street, W., and was educated at Evelyns and Eton, where he won the School Fives in 1907, was captain of his house, in the Sixth Form, and a member of the Eton Society.

He received his commission in the Grenadier Guards in February, 1910, becoming Lieutenant in September of the same year, and served with his Regiment till the summer of 1914, when he was appointed A.D.C. to Viscount Buxton, Governor-General of South Africa, and arrived there to find that war had broken out. He at once resigned his appointment and returned to England, and had hardly arrived when he received orders to rejoin his Regiment at the front.

Lieutenant Tudway was a member of the Guards' and Pratt's Clubs, and of I Zingari and the M.C.C. At Eton he was noted for his cheery and charming manners. He was a good cricketer and an excellent shot, and became very popular with his brother officers and in society. At the Wells County Petty Sessions after his death the Chairman (Colonel Alfred Thrale Perkins, C.B.) paid a touching tribute to the young officer, and a brass tablet has been fixed in the wall of the north choir aisle in Wells Cathedral to his memory.

The Officer Commanding at the Grenadier Guards Headquarters at home wrote to his father extolling his late son's soldierly qualities and charming personality.

TUFNELL

Carleton Wyndham

Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, Grenadier Guards. Killed in action 6th November 1914. Aged 22. Son of Carleton Fowell Tufnell and Laura Gertrude Tufnell, of Watendone Manor, Kenley, Surrey. Buried in ZILLEBEKE CHURCHYARD, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot/Row/Section D. Grave 1.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

TUFNELL, CARLETON WYNDHAM, Lieut., 2nd Battn. Grenadier Guards, 3rd s. of Carleton Fowell Tufnell, of Waterdone Manor, Kerney, Surrey, by his wife, Laura Gertrude, dau. of William Parker Charsley, of Ceylon, M.D.; b. Sydenham, co. Kent, 5 Aug. 1892; educ. Eton and Sandhurst ; gazetted 2nd Lieut., 2nd Grenadier Guards, 4 Sept. 1912; left for France in Sept. 1914, and was promoted Lieut. He was mortally wounded near Klein Zillebeke, during the fiat Battle of Ypres, on the evening of 9 Nov. 1914, dying shortly after he reached hospital. He was machine gun officer of his Battn., and was hit whilst taking up a position. Buried in Zillebeke Churchyard; unm. At Eton, Lieut. Tufnell was one of the best all-round athletes the school has known. He was captain of the Eleven, Keeper of the Field (two years), Keeper of Oppidon Wall and Mixed Wall, and President of the Eton Society ("Pop."). He won the Victor Ludorum Prize at athletic sports, and the King's medal in the O.T.C. At Sandhurst, he was Captain of the cricket, association football, and athletic team, and later played cricket for the Household Brigade, M.C.C., and Zingari, and represented the British Army against the Dutch Army at “Soccer,” both in England and Holland, in the season of 1914-15.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

LIEUTENANT CARLETON WYNDHAM TUFNELL, 2nd BATTN. GRENADIER GUARDS, third son of Carleton Fowell Tufnell, of Watendone Manor, Kenley, and nephew of Rear-Admiral Lionel Grant Tufnell, C.M.G., was born at Sydenham, Kent, on the 5th August, 1892.

He was educated at Eton, where he was captain of the Cricket XI, and for two years captain of the Football XI ; was the winner of the Victor Ludorum Cup, President of the Eton Society, and winner of the King's medal in the O.T.C. Passing through the R.M.C., Sandhurst, he joined the Grenadier Guards in September, 1912, becoming Lieutenant in September, 1914, and being for some time in the King's Company in the 1st Battalion.

Lieutenant Tufnell was killed on the 6th November, 1914, while proceeding in command of his machine-gun section to defend a wood near Ypres, and was buried in Zillebeke Churchyard. He was a member of the M.C.C. and I Zingari. While at school he played for two years in the Eton v. Harrow and Eton v. Winchester matches. He represented the Army in Association Football v. the Dutch Army on two occasions, and was a prominent member of the Household Brigade Cricket Club.

