Ministry of Defence
Ministry of Defence

Lest We Forget
British Legion
The Royal British Legion

LITTLEOVER WAR MEMORIAL

World War 1 & 2 - Detailed information
Compiled and copyright © Julie Walton 2020

The memorial is at the edge of the churchyard overlooking Normanton Lane on the east side of St. Peter's Church in Littleover. The memorial takes the form of a sandstone wheel cross on a pedestal, plinth and two stepped base. The cross is decorated on the 6 o'clock face with intricate carvings of bosses, acanthus leaves, fruit, ropework and interlaced strapwork in the Celtic style and the battered square pedestal bears the incised inscription and names in uprightlettering coloured black. There are 37 names listed for World War 1 and 46 names for World War 2.

Extract from the Derby Daily Telegraph 23 January 1922, page 2, containing details of the memorial service and the unveiling ceremony.

THE SILENT WITNESS.

UNVEILING OF LITTLEOVER'S WAR
MEMORIAL CROSS.

IMPRESSIVE CEREMONY.

Littleover gave 36 valued lives to win the war. To the memory of these heroes —some little more than boys, some in the first flush of manhood, and 0thers of maturer age—a beautiful Ionic cross of Derbyshire stone, erected just inside the main entrance to the village churchyard, was unveiled on Sunday afternoon. During the proceedings the sun shone and the fog went away.
There was service, in the church. The little edifice was crowded, but seats were reserved for relatives of the men who were being honoured. "Fight the good fight with all thy might" was the opening hymn, followed by a prayer remembering before God "our brethren who laid down their lives in the cause of liberty." The lesson from the Wisdom of Solomon was read by Mr. G. B. Robotham, late ot the Sherwood Foresters, who gained the Distinguished Flying Cross in the war. The hymn "For all our sons, O Lord of Hosts," was sung. Then came an impressive silence, the congregation standing for a few minutes in solemn remembrance of the dead, followed by the moving Dead March in "Saul," the organist (Mr. W. H. Smith) also playing during the service 'Memoriam" by Page, "O rest the Lord," and "Blest are the departed."
The service inside the church over, the choir, followed by the Bishop of Derby, and the vicar of the parish (the Rev. D. W. Money), and the congregation proceeded to the memorial cross. Here, too, the relatives were rightly given pride , place close to the memorial. A large crowd, who could not, of course, have been accommodated in the church, had assembled in the churchyard— where it was a pleasure to see Sunday school scholars of church and chapel gathered together— and outside in the road. Suitable sentences of scripture were read by the vicar, and then Mrs. William Coliard, of Olive House, Stenson-lane, who had been selected by lot from among the relatives of the fallen, unveiled the memorial. It was dedicated by the bishop, who said, "In the faith of Jesus Christ and in memory of the men of this village who gave their lives in the Great War for freedom and truth and peace dedicate this memorial to the glory of God and in their honour; in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Ghost." Prayer followed.
A Link with the Distant Past.
The Bishop commented on the central and dominating position of the memorial. They had felt, he said, that there must be some memorial of those 36 lives on which the whole their present and future prospects of life were built up. Wouid not be becoming of him to speak—chiefly because in the main he did not know the meaning which was so intense and intimate many of them'—of those names. But they felt there had to be some memorial of what had been done by them, and he thought they rightly felt there could no better place for it than in their own churchyard. The thoughts those boys in the far distant lands would often have turned to some of the happiest moments of their lives connected with that parish church or other house God in the village. The memorial in that cross was in keeping, because it fitted all thoughts; it was in line with what they wished to commemorate. The particular form of their cross, he was told, went back to Iona, off the west coast of Scotland, and if so it looked back to the very earliest beginning of Christianity in this island of ours. So it linked the present moment with the farthest distant past, and all connected with the Cross. It was an effort accomplished. The men felt the call to service, and rose up and went earlier or later. He supposed in one way or another there was a compelling force, although they could not argue about it or explain it, and they could do no other. hen one looked back they could think of case after case where all was laid down, not but strongly—hope, things already accomplished, things well-nigh accomplished, some well within their grasp, and great plans yet unfulfilled—all things were put on one side, given up.
Outside Conscience.
The cross stood as the silent witness, continued the Bishop, to what, whether consciously or unconsciously, went on in the minds of the vast majority of those men. There were great many tragic services and a great many sacrifices; a great many things accomplished, well wrought out by those who never crossed the narrow seas or went to far-off lands —things worked out in the quiet of homes—noble homes, humbler homes—by fathers, old men, mothers, sisters, and younger brothers, who joined in doing what they could. The cross was an outside conscience, and was a step to a more abundant life. They could not look at a cross like that without thinking of Him who hung there: it called up the figure of Christ and of their duty to Him who to the end endured, and who an unbroken courage which carried Him right through; a man who valued fellowship with other men and women, and everything in life this world, and yet was ready take up, bear, and carry though, cost what it might, and that was what it cost—the Cross. That was life. When they locked into their own hearts they saw many things that He saw. and all other things they knew were tinsel and not lasting. They did not honour the heaviest money-bags, but those who served mankind. They knew in their heart of hearts what was honour, and he was sure that every man and woman was at his or her best when the hardest task expected from them was to be fulfilled. And it was in those great days, when they witnessed some of the finest and noblest things ever done.
