Ministry of Defence
Ministry of Defence

Lest We Forget
British Legion
The Royal British Legion

OXFORD St ALDATES WAR MEMORIALS

World War 1 & 2 - Roll of Honour with detailed information
Compiled and copyright © Barry Burnham 2012

The memorial takes the form of a carved Stone Tablet set into the out-side wall of the church, on the south wall below the eastern most window of the south aisle.

The final design for the War Memorial resulted in the Stone Tablet being three foot six inches wide by two foot six inches deep (approx. 107 X 76cms) and made of Ancaster Stone. The stone was divided into three columns, with the central column being a gothic-style cross; with the inscription split in two, and half of the inscription above each of the two lists of names.

The complete inscription reads -“The Reredos is Dedicated to God with Praise and Thanks-giving In Memory of All S. Aldates Men who Gave Their Lives in the Great War 1914-1919

Photograph Copyright © Barry Burnham 2012
St. Aldates Church taken from St. Aldates Street, circa 1906

The tablet lists in strict alphabetical order, the names of the fallen in two columns of nineteen.

An Oak Reredos inside the church also formed part of the St. Aldates Great War Memorial. The Oak Reredos was 3 foot 11 inches tall by 10 feet wide with a depth of 6 inches (Approx. 305x119x15cms) and consisted of a moulded and ornamented frame, with carved cresting above, enclosing a series of niches and panels. The niches contained carved figures of the patron Saints of the United Kingdom - St. George, St. Andrew, St. David and St. Patrick, with St. Frideswide and St. Aldate at either end. The Panels had carved foliage and shields bearing emblems of the Sacred Passion treated heraldically. The whole was decorated in colour.

Regrettably, the Oak Reredos was removed from the church sometime during the last decade of the twentieth century, and was subsequently sold, reportedly due to lack of space following renovations at the church. The current whereabouts of the Reredos is unknown.

There is no memorial for the Second World War within the church.

ALLSWORTH Robert
Private 30230, 13th Battalion, Royal Berkshire Regiment, attached 165th Company, Labourer Corps. Born in the Oxon village of Curbridge in 1878, Robert Allsworth was the third and youngest son of Alfred Allsworth, an A.G labourer, and his wife Mary (nee Cox). Himself employed as a farm labourer, Robert Allsworth married Louisa Fitchett at St. Aldates on 6 June 1900. Along with the birth of ten children, and a move around various Oxon villages, Robert Allsworth finally arrived in Oxford by the time of his enlistment in October 1915. Formerly serving with the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, and later the Royal Berkshire Regiment, Robert Allsworth was attached to the Labour Corps when he was killed in action, possibly at Passchendaele on 18 October 1917, aged 39. Robert Allsworth was buried at the Artillery Wood Cemetery, (Grave Ref VII.E.1) Belgium.
BRICKNELL Harold
Private 10425, 2nd Battalion, Bedfordshire Regiment. The youngest of seven children born to John and Annie Bricknell, Harold was born in Oxford, at 4 Thames Street, St. Aldates on 9 June 1895. Formerly employed as a Post Office messenger boy, Harold enlisted shortly before the outbreak of war, arriving in France in December 1914. Recorded as killed in action at Festubert (France) on 17 May 1915, Harold Bricknell was initially recorded as missing, yet he supposedly died of wounds, with his body lost on the battlefield. Harold Bricknell was later honoured on the Le Touret Memorial, (Panels 10/11) France.
BULL Charles
Private 8369, 2nd Battalion, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry. Born in Oxford at Towels Buildings, Dale Street, St. Ebbes on 12 January 1883, Charles Bull was the third of eight sons born to Sarah and Harry Bull, a plasterer by trade. A former Holy Trinity Schoolboy, and milkman, Charles joined the local Militia in 1900, and joined the regular army the following year. Later employed as a ‘cork scalder’ at Halls Brewery, Charles was recalled to the colours at the outbreak of war, and arrived in France in September 1914. Killed in action at the battle of Loos on 25 September 1915 aged 32, Charles Bull was buried at the Guards Cemetery, Windy Corner, (Grave Ref II.B.7) France.
