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LORDS CRICKET GROUND MCC MEMBERS
WORLD WAR 1 MEMORIAL

World War 1 - Detailed information
Compiled and Copyright © Martin Edwards 2008

 

MCC MEMBERS WORLD WAR 1 MEMORIAL

SURNAMES STARTING WITH 'L'

LA COSTE, M.C.

Charles John Constable

Captain, General List attached 1/8th Battalion, Prince of Wales's Own (West Yorkshire Regiment). Killed in action 9th October 1917. Aged 36. Born 1st December 1880 in Walmer, Kent. Baptised 2nd January 1881 in Ringwould, St Nicholas, Kent. Educated at Wellington College, Sandhurst. Commissioned Royal Warwickshire Regiment (resigned 19th July 1905 [London Gazette 18th July 1905]). Rejoined from South America, September, 1914; Staff Captain, 57th Brigade, 1915; Brigade Major, Chisledon, November, 1916. Returned to France, June, 1917. Son of Col. Charles Frederick La Coste (R.M.L.I.) and Margaret Mary Ann Banks, his wife; husband of Grace La Coste (nee Neilson), of Philadelphia, U.S.A., and of Manor House, Shottermill, Haslemere, Surrey. Awarded the Military Cross (M.C.). Height 5 feet 8 inches. In the 1881 census he was new born, born Walmer, Kent, son of Charles Frederick and Margaret M A Lacoste, resident 11, The Beach, Walmer, Eastry, Kent. In the 1911 census he was aged 30, born Walmer, Kent, a Retired lieutenant army, married to Grace, resident 91 the Vineyard, Richmond, Surrey,. No known grave. Commemorated on TYNE COT MEMORIAL, Zonnebeke, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 161.

LAGDEN

Ronald Owen

Captain Ronald Owen Lagden
IWM (HU 123761)
Captain, 6th Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Killed in action 3rd March 1915. Aged 26. Born 21 November 1889, Maseru, Basutoland. Son of Sir Godfrey Lagden, K.C.M.G., and Lady Lagden, of "Selwyn," Oatlands Chase, Weybridge. In the 1901 census he was aged 11, born Maseru, South Africa, a Pupil, resident Durnford House, High Street, Longton Matravers, Wareham, Dorset. In the 1911 census he was aged 21, born Basutoland, South Africa, an Undergraduate, a student, resident Penmenner the Lizard, Landewednack, Cornwall. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 51 and 53.

See his statistics on CricInfo

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 2:

CAPTAIN RONALD OWEN LAGDEN, 6th (RESERVE), attd. 4th BATTN. THE KING'S ROYAL RIFLE CORPS, was reported wounded and missing, 1st March 1915, and is believed to have been killed on that occasion.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1916:

LAGDEN Ronald Owen of Selwyn Oatlands Chase Weybridge Surrey was killed in action on 3 March 1915 in France Administration London 3 April to sir Godfrey Yeatman Lagden K.C.M.G. Effects £1730.

Extract from Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer - Tuesday 9 March 1915, page 6:

THE STRICKEN BRAVE.

Captain James Gerald Willoughby, of the 33rd QF Victoria's Own Light Infantry, lndian Army announced to have been killed on March 31st in the Persian Gulf operations. He was the only son of Major-General James Fortnom Willoughby of the same regiment, and of Mrs. Willoughby of ?, Parabola Road, Cheltenham, and Springfield, Bourton-on-the-Water, and was 31 years of age last December. He was educated at Cheltenham College (who he represented in the Ashburton Shield competition at Bisley) and at New College. Oxford, and was given a commission from the Army into the 2nd Battalion Essex Regent in 1904.

LANG

Arthur Horace

Second Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, Grenadier Guards attached Scots Guards. Killed in action between 25th and 26th January 1915. Aged 24. Born 25 October 1890, Malabar Hill, Bombay (now Mumbai), Maharashtra, India. Baptised 12 December 1890, Malabar Hill, All Saints, Bombay (now Mumbai), Maharashtra, India. Son of Basil and Alice Sophia Lang, of Royal Oak Hotel, Sevenoaks Kent. Buried in CANADIAN CEMETERY No.2, NEUVILLE-ST. VAAST, Pas de Calais, France. Plot 12. Row E. Grave 22. See also Cambridge University, Trinity College

See his statistics on CricInfo

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice, Volume 2, page 273:

2nd LIEUTENANT ARTHUR HORACE LANG, SPECIAL RESERVE, GRENADIER GUARDS, attd. 1st BATTN. SCOTS GUARDS, the son of Basil Lang, late Advocate-General of Bombay, and Mrs. Lang, Westerham, Kent, was born in Bombay on the 25th October, 1890.

He was educated at Harrow and Trinity College, Cambridge. He was a member of the Pitt Club, at Cambridge, of the Conservative Club, London, and of I Zingari.

In August, 1914, he was gazetted 2nd Lieutenant in the Special Reserve of the Grenadier Guards, and for a short time was attached to the 2nd Battalion of that Regiment. Afterwards he was attached to the 1st Battalion, Scots Guards, and was serving with it when he was killed in action defending the front trench at Cuinchy, Flanders, on the 25th June, 1915.

Extract from Westminster Gazette - Thursday 24 May 1917, page 3:

WILLS.

Second-Lieutenant Arthur Horace Lang, Grenadier Guards, a former captain of the cricket eleven at Harrow, left “£100 to Harrow School Cricket Club.” His property was worth £15,346.

Extract from Westminster Gazette - Thursday 24 May 1917, page 3:

CRICKET AND THE WAR.
OUR FALLEN HEROES.—X.

SUSSEX.