"And we have to be a little bit worthy of what they gave," said the Bishop. They needed the Light to shine in life, in business, and in politics. He referred to the brighter outlook in Ireland and international affairs, and said God help us if the efforts at Washington and other coferences failed, for then the world would go down in ruins. The hope was in following the line of the Cross. Men who tried follow the lead of their Master along the footway of the Cross found power, wisdom, and later on success, and unto them was given a deeper fellowship. "And in God's keeping in that, fellowship we leave those whom we honour. And to you present who provided the Cross I say you have done well, and I hope that may be what I believe God intends it be—not only a reminder, but an inspiration to those who follow," were the concluding words of the Bishop's address.
The hymn. " For all the saints who from their labours rest," was sung, prayer was offered by tha vicar, the first verse of the National Anthem was sung, and the Bishop pronounced the blessing, The Last Post and Reveille were sounded, and, a memorable service concluded with the laying of wreaths at the base the Cross.
DAY OF REMEMBRANCE.
LARGE GATHERING AT UNVEILING
OF ST. LUKE'S MEMORIAL.
The Mayor and Mayoress (Coun. and Mrs. W. R. Raynes), together with many members of the Corporation, wore in attendance at St. Luke's Church on Sunday afternoon, the occasion of the unveiling of the parish war memorial. The commodicus church was filled to overflowing, the vicar (Rev. A. Uuhwatt) conducting an impressive service.
Tak:ng as his text the words, "Well done," Archdeacon Noakes appealed to his hearers to regard the day from two points of view. First of all he wanted them to regard it as a day of remembrance, "O God of Hosts, be with us yet, lest we forget," and secondly as a day of resolution, "See ye to it that these died not die in vain." When the story of the early days of the war came to be revealed by the historian's pen it would be a story of ghastly inventions and noble daring; a story of noble sympathy and God-like sacrifice, one which would surpass the imagination of a Veme or Wells. Amongst those who would figure in this story would be their friends, many of them mere boys. Mere boys, perhaps; but called upon to do a man's work, and a man's work they did. They went with songs to battle, and were staunch to the end against odds uncounted, falling with their faces to the foe. "Do not think their lives were wasted because they died young?" said the Archdeacon. "Our Lord's life was short one, but before He died He redeemed the world," It had been well said that "Death did not count God's great scheme of work. With regard to the second aspect of the occasion, as a dayof resolution, the speaker commenced by quoting Kipling."How shall I live with myself the years which they have bought for me." If the dead could reply they would bid them to cease their weeping and fight against these things which breathe and strife. If they strove to drive the mean, the unworthy, the selfish, and the impure from their hearts, and replace them with Christ-like qualities they were doing something to make the world a better place. But if their ideals were selfish and unChristlike they were dragging the world back towards anguish, and the sacrifice of the Great War would be in vain so far as they were concerned. If they did not live up to the ideals set by those who made tht sacrifice they were not playing the game. They were not fair to the maimed soldiers they passed in the street bearing the marks of suffering. They were not fair towards the Christ who died for them.
Unveiled by Major C. D. Harvey, D.S.O., the memorial revealed itself as a large bronze tablet set in a moulded frame of unpolished wood with a shelf below for flower vases and a crucifix. Within a design in relief embodying the rose, thistle and shamrock are the words "Parochial roll of honour 1914-18." Above are the words, "To the glory of God and in memory of those fallen in th. Great War." Below the floral decoration mentioned follows the lengthy list of names with each man's regiment or ship appended. At the foot the tablet are the words, "They loved not their lives unto death."
Major Harvey said they were privileged to be able to witness the unveiling of the memorial to the eight officers and 281 non-commissioned officers and men, of which number four officers and 88 non-coms, and men were his own regiment, the Sherwood Foresters.
The Last Post ana Reveille were sounded by buglers from the barracks at the conclusion.

Photograhs Copyright © Julie Walton 2020

TO THE GLORY OF GOD
AND
TO THE ENDURING MEMORY
OF THOSE PATRIOTIC MEN OF LITTLEOVER
WHO WENT FORTH TO THE GREAT WAR
AND WHO FOUGHT AND FELL IN OUR DEFENCE
THIS MONUMENT IS ERECTED IN THE YEAR 1921
AS A GRATEFUL AND IMPERISHABLE TRIBUTE
THE COURAGE AND DEVOTION OF THOSE WHOSE NAMES
ARE HERE INSCRIBED IMPELLED THEM AT ONCE
TO RESPOND TO THEIR COUNTRY’S CALL.
THEIR GALLANT EFFORTS,
IN THE BATTLES OF THE NATIONS HAVE FOUND
AN HONOURED PLACE IN BRITISH ANNALS,
WHICH WILL RECORD THROUGHOUT THE AGES
THEIR HEROIC SELF SACRIFICE UNDER PROVIDENCE
TO SAFEGUARD OUR LAND FROM INVASION BY A RUTHLESS FOE:
AND GLORY ENCIRCLES WITH A NOBLE DIADEM
THESE BRAVE SONS WHO WENT OUT FROM OUR MIDST
AND DIED THAT ENGLAND MIGHT LIVE.