BULL Sidney Frank
Private 8404, 2nd Battalion, Royal Berkshire Regiment. The eleventh of twelve children born to Harry Bull, a plasterer, and his wife Sarah (nee Aldridge), Sidney Frank Bull was born at Towles Row, Dale Street, St. Ebbes on 3 September 1890. Like his brother, a former Holy Trinity Schoolboy, Sidney originally gained employment at Turner Bros (Athletic outfitters) in Turl Street before his enlistment to the local Militia in October 1906. Joining the regular army of the Royal Berkshire Regiment the following year, Sidney remained in the army until the outbreak of war. After previously seeing service in India, Sidney Bull first arrived in France in November 1914, and was killed in action on the opening day of the Somme offensive (1 July 1916) aged 25. After the war, the name of Sidney Bull was later honoured on the Thiepval Memorial, (Pier 11.D) France.
BUTLER Fred
Lance Corporal 10457, 5th Battalion, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry. Born into one of the poorest areas of Oxford, Fred Butler was born at Shepperd’s Row, St. Aldates on 26 August 1891; one of nine children born to Henry and Sarah Ann Butler. Employed as a ‘carter’ before the war, Fred Butler enlisted during the autumn of 1914, and first arrived on French soil in May 1915.Just four months later, Fred Butler was killed in action at the battle of Loos on 25 September 1915, and with his remains lost on the battlefield, (Sidney was initially recorded as missing) Sidney’s name was later honoured on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium.
BROGDEN Percival Edward Arthur
Private 43689, 2/8th Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment. The eldest of six children, ‘Percy’ Brogden was born at Summerfield Road, New Hinksey (Oxford) on 9 June 1889 to Joseph Brogden a Police Constable with the City of Oxford Police, and his wife Charlotte Hamilton. Employed by A.R Mowbray in St. Aldates, Percival Brogden joined the Army in 1917, and was wounded in action on 27/28 May 1918. He later died in hospital in Calais (16 June) and was buried at the Les Baraques Military Cemetery, (Grave Ref IV A.3) Sangatte, France.
CROSS William Charles
First Class Stoker SS/104223, HMS Good Hope, Royal Navy. Born in Summertown, North Oxford on 11 December 1888, the third son of William (a labourer) and Ann Cross. Employed as a butcher’s assistant in his youth, William Cross joined the Royal Navy in December 1906, and became a window cleaner on his return to Oxford in 1912. Following his marriage to Frances Broad in August 1914, and the birth of his son the following month, William Cross was recalled to the Navy as a result of the outbreak of war, and assigned to HMS Good Hope. Serving in the South Atlantic, HMS Good Hope took part in the battle of Coronel off the Chilean Coast on 1 November 1914, and was sunk with the loss of all hands. Aged 27 at the time of his death, the name of William Cross was later commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial.
DIPPLE John Thomas
Private 9033, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry,~(Depot) formerly 2nd and 5th Battalion. The eldest of twelve children born to John and Caroline Dipple, John Thomas Dipple was born in the Oxford parish of St. Thomas in 1876. Employed as a house painter in his late teens, John Dipple joined the Oxfordshire Light Infantry in 1896, and mostly served in India until his discharge early in November 1908. Later employed as a college porter, John Dipple married Lillian Maud Griffin in April 1912. Recalled to the colours on the outbreak of war in August 1914, John Dipple was posted to France in May 1915, and wounded a few months later. After returning to France, John Dipple was home on leave when he was taken seriously ill, and died of Cardiac Disease at the 3rd Southern General Hospital in Oxford on 12 November 1917, aged 41. Following his death, John Dipple was buried at Botley Cemetery (Grave Ref II.97) Oxford. (GWGC Cemetery)
EDNEY William
Formerly 5455 10th Protection Company, Royal Defence Corps, and Oxfordshire National Reserve. Born at 21 English Row, St. Aldates (Oxford) on 20 November 1860, William Edney was one of at least ten children born to Robert and Hannah Edney. After spending time at the Cowley Industrial School, William Edney held various occupations, including shop porter, brick-layers labourer, and faggot maker. A long-time member of the local Militia, William originally enlisted in 1879 and remained with the Oxfordshire Light Infantry Militia until March 1907. Following his marriage to Julia Parsons in July 1883, William Edney saw the birth of at least one child, with the possibility of a second child dying in infancy. Joining the Territorial Army in November 1914, William Edney saw service until November 1916, but was discharged as a result of contracting a Carcinoma of the neck in December 1916. After returning home to Oxford, William Edney died six months later on 27 June 1917 aged 56. Following his death, William was interred at Osney Cemetery, Oxford, and forgotten by the Army until December 2010, when his name was belatedly added to the CWGC Roll of Honour.