Sec Lt ARTHUR HORACE LANG (Grenadier Guards, attd Scots Guards) was reported “missing, believed killed,” and suberquently returned as “killed” on about Jan. 26, 1915. Born at Bombay on Oct. 25, 1890, he figured in the Harrow XI. four years (1906-1909), and in the last two acted as skipper and appeared for the' Public Schoots v. the M.C.C. to which was elected to membership in 1910. He was sound batsman and capable wicketkeeper, in the latter department securing eight victims against Eton in 1907. Proceeding to Cambridge University, he did not secure his “blue”" till his last yaer (1913). though he made some good scores in trial games, and 53 v. the M.C.C. at Lord's, in 1912. Going in first, v. Oxford, he made 28 and 4. and stumped three, his highest score of the season being 46 v. Hampshire, at Fenner’s, his average 18.36. From 1907 to 1911 he played for Suffolk, but in 1912 and 1913 transferred his allegiance to Sussex, for which in the latter he scored 141 v. Somerset at Eastbourne, and 104 v. Cambridge University, at Fenner's, though in this case might have been caught in the slips before he had “broken his duck.” His County Championship average for ten innings was 30.60, which placed him third on the list.

Extract from Birmingham Daily Post - Friday 25 May 1917, page 3:

LATEST WILLS .

Second Lieutenant Arthur Horace Lang, the Conservative Club, St. James’s Street, London, S.W., of the Grenadier Guards, attached to the Scots Guards; died on active service at La Bassee in France. (Net personalty £15,306) £15,346

LEATHAM

Edward Hubert

Old Etonian. Lieutenant, 12th (Prince of Wales's Royal) Lancers. Killed in action 31st October 1914. Born 20th July 1886 in Wentbridge. Left Eton College in 1905. Served in India and South Africa. No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 5.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice, Volume 1, page 222:

LIEUTENANT EDWARD HUBERT LEATHAM, 12th (PRINCE OF WALES'S ROYAL) LANCERS, who was killed in action near Ypres on the 31st October, 1914, was the second and only surviving son of the late Mr. E. E. Leatham, of Wentbridge House, Pontefract.

He was born at Wentbridge, Yorkshire, on the 20th July, 1886, and was educated at Eton and the R.M.C., Sandhurst. He joined the 12th Lancers in October, 1906, becoming Lieutenant in August, 1908.

He played in his Regimental polo team when it won the Inter-Regimental Cup in 1914 and the Coronation Cup. He was also a successful gentleman jockey and point-to-point rider.

He was killed while helping to get a wounded man back into a trench into which he had safely got the rest of his men. While returning he was struck by a shell.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1915:

LEATHAM Edward Hubert of Wentbridge House Pontefract Yorkshire a lieutenant in the 12th Royal Lancers died 31 October 1914 near Ypres in the kingdom of Belgium whilst on active service Probate Wakefield 19 February to Gordon Cunard esquire. Effects £28435 10s.
Resworn £29024 3s. 6d.

Extract from Sheffield Daily Telegraph - Saturday 6 March 1915, page 10:

Lieut. Edward Hubert Leatham, 12th Royal Lancers, of Wentbridge House, Pontefract, Yorks, who was killed in action near Ypres on the 31st October last, son of Mr. Edmund Leatham, banker, of Pontefract (unsettled property, net personalty £26,378) £28,455.

LEEKE

Ralph Henry

Old Etonian. Major, Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own) attached 4th Battalion, King's African Rifles. Died of black water fever contracted on service in East Africa 5th November 1915. Aged 31. Born 8th December 1883 at Aston Hall, Salop. Baptised 13th January 1884 in Longford, Shropshire. Son of Col. Ralph and the Hon. Mrs. Mary Theresa Leeke, of Aston, Newport, Salop. Height 5 feet 7 inches. Left Eton College in 1901. In the 1891 census he was aged 7, born Aston, Shropshire, son of Ralph and Mary T Leeke, resident Longford Hall, Longford Brook, Longford, Newport, Shropshire. Buried in TAVETA MILITARY CEMETERY, Kenya. Plot III. Row B. Grave 2.

Extract from De Ruvigny's Roll Of Honour 1914-1918, Volume 2, page 199:

LEEKE, RALPH HENRY, Major. The Prince. Consort's Own Rifle Brigade, and 2nd in Command 4th Battn. King's African Rifles, elder s. and h. of Col. Ralph Leeke, of Longford Hall, and Aston Hall, Shropshire, late Grenadier Guards, by his wife, Hon. Mary Teresa, née Manners, 2nd dau. of John Thomas, 2nd Lord Manners; and brother to Lieut. C. Leeke (q.v.): b. Aston Hall aforesaid, 8 Dec. 1883: educ. Eton, and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst; gazetted 2nd Lieut. Rifle Brigade 22 Oct. 1902: Lieut. 26 Sept. 1906; Capt. 1 Feb. 1913, and Temp. Major Sept. 1915 served with the 2nd Battn. at Cairo and with the 1st Battn. in Ireland and Malta: was seconded for service under the Colonial Office 30 Dec. 1909, and posted to the 4th King's African Rifles in Uganda; was given the local rank of Capt. 29 May. 1912, and the same year proceeded to the Northern Patrol and served in several punitive expeditions against the Turkana, Dodinga, and other tribes (mentioned in Despatches), and when the European War broke out was in charge of the Rudolph Province; was sent in Oct. 1914, to the Voi district. British East Africa, with four companies of the K.A.R. for the protection of the railway; was present at numerous patrol fights, and the unsuccessful attack on the German position at Mbuguni, and died at Mzima, on the Tsavo River, B.E.A., 5 Nov. 1915, of blackwater fever, contracted on active service. His Commanding Officer wrote: “He had very completely the confidence of officers and men under him; he had been since Oct. in command of four companies in the Voi district. The men have done splendidly there whenever they have met the Germans, and it is in a great measure due to his fine leading and command," and a brother officer: "He was by far the best soldier in the battalion: a really exceptional man and liked by everybody. His promotion just before his death was the finest thing that ever happened in the Regiment. It was an awful blow to me—I think I have told you before he was the one man I have ever met whom I would go anywhere for, and whose opinion I knew at all times to be really sound. In him the K.A.R. lost their best officer, and I my best friend. His work in the North was wonderful, but hidden under a bushel. He was writing an article at the time of his death to the journal of the Royal Geographical Society, and now I intend to finish it for him, as they want to publish it with his map." Unm.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1916:

LEEKE Ralph. Henry of Aston Shropshire died 5 November 1915 at Mijuna British East Africa Administration London 29 March to Ralph Leeke lieutenant colonel (retired) H M. Army. Effects £1340 143. 4d.