MOBS JANUA VITA.

1914-1918

1915  
LANE Harold
Corporal 3644, 2nd Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Killed in action 9 August 1915 in France. Born and enlisted Derby, resident Littleover, Derbyshire. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 39 and 41.
LEE Wilfred Robert
Corporal 1500, 1st/1st Battalion, Derbyshire Yeomanry. Killed in action 21 August 1915 at Gallipoli. Born and resident Littleover, Derbyshire, enlisted Derby. No known grave. Commemorated on HELLES MEMORIAL, Turkey (including Gallipoli). Panel 17 to 18.
TURNER Arthur
Private 17125, 10th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Died of wounds 25 September 1915 in France. Aged 21. Born and resident Littleover, Derbyshire, enlisted Derby. Son of Sarah Lily Davies, of Normanton Lane, Littleover, Derby. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 39 and 41.
OTTEWELL Henry Draper
[Listed as OTTERWELL on SDGW] Private 22066, 1st Battalion, Gloucestershire Regiment formerly 30163, Reserve Cavalry. Killed iin action 8 October 1915 in France. Born Littleover, Derbyshire,, enlisted Leicester. No known grave. Commemorated on LOOS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 60 to 64.
COLLARD Harold George
Private 17304, 10th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Killed in action 14 December 1915 in France. Born and enlisted Derby, reident Littleover, Derbyshire. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 39 and 41.
1916  
SPENCER Lewis
[Spelt Louis on SDGW and CWGC] Private 5730, 2nd Battalion, Leicestershire Regiment. Killed in action 7 January 1916 in Mesopotamia (Persian Gulf). Born and resident Littleover, Derbys, enlisted Derby. No known grave. Commemorated on BASRA MEMORIAL, Iraq. Panel 12.
FREESTON George W
Sergeant 14258, 10th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Killed in action 14 February 1916 in France. Born and enlisted Deby, resident Littleover, Derbyshire. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 39 and 41.
VICKERS Richard
Private 43434, 17th Battalion, Manchester Regiment formerly 4647, Duke of Cambridge's Own (Middlesex Regiment). Killed in action 19 [SDGW] or 11 [CWGC] April 1917 in France. Born St. John's, Normanton, resident Normanton, enlisted Witley Camp, Surrey. In the 1901 census he was aged 11, born Derbyshire. son of Richard and Eliza Vickers, resident Sunny Hill, Normanton, Shardlow, Derbyshire. No known grave. Commemorated on ARRAS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Bay 7.
McINNES John Edward
Second Lieutenant, 1st/5th Battalion (Territorial), Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Killed in action 1 July 1916 in France. Aged 22. Baptised 2 December 1894 in Littleover, St. Peter. Son of Edward and Caroline Frances Elizabeth McInnes, of Hilltop, Littleover, Derby. In the 1901 census he was aged 6, born Littleover, Derbyshire, son of Edward and caroline F McInnes, resident The Old Hall, Burton Road, Littleover, Shardlow, Derbyshire. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 10 C 10 D and 11 A.
JOHNSON Frederick
Guardsman 14725, 2nd Battalion, Grenadier Guards. Killed in action 17 [CWGC] or 15 [SDGW] September 1916 in France. Born Littleover, Derbyshire, enlisted Derby. Baptised 3 September 1893 in Littleover, St. Peter, son of Arthur and Gertrude Johnson. In the 1901 census he was aged 9, born Littleover, Derbyshire, son of Arthur and Gertrude Johnson, resident Normanton Lane, Littleover, Shardlow, Derbyshire. Buried in GUARDS' CEMETERY, LESBOEUFS, Somme, France. Plot XIII. Row N. Grave 8.
WILLIAMSON Frank
Private 401840, 7th Battalion, Canadian Infantry. Missing in action presumed dead 8 September 1916 in France. Born 1 October 1879 in Durham. Brother of Sam Williamson, of Royal Naval Barracks, Devonport. Previously served 7 years with Royal Marine Light Infantry. Attested 13 November 1915 in Windsor, Ontario, Canada, aged 36 years 1 month, height 5 feet 10 inches, weight 145 lbs, chest 35-38 inches, fresh complexion, grey eyes, brown hair, religious denomination Church of England, Labourer by trade. Unmarried. Embarked Canada 17 March 1916, disembarked England 25 March 1916. No known grave. Commemorated on VIMY MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. National Archives of Canada Accession Reference: Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF), RG 150, Accession 1992-93/166, Box 10412 - 27
HOBBS, D.S.O. Charles James Willoughby

