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LORDS CRICKET GROUND MCC MEMBERS
WORLD WAR 1 MEMORIAL

World War 1 - Detailed information
Compiled and Copyright © Martin Edwards 2008

 

MCC MEMBERS WORLD WAR 1 MEMORIAL

SURNAMES STARTING WITH 'G'

GEDGE

Cecil Bertie

Old Etonian. Second Lieutenant, 3rd (City of London) Battalion (Royal Fusiliers), London Regiment. Killed in action 25th September 1915. Baptised 2nd May 1866 in Mitcham, Surrey, son of Sydney and Augusta Elizabeth Gedge. Married Jessie Catherine Bickley Rogers in 1892 in St Margaret, Westminster, Middlesex. Educated Eton College, left 1885. In the 1881 census he was aged 15, born Mitcham, Surrey, a scholar, boarding at Eton College, Eton, Buckinghamshire. In the 1891 census he was aged 25, born Mitcham, Surrey, a Student at Inner Temple (Law), son of Sydeny and Augusta E Gedge, resident Queens Mansions, Victoria Street, Westminster, St George Hanover Square, London & Middlesex. In the 1901 census he was aged 35, born Mitcham, Surrey, a Barrister, husband of Jessie C B Hedge with one daughter, resident Hyde Park Mansions, 5, St Marylebone, Marylebone, London & Middlesex. No known grave. Commemorated on LOOS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 130. See also Cambridge University, Trinity College

Extract from Du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour, volume 2, page 132-133:

GEDGE, CECIL BERTIE, 2nd Lieut., 3rd Battn. (Royal Fusiliers) The London Regt. (T.F.), attd. Grenadier Coy., Garhwal Brigade. I.A., only surv. child of Sydney Gedge, of Mitcham Hall, co. Surrey, Solicitor, by his wife, Augusta, dau. of Robert Herring ; b. Mitcham Hall aforesaid, 20 Feb. 1866 ; educ. Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge, where he graduated B.A.; was a Barrister, being called to the Bar (Inner Temple) in 1891, and afterwards practised on the South-Eastern Circuit and at the Essex and Herts Sessions ; joined the Sportsman's Battn. 9 Oct. 1914 ; was gazetted 2nd Lieut. 3rd London Regt. 1 April, 1915 ; went to France in June. when he was attached to the Grenadier Coy., Garhwal Brigade, and was killed in action at the Battle of Loos 25 Sept. following. His Colonel wrote : "He was wounded early in the advance and came back and had his wounds dressed, and then went out again to lead his men, and he has not been seen since. He was a brave English gentleman, and we are glad to think he was one of us. . . . I am very sorry to say I have had strict orders not to send forward for 'Mention' any officer who has been killed. If it were not for this very strict rule I should have sent forward your husband's name," and a brother officer : "There is one thing that may console you, and that is, your husband showed the greatest courage. He was wounded by shrapnel early in the morning, but refused to go back. He just had his men bind him up, and when the order came to go over the parapet, he led his men over like a hero." He was a good sportsman, being well known in Switzerland as a curler ; was also a keen scholar, and had edited various publications, including "Granta" in 1890, "Huts," 1902-3, and was sub-editor of Lord Halsbury's "Laws of Ayland." He m. at St. Margaret's, Westminster, 6 Aug. 1892, Jessie Bickley (Brackondale, Strawberry Hill, Twickenham), 3rd dau. of Bery Bickley Rogers, and had a dau., Sydney, Jessie, b. 12 Sept. 1893.

Extract from Birmingham Daily Post - Monday 11 October 1915, page 4:

KILLED.

GEDGE, Sec. Lieut. C. B., 3rd Battalion Lonon Regiment (Royal Fusiliers) (T.F.).
[Lieutenant Cecil Bertie Gedge was the only surviving son of Mr. Sydney Gedge, formerly solicitor to the London School Board. He was called to the Bar in 1891, and practised in the South-Eastern Circuit, and the Essex and Herts Sessions. He was 49 years of age, and received his commission in April.]

GILLIAT

Otho Claud Skipwith

[Spelt GILLIATT on SDGW and also Claude on SDGW] Old Etonian. Captain, 1st Battalion, Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own). Killed in action 30th October 1914. Aged 31. Son of Howard and Helen Gilliat, of Stragglethorpe Old Hall, Newark-on-Trent. Served in the South African Campaign. Buried in LE TOUQUET RAILWAY CROSSING CEMETERY, Comines-Warneton, Hainaut, Belgium. Plot/Row/Section A. Grave 1.