Extract from Dundee Evening Telegraph - Thursday 11 November 1915, page 4:

Major Leeke. Rifle Brigade.

Major Ralph Henry Leeke, Rifle Brigade (died in East Africa of fever on active service, November 5), was born in 1883. He was the elder son and heir of Colonel Ralph Leeke of Longford Hall, Shropshire (whose mother was daughter of the fourth Earl of Portsmouth) by his marriage with the Hon. Mary Theresa Manners, sister of the third Lord Manners, whose eldest eon fell in the war last year. Major Leeke was educated Eton. He entered the Rifle Brigade in 1902, and had served in numerous operations in East Africa. He became Major in September. He was related to the Drummonds of Hawthornden through the marriage of his uncle, the Rev. Thomas Newton Leeke, to the only daughter of Sir James Drummond, third Baronet.

Extract from Truth - Wednesday 17 November 1915, page 6:

Another green jacket has been added to the Roll of Honour—Major Ralph Henry Leeke, of the Rifle Brigade, whose death was reported last week from black water fever contracted on service in East Africa, where he was serving as second in command of the 4th Battalion King's African Rifles. Before the present war broke out he had seen service in Uganda against the Turkana and Dodinga tribes, and in August last was present at the attack on the German position at Mbuguni. He had a promising career in front of him when his life was so prematurely cut short. Major Leeke was the son of Colonel Ralph Leeke, who retired from the Grenadier Guards in 1890, and resides at his family place of Longford, in Shropshire.

LEFROY, D.S.O.

Bertram Perceval

Lieutenant-Colonel, 2nd Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Died of wounds 27th September 1915. Aged 37. Son of the late Thomas Charles Perceval and Isabella Napier Lefroy. Awarded the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.). In the 1881 census he was aged 2, born London, Middlesex, son of Thomas and Isabella N Lefroy, resident 43, Stanhope Gardens, Kensington, London & Middlesex. In the 1891 census he was aged 12, born London, Middlesex, a scholar, son of Thomas C P and Isabella N Lefroy, resident Ashburn Place, Kensington, London & Middlesex. In the 1911 census he was aged 32, born South kensington, Middlesex, unmarried, a student, Infantry captain, resident Staff College, London Road, Camberley, Frimley, Surrey. Buried in FOUQUIERES CHURCHYARD EXTENSION, Pas de Calais, France. Plot/Row/Section I. Grave 40.

Extract from Distinguished Service Order 1886 to 1915 published by Naval & Military Press:

LEFROY, BERTRAM PERCEVAL, Lieut., was born 18 May, 1878, in London, son of the late Thomas Charles Perceval Lefroy, of 11, Ashburn Place, S.W., and Isabella Napier, daughter of the late Alexander Hastie, of Carnock, Fifeshire. He was educated at Harrow and Sandhurst, and joined the Royal Dublin Fusiliers 7 May, 1898; became Lieutenant 10 May, 1899. He served in the South African War, 1899-1901 (dangerously wounded); was present at the Relief of Ladysmith; took part in the operations in the Transvaal in June, 1900; in Natal, March to June, 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July, 1900; in Orange River Colony, June, 1900; in the Transvaal, Dec. 1900, to Aug. 1901; also during the operations on the Zululand Frontier of Natal in Sept. 1901, including defence of Fort Itala. He was mentioned in Despatches 11 Oct. 1901; received the Queen's South African Medal with five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 11 Oct. 1901]: “Bertram Perceval Lefroy, Lieut., The Royal Dublin Fusiliers.” The D.S.O. was awarded for “gallantry in the Defence of Forts Prospect and Itala.” The defence of the two forts, though so few were engaged, was considered one of the most brilliant affairs in the war, the attacking force being about four times the number of the defenders, and the Boer loss larger in proportion than in almost any other action. Major Chapman was in command at Fort Itala. Lieut. Lefroy (with Lieut. Kane, South Lancashire Regt., who was killed) commanded about 90 of the Mounted Infantry at the outpost on the top of Itala Hill. He himself shot Potgieter, the enemy commander, and was very severely wounded. Lord Kitchener himself sent in Lieut. Lefroy's name for the D.S.O., and for his promotion, in getting which he was transferred to the 3rd Battn. The Royal Warwickshire Regt. The latter eventually proved in some ways unfortunate, as this battalion was one of those subsequently done away with, and caused Capt. Lefroy a serious loss of seniority. The following is an extract from a letter written by Lieut. B. P. Lefroy while he was lying wounded after Itala (he had been wounded in four places, two of which just escaped being fatal): "When we heard that we were going to be attacked at Itala. I was sent right up to the top of the Itala Hill with about 90 men, to try and hold it, and prevent the Boers from attacking the camp from that direction. At about 2 a.m., 26 Sept., they attacked my post five or six hundred strong. It was fairly dark, and the ground was covered with little rocks, which made it very hard to distinguish people. We kept up a heavy fire on both sides. They worked right round our right, and then rushed the position. It was a very plucky rush, but as they were about five to one, we couldn't keep them out, and it ended in a sort of grand mêlée. I have a vivid recollection of popping off my revolver with Boers all round me, and then I got too full of lead to continue the operation. They took about 37 prisoners and held the position all day. We people with bullets in us had to lie all day on our backs in the sun, and we didn't get down again till 3 a.m. next morning, when the people in the camp, finding the Boers had cleared, sent up for us. It was bitterly cold during the night, and a damn mist. The camp held out splendidly all night and day, until the Boers didn't think it worth while losing any more men. There were about 1,500 Boers, and about 300 of us, so we didn't do so badly." He became Captain Aug. 1902. After the Boer War, he served in England, Gibraltar, again in South Africa, returned to England, and went through the Staff College. At the outbreak of the Great War he was holding an appointment as General Staff Officer at the War Office. In Aug. 1914, he went out on the Staff of the First Division. After seven months he returned to England to serve on the Staff of the 26th Division at Warminster until July, 1915, when he went out to command the 2nd Battn. Warwickshire Regt. He was Brevet Major in the King's Birthday Honours List, 1915; Major 8 Aug. and Lieutenant-Colonel 1 Sept. 1915. Lieut.-Colonel Lefroy was fatally wounded at the Battle of Loos 25 Sept. 1915, and died in the Field Ambulance on the 27th. He was three times mentioned in Despatches during the War (17 Sept. 1914; 14 Jan. 1915 and 31 May, 1915); received the Cross of the Legion of Honour. He was much beloved by his men, and they would have followed him anywhere. The dying message he left for them was made a battalion order, and will not be forgotten by those of the old Regiment who survive. It was: “Tell them my last thoughts are with them. I pray that their bravery in the hour of severe testing may win them through to success. Would to God I had been spared to serve and lead them a little longer. But as it is I trust that the men of the Warwickshire Regiment will pull together, work together and uphold the credit, the good name and the traditions that the Regiment has so nobly won. May God's blessing rest on them in their hour of danger or peace, and may heroic self-sacrifice of their officers, non-commissioned officers and men who have fallen inspire them to deeds of unfaltering and unfailing bravery?”