Major, 2nd Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Died of wounds 16 October 1916 in France. Aged 40. Born 23 January 1879 in Tyldesly, Lancashire. Baptised 5 March 1876 in Swinton, Eccles, Lancashire, son of Simpson Hackett and Sarah Hobbs. Son of Capt. and Mrs. Simpson Hackett Hobbs. Twice Mentioned in Despatches. Educated Rossall School and Royal Military College andhurst. Passed out of Military College 1896 as Lieutenant, Captain 1901, Major 1904. Married Dorothea Jessy Bell at St. Mary Abbotts, Kensington 21 November 1906, two daughters. In 1900 he comamnded a section of No. 5 Company, Mounted Infantry in Malta. In 1901-1902 he comamnded a company in 17th Mounted Infantry Battalion in South Africa. Mounted Infantry in Malta. Served as Adjutant 8th Battalion 1 October 1905 to 30 September 1910. Height 6 feet 1½ inches. Served in India 10 November 1896 to 24 October 1899, Malta 25 October 1899 to 4 January 1901, South Africa 5 January 1901 to 1 October 1902. In the 1911 census he was aged 35, born Tyldesley, Lancashire, a Captain H.M. Army, married to Dorothea with two daughters, resident Wardour, Crown Hill, Tamerton Foliott, Devon. Buried in GROVE TOWN CEMETERY, MEAULTE, Somme, France. Plot I. Row B. Grave 6.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1917:

HOBBS Charles James Willoughby of 20 Fisbury-road Hove Sussex major Sherwood Foresters died 16 October 1916 in France Probate London 13 January to William Otway Wilson estate agent.- Effects £541 8s. 8d.

1917  
WIBBERLEY Herbert L
Private 36036, 24th Battalion (Tyneside Irish), Northumberd Fusiliers formerly 68568, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Died of wounds 30 April 1917 in France. Born Littleover, Derbyshire, enlisted Derby. Husband of M. Wibberley, of 110 Victoria Park, Weston-super-Mare; brother of Benjamin (below). In the 1901 census he was aged 20, born Littleover, Derbyshire, a Domestic Gardener, son of Alfred A and Maria Wibberley, resident Top of the Hollows, Littleover, Shardlow, Derbyshire. In the 1911 census he was aged 30, born Littleover, Derbyshire, a Domestic Gardener, son of Maria Wibberley (a widow), resident Old Hall Road, Littleover, Derbyshire. Buried in DUISANS BRITISH CEMETERY, ETRUN, Pas de Calais, France.Plot II. Row Q. Grave 2.
SMITH George
Private 202025, 2nd/5th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Killed in action 4 May 1917 in France. Born Little Eaton, Derbyshire, resident Littleover, Derbyshire, enlisted Derby. No known grave. Commemorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 10 C 10 D and 11 A.
FORD Alfred L
8th Hussars. Died in Germany.
MOORCROFT Thomas
Private 83429, 38th General Hospital, Royal Army Medical Corps. Died on service 14 June 1917 in Malta. Aged 20. Born Littleover, Derbyshire, enlisted Derby. Son of Mr. T. Moorcroft, of 13, North St., Littleover, Derby. Buried in PIETA MILITARY CEMETERY, Malta. Plot C. Row XIV. Grave 3.
CORDEN Joseph
Private 203383, 1st/5th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Killed in action 1 July 1917 in France. Enlisted Derby. No known grave. Commemorated on ARRAS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. bay 7.
NEWTON Charles
Private 63074, 2nd Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Killed in action 1 July 1917 in France. Aged 31. Born and resident Littleover, Derbyshire, enlisted Derby. Husband of Emma Lilian Newton, of Burton Rd., Littleover, Derby. No known grave. Commemorated on LOOS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 87 to 89.
WILLIAMS Samuel [John]
[Memorial states 2nd Battalion] Private 21952, 1st Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Killed in action 31 July 1917 in France. Born Littleover, Derbyshire, resident Howden, Yorkshire, enlisted Derby. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 39 and 41.
SHAW Frederick R aka Fred
Private 43066, "C" Company, 20th Battalion, Durham Light Infantry. Died 31 July 1917 in France. Aged 19. Son of A. L. Shaw, of Edale, Wade Avenue, Littleover, Derby, and the late William Shaw. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 36 and 38.
POPPLE James Frederick
Corporal TF/235283, 23rd Battalion, Duke Of Cambridge's Own (Middlesex Regiment) formerly 3735, 5th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Killed in action 10 August 1917 in France. Aged 32. Born East Woodhay, Yorkshire, resident Littleover, Derbyshire, enlisted Derby. Husband of Mary Elizabeth Popple, of Thorrihill Rd., Littleover, Derby. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 49 and 51.
OSBORNE John
13th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Died in England
STONES, M.C. Francis Dawbarn

