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WORCESTER, WORCESTERSHIRE COUNTY CRICKET CLUB
WORLD WAR 1 WAR MEMORIAL

World War 1 - Roll of Honour with detailed information
Compiled and copyright © 2004 - Transcribed Sandra Taylor

Worcestershire County Cricket Club is located in New Road, Worcester, very close to the centre of Worcester. The memorial consists of a wooden plaque that is found in the Members Pavilion and lists the names of the 17 members of the club who died in the Great War.


Photographs Copyright © Sandra Tayor 2005
1914
DULCE ET
DECORUM
EST PRO
PATRIA MORI
1918
IN PROUD REMEMBRANCE
OF THE MEMBERS OF
THE WORCESTERSHIRE COUNTY CRICKET CLUB
WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES IN THE GREAT WAR

ANDERSON

C.

No further information currently available.

BURNS

William Beaumont

Second Lieutenant, 1st Battalion Worcestershire Regiment. Born 29th August 1883 at Rugeley, Staffordshire, died on 8th July 1916 at Contalmaison, France. Thiepval Memorial Pier and Face 5A and 6C. First team member for Worcestershire County Cricket Club from 1903-1913 and Marylebone Cricket Club from 1906/07-1912.

On the 7th and 8th July the drizzle developed into heavy rain, converting the trenches into troughs of knee-deep mud. At about 2 p.m. the enemy were heavily reinforced and commenced a powerful attack. The German artillery pounded the ruins held by the Worcestershire, and strong bombing parties of the enemy worked down from the higher ground. A desperate struggle raged round the ruins of the Church, where a party of the Worcestershire, inspired by two brave subalterns, 2nd Lieutenant A.W. Isaac and 2nd Lieutenant W.B. Burns, fought on till all were overwhelmed.

Source: The Worcestershire Regiment in the Great War by Captain H. FitzM. Stacke of the Regiment, 1928.

CARTLAND

T.

Possibly George Trevor Cartland, Captain Adjutant, 1st Battalion Rifle Brigade. Died aged 23 on 1st July 1916. Son of George and Lilian Cartland, of Bevere Cottage, near Worcester. Serre Road Cemetery No.2 III. E. 14.

COLLIER

A.J.

No further information currently available.

GILMOUR

Herbert James Graham

Lieutenant, 3rd Battalion Worcestershire Regiment. Died aged 31 on 19th September 1914. Son of Ethel Blanche Price-Hughes (formerly Gilmour), of Red Hill, Worcester, and the late James Graham Gilmour. Served in the South African Campaign. La Ferte-Sous-Jouarre Memorial. Also appears on Worcester St Martin, Worcester Cathedral Cloister Windows and Worcester St Philip & St James memorials.

September 19th 1914 was the first of three days of continuous strain and heavy fighting on the Aisne Heights. The enemy made a serious attack during the evening of the 19th and Lieutenant Gilmour was one of two platoon commanders who were killed during that attack, along with many of their men.

Source: The Worcestershire Regiment in the Great War by Captain H. FitzM. Stacke of the Regiment, 1928.

GRAHAM

A G.

Possibly Alec George Malcolm Graham, Captain 6th Battalion Worcestershire Regiment attached The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment. Died 22nd December 1914. Le Touret Memorial Panel 17 and 18.

ISAAC

Arthur Whitmore

Second Lieutenant, 5th Battalion Worcestershire Regiment. Born 4th October 1873 at Powick Court, Worcestershire, died 7th July 1916 at Contalmaison, France. Thiepval Memorial Pier and Face 5A and 6C. First team member for Worcestershire County Cricket Club from 1899-1911. Also appears on Worcester Guildhall, Worcester St John in Bedwardine and Worcester Masonic Hall memorials and Worcester Cathedral cloister windows.

On the 7th and 8th July the drizzle developed into heavy rain, converting the trenches into troughs of knee-deep mud. At about 2 p.m. the enemy were heavily reinforced and commenced a powerful attack. The German artillery pounded the ruins held by the Worcestershire, and strong bombing parties of the enemy worked down from the higher ground. A desperate struggle raged round the ruins of the Church, where a party of the Worcestershire, inspired by two brave subalterns, 2nd Lieutenant A.W. Isaac and 2nd Lieutenant W.B. Burns, fought on till all were overwhelmed.

Source: The Worcestershire Regiment in the Great War by Captain H. FitzM. Stacke of the Regiment, 1928.

ISAAC

John Edmund Valentine

Captain, 2nd Battalion Rifle Brigade. Born 14th February 1880 at Powick Court, Worcestershire, died 9th May 1915 at Rouge Bancs, Fromelles Ridge, Armentieres, France. Awarded the DSO. New Irish Farm Cemetery XXXI. F. 13. First team member for Orange Free State 1906/07 and Worcestershire County Cricket Club from 1907-1908. Also appears on Worcester Guildhall, and Worcester St John in Bedwardine memorials and Worcester Cathedral cloister windows and Lords Cricket Members World War 1 Memorial.