Extract from De Ruvigny's Roll Of Honour 1914-1918, volume 2, page 199-200:

LEFROY, BERTRAM PERCEVAL, D.S.O., Lieut.-Col., 2nd Battn. (6th Foot). The Royal Warwickshire Regt., 2nd s. of the late Thomas Charles Perceval Lefroy, by his wife, Isabella Napier (11, Ashburn Place, Cromwell Road. S.W.). dau. of the late Alexander Mastic, of Carnock; and gdson. of the late Very Rev. Jeffry Lefroy, Dean of Dromore; b. London, 18 May, 1878; educ. The Grange, Folkestone; Harrow, and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst: was gazetted 2nd Lieut. The Royal Dublin Fusiliers 7 May, 1898; promoted Lieut. 10 May 1899, Capt. 2 Aug. 1902, and transferred to the 2nd Royal Warwickshire Regt.; Brev. Major 3 June, 1915, Major 24 July, 1915, and Lieut.-Col. 8 Aug. 1915; served in the South African War 1899-1901; took part in the Relief of Ladysmith; operations in the Transvaal in June, 1900; operations in Natal, March to June, 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July, 1900; operations in Orange River Colony June, 1900; operations in the Transvaal Dec. 1900, to Aug. 1901, and those on the Zulu Frontier of Natal in Sept. 1901, including Defence of Fort Itala. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 11 Oct. 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and was awarded the D.S.O. for gallantry in defence of Forts Prospect and Itala, where he was severely wounded. After the termination of the South African War he served with the 1st and 2nd Battns. at various English stations, at Gibraltar, and again in South Africa, returning to England and going through the Staff College in 1911-12, and was subsequently General Staff Officer. 3rd Grade, at the War Office from 14 April to 4 Aug. 1914. On the outbreak of war he went to France on the staff of the 1st Division, with which he served for seven months, subsequently returning to England to serve on the Staff of the 26th Division, going back to France early-in July, 1915, to command the 2nd Royal Warwickshires, and died in the Field Ambulance 27 Sept. following, from wounds received in action at the Battle of Loos on the 25th, while leading his battalion into action. Buried at Fouquiresles-Bethune. The Quarter Master wrote: "When we heard it was your gallant son who was coming to command the Regiment, it seemed to us who knew him almost too good to be true," and a N.C.O.: "The last I saw of the Colonel he was holding a German sap and calling for the Reserve to come up. That was after he was wounded; he was a very brave man." In his last message to his men he said "Tell them my last thoughts are with them. I pray that their bravery in the hour of severe testing may win them through to success. Would to God I had been spared to serve and lead them a little longer: but, as it is, I trust the men of the Warwicks will pull together, work together, and uphold the credit, the good name, and the traditions that the Regiment has so nobly won. May God's blessing rest on them in their hour of danger or peace, and may the heroic self-sacrifice of their officers, N.C. officers and men who have fallen inspire them to deeds of unfaltering and unfailing bravery." This was afterwards made a Battalion Order. Lieut.-Col. Lefroy was three times mentioned in Despatches by F.M. Sir John (now lord) French [London Gazettes. 19 Oct. 1914, 17 Feb. 1915. and 22 June, 1915], and was awarded the Legion of Honour by the President of the French Republic for gallantry during operations between 21-30 Aug. 1914 [London Gazette. 3 Nov. 1914].

Extract from Irish Officers Died In The Great War, 1914-1919:

Lieut.-Colonel Bertram Perceval Lefroy, D.S.O., 2nd Batt. Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who died on September 27th, from wounds received when leading his men into action, on the 25th, was born in May, 1878. He was the second son of Thomas Charles Perceval Lefroy, of 11 Ashburn Place, London, and Isabella Napier, daughter of the late Alexander Hastie, of Carnock, N.B. He served in the South African War, and received the D.S.O. for gallantry at the defence of Forts Prospect and Itala, where he was severely wounded. He held the Queen's Medal, with five clasps. At the beginning of August, 1914, he went out on the staff of the 1st Division, and remained seven months. He then served on the staff of the 26th Division in England until the beginning of July, when he returned to the Front to command the 2nd Batt. Royal Warwickshires. He was three times mentioned in despatches, and received the Legion of Honour. Lieut.-Colonel Lefroy was a grandson of the late Very Rev. Jeffry Lefroy, Dean of Dromore.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1915:

LEFROY Bertram Percival of 11 Ashburn-place Cromwell- road South Kensington Middlesex D.S.O. lieutenant colonel 2nd Royal Warwickshire regiment died 27 September 1915 at Finquieres in France Administration London 24 December to Isabelle Napier Lefroy widow.
Effects £1012 2s. 9d.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1922:

LEFROY Bertram Percival of 11 Ashburn-place Cromwell-road South Kensington Middlesex D.S.O. lieutenant-colonel 2nd Royal Warwickshire Regiment died 27' September 1915 in France Administration London 28 October to Annette Helena Lefroy spinster. Effects £10.
Former Grant P.R. December 1915.