[Memorial states 5th Battalion] Captain, 6th Battalion (Territorial), Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Died of wounds 28 September 1917 in France. Aged 39. Baptised 25 January 1893 in Cromford, Derbyshire, son of Thomas and Maria Yelverton Stones. Son of Thomas and Maria Yelverton Stones; husband of Margaret Julia Stones (nee Moxon), born 22 July 1883, residing at 75, Holland Road, Kensington, London, married at St Giles, Matlock, Derbyshire, 6 May 1906. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). In the 1881 census he was aged 3, born Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, son of Thomas and Maria Y Stones, resident 23, South Brink, Wisbech St Peter, Wisbech, Cambridgeshire. In the 1881 census he was aged 13, born Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, a scholar, son of Thomas and Maria Y Stones, resident Duffield Road, St Alkmund, Derby, Derbyshire. In the 1911 census he was aged 33, born Wisbech, Isle of Ely, Cambridgeshire, a Chartered Accountant. married, resident 25, Hartington Street, Derby, Derbyshire. Buried in MENDINGHEM MILITARY CEMETERY, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot VI. Row F. Grave 9.

Extract from Derby School Register, Pub 1902:

STONES, Francis Dawbarn (Jan., 1890, to Dec., 1892), b. 30 Jan., 1878
Son of Thomas Stones, 30, Duffield Road, Derby ; afterwards, The Villa, Matlock Bath.——Articled to Mr. Hart. Accountant, Derby.

Extract from De Ruvigny's Roll of Honour 1914-1918, volume 3, page 259:

STONES, FRANCIS DAWBARN, M.C., Capt., 6th (Territorial) Battn. The Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regt.), s. of the late Thomas Stones, by his wife, Maria Yelverton, dau. of William Dawbarn, of Elmswood Hall, Liverpool ; b. Isle of Ely, co. Cambridge, 30 Jan. 1878; educ. Derby School ; was subsequently articled to Mr. D. Sibbald, Chartered Accountant, Derby, with whom he became a partner in 1904 ; joined the Sherwood Foresters (T.F.) 1899; resigned in 1906 ; rejoined the 6th Battn. 3 Oct. 1914, with the rank of Capt. ; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from June, and died at No. 64 Casualty Clearing Station 28 Sept. 1917, from wounds received in action at Zonnebeke the previous day. Buried in the British Soldiers' Cemetery, Proven. His Commanding Officer wrote : "He was just about the keenest officer that I ever saw, and his preparation for the action in which he lost his life was beyond all praise. The magnificent way his company behaved only proved what an example he had set them. He died as he lived, a brave soldier and a gallant gentleman. . . . I am so delighted to hear that his splendid work on the day he was killed has been rewarded by the Military Cross." He was awarded the Military Cross [London Gazette, 17 Dec. 1917), for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty when in command of his battalion, after the battalion commander had become a casualty. When the battalion was in danger of being forced back he rendered great assistance in organizing strong resistance and reinforcements to the front line. [Extract from London Gazette, 23 April, 1918.] During his period of service with the old Volunteers his company became very efficient at rifle shooting, and several times carried off the Battalion Prize Shield, owing to his keenness. He m. at the Parish Church, Matlock, 10 May, 1906, Margaret Julia, dau. of the late William Moxon, M. D., J.P., V.1).; of Matlock, co. Derby; s.p.