Extract from Du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

GILLIAT, OTHO CLAUDE SKIPWITH, Capt., 1st Battn., The Rifle briagde (The Prince Consort's Own), s. of the late Howard Gilliat, of Abbot's Repton Hall, Huntingdon; b. Buckingham Gate, London, S.W., 7 Dec. 1881; educ. Golden Parsonage, Cheam; Eton, and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst; gazetted 2nd Lieut. Rifle Brigade 8 Jan. 1901; served in the South African War 1902 (Queen's Medal with three clasps); retired with the rank of Capt. 29 July, 1911, and joined the 5th (Reserve) Battn. of his Regiment; rejoined the Regular Battn. on the outbreak of the European War; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders, and was killed in action 30 Oct. 1914; unm.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

CAPTAIN OTHO CLAUDE SKIPWITH GILLIAT, 1st BATTN. RIFLE BRIGADE, (THE PRINCE CONSORT'S OWN), born on the 7th December, 1881, at Buckingham Gate, London, S.W., was the son of the late Howard Gilliat, of Abbot's Ripton Hall, Huntingdon, and of Mrs. Howard Gilliat. He was educated at Golden Parsonage, Cheam; and at Eton, where he was in the Cricket XI in 1899, and in the Field XI in 1898 and 1899. He was also a member of the Free Foresters, I Zingari, Eton Ramblers, and Green Jackets Cricket Clubs.
Proceeding to the R.M.C., Sandhurst, he joined the 4th Battalion Rifle Brigade in January, 1901. He served in the South African War, being present during operations in the Orange River and Cape Colonies, receiving the Queen's medal with three clasps. From 1908-09 he was A.D.C. to Admiral Sir F. Bedford, in Western Australia, and to Earl Dudley, Governor-General from 1909-11, in which year he became Captain. He retired from the Regular battalion, and joined the 5th Battalion; but on the outbreak of the Great War he rejoined the Regular Army, proceeding to France with the 1st Battalion. He was shot through the heart by shrapnel bullet on the 30th October, 1914.
Captain Gilliat, who was a member of the Army and Navy Club, was a golf player, handicap “scratch." He was unmarried.

Extract from Newcastle Journal - Tuesday 10 November 1914, page 4:

Captain Otho Claude Skipwith Gilliat (killed in action), who was born on December 7th, 1881, received his commission in the Rifle Brigade on January 8th, 1901, being gazetted captain in January, 1911. He retired in that year, rejoining his regiment at the outbreak of the war. He served in the South African War, and received the Queen's medal with three clasps.

GOLD

Cecil Argo

Old Etonian. Lieutenant, Adjutant 5th Battalion, Princess Charlotte of Wales's (Royal Berkshire Regiment). Killed in action 3rd July 1916. Aged 29. Born 3rd June 1887, St Pancras, London. Son of Argo and Mary Gold, of 31, Gloucester Square, Hyde Park, London. In the 1901 census he was aged 13, born Cumberland Terrace, London, a student, baording at Eton College, Eton, Buckignhamshire. Buried in AVELUY COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Somme, France. Plot/Row/Section H. Grave 38.

Extract from Wisden's Crickters Almanac

Lieut. and Adjutant Cecil Argo Gold (Royal Berkshire Regiment) was killed on July 3, aged 29. In 1905 and 1906 he was in the Eton XI, having a batting average of 26.60 in the first year and one of 21.50 in the second. In his matches against Harrow and Winchester he made 186 runs with an average of 23.25, his highest score being 57 against Harrow in 1906. He played in the Freshmen's match at Oxford in 1907, making 0 and 35, but did not obtain his Blue. Since 1907 he had been a member of the M.C.C. He had been mentioned in Dispatches.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1926:

GOLD Cecil Argo of 31 Gloucester-square Kensington Middlesex died 3 July 1916 at Ovillers near Albert France Administration London 29 December to Alfred Gilbey Gold esquire.
Effects £8754 8s.

Extract from Reading Mercury - Saturday 15 July 1916, page 2:

BERKS OFFICERS KILLED
LIEUTENANT AND ADJUTANT C. A. GOLD.

Lieutenant and Adjutant Cecil Argo Gold, Royal Berkshire Regiment (killed in action on July 3), was the eldest of three brothers who joined this regiment in 1914. The eldest son of Argo and Mary Gold, of Bray, Berks, and 31, Gloucester Square, he was educated at Eton (where he was in the cricket eleven in 1905 and 1906) and Magdalen College. Oxford, afterwards becoming a solicitor. He left with his battalion for the front fourteen months ago. He was mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig’s dispatches. A brother, Captain P. H. Gold, Royal Berks, was wounded on October 13th. Lieutenant and Adjutant Gold was killed in the early hours of the morning of the 3rd inst. in an assault on a certain village in France just before it got light. His colonel writes:—-‘‘I went forward to the German trenches, with Cecil and my orderly, who was, I believe, also killed. I cannot tell you what a blow his death is to all, and how much we shall miss him. He was a splendid example as an officer, and always had the battalion’s comfort and welfare in his mind. I never saw him depressed, and his willingness knew no bounds. As an adjutant he was splendid, and cannot be replaced.”