TURNBULL

Hugh Vincent Corbett

Captain, 2nd Battalion, King's Own Scottish Borderers. Killed in action 13th November 1914. Aged 37. Son of Charles Cubitt Turnbull, of Murvagh, Cheltenham. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 22.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

TUFNELL, CARLETON WYNDHAM, Lieut., 2nd Battn. Grenadier Guards, 3rd s. of Carleton Fowell Tufnell, of Waterdone Manor, Kerney, Surrey, by his wife, Laura Gertrude, dau. of William Parker Charsley, of Ceylon, M.D.; b. Sydenham, co. Kent, 5 Aug. 1892; educ. Eton and Sandhurst; gazetted 2nd Lieut., 2nd Grenadier Guards, 4 Sept. 1912; left for France in Sept. 1914, and was promoted Lieut. He was mortally wounded near Klein Zillebeke, during the fiat Battle of Ypres, on the evening of 9 Nov. 1914, dying shortly after he reached hospital. He was machine gun officer of his Battn., and was hit whilst taking up a position. Buried in Zillebeke Churchyard; unm. At Eton, Lieut. Tufnell was one of the best all-round athletes the school has known. He was captain of the Eleven, Keeper of the Field (two years), Keeper of Oppidon Wall and Mixed Wall, and President of the Eton Society ("Pop."). He won the Victor Ludorum Prize at athletic sports, and the King's medal in the O.T.C. At Sandhurst, he was Captain of the cricket, association football, and athletic team, and later played cricket for the Household Brigade, M.C.C., and Zingari, and represented the British Army against the Dutch Army at “Soccer,” both in England and Holland, in the season of 1914-15.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

CAPTAIN HUGH VINCENT CORBETT TURNBULL, 2nd BATTN. KING'S OWN SCOTTISH BORDERERS, who was killed in action on the 13th November, 1914, was the only son of the late Charles Cubitt Turnbull, of Murvagh, Cheltenham, and Upper Colletts, Cleeve Hill, Gloucestershire.

He was born on the 20th July, 1877, and was gazetted to the King's Own Scottish Borderers, from the Militia, in May, 1898, becoming Lieutenant in May, 1900, and Captain in June, 1908. From January, 1911, to August, 1912, he was Adjutant of his battalion, and on the 8th August, 1912, was detached from his Regiment for employment with the Egyptian Army. When war was declared he returned to England and was posted to the 2nd Battalion of his Regiment.

TURTON

Edmund Spencer

Lieutenant, A.P.W.O., Yorkshire Hussars Yeomanry. Killed in action 1st September [SDGW] or 31st August [CWGC] 1915. Aged 26. Son of Edmund Russborough Turton (M.P.) and Clementina Turton, of Upsall Castle, Thirsk, Yorks. Buried in LIJSSENTHOEK MILITARY CEMETERY, Poperinge, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot I. Row A. Grave 16.

TWINING

Cecil Francis Harvey

Captain, 3rd Battalion attached "A" Company, 1st Battalion, Hampshire Regiment. Killed in action 3rd May 1915. Aged 30. Son of Herbert Twining, of 48, Ennismore Gardens, South Kensington, London; husband of Dorothea E. Bonham-Christie (formerly Twining), of Hatton Gore, Harlington, Middx. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 35.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 2:

CAPTAIN CECIL FRANCIS HARVEY TWINING, 3rd (RESERVE) (attd. 1st) BATTN. HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT, was the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Haynes Twining, of 48, Ennismore Gardens, S.W.

He was born on the 2nd August, 1885, at 7, Stanhope Street, Hyde Park, London, W., and was educated at Hazelwood, Limpsfield, and at Eton. He received his commission as 2nd Lieutenant in the 3rd Battalion Hampshire Regiment from the Militia in April, 1904, becoming Lieutenant in November, 1908, and Captain in September. 1914. For active service in the War with Germany Captain Twining was attached to the 1st Battalion of his Regiment, which he joined at the Aisne. He was wounded at Messines in a night attack on the 1st November, 1914, and was invalided home, but rejoined his Battalion in March, 1915, and was killed in the second battle of Ypres on the 3rd May, 1915. He was buried four miles north-east of Ypres, about a mile from Zonnebeke.