Extract from Warwick and Warwickshire Advertiser - Saturday 28 November 1914, page 5:

Captain Bertram Lefroy, D.S.O., of the 1st Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment, has been appointed General Staff Officer, 2nd Grade, 4th Division, on active service.

Extract from Weekly Dispatch (London) - Sunday 29 October 1916, page 8, referring to Old Harrowvians:

Of Lieutenant-Colonel Bertram Lefroy. D.S.O., fatally wounded:

To his men he sent the message: "Would they, in his memory, always pull together, buck up, and do all the great things he always knew they could and would do."

To his old House: "Play up."

LEGGE

the Hon Gerald

Old Etonian. Captain, 7th Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment. Killed in action 9th August 1915. Aged 33. Son of the Rt. Hon. William Henage Legge, 6th Earl of Dartmouth. In the 1891 census he was aged 8, born London, Middlesex, son of William Heneage and Mary Legge, resident Woodsome Hall, Back Lane, Farnley Tyas, Huddersfield, Yorkshire & Yorkshire (West Riding). Left Eton College in 1899. In the 1901 census he was aged 18, born London, a Pupil. resident The Rectory, Quidenham, Guiltcross, Norfolk. Matriculated 1901. Christ Church, Oxford University. In the 1911 census he was aged 28, born 55 Manchester Street, London, a Planter. second son of The Earl Of Dartmouth Patshull House, Patshull, Staffordshire. No known grave. Commemorated on HELLES MEMORIAL, Turkey. Panel 134 to 136.

Extract fromm Staffordshire Advertiser - Saturday 4 September 1915, page 7:

DEATH OF CAPT. THE HON. GERALD LEGGE.

We regret to record that Capt. the Hon. Gerald Legge, who in the earlier casualty lists was reported missing, died of wounds on Aug. 9 at Suvla Bay, while serving with the 7th (Service) Battalion South Staffordshire Regiment.

Capt. Legge is the second son of the Earl of Dartmouth, Lord-Lieutenant of the county, and born on April 30, 1882. He commenced his military career in the 4th Battalion Lincolnshire Regiment (the old Royal South Lincolnshire Militia), which he joined as 2nd-lieutenant May 16, 1901. He was promoted to be lieutenant on March 27, 1901, and when he had become senior officer of his rank in January, 1905, retired from the Service. Subsequently he was co-opted as a member of the Staffordshire Territorial Force Association and did good service in that capacity. When the present war broke out he rejoined the Colours and was gazetted a lieutenancy in the 7th (Service) Battalion South Staffordshire Regiment on Sept. 4 last year. He obtained his captaincy on Oct. 29, and has since been in command of a company in the battalion, with which he sailed for the Dardanelles July 1.

Capt. Legge was keen sportsman and a great traveller. He had taken part in many big game-hunts, and a number of trophies collected by him in various expeditions are preserved at Patshull House. On one occasion, when returning to the coast after an expedition to British West Africa, he and his party had to fight their way through tribes of hostile natives, who shot at them with poisoned arrows, from which they had some hair-breadth escapes. For some years before the outbreak of the present war Capt. Legge had been engaged on a work on wild ducks, dealing with specimens from all parts of the world, of which he was making a collection, and of which he had acquired most valuable information bearing on their haunts and habits.

Extract from Dundee Evening Telegraph - Tuesday 31 August 1915, page 4:

Captain the Hon, G. Legge.

Captain the Hon. Gerald Legge, 7th Battalion South Staffordshire Regiment (missing at the Dardanelles), was born April 30, 1882. He is the second son of the sixth Earl of Dartmouth, P.C., by his marriage with Lady Mary Coke, daughter of the second Earl of Leicester, K.G. Captain Legge is a member of the Territorial Force Association of Staffordshire. He is a cousin of the Earl of Dunmore, V.C., and of Lady Marjory Dalrymple Hamilton of Bargany, Ayrshire. His elder brother, Viscount Lewisham, major, Staffordshire Yeomany, is married to a daughter of the Marquis of Lincolnshire, whose only son, Viscount Wendover, recently died of wounds. The first Lord Dartmouth, who was an eminent naval commander in the reigns of Charles II. and James VII., commanded the British fleet sent to demolish Tangier, for which Parliament granted him £10,000.

Extract from Belfast News-Letter - Wednesday 29 September 1915, page 10:

CAPTAIN THE HONOURABLE G. LEGGE.

Captain the Honourable Gerald Legge, 7th Battalion South Staffordshire Regiment, who has been killed in action the Dardanelles, 'was the eldest son of the Right Honourable the Earl of Dartmouth, and was related to a number of titled families in Ulster. His uncle, the Honourable Sir Henry Charles Logge. K.C.V.O., who has been connected with the Royal Household during the reigns of Queen Victoria, King Edward, and the present Sovereign, married the Honourable Amy Gwendoline Lambart, descendant of the first Earl of Cavan, and a granddaughter of the second Marquess Conyngham, a lieutenant-general in the Army. It is interesting to note that Lady Legge is a sister of Mrs. Dunville, wife of Mr. John Dunville, D.L., of Redburn, Holywood, who is a flight lieutenant in the Naval Wing of the Royal Naval Air Service, and who is well known in aeronautical and hunting circles. Deceased, who was 35 years of age, was also a grand-nephew of the Countess of Leitrim, who died in 1892.

Extract from Lichfield Mercury - Friday 10 December 1915, page 6:

WILL OF THE LATE CAPT. THE
HON. GERALD LEGGE.