FINCH Thomas
Private 285060, 1/1st Bucks Battalion, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry. Born at 18 Thames Street, St. Aldates, Thomas Finch was born on 7 May 1883, one of twelve children born to William Finch, a bricklayer, and his wife Charlotte. A former St. Aldates Schoolboy, Thomas trained as a bricklayer in his youth, yet was recorded as a mason around the time of his marriage to Emily Hine in November 1907. Following the birth of four children (two of which died in infancy) Thomas Finch joined the army, possibly in 1915. Wounded in March 1917, Thomas was recorded as missing at 3rd Ypres (Passchendaele) on 8 August 1917, and later recorded as having been killed on that date, aged 37. Due to the loss of his remains, Thomas Finch was later commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, (Panels 96-98) Belgium.
FINCH Albert John
Stoker 1st Class SS/115390, HMS Eden, Royal Navy. The younger brother of Thomas Finch, Albert John Finch was born at 18 Thames Street, St. Ebbes on 13 August 1892, the tenth of twelve children born to William and Charlotte Finch. Employed as a porter in 1911, Albert was employed by the London and North Western Railway as a goods porter prior to his enlistment in January 1914. Joining the Royal Navy as a Stoker II, Albert was eventually attached to HMS Eden which sank in the English Channel following a collision with SS France on 17 June 1916. Officially recorded as lost at sea aged 24, Albert Finch was later commemorated on the Chatham Naval Memorial. (Ref 17)
GRAIN Alfred John
Private 628090, 47th Battalion, (Western Ontario Regiment) Canadian Infantry. Born on 1 January 1891, Alfred John Grain was born at 38 St. Aldates Street, Oxford, the second eldest son of Robert Grain and his wife Mary (nee Madden). Employed as a painter and labourer in 1911, Albert Grain moved to Canada in November 1911, and was employed as a waiter at the time of his enlistment in July 1915. Returning to the UK in November 1915 Alfred Grain arrived in France in August 1916, and was killed in action near to Vimy between 5-7 May 1917 aged 26. As his body was lost on the battlefields of France, Alfred Grain was later commemorated on the impressive Vimy Memorial, France.
GRAHAM Walter
Driver 76607, 42nd Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. The son of a bricklayer’s labourer, Walter Graham was born in Oxford at 4 Burrows Yard, St. Aldates on 19 March 1895, the youngest of three sons born to Edwin and Hannah Graham. A St. Aldates Schoolboy and member of the Church lads Brigade, Walter was employed as a photographer’s assistant aged 16, but was later employed by Morrells Brewery prior to his enlistment shortly before the outbreak of war. Killed by shellfire whilst taking ammunition to the forward lines, Walter Graham was killed in action on 13 May 1917 aged 22, with his body laid to rest at the Tilloy British Cemetery, (Grave Ref I.B.2) France.
GRACE Harry
Private 9333, 3rd Battalion, Coldstream Guards. Born in or near to the market town of Bicester in 1889, Harry Grace was the youngest son of Susan and George Grace, a bricklayer for Bicester. After the death of his father in 1897, the Grace family moved to Oxford, with Harry educated at St. Aldates School. Employed as a chimney sweep, George joined the local Militia in 1906, joining the 4th Battalion, Oxfordshire Light Infantry. Again employed as a chimney sweep, Harry Grace joined the Coldstream Guards in November 1911. Deployed to France in August 1914, Harry must have seen action from the opening encounters of the Great War, and was wounded in action east of Ypres in November 1914. Taken to the 3rd British Red Cross Hospital at Abbeville, Harry Grace died of his wounds on 14 November. His body was later interred at the nearby Abbeville Communal Cemetery, (Grave Ref I) France.