A brother officer writes of him: “His death was a great shock to all of us in the company, as he was loved by officers and men alike. The men of his company were very fond of him and would have followed him anywhere; his thought was always for their safety, and I don't think he paid enough attention to his own."

He was a member of various cricket clubs, including the M.C.C., Free Foresters, Eton Ramblers, Butterflies, and Hampshire Hogs. He was also a member of the Conservative and Prince's Clubs, and of the Stoke Poges and East Brighton Golf Clubs.

Captain Twining married Dorothy Elizabeth, daughter of Charles E. N. Charrington, of Frensham Hill, Surrey.

TYSER

George Beaumont

Major, 7th Battalion, East Lancashire Regiment. Killed in action 5th July 1916. Aged 39. Youngest son of George Walter and Annie Tyser, of Oakfield, Mortimer, Reading. Buried in BAPAUME POST MILITARY CEMETERY, ALBERT, Somme, France. Plot I. Row B. Grave 7.

TYSER

Henry Erskine

Second Lieutenant, "D" Company, 8th Battalion, Black Watch (Royal Highlanders). Killed in action 9th April 1917. Aged 43. Only son of William Haviside Tyser and Amy Tyser. Educated at Eton and Trinity College, Oxford. Member of his father's firm, Messrs. Tyser & Co., up to 31st December 1913. Elected an Underwriting member of Lloyd's in 1898, resigned January, 1917. In 1914 retired from business and volunteered for War Service, being gazetted to Black Watch early in 1915. Born at Vinesgate, Brasted, Kent. Buried in MINDEL TRENCH BRITISH CEMETERY, ST. LAURENT-BLANGY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot/Row/Section B. Grave 1.

VENABLES

Gilbert Rowland

Second Lieutenant, 3rd Battalion, King's (Shropshire Light Infantry). Killed in action 7th March 1915. Aged 34. Son of Rowland George and Gertrude Venables, of Oakhurst, Oswestry, Salop. Buried in VOORMEZEELE ENCLOSURE No.3, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot I. Row A. Grave 2.

WALPOLE

Horatio Spencer

Lieutenant, 1st Battalion, Coldstream Guards. Killed in action 9th April 1918. Aged 36. Son of Henry Spencer Vade-Walpole and Frances Selina, his wife, of Chipstead, Surrey; husband of Dorothea Frances Walpole, of "The Firs," Stevenage, Herts. Buried in BAC-DU-SUD BRITISH CEMETERY, BAILLEULVAL, Pas de Calais, France. Plot II. Row B. Grave 22.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

WALPOLE, HORATIO SPENCER, Lieut., 1st Battn. The Coldstream Guards, yr. s. of the late Henry Spencer Vade-Walpole, Barrister-at-Law, by his wife, Frances Selina (27, Montpelier Square, S.W.), dau. of the late Thomas Bourke (widow of Capt. Denzil Chamberlayne); and brother to Capt. T. H. B. Vade-Walpole, killed in action near Loos 20 Sept. 1915 (see Vol. II., page 304); b. Teddington, co. Middlesex, 19 July, 1881; educ. Eton, and New College, Oxford; was a Solicitor; joined the Inns of Court O.T.C. 3 Jan. 1916; gazetted 2nd Lieut. the Coldstream Guards 25 March following; promoted Lieut. Sept. 1916; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from Aug. of the same year was wounded near Les Boeufs in the Guards' attack on 15 Sept. following, and invalided home ; returned to France in Aug. 1917, and was killed in action near Arras 9 April, 1918. Buried in the British Military Cemetery, Bac du Sod, near Bailleulmont. His Commanding Officer wrote: “The Regiment has lost in him a most excellent officer, who could always be relied on in any time of stress or trouble. We can ill afford to lose such as he was. His country owes him a special debt, as he gave up so much to fight for her. His brother officers will miss To badly; he was so keen and ready for anything; his personality; was so strong, it made itself felt wherever he went, and everybody loved him.” He was heir-presumptive to the two baronies of Walpole. He m. at St. Stephen's, Gloucester Road, SW., 3 July, 1906, Dorothea Frances, only dau. of tbe late Frederick Butler Molyneux Montgomerie, of 1, Cromwell Place, South Kensington, S.W., and had two children: Robert Henry Montgomerie, b. 25 April 1913, and Pamela Frances, b. 22 Feb. 1908.