Extract from Distinguished Service Order 1886-1915 published by Naval & Military Press:

ISAAC, JOHN EDMUND VALENTINE, Capt., was born 14 Feb. 1880, at Powyke Court, Worcestershire, son of John Swinton Isaac, D.L., of Boughton Park, Worcester, Banker, and Amelia Alicia Anne, daughter of Major-General R. H. Crofton, Royal Artillery. He was educated at Wixenford and Harrow, and was gazetted to the 5th Northumberland Fusiliers at York 9 May, 1900. He joined his Regiment in South Africa, on active service, leaving England on 28 June, 1900. He was dangerously wounded at Nooitgedacht (General Clements' action on the Mahaliesburg 13 Dec. 1900); and, after two years' sick leave, went back to duty. He had been gazetted Lieutenant 28 Nov. 1900, and became Captain 1 April, 1905. On the disbandment of his battalion he was gazetted to the Rifle Brigade 24 June, 1908, and subsequently served in Malta and Egypt. In the autumn of 1911 he sent in his papers, and went to Vancouver, British Columbia. On rumours of war he at once returned to England, and joined the Rifle Brigade, Reserve of Officers, 1 Sept. 1914. Capt. J. E. V. Isaac was appointed A.D.C. to Major-General Sir Thompson Capper, Commanding the 7th Division, and went to Flanders on his Staff in Oct. 1914. He was present at the First Battle of Ypres, where he was badly wounded in the left arm. For his services at that time he was mentioned in Despatches, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 1 Dec. 1914]: "John Edmund Valentine Isaac, Capt., Reserve of Officers, The Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own). He has shown conspicuous gallantry on all occasions, and has always obtained reliable and valuable information when required. On 24 Oct. he guided a unit to a critical point with great skill, which resulted in checking the enemy. He was wounded in the engagement." With his arm still rather useless, he returned to duty on 19 Dec. 1914, and obtained leave to rejoin his Regiment, 2nd Battn. Rifle Brigade, 5 May, 1915. Four days later he was killed, leading his men, on the Fromelles Ridge. The " Athletic News " of 6 Sept. 1915, says: "Capt. J. E. V. Isaac (Rifle Brigade), unofficially reported killed, was a member of the well-known Worcestershire cricketing family. Since 1903 lie had been a member of the M.C.C. In Nov. last he received the D.S.O." Capt. Isaac was a good cricketer; played for his county and his Regiment. He was a member of I Zingari and the Free Foresters' Club. He won the Cairo Grand National in 1911, while with his Regiment in Egypt. He was a keen huntsman and hunted with the Worcestershire, Pytchley, York and Ainsty, etc., etc.

See his statistics on CricInfo

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 2:

CAPTAIN JOHN EDMUND VALENTINI ISAAC, D.S.O., RESERVE OF OFFICERS attd. 2nd BATTN. RIFLE BRIGADE (THE PRINCE CONSORT'S OWN, third son of John Swinton Isaac, Esq., D.L., of Boughton Park, Worcester, was born at Powyke Court, near Worcester on the 14th February, 1880.

He was educated at Wixenford and at Harrow, and was gazetted to the Northumberland Fusiliers from the Militia in April, 1900, and, being posted to the 2nd Battalion, sailed in June to join it in South Africa. Thus he began his military career on active service in the Boer War, in the course of which he was severely wounded in December, 1900, at Nooitgedacht. He was present at operations in the Transvaal, Orange River Colony, and Cape Colony between May, 1900, and March, 1901. For his services he received the Queen's medal with four clasps. He was promoted Lieutenant in November, 1900, and Captain in April, 1905. On the disbandment of his battalion of the Northumberland Fusiliers he was transferred, in June, 1908, to the Rifle Brigade.

In 1911 Captain Isaac retired from the Army, and went to Vancouver, British Columbia, where he made many friends. On hearing rumours of war he returned to England in August, 1914, and in a fortnight joined the Special Reserve of Officers. Shortly afterwards he was appointed A.D.C. to Major-General Sir T. Capper, Commanding the VIIth Division, and proceeded to the front in October, 1914. He was wounded on the 24th October at the first Battle of Ypres. For his behaviour there he was awarded the D.S.O., receiving the decoration at the hands of the King on the 15th April, 1915.

The following is the official record of the award: “Has shown conspicuous gallantry on all occasions. Has always obtained reliable and valuable information when required. On October 24th he guided a unit to a critical point with great skill, which resulted in checking the enemy. He was wounded in the engagement."