GORDON

Gerard Montague

[Gerald on SDGW] Captain, 5th Battalion attached Adjutant, 12th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). On the evening of 9th June 1917 the battalion had just relieved the 1st Battalion Royal Fusiliers when he was killed in action when a shell fell close to HQ. Aged 26. Born on 8th January 1891 in Sherborne. Son of George and Mary Gordon, of Wincombe Park, Wilts, and The Barn House, Sherborne, Dorset. Educated at Durnford House, Wellington College and the South Eastern Agricultural College, Wye, Kent. Attended Wye College from January 1910 and left Christmas 1911. Whilst at Wye he captained the cricket team in 1911 and was also a member of the hockey team. Whilst at Wellington he played for two years in the cricket XI and also represented his school in the Public Schools’ Racket competition at Queen’s Club. Member of the M.C.C. and of the Free Foresters and for several seasons played for the Dorset County XI. On 15th August 1914 he obtained a commission with the 3rd Battalion of the Royal Fusiliers and served on the Western Front from 9th February 1915 with the 12th (Service) Battalion and later became adjutant. At the beginning of 1917, he was admitted to hospital suffering from appendicitis. After recovering from an operation to remove his appendix he returned to the Front in May. Buried in RENINGHELST NEW MILITARY CEMETERY, Poperinge, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot II. Row C. Grave 23. See also South Eastern Agricultural Collge, Wye and Durnford School, Langton Matravers, Dorset War Memorial

Extract from Du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour, volume 4, page 66:

GORDON, GERARD MONTAGUE, Capt. and Adjutant, The Royal Fusiliers, 3rd and yst. s. of George Henry Gordon, of The Barn House, Sherborne, and Wincombe Park, Shaftesbury, J.P. co. Wilts and Dorset. Chairman of the Dorset War Agricultural Committee, by his wife, Mary, dau. of Francis Stanier, of Biddulph, co. Stafford ; b. Sherborne, 8 Jan. 1891 ; educ. at Durnford House ; Wellington College, and the South Eastern Agricultural College, Wye, co. Kent ; obtained a commission 15 Aug. 1914 ; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from Feb. 1915, and was killed in action 9 June, 10 Buried in the Military Cemetery at Reninghelst, near Ypres. A brother officer wrote : "He was one of the bravest men I have met out here, and his sense of duty in returning to the front so soon after his recent operation filled us all with the deepest admiration. He was always so merry and bright, and a great favourite with us all," and another of his Regiment : "His parting from us has caused a deep cloud over the battalion, because he was one of the best, and one we could ill afford to lose." While at Wellington he played for two years in the cricket eleven, and represented his school in the Public Schools' Racket Competition at Queen's Club. He was a member of the M.C.C. and of the Free Foresters, and for several seasons did good service for the Dorset County XI. He was a fine horseman and took high honours as an athlete ; unm.

GORDON-LENNOX

Lord Bernard Charles

Old Etonian. Major, 2nd Company, 2nd Battalion, Genadier Guards. Killed in action at Zillebeke 10th November 1914. Aged 36. Born 1st May 1878, Westminster, London. Third son of the 7th Duke of Richmond and Gordon; husband of Lady Evelyn Gordon Lennox, of Halnaker House, Chichester, Sussex, married July to September Quarter 1907 in St. George, Southwark, London. Educated Eton, left 1896. Mentioned in despatches. Buried in ZILLEBEKE CHURCHYARD, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot/Row/Section E. Grave 3. See also Boxgrove Priory, Sussex

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1, page 228:

MAJOR LORD BERNARD CHARLES GORDON-LENNOX, 2nd BATTN. GRENADIER GUARDS, who was killed in action at Zillebeke on the 10th November, 1914, was the third son of the seventh Duke of Richmond and Gordon, K.G.

Born in London on the 1st May, 1878, he was educated at Eton College and Sandhurst, from which he joined the Grenadier Guards in February, 1898, becoming Lieutenant in October, 1899.

He took part in the South African War, being present at the operations in the Orange Free State, including the actions at Poplar Grove and Driefontein, for which he received the Queen's medal with two clasps. From 1904-06 he was seconded for service with the Chinese Regiment at Wei-hai-Wei. He was promoted Captain in 1909, and was A.D.C. from November, 1907, to July, 1909, and Assistant Military Secretary, from August, 1909, to November, 1911, to the General Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Northern Command.

For his services in the war he was mentioned in the Supplement to Sir John French's Despatch of 14th January, 1915, published by the War Office in April, 1915.