HEARNE Harry Basil
Private 9779, 2/4th Battalion, Royal Berkshire Regiment. The son of a ‘master’ billiard marker, Harry Basil Hearne was born in Oxford at 19 Green Street, Cowley, on 13 June 1898, the eldest of three sons born to Rose and Harry Hearne. Possibly still only 16 years of age when he enlisted, Harry Hearne was wounded during the summer of 1917, and later posted as missing in action during the opening encounter of the German spring offensive on 21 March 1918. Later confirmed as killed in action on that date, the name of Harry Hearne was eventually honoured on the Pozieres Memorial, (Panels 56/57) France.
HILL George Thomas Ballington
Private 2334, 1/4th Battalion, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry. The eldest son of Salvation Army Preacher Thomas Hill, and his wife Jane, George Thomas Ballington Hill was born in the Norfolk market town of North Walsham on 17 February 1890. One of six children, George Hill arrived in Oxford with his family during the early years of the twentieth century, and by 1911, he was employed as a house porter. Like his parents, George became involved in the Salvation Army, who after his death held a memorial service in his honour. Following his enlistment in September 1914, George Hill was sent to France in March 1915, but was killed by a snipers bullet just a month later on 30 April. George Hill was buried at the Rifle House Cemetery, (Grave Ref III.E.2) Belgium.
HOLDEN Thomas Bradley
Private 13674, 10th Battalion, Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). Born in the cotton town of Burnley in Lancashire on 6 February 1892, Thomas Bradley Holden was the only son and second of three children born to Martha and Joseph Holden. Following the break-up of his parent’s marriage, Thomas appears to have lived with his father in Oxford, but returned north where he gained employment at Vickers, the world famous naval shipyards, and Butterworth and Dickinson’s, a textile machinery manufacturer. Enlisting on 3 September 1914, Thomas Holden was posted to a Scottish Battalion, and wounded in the battle of Loos. After seeing heavy fighting on 1 August 1917, Thomas Holden was killed in action as a result of concussion caused by an enemy shell burst at Passchendaele, on 23 August 1917 aged 25. The body of Thomas Holden was lost on the battlefields of Flanders, and his name was later immortalised on the impressive Tyne Cot Memorial, (Panels 68-70, 162-162a) Belgium.
HOUNSLOW Frank
Lance Sergeant 201735, 3/4th Battalion, Queen’s Own Royal West Kent Regiment. The seventh son and tenth of twelve children born to William and Harriett Hounslow, Frank was born in Oxford at 13 Friars Wharf on 23 September 1889. The son of a gas-fitter, Frank Hounslow began his working life as a ‘cook’ in one of the numerous Oxford Colleges, and held this occupation at the time of his marriage to Ethel Skidmore in June 1908, which later produced two sons. Possibly enlisting early in 1916, (he may also have been conscripted), Frank was probably posted to France in May 1917 and was just five months later killed in action at Passchendaele on 10 November 1917, aged 28. Following his death, Frank Hounslow was later laid to rest at the Cement House Cemetery, (Grave Ref I.L.3) Belgium.~
HOUNSLOW Nelson
Private 3655, 1/4th Battalion, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry. The youngest of twelve children born to gas fitter William Hounslow and his wife Harriett Bourton, Nelson was born at 13 Friars Wharf, St. Ebbes during the summer of 1893. A former St. Aldates Schoolboy, by 1911 Nelson had secured himself employment as a tailor’s assistant. Following his enlistment in November 1914, Nelson Hounslow joined the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, but was not posted to France until 1916 at the earliest. Wounded in action, Nelson died of his wounds at Le-Sars in France on 11 December 1916 aged 23. Following his tragic death, the body of Nelson Hounslow was buried at the Contalmaison Chateau Cemetery, (Grave Ref I.E.14) France.