MARSHALL William Hollin
Private 37008, 1st Battalion, Northumberland Fusiliers formerly TR/5/39012, Training Reserve. Died on service 20 November 1917 in France. Born Littleover, Derbyshire, enlisted Derby. Son of John and Sarah Annie Marshall, of Church St., Littleover, Derby. No known grave. Commemorated on ARRAS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Bay 2 and 3.
SHAW William Henry
Secnd Lieutenant, 5th Battalion (Territorial), Norfolk Regiment. Killed in action 2 November 1917 in Palestine. Aged 23. Baptised 27 June 1894 in Derby, Derbyshire, son of William and Alice Louvina Shaw. Son of Mrs. Alice Shaw. In the 1901 census he was aged 6, born Derby, son of William and Alice Shaw, resident 34, London Road, Derby, Derbyshire. In the 1911 census he was aged 16, born Derby, a Junior Clerk In Mining Company, son of Alice Lorena Shaw (a widow), resident Wade Avenue, Littleover, Derbyshire. Buried in GAZA WAR CEMETERY, Israel and Palestine (including Gaza). Plot XXIV. Row B. Grave 3.
GROVE James William
Private 39461, 8th (Service) Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment formerly 88603, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Died of wounds 20 November 1917, in France. Born and enlisted Derby. Married Sarah Jane Burton at St Augustine, Derby, in the July to September Quarter 1910. In the 1891 census he was aged 8, born Derby, a scholar, son of Frederick G and Fanny Grove, resident Rawdon Street, New Normanton, Derby, Derbyshire. In the 1911 census he was aged 28, born Derby, a Bricklayers Labourer, married to Sarah Jane Grove, resident Park Lane, Littleover, Derbyshire. Buried in DOZINGHEM MILITARY CEMETERY, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot XV. Row C. Grave 3.
JERRAM William Raymond
Gunner 6201, "A" Battery, Royal Canadian Horse Artillery. Killed in action 6 September 1917 in France. Aged 28. Born 28 August 1889 in Derby. Son of Edith Dunning (formerly Jerram), of Blue River, British Columbia, and the late William Jerram. Native of Derby. Resided in Canada 6 years. Enlisted August 1914. Attested 21 September 1914 at Valcartier, Quebec, Canada, aged 25 years 2 months, a Butcher by trade, unmarried, height 6 feet, chest 38-42 inches, fresh complexion, blue eyes, dark hair, religious denomination Church of England. Wounded 18 August 1917 but remained on duty. Buried in SUCRERIE CEMETERY, ABLAIN-ST. NAZAIRE, Pas de Calais, France. Plot I. Row A. Grave 11. National Archives of Canada Accession Refeence: Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF), RG 150, Accession 1992-93/166, Box 4830 - 17
1918  
BALDWIN Fred
Sapper 108122, 92nd Field Company, Royal Engineers. Killed in action 21 March 1918 in France. Aged 31. Born Belper, Derbyshire, resident Penygraig, Glamorganshire, enlisted Tonypandy, Glamorganshire. Son of Emily Baldwin, of Golf Link Cottages, Littleover, Derby, and the late Charles Baldwin; husband of Sarah Jane Baldwin, of 7, Blaeulai St, Pen-Y-Graig, (Rhondda), Glam. No known grave. Commemorated on POZIERES MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Panel 10 to 13.
THIRLBY Stuart Longsdon

Second Lieutenant, 6th Battalion, Leicestershire Regiment. Killed in action 22 March 1918 in France. Aged 25. Baptised 29 July 1892 in Derby, son of Frank Stuart and Annie Longsdon Thirlby. Son of Frank Stuart Thirlby and Annie Longsdon Thirlby, of "Fairholme", Littleover, Derby. In the 1901 census he was aged 8, born Derby, son of Frank S and Annie L Thirlby, resident Shepherd Street, Littleover, Shardlow, Derbyshire. No known grave. Commemorated on POZIERES MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Panel 29 and 30.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1920:

THIRLBY Stuart Longsdon of Fairholme Littleover Derbyshire died on or since 22 March 1918 in France Administration London 7 April to Frank Stuart Thirlby solicitor.
Effects £337 10s. 6d.