In 1907 Lord Bernard Gordon-Lennox married Evelyn, second daughter of the first Lord Loch, and left two sons: George Charles, born May, 1908; and Alexander Henry Charles, born April, 1911.

He was a member of the Guards' and Turf Clubs, and was a thorough all-round sportsman, his principal recreations being shooting, fishing, cricket, and polo. By his death the Army has lost a keen and brilliant officer, and the world of sport an exponent of whom there were very few equals.

Extract from CricInfo:

Major Lord Bernard Charles Gordon-Lennox, third son of the Duke of Richmond, who was born on May 1, 1878, was killed in action on November 10 whilst serving with the Grenadier Guards. He did not obtain a place in the Eton XI, but was more fortunate at Sandhurst, for whom he played an excellent innings of 80 against Woolwich in 1897. Subsequently he became a member of the M. C. C. and I Zingari, and in 1914 visited Egypt with the latter's team, scoring 119 against All Egypt at Alexandria. For the Household Brigade Lord Bernard was a prolific scorer.

GOSLING, C.M.G.

Charles

Old Etonian. Brigadier-General, commanding 10th Infantry Brigade, General Staff formerly King's Royal Rifle Corps. Killed in action 12th April 1917. Aged 48. Left Eton College in 1886. Husband of Mrs. V. R. Gosling, of Marlingford Hall, Norwich. Mentioned in despatches three times. Buried in HERVIN FARM BRITISH CEMETERY, ST. LAURENT-BLANGY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot/Row/Section C. Grave 6.

Extract from Belfast News-Letter - Wednesday 10 May 1916, page 5:

BRIGADIER-GENERAL CHARLES GOSLING.

Brigadier-General Charles Gosling, who has been wounded, was born in 1868, and joined the Royal Irish Rifles when he was 20. In a few mouths afterwards, however, he transferred to the King’s Royal Rifle Corps, and with that regiment he has passed his military career, including his work in the South African war. during which took part in the defence of Ladysmith, getting the Queen’s medal and clasp. He has served on the staff, and was made, brigadier-general last July.

Extract from Dublin Daily Express - Wednesday 18 April 1917, page 5:

OBITUARY

The “Morning Post's” unofficial list of casualties this morning contains the name of Brigadier-General Charles Gosling, C.M.G., killed in action April 12th. he was born in 1868, and entered the Army in 1888. For his services in the present war he was mentioned in despatches, and last year was made a C.M.G. In the South African war he was with Sir George White in tho defence of Ladysmith.

Extract from Sheffield Independent - Friday 20 April 1917, page 4:

Four Months Married.

One of the saddest tragedies of the war is the death in action of Brigadier-General Charles Gosling, C.M.G., on 12 April. He was married only two months ago to a lady who lost her first huslaand, Captain Maurice Helyar, Rifle Brigade, in January, 1915—also two month after the wedding.

Extract from King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle 1900-1920, page 306-307:

BRIGADIER-GENERAL CHARLES GOSLING, C.M.G.

Charles Gosling was born in June 1868, educated at Eton, and entered the Army in August 1888, being posted to the Royal Irish Rifles, and transferred to the Regiment in the following November. Gosling served nearly the whole of his service abroad, and was aboard the Warren Hastings when that ill-fated vessel was wrecked off the island of Reunion in 1896. On this occasion he was awarded the silver medal by the Royal Humane Society for twice attempting to save a man who had been washed overboard.

Later he saw active service in the South African War, 1899-1902, being employed with the Mounted Infantry in the operations in Natal, 1899, including the action at Rietfontein and the Defence of Ladysmith, and operations in Cape Colony and Orange River Colony, 1902, receiving the Queen's medal with clasp.

From June 1903 to May 1904, when he received his majority, he was acting as D.A.A.G. in South Africa, and after serving with the 3rd Battalion in India, succeeded the late Colonel Chaplin in command of that Battalion in September 1912.

Proceeding to France in December 1914, he remained with the 3rd Battalion during that very trying period until wounded in February 1915, in the attack on St. Eloi. Returning to France in the following May, he was given command of the 7th Infantry Brigade, which he held for twelve months until being again severely wounded. In December of the same year, he again returned to France, and commanded the 10th Infantry Brigade until killed in action on April 12th, 1917, near Arras.

For his services in this war Gosling was three times mentioned in despatches, promoted a Brevet-Colonel January 1916, and created a Companion of the Order of St. Michael and St. George.

The above record is sufficient testimony to Charles Gosling's qualifications as a leader of men. An all-round sportsman, possessed of a sympathetic and tactful personality, combined with sound commonsense, he made an ideal commander, and the opinions of those who had the pleasure of serving under him are a lasting record to his sterling worth.

Shortly before his death, he married the widow of the late Captain Helyar, of the Rifle Brigade.