JONES Thomas George
Private 16698, 3rd Battalion, Royal Fusiliers. Born in the village of Wendlebury, North Oxon, during the summer of 1897, the eighth of nine children, Thomas George Jones was the second youngest son of Jane Jones, (nee Merry) and her second husband John Cornelius Jones. Later living in Bicester, Thomas Jones was first found employment as a draper’s errand boy aged 13, and possibly joined the army just three years later. Certainly in uniform by the summer of 1915, Thomas Jones was initially posted to Salonika before being moved to France in July 1918. Killed in action at Les-Etoquies, Thomas Jones was possibly killed on 4 November 1918 (SDGW) although the CWGC has a date of 7 November, aged 21. After his death, Thomas Jones was buried at Crossroads Cemetery, (Grave Ref I.B.30) France.~
KERRY Frederick John
Rifleman 485112, 12th Battalion, London Regiment (Rangers) attached to the Kings Royal Rifle Corps, formerly Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry. One of two brothers killed during the war, Frederick John Kerry was born in Oxford at 4 Shepperd’s Row St. Aldates on 26 June 1882, the eldest of two sons born to John and Elizabeth Kerry. A former St. Aldates Schoolboy, Frederick later gained employment at the Clarendon Press as a bookbinder. Following his marriage to Margaret Porch in Somerset in August 1911, Frederick Kerry returned to Oxford where he enlisted in May 1915. Initially joining the Oxford and bucks, Frederick was posted to France in July 1916, but returned home to England in November 1917. Returning to France with the London Regiment in September 1918, Frederick Kerry was killed in action just 10 days later on 18 September 1918 aged 36. Following his death, the remains of Frederick Kerry was buried at the Bellicourt British Cemetery, (Grave Ref I.J.14) France.
KERRY William
Private 201349, 2/4th Battalion, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry. The youngest of four children and the younger brother of Frederick Kerry, William was born in Shepperd’s Row, St. Aldates on 26 February 1892, to Elizabeth and John Kerry. Like his brother, William was educated at St. Aldates School, followed by employment at A.R Mowbray & Co, a well-known firm of religious printers and publishers in St. Aldates. Joining the Territorial Army early in 1915, William was probably first sent to France in May 1916. Caught in the German Spring offensive of March 1918, William Kerry was held as a prisoner of war in Germany, where he later died of Tuberculosis due to starvation on 28 July 1918, aged 26. William Kerry was later buried at the Niederzwehren Cemetery, (Grave Ref II.G.5) Germany.
LILLEY Horace Christopher
Private L11384, 1st Battalion, the Queen’s (Royal West Surrey) Regiment, formerly 240820 Army Service Corps. The third of ten children born to labourer & painter William Lilley, and his wife Elizabeth (nee Bull), Horace Christopher Lilley was born in Oxford at 22 English Row, St. Aldates on 31 January 1889. A former St. Aldates Schoolboy, Horace was recorded as a manual labourer after completing his education, and joined the Militia of the Royal Berkshire Regiment in December 1905. Following his marriage to Emma Speakes in August 1906, Horace saw the birth of six children (one of which died in infancy) and gained employment with the drainage depot of the local water-works. Enlisting at the outbreak of war, Horace Lilley initially served with the Army Service Corps, and was attached to the horse transport section. Later moved to the Queen’s Regiment, Horace Lilley was killed in action at Passchendaele on 25 September 1917, and as his body was never recovered from the battlefields of Flanders, his name was later commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, (Panels 14-17, or 162-162a) Belgium.
MAWER John Edwin
Private 9755, 2nd Battalion, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry. A Londoner by birth, John Edwin Mawer was born at 50 Swinton Street, St Pancras, on Monday 16 June 1884; the eldest of four sons’ born to bookbinder, Edwin and Florence Mawer. Raised in the St. Clements area of Oxford, John Mawer began his working life as an ‘organ builder’, and he still had this occupation at the time of his marriage to Elizabeth Field at St. Aldates Church in February 1908 which produced three children. After possibly having seen previous military service, John Mawer was soon serving with the army following the outbreak of war, and arrived in France in September 1914. Despite having been recorded as wounded and missing, John Mawer was later recorded as killed in action at Festubert on 16 May 1915, aged 30. Following his death, the name of John Mawer was later commemorated on the Le-Touret Memorial, (Panel 56) France.