He was also mentioned in Sir John French's Despatch of the 14th January, 1915. On recovering from his wound he returned to his duties on the Staff in December, 1914, rejoining his Regiment on the 7th May, 1915. He was killed on the 9th May near Fromelles while leading his men. He fell just after they took the German trench, but it was not possible to recover his body.

Captain Isaac, who was a member of the Bath Club, was a good cricketer, playing occasionally for his county, and belonging to the I Zingari, the Free Foresters, and the M.C.C. He was also a good rider, and won the Cairo Grand National in February, 1911.

JEWELL

Dudley Mark Hayward

Second Lieutenant, 18th Battalion Royal Fusiliers attached Royal Engineers. Died aged 22 on 20th January 1916. Son of Ada Margaret Pugh Cook (formerly Jewell), of Warnercroft, Selsey, Sussex, and the late Maurice Jewell. Guards Cemetery, Windy Corner, Cuinchy III. D. 13.

JEWELL

Edward Herbert

Second Lieutenant, "B" Company 11th Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers. Died aged 21 on 16th May 1916. Native of Selsey, Sussex. Son of Ada Margaret and the late Maurice Jewell. Ecoivres Military Cemetery, Mont-St. Eloi I. M. 11

LUSHINGTON

Cecil Henry Gosset

Lieutenant, "A" Company 10th Battalion Worcestershire Regiment. Died aged 31 on 3rd July 1916. Son of Maj. and Mrs. Arthur James Lushington, of The Park, Sandling, Maidstone, Kent; husband of Evelyn Marian Lushington. Thiepval Memorial Pier and Face 5 A and 6 C.

The battle of La Boisselle was fierce with bomb and bayonet fights over successive lines of trenches. The companies became confused, control became impossible and the platoons stormed forward as best they could, led by their subalterns and N.C.O.’s. The battle continued among the shattered buildings and ruins of the village. The battalion lost a third of its fighting strength including 9 officers, one of whom was Lieutenant Lushington.

Source: The Worcestershire Regiment in the Great War by Captain H. FitzM. Stacke of the Regiment, 1928.

NESBIT

Arnold Stearns

Captain, 3rd Battalion Worcestershire Regiment. Born 16th October 1878 at Walton-on-Thames, Surrey, England died 7th November 1914, Ploegsteert Wood, Belgium. Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial Panel 34. First team member for Worcestershire County Cricket Club in 1914.

November 6th 1914 saw the low-lying valley of the Lys blanketed by a thick fog. The fog lasted all day, great shells hurtling through the air while the men in the waterlogged trenches stared ahead. In the darkness between 3 and 4 a.m. on 7th November a very heavy shellfire was opened on the British line east of Ploegsteert Wood. Around 5 a.m. masses of German infantry came plunging through the fog. Losses were heavy with over 200 soldiers killed including Captain Nesbit. He was mentioned in despatches on 17th February 1915.

Source: The Worcestershire Regiment in the Great War by Captain H. FitzM. Stacke of the Regiment, 1928.

NORTHEY

A.

possibly Alfred Northey, Lieutenant, 3rd Battalion Worcestershire Regiment. Died aged 28 on 12th October 1914. Son of Mrs. Northey, of "Lisworney", Tunbridge Wells, and the late Rev. A. E. Northey. Brown's Road Military Cemetery, Festubert IV. F. 16.

PALMER

Cecil Howard

Lieutenant Colonel, commanding 9th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Formerly of the Worcestershire Regiment. Born 14th July 1873 at Eastbourne, Sussex, died aged 42 on 26th July 1915, near Hill Q, Gallipoli, Turkey. Son of the Rev. J. Howard Palmer and Mrs. Palmer, of East Worldham Rectory, Alton, Hants; husband of Hilda Beatrice Palmer, 35 Anstey Rd, Alton, Hants. Served in the South African Campaign (Mentioned in Despatches). A.D.C. to General Aldershot Infantry Brigade 1901-2, Adjutant 1st Worcestershire Volunteer Battalion 1906-9. Hampshire County cricketer. Native of Eastbourne. Helles Memorial Panel 35 to 37. First team member for Hampshire County Cricket Club 1899-1907 and Worcestershire County Cricket Club 1904. Also appears on Worcester Guildhall and Worcester St Peter's Church memorials

ROGERS

Herbert James

Lance Corporal S/11889, 7th Battalion, Seaforth Highlanders. Died 12 October 1916. Aged 23. Born in Camberley, Surrey on 6th March 1893. Son of Peter and Ellen Rogers (nee Wyeth) of St. John's Ground, 211 Woodstock Road, Oxford. Peter was a professional cricketer. Educated at Bedford House School. A professional cricketer for Worcestershire County Cricket Club. A middle order left-hand bat and off-break bowler also played for Hampshire and North Oxford Cricket Club. Enlisted in the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry at Oxford in October 1914. Gazetted to the Middlesex Regiment in June 1915. Invalided out in October 1915. Re-enlisted in the Seaforth Highlanders in November 1915. Went to France in August 1916. No known grave. Commemorated on THIPEVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 15 C.