Captain the Hon. Gerald Legge, Patshull House, near Wolverhampton, of the South, Staffordshire Regiment, second son of the Earl of Dartmouth, was a cousin the Earl of Dunmore, V.C He was killed action in the Dardanelles on August 9th last, leaving estate valued at £19,638, with net personalty £19,625. Lady Joan Margaret Legge, Patshull House, his sister, is the sole executrix. The will is daed March 3rd, 1915, wherein testator leaves £100 each to Elizabeth Legge, Mark and Michael Heathcote Emery, his godchildren; collection of birds to Lord William Percy. The residue of his property he leaves to his brother, Viscount Lewisham, the Hon. Humphrey Legge and his sister Lady Joan Margaret Legge.

Extract from Staffordshire Advertiser - Saturday 6 May 1916, page 3:

GERALD LEGGE MEMORIAL.

A letter was received from Sir Richard Paget requesting the services of county instructors for judging gardening and woodwork in competitions organized by the Scouts' County Association for the Gerald Lcgge Memorial prize. It was resolved that the Director be instructed to place the services of two instructors at the disposal of the association on the conditions mentioned.

Extract from The Sketch - Wednesday 09 July 1913, page 7:

Those well-known men who are shown helping to clean Bingley Hall, Birmingham, for the Boy Scout Exhibition are the Hon. Moubray St. John, elder of Lord St. John of Bletso's brothers; the Hon. Gerald Legge, second son of the Earl of Dartmouth; Lord Hampton; and Lord St. John of Bletso.

Extract from Staffordshire Advertiser - Saturday 13 October 1917, page 6:

STAFFS. SCOUTS’ MEMORIAL TO
CAPT. THE HON. GERALD LEGGE.

To the Editor of the Staffordshire Advertiser.

SIR,—As it is proposed shortly bring to a close the collection funds for the Scouts' County Memorial to the late County Commissioner, Capt. the Hon. Gerald Legge, we are venturing to make a special appeal through your columns for the help of all Scouts and those in sympathy with the movement, in order to bring the amount to the full total of £420, towards which a substantial sum is still required.

You will perhaps allow us remind your readers of the chief points in the above scheme, which offers prizes for proficiency in carpentering and gardening, in accordance with a carefully-thought-out plan.

The importance of both these subjects has been greatly emphasized by the war, and the value of training in handicraft, in the development of dexterity, exactness and neatness will be fully recognized.

Gardening is, of course, particularly useful nationally at the present time, and it has a permanent effect on character and temperament by bringing the Scout into close contact with nature.

We confidently appeal for generous support, both as a way of acknowledging the valuable work carried out by the late County Commissioner whilst he held the position, and for the noble example of patriotism and self-sacrifice by his death in Gallipoli.

Contributions should be sent to the County Secretary, Mr. J. Corbett, “Willowmore,” Sedgley, who will pleased to forward a copy of the scheme on application.

R. A. S. PAGET, County Commissioner.
C. H. WRIGHT, District Commissioner.

LEIGH, D.S.O.

Chandos

Major, 2nd Battalion, King's OWn Scottish Borderers. Died 29th August 1914. Aged 41. Born 29th August 1873, baptised 30th August 1873m in West Derby, Lancashire, son of Edward Chandos and Katharine France Leight. Son of the Hon. Sir E. Chandos Leigh; husband of Winifred (nee Jeffreys) Leigh, married in April to June Quarter 1912 in Holy Trinity, Kensington, London, Middlesex. Brother of Edward Henry (below). Awarded the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O). In the 1881 census he was aged 7, born Lancashire, a scholar, son of Edward C and Kathrine F Leigh, resident 20, Manchester Square, St Marylebone, Marylebone, London & Middlesex. In the 1891 census he was aged 17, born Liverpool, a student, boarding with the Rector of Whitchurch, resident Whitchurch Rectory, Wimpstone, Whitchurch, Stratford on Avon, Warwickshire. Buried in HAUTRAGE MILITARY CEMETERY, Saint-Ghislain, Hainaut, Belgium. Plot II. Row A. Grave 5.

Extract from Distinguished Service Order 1886 to 1915 published by Naval & Military Press:

LEIGH, CHANDOS, Lieut., was born in Aug. 1873, son of the Honourable Sir E. Chandos Leigh, K.C., of 45, Upper Grosvenor Street, W., and of Lady Leigh. He was educated at Harrow and Cambridge, and joined the King's Own Scottish Borderers, through the Warwickshire Militia, 29 May, 1895, becoming Lieutenant 22 Sept. 1897. He served in the South African War, 1900-2, employed with Mounted Infantry, and took part in the Relief of Kimberley; operations in Orange Free State, 1900, including operations at Paardeberg; actions at Poplar Grove, Houtnek (Thoba Mountain), Vet River and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg and Diamond Hill; operations in Orange River Colony in 1900, including actions at Wittebergen and Bothaville; operations in the Transvaal, Orange River Colony and Cape Colony 30 Nov. 1900, to 31 May, 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 Sept. 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 Sept. 1901]: "Chandos Leigh, Lieut., King's Own Scottish Borderers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa." The Insignia were presented to him by the King 29 Oct. 1901. He was promoted to Captain 1 April, 1901. Capt. Leigh then spent ten years in the Egyptian Army. He took part in the operations against the Nyam Nyam Tribes in the Bahr-el-Ghazal Province, and received the Orders of the Medjidie and Osmanieh, and the Bahr-el-Ghazal Medal and clasp. Major Leigh went to France with his Regiment, and was reported missing on the 23rd Aug. 1914, at Mons. When last seen he was, though wounded, waving his men on, and telling them not to mind about him. Six months later returned wounded prisoners reported that he died in Aug. 1914, of wounds received in action at Mons. He was the first Harrovian to fall in the war. His only brother, Lieut. E. H. Leigh, 2nd Battn. Rifle Brigade, was killed on the Aubers Ridge in May, 1915, and their grief-stricken father died three days later. Major Leigh was a fine steeple-chase rider and polo player, as well as a keen cricketer and rider to hounds. He married Winifred, daughter of the late Right Honourable A. F. Jeffreys, M.P., of Buckham, Hampshire.