MILES Albert James
Lance Corporal 40720, 10th Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment, formerly Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry. Born in Oxford at 22 Great Clarendon Street, Jericho on 1 July 1897; Albert James Miles was the third son of Frederick Miles, a railway porter, and his wife Elizabeth (nee Hall). A member of the locally famous Balliol Boys Club, and a former St. Aldates Schoolboy, Albert Miles was employed at Morrell’s Brewery before his enlistment in August 1914, aged 17. Deployed to France in May 1915, he was wounded in June, and supposedly deployed to Mesopotamia the same month. It’s unlikely he ever served in Mesopotamia, and it seems he spent his entire time on the Western Front. Posted to the Worcester Regiment during the autumn of 1916, Albert Miles was killed in action at Messines on 17 June 1917 aged 19. As his remains were lost on the battlefields of Flanders, Albert Miles was later honoured on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, (Panel 34) Belgium.
PRICE Richard William
Private L/6712, 1st Battalion, East Kent Regiment (The Buffs). Born as Richard William Mosto (the son of Alice Mosto) on 13 July 1884, Richard was born at Charles Street in Cowley, but was raised in the parish of St. Aldates. Raised with the surname of Price, (his mother’s married name), Richard initially worked as a labourer and joined the local Militia in 1901.Later joining the Buffs under his original surname of Mosto; Richard married Martha Harvey with the same surname in December 1910. Now employed as a local village postman, Richard Mosto was living at Bletchingdon (North Oxon) when his two children were born. Recalled to the Buffs on the outbreak of war, Richard Mosto was killed in action on the Somme on 15 September 1916, aged 32, and later commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial (Pier and Face 5D) France, as R.W. Mosto. Richard was also remembered on the St. Aldates Memorial as Richard Price.
PARROTT Aubrey
Flight Sergeant, Royal Air Force, formerly Royal Flying Corps. Originally missing from the GWGC Roll of Honour, Aubrey Parrott died of Influenza at the 1st Eastern Military Hospital in Cambridge on 22 March 1919. The third of four sons’ born to Alfred and Alice Parrott, Aubrey Parrott was born in Oxford at 58 Abbey Road, Osney on 26 March 1896. Formerly a St. Peter-le-Bailey and St. Frideswide Schoolboy, Aubrey was employed as a telegraph messenger boy in his youth, but was training to be an electrician when he enlisted in October 1914. Serving with the 15th Squadron, Aubrey was posted to France in December 1915 where he served as a mechanic (wire rigger). Returning to Oxford, Aubrey married Beatrice Marsh in March 1918, and was transferred into the newly formed RAF in April 1918. After his death, Aubrey Parrott was buried at Osney Cemetery, Oxford, with his name belatedly added to the CWGC Roll of honour in July 2011.
RAWLINGS William
Private 9081, 2nd Battalion, Royal Berkshire Regiment. Possibly born in Oxford as Francis Rawlings on 14 March 1890, at the time of his death, William Rawlings was the son of Mrs Ann Rawlings of English Row, St. Aldates, Oxford. A pre-war regular who enlisted in January 1909, William had served in India prior to the outbreak of war, but returned to England where he was posted to France in November 1914. Killed during the battle of Loos, William Rawlings was killed in action at Bois Grenier on 25 September 1915, aged 25. With his remains lost on the battlefield, the name of William Rawlings was eventually honoured on the Ploegsteert Memorial, (Panels 7 & 8) Belgium.