WALROND

the Hon William Lionel Charles

Lieutenant, Royal Army Service Corps. Died 2nd November 1915. Aged 38. Born in Devonshire. Son of the Right Hon. William Hood Walrond, 1st Baron Waleran, P.C., and Baroness Waleran; husband of the Hon. Mrs. W. L. Walrond (now the Hon. Mrs. H. W. Adams, of Bradfield, Cullompton, Devon). Formerly Secretary to the First Lord of the Treasury, and Member of Parliament for Tiverton. Buried douth og the church in ALL SAINTS CHURCHYARD, BRADFIELD, Devon.

WARD, M.V.O.

the Hon Gerald Ernest Francis

Lieutenant, 1st Life Guards. Killed in action 30th November [SDGW] or 30th October [CWGC & CricInfo] 1914 at Zandvoorde, Belgium. Aged 36. Born 9th November 1877, Himley Hall, Staffordshire. Son of 1st Earl of Dudley; husband of Lady Evelyn Ward, of 52, Danes St., London. Member of the Royal Victorian Order (M.V.O.). No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 3.

See hist statistics at CricInfo

WELD-FORESTER, M.V.O.

the Hon Arthur Orlando Wolstan Cecil

Major commanding King's Company, 1st Battalion, Grenadier Guards. Died of wounds 1st November 1914. Aged 37. Son of 5th Baron Forester and Baroness Forester, of Willey Park, Broseley, Salop. Member of the Royal Victorian Order (M.V.O.). Buried near south-east corner of chruch ST. JOHN THE DIVINE CHURCHYARD, WILLEY, Shropshire.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

MAJOR the Honble. ARTHUR ORLANDO WOLSTAN CECIL WELD FORESTER, M.V.O., 1st BATTN. GRENADIER GUARDS, COMMANDING THE KING'S COMPANY, died at King Edward VII Hospital, London, from wounds received near Ypres, Belgium, on the 29th October, 1914, having gone out with the VIIth Division. He was the fifth son of Cecil, fifth Baron Forester, and was born in London on the 13th July, 1877.

He was educated at Harrow, and joined the Grenadier Guards from the 3rd Shropshire Light Infantry (Militia) in December, 1897, becoming Lieutenant in October, 1899. With his battalion he served in Malta, and subsequently, under Sir Leslie Rundle, in the VIIIth Division through the Boer War, receiving the Queen's medal with three clasps and the King's medal with two clasps. He was promoted Captain in the 3rd Battalion in January, 1905, of which he was Adjutant from January, 1907, to 31st December, 1909. From 1910 to 1912 he was A.D.C. to Lord Hardinge, Viceroy of India, and was awarded the M.V.O. for his services in that position during the visit of King George V. In 1912 he obtained his Majority, with the command of the King's Company of his Regiment. Major Weld Forester was a member of the Guards' and Turf Clubs, played cricket and golf, and was fond of hunting and shooting.

WELLS-COLE, MiD

Neville William

Major, 28th brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Killed in action 6th Janaury 1918. Aged 26. Son of Mrs. M. B. Wells-Cole, of Stones Place, Lincoln, and the late Gervas F. Wells-Cole. Educated Hindhead, Winchester and Woolwich R.M.A. Mentioned in Despatches (MiD). Buried in CANADA FARM CEMETERY, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot III. Row G. Grave 2.

WHINNEY

Edward

Major , 7th Battalion (Territorial), Duke of Cambridge's Own (Middlesex Regiment). Killed in action 26th September 1916. Aged 46. Son of the late Frederick and Emma Whinney; husband of Maude Whinney, of 10, Aubrey Walk, Campden Hill, Kensington, London. Buried in CONNAUGHT CEMETERY, THIEPVAL, Somme, France. Plot I. Row E. Grave 10.