GREGSON-ELLIS

Reginald George

Old Etonian. Captain, Buckinghamshire Battalion (Territorial), Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry. Died of wounds 17th April 1917. Left Eton College in 1902. Married Lucy M Reynolds in the July to September Quarter 1923 in High Wycombe Registration District, Buckinghamshire. Buried in PERONNE COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Somme, France. Plot I. Row B. Grave 18.

Extract from Du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour, volume 3, page 91:

GREGSON-ELLIS, REGINALD GEORGE, Capt., 1st Buckinghamshire (Territorial) Battn. The Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry. elder s. of the late Charles Gregson-Ellis, Barrister-at-Law, by his wife, Mildred Agnes (Claremont House, High Wycombe), dau. of Cotterill Scholefield ; b. London. 23 May, 1884 : educ. Horris Hill, and Eton College ; was an Actuary in the Metropolitan Life Assurance Society ; obtained a commission as 2nd Lieut. Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry 23 Sept. 1914: promoted Lieut. Aug. 1915, and Capt. 22 July, 1916 ; served with the Expeditionary Force in France from 29 March. 1915 ; took part in the Battle of the Somme, and died at Peronne 17 April, 1917, from wounds received in action while leading his company in an attack on Tomboise Farm, 12 miles east of Peronne. Buried in Peronne Military Cemetery, Capt. Gregson-Ellis was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 25 May, 1917], by F.M. Sir Douglas Haig, for gallant and distinguished service in the field. While at Eton he played for the Cricket 1901, was captain the following year, and was also President of the Eton Society. He m. at the Parish Church. High Wycombe, 23 Sept. 1913, Lucy Monica, eldest dau. of Lewis William Reynolds, of The Priory, High Wycombe, J.P.. and had a dau. Mary, b. 9 Aug. 1911.

GRENFELL, VC

Francis Octavius

Old Etonian. Captain, 9th (Queen's Royal) Lancers. Killed in action 24th May 1915. Aged 35. Born 4th September 1880. Son of Pascoe Du Pre Grenfell and Sophia, his wife. Educated at Eton, Francis became "Master of the Beagles" in 1898. Represented his school at cricket. Twin brother of Riversdale (below). On leaving Eton in 1899 he joined the 3rd (Militia) Battalion, Seaforth Highlanders. He saw service in the South African War in the King's Royal Rifle Corps. Awarded the Victoria Cross (V.C.). Buried in VLAMERTINGHE MILITARY CEMETERY, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot II. Row B. Grave 14.

On 24th August 1914 at Audregnies, Belgium, Captain Grenfell and his Regiment had charged a large body of German infantry. Casualties were very heavy and Captain Grenfell was the senior officer left. He was rallying part of the Regiment behind a railway embankment when he was twice hit and severely wounded. When the commander of the 119th Battery, Royal Field Artillery, asked for help in saving the guns near Doubon, Grenfell, despite his wounds, gathered some volunteers, and, under a hail of bullets, helped to push the guns out of range of enemy fire. He recovered from those wounds only to be killed in action at Hooge, Belgium, several months later. His medal is on display at the 9th/12th Lancers Regimental Museum in Derby. An extract taken from the London Gazette dated 16th November, 1914 records the following:-

"For gallantry in action against un-broken Infantry at Andregnies, Belgium, on 24th August, 1914, and for gallant conduct in assisting to save the guns of 119th Battery, Royal Field Artillery, near Doubon the same day."

Extract from Du Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:

GRENFELL, FRANCIS OCTAVIUS, V.C., Capt., 9th Lancers, 8th s. of the late Pascoe Du Pre Grenfell, of Wilton Park, Beaconsfield, by his wife, Sophia, dau. of Vice-Admiral John Pascoe Grenfell, Brazilian I.N., and nephew of Francis Wallace, 1st Baron Grenfell, P.C., G.C.B. ; G.C.M.G., Field-Marshal ; b. Hatchlands, Guildford. 4 Sept. 1880 ; ethic. Eton (Mr. Durnford's House, 1894-99); received a commission in the 3rd (Militia) Battn. Seaforth Highlanders, 13 Dec. 1899 ; gazetted 2nd Lieut. King's Royal Rifle Corps, 4 May, 1901 , and Lieut. 28 Jan. 1905 ; transferred to 9th Lancers 6 May, 1905 ; promoted Capt. 7 Sept. 1912 ; was Adjutant 1 Nov. 1912 to 13 Jan. 1914 ; served (1) in the South African War, 1901-2 ; took part in operations in Cape Colony and Transvaal, 1901, and in those in Orange River Colony, Jan. to 31 May, 1902 (Queen's medal with five clasps) ; and (2) with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders ; was twice mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 20 Oct. and 16 Nov. 1914] by F.M. Sir John French, and was killed in action, after being twice wounded at Hooge, 24 May, 1915 ; unm. He was awarded the Victoria Cross "For gallantry in action against unbroken infantry at Andregnies, Belgium, on 24 Aug. 1914, and for gallant conduct in assisting to save the guns of the 119th Battery, near Doubon, the same day," being the first officer to receive it in the European War. At Eton he was in the Cricket XI in 1899, and Master of the Beagles. Like his brother, Capt. R. N. Grenfell, he was one of the finest polo players of his day. He did much for modern polo with his brother, was in the Champion side several times, and was instrumental in forming the Old Etonians Polo Team, which at one time was nominated as the Polo Cup Challenger. One of the best known men in the army, he enjoyed a popularity that few men achieve.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 2:

CAPTAIN FRANCIS OCTAVIUS GRENFELL, V.C., 9th (QUEEN'S ROYAL) LANCERS, the first officer to be awarded the Victoria Cross in the Great War, was the third member of his family to give his life fighting against Germany. His twin brother, Captain R. Grenfell, 9th Lancers, fell in action on the 14th September, 1914, and his cousin, Captain Julian Grenfell, D.S.O., Royal Dragoons, died of wounds on the 26th May, 1915.
Captain Francis Grenfell, who was born on the 4th September, 1880, at Hatchlands, Guildford, was the eighth son of the late Mr. Pascoe Grenfell, of 69 Eaton Place, and of Wilton Park, Beaconsfield, and a nephew of Field-Marshal Lord Grenfell. He was educated at Eton. (Mr. Durnford's House 1894-1899) and was in the Eton XI. in his last year. He was Master of the Beagles at the same time as his brother was Whip, and by raising funds they both played a very important part in the building of the present kennels. Captain Grenfell was a celebrated polo player, and, with his brother, did much for modern polo. He was instrumental in forming the Old Etonian Polo Team, which was at one time nominated as the Polo Cup Challenger. Ho was also an excellent rider, winning several inter-Regimental horse races, and in India won the Point-to-Point Race the day his brother won the Kadir Cup. On leaving Eton Captain Grenfell joined the 3rd (Militia) Battn. Seaforth Highlanders, with which he served over a year, and in May, 1901, he was gazetted 2nd Lieutenant in the King's Royal Rifle Corps. He took part in the South African War 1901-2, including operations in the Orange River Colony, in Cape Colony, and in the Transvaal, and he received for his services the Queen's Medal with five clasps. He was promoted Lieutenant in January, 1905, and in May of that year he exchanged to the 9th Lancers, becoming Captain in September, 1912. Captain Grenfell accompanied his Regiment to Flanders as part of the British Expeditionary Force in August, 1914.
“For gallantry in action against unbroken infantry at Andregnies. Belgium, on the 24th August, 1914, and for gallant conduct in assisting to save the guns of the 119th Battery Royal Field Artillery, near Doubon, the same day"
he received the Victoria Cross. (London Gazette, 16th November, 1914). The gunners had all been struck down, and Captain Grenfell called for volunteers to save the guns, which were safely man-handled out of action amid a storm of shell; and, in an episode where all were brave, Captain Grenfell, wounded in the hand and leg, displayed a high heroic courage, which gained him the crown of every soldier's ambition. He was also mentioned in Sir John French's Despatch of the 8th October, 1914. His wounds proved severe and he returned to England, but at the earliest moment he was back again with his Regiment. A little later he was wounded even more dangerously, and recovered a second time, only to be mortally wounded by shrapnel at Hooge on the 24th May, 1915.

GRENFELL

Riversdale Nonus aka "Rivy"

Old Etonian. Captain, Buckinghamshire Yeomanry (Royal Buckinghamshire Hussars) attached 9th (Queen's Royal) Lancers. Killed in action 14th September 1914. Aged 34. Son of Pascoe Du Pre Grenfell. Twin brother of Francis (above). Buried in VENDRESSE CHURCHYARD, Aisne, France. Grave 1.

Extract from De Ruvigny's Roll Of Honour 1914-1918:

GRENFELL, RIVERSDALE NONUS ("RIVY"), Capt., Buckinghamshire Yeomanry (Royal Bucks Hussars), att. 9th Lancers, 9th and yst. s. of the late Pascoe Du Pre Grenfell, Brazilian I.N., and nephew of Francis Wallace, 1st Baron grenfell, P.C., G.C.B., G.C.M.G., Field Marshal; b. Hatchlands, Guildford, 4 Sept. 1880; educ. Eton; received a commission as Lieut. in the Royal Bucks Hussars, 1 Sept. 1908, and was promoted Capt. Aug. 1914; served with the Expeditionary froce in France and Flanders from 18 Aug., att. to the 9th Lancers, and was killed in action at Vendresse during the Battle of the Aisne, 14 Sept. 1914; unm. He was one of the best known players in English polo. He was a member of the Hurlington Committee, which is the governing body of the game, and was among the best Nos. 1 in English polo during the past decade. He played twice in English teams that beat Ireland, and was No. 1 in the Roehampton side that won the Championship Cup in 1909, while three years before he was one of the Freebooters who secured the championship. In 1909 he organised an Old Etonians team, which played a prominent part in London polo. With his twi brother, Francis, he played in the final match for the House Football Cup in 1898, when Durnford's won by a narrow margin. He was whip of the Beagles, Francis being Mast of the BEagles at Eaton. He was founder, Chairman and Treasurer of the Islington branch of the Invalid Children's Aid Association and a Memorial Fund is being raised to endow this branch, now called the Francis and Rivy Grenfell Branch. His twin brother and his two cousins were also killed in action in the European War, while his elder brother, Pascoe St. Leger, was killed in the Matabele War, 1896, and his seventh brother, Robert Septimus, Lieut. 12th Lancers, was killed at Omdurman, 4 Sept. 1898.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1:

CAPTAIN RIVERSDALE NONUS GRENFELL, BUCKINGHAMSHIRE YEOMANRY (ROYAL BUCKS HUSSARS), attd. 9th LANCERS, was killed in action on the 14th September, 1914, at the beginning of the Battle of the Aisne. He was the ninth son of Mr. Pascoe Dupre Grenfell, of Wilton Park, Beaconsfield, Bucks, and a nephew of Field-Marshal Lord Grenfell. He was born on the 4th September, 1880, was educated at Eton, and joined the Royal Bucks Hussars in September, 1908, becoming Captain in August, 1914. He was well known as a fine polo player, and was a member of the “Old Etonian” team that won the Champion Cup in 1907. While on a visit to his twin brother in India he won the Kadir Cup. Captain Grenfell was a member of the Turf and Bath Clubs, was very interested in philanthropy, and organised a branch of the Invalid Children's Aid Association at Islington. One of his brothers, Lieutenant R. S. Grenfell, 12th Lancers, was killed in action at Omdurman, and his twin brother, Captain Francis Octavius Grenfell,V.C., 9th Lancers, after being twice wounded, fell in action at Ypres on the 24th May, 1915.

GROSVENOR

Lord Hugh William

Captain Hugh Grosvenor
IWM (HU 115517)
Old Etonian. Captain, 1st Life Guards, Household Cavalry. Killed in action 25th October 1914. Aged 30. Born 6th April 1884. Son of the 1st Duke of Westminster and Katharine Duchess of Westminster; husband of Lady Hugh (nee Mabel Florence Crichton) Grosvenor (now Lady Mabel Hamilton Stubber), of 9, Southwick Crescent, London, married 1906 in St Peter, Eaton Square, Pimlico, Middlesex. In the 1901 census he was aged 16, born London, resident with his mother, Katharine of Westminster (a widow), at Combermere Abbey, Burleydam, Dodcott cum Wilkesley, Nantwich, Cheshire. In the 1911 census he was aged 26, a Captain in the Life Guards, married to Mabel with two sons, resident 9, Southwick Crescent, London W., Paddington, London & Middlesex. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 3.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1919:

GROSVENOR the right hnnourable Hugh William of 9 Southwick-crescent Middlesex died 3o October 1914 in France Probate London 22 November to the honourable Arthur Owen Crichton Wilford Neville Lloyd retired colonel H.M. Army and George Frederick Hatfield solicitor.
Effects £32347 2s. 5d.

GULL

Francis William Lindley

Old Etonian. Major, 1st Battalion attached 13th Battalion, Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own). Killed in action at Favreuil 25th August 1918. Aged 28. Born 1st November 1889. Son of the late Sir William Cameron Gull, 2nd Bart., and the Hon. Lady Gull; husband of Elizabeth Hope Bine Gull (now the Hon. Mrs. R. Morgan Grenville), married 4th September 1914 in Sheerness, Holy Trinity, Kent. In the 1891 census he was aged 1, born London, Middlesex, son of William C and Annie C Gull, resident Hyde Park Gardens, Paddington, London & Middlesex. Left Eton College in 1908. Matriculated 1908 at Christ Church, Oxford University. Mentioned in despatches twice. Buried in ACHIET-LE-GRAND COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Pas de Calais, France. Plot III. Row A. Grave 16.

Extract from Rifle Brigade Chronicle 1890-1920, Roll of Honour 1918, page 335-336:

CAPTAIN (ACTING MAJOR) F. W. L. GULL.

FRANCIS WILLIAM LINDLEY GULL was the eldest son of Sir Cameron Gull, Bart., of Frilsham House, Yattendon and was born 1 November 1889. He was educated at Eton and Christ Church Oxford and joined the 2nd Battalion in India in October 1911. He went with the 1st Battalion to France in 1914 and was promoted Major in the 13th (Service) Battalion and was killed in action on 25 August 1918 at Favreuil, aged 28, whilst serving as 2nd in Command.