SMITH William Isaac
Corporal L/17484, 2/2nd Battalion, London Regiment, (Royal Fusiliers) formerly 2nd Battalion, Middlesex Regiment. A career soldier, William enlisted in 1908. One of thirteen children, William Isaac Smith was born in Oxford at 36 Jericho Street on 16 January 1888, the second son of Henry and Ellen Smith. Raised in the parish of St. Barnabas, William joined the army at the age of 20, and may have served in India prior to the outbreak of war. Arriving in France in November 1914, William Smith suffered from trench foot 14 months later, and was wounded in July 1916 on the Somme. Following his injury, William married Mary Lydia Whittaker in September 1916, Returning to France, William was forced to return to England for an operation on his previous leg wounds, but returned to France for a fifth and final time in September 1918, when he was attached to the London Regiment. Gassed in November 1918, (Mustard Gas) William was moved to the 39th Stationary Hospital, where he died on 19 November 1918, aged 30. Following his death, William Smith was buried at the Lille Southern Cemetery, (Grave Ref I.B.18) France.
TAYLOR Francis Steed
Rifleman S/12915, 6th Battalion, Rifle Brigade. The second youngest son of Charles and Mary Ann Taylor, Francis Steed Taylor was born in Oxford at Isis Street, St. Aldates, on 6 July 1887, one of ten children, four of which sadly died in infancy. Educated in St. Aldates, Francis gained employment as a porter at the prestigious Randolph Hotel in Oxford, where he met his future wife. Following his marriage to Eva Townley in Oxford on 31 May 1915, Francis Taylor joined the army a week later. Posted to Sheerness on the Isle of Sheppey, Francis died just six months later in a military hospital in Sheerness of Pneumonia on 3 December 1915, aged 29. Following his death, the body of Francis Taylor was returned to Oxford, and buried at the nearby Osney Cemetery. ~
THOMAS John Frederick
Private 285949, A Squadron, Queens Own Oxfordshire Hussars, formerly Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry. Born in Oxford at 57 Blackfriars Road, John Frederick Thomas was born on 14 February 1895, the eldest of two sons born to Sophia and James Thomas, a local shoeman. Educated in St. Ebbes and for a time at the Cowley Industrial School, John Thomas gained an apprenticeship as a plumber and fitter with Mr Astell in 1911, and was half way through his apprenticeship when he enlisted in September 1914. Joining the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, John Thomas was discharged just five weeks later as unfit for service. Joining the Q.O.O.H in December 1915, John Thomas was wounded in action on 23 March 1918, and later died at the Wharncliffe War Hospital, Sheffield on 21 May 1918, aged 23. Following his death, John Frederick Thomas was buried at the Wadsley Churchyard, (Grave Ref 14) Sheffield.
TIPPING Frederick George
Private 45729, 8th Battalion, King’s Shropshire Light Infantry, formerly Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, and 7th Battalion Wiltshire Regiment. Born in the small Oxon village of Holton in the summer of 1896, Frederick George Tipping was the youngest of ten children born to John and Louisa Tipping. Educated in Holton, Frederick began his working life as a farm labourer, and this was still his occupation when he married Elizabeth Loder in November 1914; a marriage which later produced one child. Frederick Tipping may have enlisted as early as September 1914 joining the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry; however, he was transferred to the Wiltshire Regiment before sailing to France in September 1915. Posted to Salonika in November 1915, almost three years later, Frederick Tipping was transferred to the King’s Shropshire Light Infantry, and was posted as missing in action on 18 September 1918, aged 23. Later confirmed as having died that day, the name of Frederick Tipping was later commemorated on the Doiran Memorial, Greece.
WEBB Harry James
Lance Corporal 21524, 11th Battalion, Durham Light infantry, formerly Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light infantry. Baptised on Christmas Day 1890, Harry James Webb was born at St. Barnabas Street, Oxford, on 14 November 1890, the fifth of six sons born to George and Alice Webb. One of ten children, Harry Webb was a keen sportsman in his youth, and gained employment at the Thames Conservancy as a blacksmith. A member of the St. Aldates Bell ringing team, Harry Webb also taught as a Sunday School teacher at the South Oxford Schools in Thames Street. After enlisting in December 1914, Harry joined the ranks of the OBLI, and just two months later was transferred to the Durham Light Infantry. Arriving in France in July 1915, Harry Webb was wounded by an enemy shell on 3 November 1915, and died at the 26th Field Ambulance the next day. After his death, Harry was buried at the Sailly Sur-la-Lys Canadian Cemetery, (Grave Ref II.B.44) France.