WHITEHEAD

James Hugh Edendale

Second Lieutenant, 9th Battalion, Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regiment). Died 13th March 1919 at St James Park, Westminster, London. Aged 28. Born 8th July 1890 at bromley, Kent. Son of Sir George Hugh Whitehead, 2nd Bart. and Lady Whitehead, of The Shrubbery, 72, Woodstock Rd., Oxford, formerly of Wilmington Hall, Dartford, Kent. Buried in the family vault in the south-east corner of ST. MICHAEL CHURCHYARD, WILMINGTON, Kent. Member of the Stock Exchange. Also listed on the Wilmington War memorial, Kent and London Stock Exchange Memorial

From de Ruvigny's ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-18 Part 5, page 170:

WHITEHEAD, JAMES HUGH EDENDALE, 2nd Lieut., 9th Battn. The Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regt.), eldest and only surv. s. of Sir George Hugh Whitehead, Bart, of Wilmington Hall, o. Kent, and of The Shrubbery, Oxford, L.P., by his wife, Gertrude Grace, dau. of Sir William Ascroft, Bart., of Overleigh House, Preston, co. Lancaster, J.P.; and brother to Lieut. G. W. E. Whitehead (q.c.); b. Bromley, co. Kent, 8 July, 1890; educ. The Old Ride, Bournemouth; Clifton College, and Trinity College, Oxford; was a member of the Stock Exchange, and a partner in the firm of George Whitehead & Chown; volunteered for active service on the outbreak of war, and was gazetted 2nd Lieut. Royal West Kent Regt. 5 Nov. 1914; served with the Regiment from that date until he resigned his commission in 1918, having contracted on service, during the first winter of the war, the illness from which, after three and a half years of patient fortitude, he died in London 13 March, 1919. Buried in Wilmington Churchyard. He was a prominent cricketer while at Clifton; one of their best Fives players and a keen athlete. At Oxford he made a good score-57 and 17—in the Freshmen's match, and on the running track represented the University against Cambridge in the hurdles. He was well known in Kent cricket, and, with his brother, is one of the Kent cricketers commemorated by the fountain erected at Canterbury.

Extract from the Stock Exchange Memorial Book:

SECOND LIEUT. JAMES HUGH EDENDALE WHITEHEAD, Royal West Kent Regiment, the son of Sir George and Lady Whitehead of Wilmington Hall, Dartford, was born in 1890, and educated at Clifton College and Trinity College, Oxford.

He played cricket for Clifton, captained Trinity and represented Kent second Eleven with great success.

His hitting powers were superb, and on one occasion he hit a ball out of the Oval. In addition he got his Blue for athletics, representing Oxford in the Hurdles in 1912. He was for a time Champion Hurdler of the Stock Exchange, of which he became a member in 1914, being a partner in his father's firm, George Whitehead and Chown.

He joined the army in November 1914, and obtained his corn-mission in the 9th Battalion of the Royal West Kents.

Contracting a severe illness from the hardships of the winter of 1914-1915, he was invalided out of the service in 1916.

With his health seriously undermined Lieutenant Whitehead was unable to resist a severe attack of influenza, and he died on 13 March 1919.

A friend wrote of him: "Both at Clifton and Oxford I had every opportunity of recognizing in him an exceptionally fine character, modest, simple, sensitive, and with any amount of grit."

See his statistics on Cricket Archive

WICKHAM

Cyril Henry

Captain,1st Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Died of wounds 15th January 1915. Buried in LA CHAPELLE D'ARMENTIERES COMMUNAL CEMETERY, Nord, France. Plot/Row/Section A. Grave 3.

WILLCOCKS

Harold Francis

Major, Royal Field Artillery attached as Adjutant, Royal Military Academy. Died 7th May 1919. Aged 29. Son of William K. and Edith Willcocks; husband of Marion E. Willcocks, of 26, First Avenue, Hove, Brighton. Chevalier of the Legion of Honour. Buried in CHARLTON CEMETERY, Greenwich, London. Grave reference 1 "C." N. 16.