ALLSOP Ernest
Private 18311, 2nd/5th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Died of wounds 7 March 1918 in France. Born and enlisted Derby, resident Littleover, Derbyshire. Son of Charles and Phoebe Eliza Allsopp, of Park Lane, Littleover, Derby. Buried in MONT HUON MILITARY CEMETERY, LE TREPORT, Seine-Maritime, France. Plot VI. Row F. Grave 2A.
SPALDING, M.M. Alfred Herbert
Private 30479, 1st Battalion, Grenadier Guards formerly 3756, Household Battalion. Killed in action 31 March 1918 in France. Aged 26. Born Winshill, Burton-On-Trent, enlisted Windsor. Son of Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Spalding, of Littleover, Derby. Awarded the Military medal (M.M.). In the 1911 census he was aged 19, born Winshill, Derbyshire, a Domestic Gardener, visiting at Newton Solney, Burton on Trent, Main Street, Newton Solney, Derbyshire. Buried in BUCQUOY ROAD CEMETERY, FICHEUX, Pas de Calais, France. Plot VI. Row F. Grave 3.
HOULSTON Francis Edwin
Private 87231, 205th Company, Machine Gun Corps (Infantry) formerly 67941, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Died of wounds 14 April 1918 in France. Aged 33. Born and enlisted Derby. Husband of Nellie Diana Houlston, of Wade House, Wade Avenue, Littleover, Derby. Buried in AIRE COMMUNAL CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot II. Row C. Grave 22.
STOPPARD Charles Edward
Private G/29211, 7th Battalion, Buffs (East Kent Regiment). Died of wounds 23 August 1918 in France. Born and resident Littleover, Derbyshire, enlisted Derby. Baptised 2 May 1897 in Littleover, St Peter, Derbyshire, son of James and Kate Maria Stoppard. Buried in DAOURS COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Somme, France. Plot VI. Row B. Grave 3.
WOOTTON Alfred
Private 141577, 1st Battalion, Canadian Infantry. Died in Military Heart Hospital, Colchester, suffering from heart disease 24 August 1918 in England. Aged 41. Born 4 February 1877. Son of Matthew and Hannah Wootton, of Sunny Hill, Normanton, Derby. Widower. Labourer by trade. Attested 27 July 1915 Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, aged 38 years 5 months, height 5 feet 3½ inches, chest 34½-37½ inches, fair complexion, blue eyes, brown hair, religious denomination Church of England. Embarked Halifax, Nova Scotia, 23 April 1916 onboard Empress of Britain, disembarked Liverpool 4 May 1916. Buried in COLCHESTER CEMETERY, Essex. Plot S. Row 1. Grave 24. National Archives of Canada Accession Reference: Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF), RG 150, Accession 1992-93/166, Box 10577 - 40
HILL Richard Ernest
Acting Corporal 39441, 1st/1st Battalion, Hertfordshire Regiment formerly 4531, Army Pay Corps. Killed in action 24 October 1918 in France. Aged 25. Born and resident Derby, enlisted London. Baptised 5 April 1893 in Derby, son of Frederick Thomas and Ann Hill. Son of Frederick Thomas and Ann Hill, of Salesches Bungalow, Chaddesden, Derby. Accountant. Enlisted December 1914. In the 1901 census he was aged 8, born Derbyshire, son of Frederick T and Ann Hill, resident 8, Exeter Place, Derby, Derbyshire. In the 1911 census he was aged 18, born Derby, a Chartered Accountants Clerk, son of Frederick Thomas and Anne Hill, resident Salisbury House, 71, Carlton Road, Derby, Derbyshire. Buried in ROMERIES COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Nord, France. Plot III. Row E. Grave 18.
WIBBERLEY Benjamin Trevor
Corporal (Rifleman) C/1280, 3rd Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Died on service 3 November 1918 in Salonika (Balkans). Aged 23. Born Littleover, Derbyshire, enlisted Derby. Baptised 3 March 1895 in Littleover, St Peter, son of Alfred Augustus and Maria Wibberley, resident Littleover. Son of Alfred Augustus and Maria Wibberley, of Mickleover, Derby; brother of Herbert (above). In the 1901 census he was aged 6, born Littleover, Derbyshire, son of Alfred A and Maria Wibberley, resident Top of the Hollows, Littleover, Shardlow, Derbyshire. In the 1911 census he was aged 16, born Littleover, Derbyshire, at school, son of Maria Wibberley (a widow), resident Old Hall Road, Littleover, Derbyshire. Buried in MIKRA BRITISH CEMETERY, KALAMARIA, Greece. Grave 1348.
VICKERS Frederick aka Fred
[Memorial states in the Dardanelles, 5th Battalion] Temporary Major, 15th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Killed in action 21 April 1917 in France. Aged 38. Son of George Barker Vickers and Susanah Vickers, of Eckington, Sheffield; husband of Sibyl Augusta Vickers, of 19, Balmoral Rd., Nottingham. Buried in VERMAND COMMUNAL CEMETERY, Aisne, France. Row A. Grave 4.
1939-1945
ALBRECHT V A
No further information currently
ALDUS R M
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BANKS J R
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BARTON J
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CHATTERTON Harry Vine
Engineer Officer, H.M. Yacht Fionola, Naval Auxiliary Personnel (Merchant Navy). Died 24 July 1944. Aged 60. Son of William and Emma Chatterton; husband of Irene Ellie Chatterton, of Littleover, Derbyshire. Buried in PLYMOUTH (WESTON MILL) CEMETERY, Devon. Section C. Consecrated Grave 18194.
CHINN K C
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CLARKE A R
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COCKSHOTT R J
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CONWAY E
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COOPER T
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DAVIES Peter Morley
Sergeant 1819560, 50 Squadron, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Died 12 April 1944. Aged 19. Son of Frederick Thomas Davies and Ada Pressly Davies, of Littleover, Derbyshire. No known grave. Commemorated on RUNNYMEDE MEMORIAL, Surrey. Panel 228.