GUNNER

John Hugh

Captain, Hampshire Yeomanry (Carabiniers) attached 15th Battalion, Hampshire Regiment. Died of wounds 9th August 1918. Aged 34. Born 17th May 1884 at Bishops Waltham. Son of Charles Richards Gunner, of Bishop's Waltham, Hants; husband of Dorothy (nee Kirby) Gunner, of 5, Warren Rd., Bournemouth, married July to September Quarter 1909 in Winchester Registration District, Hampshire. Matriculated 1902 to Trinity College, Oxford University. In the 1901 census he was aged 16, born Bishop's Waltham, Hampshire, a pupil, boarding at Marlborough College, Marlborough, Wiltshire. In the 1911 census he was aged 26, born Bishop's Waltham, Hampshire, a Solicitor, married to Dorothy with one son, resident Winchester Street, Botley, Hampshire. Buried in LA CLYTTE MILITARY CEMETERY, Heuvelland, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot VI. Row C. Grave 7. See also Bishop's Waltham War Memorial

Extract from CricInfo:

Born at Bishops Waltham on May 17, 1884, the son of C.R. Gunner who played one match for Hampshire in 1878. He was educated at Marlborough, where he was captain in 1902, and Trinity College, Oxford, but did not play first-class cricket for the University. He played in six matches for Hampshire in 1906 and 1907, scoring 65 runs with a highest of 32. A Captain in the Yeomanry, attached to the Hampshire Regiment, he died of wounds at Kemmel, Belgium, on August 9, 1918, aged 34.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1918:

GUNNER John Hugh of 5 Warren-road Bournemouth captain Hampshire Carabineers Yeomanry died 9 August 1918 in Flanders Probate London 3 October to Dorothy Gunner widow. Effects £2035.

Extract from The Sportsman - Monday 19 August 1918, page 2:

Capt John Hugh Gunner, of the Yeomanry, whose death from wounds received in action is reported, was educatad att Marlborough and Trinity College, Oxford. He was captain of his house C 1 at Marlborough, and in the school cricket XI. in 1901 and '02, being captain in the latter year. He was also, as well as three of his brothers, in the hockey XI. for three years, and at Oxford obtained his hockey half-blue. He was in his college cricket XI., a member of the Authentics and M.C.C.. playing deveral times for Hampshire, and captained his county hockey XI., in which four of his brothers also played.

Extract from The Sportsman - Saturday 24 August 1918, page 1:

ALL ROUND MARLBURIAN.

Withn regretm I received news that Capt John Hugh Gunner (Yeomanry attacned Hampshire Regiment) had succumbed on the 9th inst. to wounds received in action, another thereby being added to Hampshire's Cricket Roil Honour . He was the second son of Mr. C. R. Gunner, of Bishop's Waltham, Hants—one of a brotherhood that distinguished itself in sport—and was about 34 years of age. He was in the Marlborough cricket XI. of 1901, with an average of 23, and 1902. but in the latter, when captain, had a disappointing season, the side batting tamely, and his own average being only 11.50 for fourteen innings. Proceeding to Trinity College, Oxford, he represented his college, the Oxford University Authentics, and his county (Hampshire)on several occasions. and was elected to membership of the M.C.C. in 1903. Like his brothers, he attained great prominence at hockey, being in his school XI. three years, representing his ’Varsity, and being captain of the Hampshire hockey team, in which a strong family contingent figured. He leaves a widow and two young sons.

Extract from Hampshire Advertiser - Saturday 24 August 1918, page 2:

GUNNER.—August 9, wounds, John Hugh Gunner, Captain. Yeomanry, attd. Hampshire Regt. second son of Charles Richards and Jessie Kate Gunner, of Bishop’s Waltham, and husband Dorothy Gunner, aged 34.

Extract from Hampshire Telegraph - Friday 18 July 1919, page 7:

VESTRY MEETING.—On Friday evening a Vestry Meeting was held at the Parish Church to receive an application from Mrs, J. H. Gunner to erect in the Church a brass plate in memory of the late Capt. John Hugh Gunner. The Rector (Rev. H. E. Sharpe) presided over a small Attendance, and produced the plan, the inscription on which ran as follows: "Giving thanks to God for the memory of John Hugh Gunner, Capt. Hampshire Carabiniers, Yeomanry, killed in action near Ypres, 9th August, 1918. Aged 34. Gloria Horum non delibitur. - On the proposition of Mr. Hardy, seconded by Mr. Austin, the Rector and Churchwardens were authorised to apply for the necessary faculty to the Chancellor of the Diocese.

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