WILLIAMS

Christopher Manners

Captain (Adjutant), H.Q., 66th Brigade, Royal Garrison Artillery. Killed in action 24th March 1918. Aged 31. Son of R. M. H. Williams and Amy Williams, of Northenby, East Woodhay, Newbury, Berkshire. Buried in CHAUNY COMMUNAL CEMETERY BRITISH EXTENSION, Aisne, France. Plot 3. Row K. Grave 11.

WILLIAMS

Edward Gordon

Lieutenant, Special Reserve attached 2nd Battalion, Grenadier Guards. Killed in action 12th August 1915. Aged 27. Son of Edward Gordon Williams and Louise Davies Williams. Buried in French Civilian Plot of ST. VENANT COMMUNAL CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France.

WILLIAMS

John Nathaniel

Private 12/484, 6th (Hauraki) Company, Auckland Regiment, N.Z.E.F. Killed in action 25th April 1915. Aged 35. Born 24th January 1878, Kensington, London. Son of Col. Sir Robert Williams, 1st Bart., andat Gaba Tepe, Gallipoli Peninsula, Turkey. Lady Williams, of Bridehead, Dorchester, England. Educated at Eton and Oxford. Employed by Waihi Gold Mining Coy., Ltd. No known grave. Commemorated on LONE PINE MEMORIAL, Turkey. Panel 73.

See his statistics on CricInfo.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

WILLIAMS, JOHN NATHANIEL, Private, No.12/484, 6th (Hauraki) Auckland Battn., New Zealand Expeditionary Force (formerly Capt., 4th Dorsets (T.F.)), elder s. of Col. Sir Robert Williams, of Bridehead, Dorchester, 1st Bt., M.P., by his wife, Rosa Walker, dau. of Nathaniel Sims, of Strood Park, Horsham; b. London, W., 24 Jan. 1878; educ. Matfield, Kent; Eton, and New College, Oxford; was for some time in the 4th Territorial Battn. of the Dorsetshire Regt., becoming Capt., but resigned his commission and went to New Zealand in 1910. On the outbreak of war enlisted as a Private in the New Zealand Expeditionary Force; left for Egypt in Oct. 1914; took part in the repulse of the Turkish attack on the Suez Canal hi Feb. 1915, and in the landing at the Dardanelles, 25 April, 1915 and was killed in action at Gaba Tepe that day; unm. Major-Gen. Sir A. I. Godley, K.C.M.G., C.B., Commanding New Zealand Forces, wrote: "He was killed leading and setting a most gallant example to the men in the forefront of the Battn., and all the officer N.C.O.'s and men of the company speak of him in the highest terms of admiration and affection. He had evidently made himself most popular with them and respected by all, and had he not fallen he would have been given a commission in this force immediately after the first action. I believe the example which he set in enlisting, and dying as he did in the ranks, has done more for this force and perhaps for the Empire than he would have done as a commissioned officer!"

WILSON, M.C.

D D

Lieutenant-Colonel, 17th Indian Cavalry, Indian Army. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). Died 1st July 1916. No known grave. Commemorated on NEUVE-CHAPELLE MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 6.

WILSON

Guy Denis

Captain, 169th Brigade (Territorial), Royal Field Artillery. Killed in action 30th November 1917. Born 30th November 1882, Melbourne, Derbyshire. No known grave. Commemorated on CAMBRAI MEMORIAL, LOUVERVAL, Nord, France. Panel 1.

See his statistics on CricInfo

WILSON

Tom Benholt

Second Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, Irish Guards. Killed in action 18th July 1917. Aged 25. Son of Henry Walter and Mary Wilson, of 21, Marlborough Hill, St. John's Wood, London. Buried in CANADA FARM CEMETERY, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot I. Row E. Grave 3.

WOLFE-MURRAY, C.B.

Arthur Alexander

[Listed as Lieutenant Colonel on SDGW] Brigadier-General, General Staff, Commands and Staff formerly Highland Light Infantry. Died 7th December 1918. Aged 52. Son of the late James Wolfe-Murray; husband of Evelyn Mary Wolfe-Murray of 20 George Square, Edinburgh. Served in the South African War. Buried in EDDLESTON PARISH CHURCHYARD, Peeblesshire. Grave 39.