Extract from De Ruvigny's Roll Of Honour 1914-1918, volume 1, page 223:

LEIGH, CHANDOS, D.S.O., Major, 2nd Battn. King's Own Scottish Borderers, elder s. of the late Hon. Sir Edward Chandos Leigh, K.C., K.C.B., by his wife, Katherine Fanny (Knuston Hall, Irchester, Northants; 45, Upper Grosvenor Street, W.), dau. of the late James Rigby, of Moss House, Lancashire, D.L., and gdson. of Chandos, 1st Lord Leigh; b. 29 Aug. 1873; educ. Harrow and Cambridge; gazetted 2nd Lieut., 2nd King's Own Scottish Borderers, from the Militia, 29 May, 1895, and promoted Lieut. 22 Sept. 1897, Capt. 1 April, 1901, and Major, 17 June, 1914; served (1) in the South African War, 1900-2, employed with the Mounted Infantry; took part in the advance on, and relief of, Kimberley; operations in Orange Free State, 1900, including actions at Paardeberg , Poplar Grove, Houtnek (Thoba Mountain), Vet River and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal, May-June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg and Diamond Hill; operations in Orange River Colony, 1900, including actions at Wittebergen and Bothaville; and in operations in the Transvaal, Orange River Colony and Cape Colony, 30 Nov. 1900 to 31 May, 1902 (mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 Sept. 1901], Queen's medal with five clasps, D.S.0.); (2) with the Egyptian Army, 17 April, 1902, to 1912; took part in Bahr-el-Ghazal Expedition against the Nyam-Nyam Tribes 1905-6 (Egyptian medal with clasp; Medijidieh and Osmanich Orders); and (3) with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from 13 Aug. 1914; was reported missing and wounded after the Battle of Mons, 23 Aug. 1914, and died at Boussu shortly afterwards. When last seen, though severely wounded, he told his men to go on and never mind him, as the enemy were in great strength, and it was imperative to get back to blow up the canal bridge against their advance. Major Leigh was a fine horseman and polo player, winning his Regimental cup the year he joined the Army. He was well known with the Meath, Pytchley and other packs, won honours in the open jumping at the Dublin Horse Show, and headed the winning record for steeplechase riders, both amateurs and professional, on the Cairo Turf. He m. 6 June, 1912, Winifred Madeline, dau. of the late Rt. Hon. Arthur Frederick Jeffreys, of Burkham, Hampshire, P.C., M.P.; s.p.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice, Volume 1, page 226:

MAJOR CHANDOS LEIGH, D.S.O., 2nd BATTN. KING'S OWN SCOTTISH BORDERERS, born on the 29th August, 1873, was the elder son of the Hon. Sir E. Chandos Leigh, K.C.B., K.C., of 45, Upper Grosvenor Street, London, W., and a cousin of Lord Leigh, of Stoneleigh.

He was educated at Harrow and Cambridge, and joined the K.O.S.B. from the Warwickshire Militia in May, 1895, becoming Lieutenant in September, 1897. He served in the South African War, being employed with the Mounted Infantry. He was present at the relief of Kimberley; at operations in the Orange Free State and Paardeberg, with actions at Poplar Grove, Houtnek (Thoba Mountain), Vet and Zand Rivers: in the Transvaal, May and June, 1900, with actions near Johannes- burg and at Diamond Hill; operations in the Orange River Colony, with actions at Wittebergen and Bothaville; and at operations in the Transvaal, Orange River and Cape Colonies from November, 1900, to July, 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches ("London Gazette," 10th September, 1901), was awarded the D.S.O., and received the Queen's medal with five clasps. He was promoted Captain in April, 1901, and in April, 1902, was detached from his Regiment for employment with the Egyptian Army. While with it he saw active service in the Soudan in 1905, taking part in the operations against the Nyam Nyam tribes in the Bahrel-Ghazal Province. For his services he received the Egyptian medal with clasp, and was awarded the Orders of the Osmanieh and Medjidieh.

He was a fine horseman and polo player, and was well known on the Cairo turf, where he more than once headed the winning list of steeplechase riders, both amateur and professional. He had hunted from his boyhood in Warwickshire and Northamptonshire, and more recently with the Meath and Ward Union packs, when he was quartered with his Regiment in Ireland. He also took honours in the open jumping at the horse show in Dublin.

He was with his battalion at Belfast during the troubled time of the riots at Harland and Wolff's shipyards in 1912, and through the many succeeding labour troubles in Dublin from the strikes in August, 1913.

He gave his life at Mons on or about the 24th August, 1914, where, although severely wounded and in the open, he ordered his men to leave him and retire across the Canal, so that there should be no delay in blowing up the bridge in the face of the advancing Germans.

After having been returned as “missing " for seven months, news was received in March, 1915, from a returned disabled prisoner of the K.O.S.B. that Major Leigh died and was buried at Boussu shortly after the action in which he was wounded. He married, in June, 1913, Winifred, daughter of the late Right Hon. A. F. Jeffreys, M.P., of Burkham House, Hampshire.

Extract from The Scotsman - Thursday 20 May 1915, page 6:

Sir Edward Grey received at the Foreign Office yesterday afternoon visits from the Spanish and French Ambassadors.

Both sons of Sir Edward Chandos Leigh, whose death was announced yesterday, have been killed in the present war—the older , Major Chandos Leigh, D.S.O., King's Own Scottish Borderers, in March, and the younger, Lieutenant Edward Henry Leigh, Rifle Brigade, during the present month. He fell (says the Times) in action at Fromelles on May 9, and the announcement of his death was first published last Saturday.