GRANGER H P
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GREENUP D R
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HALES Thomas Albert
Leading Aircraftman 943177, 151 M.U., Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Died as a Japanese Prisoner of War 18 September 1944. Aged 27. Son of Thomas Albert and Annie Hales, of Derby; husband of Eileen Edith Hales, of Littleover, Derby. No known grave. Commemorated on SINGAPORE MEMORIAL, Kranji War Cemetery, Singapore. Addenda Panel.
HOLMES Edward
Private 7358744, Royal Army Medical Corps attached to 59 Light A.A. Regiment, Royal Artillery. Died between 12 December 1940 and 13 December 1940. Aged 20. Son of George Frederick Walter and Lilian Holmes, of Littleover, Derby. Buried in LITTLEOVER (ST. PETER) CHURCHYARD, Derbyshire.
HUNT I
No further information currently
KIRKLAND Leslie Howard
Able Seaman P/JX 197667, H.M.S. Barham, Royal Navy. Died 25 November 1941. Aged 21. Son of Bernard Edward and Lily Kirkland, of Littleover, Derbyshire. No known grave. Commemorated on PORTSMOUTH NAVAL MEMORIAL, Hampshire. Panel 48, Column 2.
WARDLE-KNIGHT Eric Cecil
Sergeant 742468, 142 Squadron, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Died 21 September 1940. Aged 20. Son of Cecil John and Dorothy Anne Wardel Knight, of Littleover, Derby. Buried in LITTLEOVER (ST. PETER) CHURCHYARD, Derbyshire/
LEADBETTER G E
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LEEMAN P
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LOWNDES F H
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MEEK Thomas James
Driver 2356818, 18th Division Signals, Royal Corps of Signals. Died as a Japanese prisoner of War 21 November 1943. Aged 34. Son of Frederick James Meek and Minnie Meek, of Littleover, Derby; husband of Eva Meek, of Littleover. Buried in CHUNGKAI WAR CEMETERY, Thailand. Plot 9. Row K. Grave 3.
MITTON Harold [bertram]
Flight Sergeant 1319639, 425 (R.C.A.F.) Squadron, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Died 11 February 1944. Aged 22. Son of Dr. James Bertram Mitton and Alys Mary Mitton, of Littleover, Derby. His brother Kenneth Peter also died on service (see below). Cremated and commemorated in NOTTINGHAM CREMATORIUM, Nottinghamshire. Panel 4.
MITTON Kenneth Peter
Private 14415183, 1st/6th Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment. Died 16 July 1944. Aged 19. Son of James Bertram and Alice Mary Mitton, of Littleover, Derbyshire. His brother Harold Bertram also fell (see above). Buried in FONTENAY-LE-PESNEL WAR CEMETERY, TESSEL, Calvados, France. Plot V. Row A. Grave 17.
MURFIN William Benjamin
Private 5887239, 1st Battalion, Northamptonshire Regiment. Died 8 May 1944. Aged 25. Son of William and Sarah Jane Murfin, of Littleover, Derbyshire. Buried in IMPHAL WAR CEMETERY, India. Plot 6. Row F. Grave 7.
MYCROFT H M
No further information currently
PALIN Albert
Gunner 840177, 7 Coast Regiment, Royal Artillery. Died as a Japanese Prisoner of War 14 August 1943. Aged 36. Son of Herbert and Edith Palin, of Littleover, Derby. Buried in KANCHANABURI WAR CEMETERY, Thailand. Plot 8. Row G. Grave 56.
POULSON Stuart James Walton
[Spelt PAULSON on memorial] Flight Sergeant 1580290, 114 Squadron, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Died 16 April 1944. Aged 20. Son of Cuthbert W. and Marie E. H. Poulson, of Littleover, Derbyshire. No known grave. Commemorated on MALTA MEMORIAL, Malta. Panel 14, Column 1.
PRIOR E W
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REEVES C V
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RUDGE Maurice Henry
Warrant Officer Class I 10590997, Royal Army Ordnance Corps. Died 29 July 1946. Son of Arthur William and Bertha Rudge, husband of Dorothy Mary Rudge, of Littleover, Derby. Buried in LITTLEOVER (ST. PETER) CHURCHYARD, Derbyshire.
SALT Bernard
Pilot Officer 54522, 12 Squadron, Royal Air Force. Died 31 March 1944. Aged 23. Son of Thomas and Gertrude Ellen Salt of Littleover. Derby. Buried in RHEINBERG WAR CEMETERY, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany. Plot 14. Row D. Grave 21.
SALT F C
No further information currently
SANFORD Peter William
Captain 265231, Royal Artillery. Died 26 June 1945. Aged 23. Son of Dudley William and Dinah Blanche Sanford, of Littleover, Derby. Buried in KIRKEE WAR CEMETERY, India. Plot 2. Row K. Grave 11.
SCOTT N B
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SELBY G A
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SELBY H C
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SMITH Harry (The Rev.)
Chaplain 4th Class 95864, Royal Army Chaplains' Department. Died 15 August 1944. Aged 37. Son of Leonard and Cicely Smith, of Littleover, Derby. Buried in BROUAY WAR CEMETERY, Calvados, France. Plot I. Row A. Grave 12.
THOMAS A F
No further information currently
TROTT James Henry
Captain 212868, 65 Field Regiment, Royal Artillery. Died 12 September 1944. Aged 25. Son of Henry James Trott and Rose Kathleen Trott, of Littleover, Derby. Buried in ANCONA WAR CEMETERY, Italy. Plot IV. Row C. Grave 9.
VAN SCHAICK J E
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WILSON P P B
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WRIGHT K W
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WRIGHT R A
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YORKE P L
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SELLORS James Edward
Sergeant 747887, 148 Squadron, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Killed in action in 9 April 1941. No known grave. Commemorated on MALTA MEMORIAL, Malta. Panel 2, Column 1.

Last updated 12 September, 2020

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