WOLLASTON, D.S.O.

Frederick Hargreaves Arbuthnot

Lieutenant-Colonel, 4th Battalion, Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own) commanding 1st/5th Battalion, Suffolk Regiment. Killed 8th March 1918. Aged 39. Son of Frederick Wollaston, D.L., J.P., of Leicestershire, and Mrs. Wollaston, of Shenton Hall, Nuneaton. Awarded the Distinguished Service order (D.S.O.). Buried in ST. JOHN CHURCHYARD, SHENTON, Leicestershire.

Extract from The Distinguished Service Order 1916-1923 published by Naval & Military Press:

WOLLASTON, F. H. A. (D.S.O. L.G. 14.1.16); b. 7.5.70; s. of F. Wollaston; educ. Eton; 2nd Lt., Rif. Brig. (from Militia), 18.10.99; Lt. 24.10.00; Capt. 27.2.05. On the outbreak of the European War he was in India, and he joined his Regiment in Belgium in March, 1915. At the end of the year he was transferred to the Salonika Army, where he served for eight months. Major Wollaston was mentioned in Despatches for his services on the Western front and awarded the D.S.O.; was subsequently promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel commanding a battalion of the Suffolk Rgt. in Egypt, where he commanded his Regiment in the Battle of Gaza and the subsequent advance in Palestine, and was a third time mentioned in Despatches. He was killed by a German tomb in the air raid on London 7.3.18, on his way back to Palestine the next day to resume command of his Regt. after three weeks' leave.

WOOD

Alexander

Major, 3rd Battalion, Royal Sussex Regiment. Died of wounds 12th April 1917. Aged 37. Son of the late Maj. Gen. Edward Wood, C.B. and Mrs. E. Wood, of Hampton Court Palace; husband of Doris Margaret Wood, of The Old Gables, Warfield, Berks. Buried in FAUBOURG D'AMIENS CEMETERY, ARRAS, Pas de Calais, France. Plot V. Row A. Grave 4.

WOOD

Geoffrey Dayell

Lieutenant, 7th Battalion, Suffolk Regiment. Killed in action 13th October 1915 at Ohenzollern, near Loos, France. Aged 24. Born 17th August 1891, Hampstead, London. Son of Ernest Richard and Katherine Grace Wood, of Melton Hall, Melton, Suffolk. No known grave. Commemorated on LOOS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 37 and 38. See also Melton War Memorial

See his statistics on CricInfo.

Extract from du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

WOOD, GEOFFREY DAYRELL, Lieut., 7th (Service) Battn. The Suffolk Regt., 2nd s. of Ernest Richard Wood, of Melton Cottage, East Bergholt, co. Suffolk, by his wife, Katherine Grace; b. London, 19 Aug. 1891; educ. Eaton House, Aldeburgh; Cheltenham College, and Exeter College, Oxford; joined the University O.T.C. in 1911; volunteered for foreign service on the outbreak of war, being gazetted 2nd Lieut. in the Suffolk Regt. 26 Aug. 1914, and promoted Lieut. 8 March, 1915; went to France at the end of May, and was killed in action at the Hohenzollern Redoubt 13 Oct. following. Buried where he fell. While at Cheltenham he was head of his house, captain of the school cricket eleven in 1909 and 1910, and captain of the school Rugby football team and hockey team in 1910; and at Oxford he played in the Freshmen"s trial match in 1911, and the Seniors" trial match in the following year, being also a member of Lord’s and of the Oxford Authentics ; unm.

WOOD, D.S.O.

Maxmilian David Francis

Lieutenant-Colonel, 9th Battalion, Prince of Wales's Own (West Yorkshire Regiment). Died of wounds 22nd August 1915 near Ismail Oglu Tepe, Gallipoli Peninsula, Turkey. Aged 42. Born 22nd February 1873, Kamptee (now Kamthi), Maharashtra, India. Son of Charles Arthur Watkins Harcourt Wood and Maria Louisa Wood, of Carleton, Pontefract, Yorks; husband of Eugenie Sybil Seymour (formerly Wood), of Kilbees Farm, Winkfield, Berks. Awarded the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.). No known grave. Commemorated on HELLES MEMORIAL, Turkey. Panel 47 to 51.