Extract from Oxford Times 11th November 1916
Lance Corporal Herbert James Rogers, aged 22, Seaforth Highlanders, only son of Mr and Mrs Peter Rogers, St John’s Ground, 211, Woodstock-road, was killed in action on October 12. Educated at Bedford House School, he adopted cricket as a profession and was qualifying for the Worcestershire Club. He joined the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, as a private in October 1914, and was gazetted to the 15th Middlesex in June 1915. Invalided out of the Army in October of the same year, he joined the Seaforths the next month and went to France in August last.
The death in action of “Bert” Rogers, writes our sporting correspondent, adds another to the growing list of the North Oxford Cricket Club who have made the great sacrifice in the war. Young Rogers could not very well help being a decent cricketer. His father Peter Rogers, has been one of the main stays of Oxford cricket for something over 20 years. And if the son’s prowess had not fully developed, he yet afforded some evidence that he would not allow the family reputation to suffer. It was some 6 or 8 years ago when he first came to the front as a right-hand leg break bowler. In local cricket he played havoc with all sorts of batsmen, and on his day was almost unplayable. On such occasions his length and break were remarkable. He attracted the attention of Mr F. H. Bacon, the Hants county secretary, and after being attached for a short time to the county ground staff he qualified for the southern County, and played for three matches for them in 1912. He afterwards qualified for Worcestershire, and in 1914, his last cricket season, he accomplished many excellent performances both with bat and ball. Indeed it has been said, that his batting showed remarkable improvement he bode fair to become an all-round Cricketer of merit. A young fellow of splendid physique, quiet habits, and unassuming manner, he was a credit to the profession he had adopted, and genuine regrets will be felt at his early death, though the manner of it is, perhaps, such as he would have desired.

(Details kindly supplied by Ken and Pam Linge of the Thiepval Project)

WINNINGTON

John Francis Sartorius

Lieutenant Colonel, 1st Battalion Worcestershire Regiment. Secondary Unit, commanding 1st/4th Battalion Northamptonshire Regiment. Born 17th September 1876 at Charlton Kings, Gloucestershire, died 22nd September 1918, near Kefar Kassin, Ramle, Palestine. Husband of Joyce M. Winnington, of Boughton Park, Worcester. Awarded the DSO. Ramleh War Cemetery C. 31. First team member for Worcestershire County Cricket Club in 1908. Also appears on Worcester Guildhall and Worcester St John in Bedwardine memorials as F.J. Winnington and Worcester Cathedral cloister windows as J.F.S. Winnington.

John Winnington is mentioned a number of times in the Regimental book. He was invalided after the battle of Neuve Chapelle from the effects of the strain and exposure of the three days and nights of fighting. Whilst fighting at Gallipoli, his health once again broke down and he was deemed physically unfit for duty. The Gallipoli campaign was the last that the Regiment was to see of that gallant officer, who was destined to fall later at the head of a battalion of another Regiment in Palestine. He is mentioned in despatches on 22/6/15, 12/7/16 and 5/6/19.

Source: The Worcestershire Regiment in the Great War by Captain H. FitzM. Stacke of the Regiment, 1928.

WODEHOUSE

Ernest Charles Forbes

Lieutenant Colonel, Worcestershire Regiment. Died aged 43 on 12th March 1915. Son of the late Lieutenant Colonel C. Wodehouse, C.I.E.; husband of A. Violet Wodehouse, 11 Prince of Wales Terrace, Kensington, London. Awarded the DSO. Le Touret Memorial Panel 17 and 18. Also appears on Worcester Guildhall and Worcester St John in Bedwardine memorials and Worcester Cathedral cloister windows.

Ernest Wodehouse is mentioned a number of times in the Regimental book. During the Battle of Neuve Chapelle, Lieut. Col. Wodehouse led a battalion advance, storming the buildings in front and preparing to hold them against counter-attacks. However, no support came and the British artillery intermittently bombarded the captured buildings. It became clear that that the battalion’s position, far in advance of the remainder of the brigade, encircled by the enemy on 3 sides and shelled by both artilleries, was no longer tenable. Officers and men fell fast during the retirement, which was over open and level ground flanked on both sides by the strongly posted enemy. The loss of Colonel Wodehouse was felt most keenly by all the survivors, for his courage, kindliness and resource had been the mainstay of the battalion throughout the long ordeal of the winter. He is mentioned in despatches on 22nd June 1916.

Source: The Worcestershire Regiment in the Great War by Captain H. FitzM. Stacke of the Regiment, 1928.

Cricket bat with 3 laurel leaves wrapped over.

THEIR NAME LIVETH FOR EVERMORE

Last updated: 9 August, 2012

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