WHITING William
Although the name of William Whiting appears on the St. Aldates Memorial, there is no record of a man of that name who died in the Great War having lived in the St. Aldates area around this time.
WHEELER Frederick John
Private 201112, 2/4th Battalion, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry. The eldest of four children, Frederick John Wheeler was born in the small hamlet of Sutton Wick (near to Abingdon, and formerly in Berkshire) on 27 April 1890, the son of Gertrude and John Wheeler, a railway carman. Attending St. Frideswide School in Oxford, Frederick Wheeler later gained himself employment as a labourer for the Oxford Corporation, and this was still his occupation when he enlisted in September 1914. Arriving in France in May 1916, Frederick Wheeler saw action in Belgium at Passchendaele in 1917 and the German Spring offensive of March 1918. Killed in action on 24 March 1918 aged 27, the body of Frederick Wheeler was not recovered from the battlefields of France, and his name was later honoured on the Pozieres Memorial, France.
WILLIAMS Frank Ernest
Sergeant R/13008, 2nd Battalion, Kings Royal Rifle Corps. Born as Ernest Frank Williams, Frank was born at 1 Kings Row, St. Aldates on 25 March 1894, the second of two sons born to Anna and Edward Williams, a college servant. With siblings from his mother’s previous marriages, Frank was raised in St. Aldates, and on completion of his education, gained employment as a grocer’s errand boy. Later living with his married sister and her family at Thames Street, and employed in the shop of the Danish Dairy Company, Frank joined the Kings Royal Rifle Corps in May 1915, and was wounded a few months later. Arriving in France in September 1915, Frank suffered numerous health problems, but returned to the front in May 1918. Killed in action near Berthaucourt on 18 September 1918, Frank Williams aged 24, was buried at the Berthaucourt Communal Cemetery, (Grave Ref B 18) France.~
WRIGHT Ernest John
Private M2/131588, III Corps, HQMT Coy Army Service Corps. The eldest of two brothers killed during the Great War, Ernest John Wright was born on 21 February 1887, the eldest of eight children born to John and Mary Wright. Educated in St. Aldates, Ernest was employed as a porter in a bookshop at the age of 14, and later employed by a Mr Sweatman in New Inn Hall Street as printer/compositor. Married to Ethel May Silvester in December 1910, the marriage produced a son named Reginald in 1915. Employed as a motor driver for the St John’s Ambulance shortly before the war, Ernest joined the Mechanised Transport section of the Army Service Corps in October 1915, and was posted to Egypt in November 1915. Serving exclusively in Mesopotamia, Ernest Wright contracted Smallpox in November 1918, and was hospitalised at the 22nd Combined Field Ambulance at Shabana Barracks near Baghdad, where he died in 22 November 1918, aged 32. Following his death, Ernest Wright was later buried at the Baghdad (North Gate) Cemetery, (Grave Ref IV.F.3) Iraq.
WRIGHT Arthur
Third Class Steward L/6016, HMS Natal, Royal Navy. The younger brother of Ernest Wright, Arthur Wright was born at 13 Isis Street, St. Aldates on 10 March 1896, one of eight children and the youngest of three sons born to John and Mary Wright. Later employed by a Mr Sweatman of New Inn Hall Street, as a compositor, Arthur Wright joined the Royal Navy in November 1914, and was later attached to HMS Natal. With the Natal moored in the Cromarty Firth, Captain Black was holding an officers party on 30 December 1915, when a number of violent explosions tore throughout the ship (possibly caused by a fire and faulty cordite) which sank within five minutes. The body of Arthur Wright was never recovered from the freezing waters of the Cromarty Firth, and he was later recorded as lost at sea on 30 December 1915 with his name commemorated on the Chatham Naval Memorial. He was nineteen years of age.

1939-1945
ST. ALDATES CHURCH HAS NO SECOND WORLD WAR MEMORIAL

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