Details from CricInfo.

Born on February 22, 1873, at Kamptee, India. A middle order right-hand bat and right-arm fast medium bowler, he went to Wellington and Sandhurst. He played eight first-class matches for the Europeans in India between 1897/98 to 1902/93 and in one match for Hampshire in 1907 against Yorkshire at Bradford, when he was stationed nearby with the West Yorkshire Regiment.

In a rain affected match, Wood scored 5 and 4, twice falling victim to Wilfred Rhodes. He played a final first-class match in 1909 for H.D.G. Leveson-Gower's XI at Cambridge, so he played 10 first-class matches in all, with a top score of 30, but his bowling was successful in India where he took 34 wickets with a best of 6-51.

Attaining the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel, he was awarded the DSO in the First World War, and died near Ismail Oglu Tepe at Gallipoli on August 22, 1915, aged 42.

WORMALD

Drury Frank Percy

Captain, Royal Garrison Artillery (Territorial). Died 4th November 1918. Buried in ALL SAINTS CHURCHYARD, CLIVE, Shropshire.

WRIGHT, M.C.

Egerton Lowndes

Captain, 1st Buckinghamshire Battalion, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, Brigade Major, 6th Infantry Brigade. Killed in action 11th May 1918 at Barly, France. Born 15th November 1885, Adlington, Chorley, Lancashire. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). Buried in BARLY FRENCH MILITARY CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot II. Row A. Grace C.

See his statistics on CricInfo

WRIGHT

Harold

Captain, 6th Battalion, Loyal North lancashire Regiment. Died of wounds 14th September 1915 at Marylebone, London. Aged 31. Born 19th February 1884, Woodthorpe, Barrow-on-Soar, Leicestershire. Buried in ST. BARTHOLOMEW CHURCHYARD, QUORN, Leicestershire.

See his statistics on CricInfo

WYNDHAM

the Hon William Reginald

Lieutenant, Lincolnshire Yeomanry attached to 1st Life Guards. Killed in action 6th November 1914. Aged 38. Third son of the late 2nd Baron Leconfield and the Dowager Lady Leconfield, of 12, Great Stanhope St., London. Buried in ZILLEBEKE CHURCHYARD, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Special Memorial 1.

Note: Zillebeke Churchyard contains 32 Commonwealth burials and commemorations of the First World War. Fourteen (mainly officers) belonged to the Foot Guards or the Household Cavalry who died in 1914. Six of the burials are unidentified and special memorials commemorate two casualties whose graves were destroyed by shell fire.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

CAPTAIN the Honble. WILLIAM REGINALD WYNDHAM, LINCOLNSHIRE YEOMANRY, attd. 1st LIFE GUARDS, killed in action on the 6th November, 1914, was the third son of the second Baron Leconfield, and was born on the 16th March, 1876, and was heir presumptive to his brother, the third Baron Leconfield.

Captain Wyndham joined the 17th Lancers as 2nd Lieutenant in March, 1896, becoming Lieutenant in. May, 1897, and Captain in July, 1901. He served in the South African War, 1899-1900, receiving the Queen's medal with three clasps. He retired from the Army in 1903, owing to a riding accident, and took a farm in East Africa, going more lately to the Rocky Mountains. He afterwards returned home and became well known in Ireland on the turf as an owner of winning race horses, and as a member of the Jockey Club, to which he was elected in 1912.

On the outbreak of the war he made every effort to return to the service, and in August, 1914, was gazetted Captain in the Lincolnshire Yeomanry. Being anxious to proceed on active service he was finally successful in being attached to the 1st Life Guards, in which his father and two of his brothers had served.

YOUNGER

Charles Frearson

Lieutenant, Lothians and Border Horse. Died 21st March 1917. Aged 31. Son of 1st Viscount Younger of Leckie and Lucy, his wife; husband of Marjory Caroline Younger, of Gartur, Stirling, Scotland. Buried in AVELUY COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Somme, France. Plot/Row/Section M. Grave 8.

Last updated 25 March, 2014

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