Extract from The Scotsman - Thursday 20 May 1915, page 6:

Last Tuesday the Dean Hereford unveiled and dedicateda memorial tablet in Church to the memory of the two sons of Sir Chandos Leigh who have fallen in the war. Major Chandos Leigh. D.S.O., King's Own Scottish Borderers, fought in the South African War, and was afterwards 10 years in Egypt, where he was decorated with the Order of the Medjidieh and Osmanieh, and gained the Bahrel-Gnazal medal and clasp. He was killed in Flanders the age of 40. Edward Henry Leigh, who was lieutenant in the 2nd Batt, the Rifle Brigade, fell in the attack on Aubere Ridge on 9th May, 1915. He was 26 years of age and had previously been mentioned in despatches. Among the congregation were the deceased officers' mother (Lady Chandos Leigh) and Mrs. Chandos Leigh, Lord Leigh, Major the Hon. Rupert Leigh, the Hon. Agnes Leigh, the Hon. M. Cordelia Leigh, Captain and Mrs. Charrington, Mr. and Mrs. F. Newdegate, Lady Mordaunt. and Miss Mordaunt. The Vicar (Rev. H. E. Cooke) read the first portion of the service, and the Dean of Hereford the remainder. The hymns “Lead, kindly light” and “Alleluia. The strife o’er” were sung.

LEIGH

Edward Henry

Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own). Killed in action 9th May 1915. Aged 26. Son of the late Sir Chandos Leigh and Lady Leigh. Brother of Chandos (above). Educated Harrow and Pembroke College, Cambridge. In the 1891 census he was aged 2, born London, Middlesex, son of Edward Chandos and Katharine F Leigh, resident Upper Grosvenor Street, St George Hanover Square, London & Middlesex. In the 1901 census he was aged 12, born London, Middlesex, a pupil, resident Castlemount College, Dover, Kent. In the 1911 census he was aged 22, born St George Hanover Square, London, a Student at Cambridge, son of Edward Chandos and Katherine Fanny Leight, resident 45 Upper Grosvenor Street W, St George Hanover Square, London & Middlesex. No known grave. Commemorated on PLOEGSTEERT MEMORIAL, Comines-Warneton, Hainaut, Belgium. Panel 10.

Extract from De Ruvigny's Roll Of Honour 1914-1918, volume 1, page 224:

LEIGH, EDWARD HENRY, Lieut., 2nd Battn. The Rifle Brigade, yr. s. of the late Hon. Sir Edward Chandos Leigh, K.C., K.C.B. (who died suddenly, 18 May, 1915, three days after hearing of the death of his last surviving son), by his wife, Katherine Fanny (Knuston Hall, Irchester, Northants; 45, Upper Grosvenor Street., W.), dau. of the late James Rigby, of Moss House, Lancashire, D.L., and grandson of Chandos, 1st Lord Leigh; b. 14 July, 1888; educ. Harrow and Cambridge; gazetted Lieut., 2nd Battn. The Rifle Brigade, 17 April, 1913; left with his regt. for France, Nov. 1914, and was killed in the attack upon the Aubers Ridge, 9 May, 1915; unm. Lieut. Leigh was mentioned in F.M. Sir John (now Lord) French's Despatch of 5 April [London Gazette, 22 June], 1915.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice, Volume 1, page 281-282:

LIEUTENANT EDWARD HENRY LEIGH, 2nd BATTN., RIFLE BRIGADE, (THE PRINCE CONSORT'S OWN), who was killed at Fromelles on the 9th May, 1915, from a bullet wound in the head, was the son of the Hon. Sir Chandos and Lady Leigh, of 45, Upper Grosvenor Street, London, and grandson of the first Lord Leigh, of Stoneleigh, Warwickshire.

He was educated at Harrow and at Pembroke College, Cambridge. He joined this Regiment in September, 1912, with antedate, by virtue of his University degree, to September, 1911. He served two years in India, and was promoted Lieutenant in April, 1013. On returning home from India he went straight out to the front. During the attack on Neuve Chapelle, Lieutenant Leigh was in command of his company, his Captain having been fatally wounded at the beginning of the engagement.

Lieutenant Leigh, who was a singularly handsome man, was a bold rider to hounds and a good shot.

For his services in the war he was mentioned in Sir John French's Despatches of the 31st May, 1915.

Extract from The Scotsman - Thursday 20 May 1915, page 6:

Sir Edward Grey received at the Foreign Office yesterday afternoon visits from the Spanish and French Ambassadors .

Both sons of Sir Edward Chandos Leigh, whose death was announced yesterday, have been killed in the present war—the older , Major Chandos Leigh, D.S.O., King's Own Scottish Borderers, in March, and the younger, Lieutenant Edward Henry Leigh, Rifle Brigade, during the present month. He fell (says the Times) in action at Fromelles on May 9, and the announcement of his death was first published last Saturday.

Extract from The Scotsman - Thursday 20 May 1915, page 6:

Last Tuesday the Dean Hereford unveiled and dedicateda memorial tablet in Church to the memory of the two sons of Sir Chandos Leigh who have fallen in the war. Major Chandos Leigh. D.S.O., King's Own Scottish Borderers, fought in the South African War, and was afterwards 10 years in Egypt, where he was decorated with the Order of the Medjidieh and Osmanieh, and gained the Bahrel-Gnazal medal and clasp. He was killed in Flanders the age of 40. Edward Henry Leigh, who was lieutenant in the 2nd Batt, the Rifle Brigade, fell in the attack on Aubere Ridge on 9th May, 1915. He was 26 years of age and had previously been mentioned in despatches. Among the congregation were the deceased officers' mother (Lady Chandos Leigh) and Mrs. Chandos Leigh, Lord Leigh, Major the Hon. Rupert Leigh, the Hon. Agnes Leigh, the Hon. M. Cordelia Leigh, Captain and Mrs. Charrington, Mr. and Mrs. F. Newdegate, Lady Mordaunt. and Miss Mordaunt. The Vicar (Rev. H. E. Cooke) read the first portion of the service, and the Dean of Hereford the remainder. The hymns “Lead, kindly light” and “Alleluia. The strife o’er” were sung.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1921:

LEIGH Edward Henry of 45 Upper Grosvenor-street Middlesex lieutenant H.M. Army died 9 May 1915 in France or Belgium Administration London 6 August to the honourable Rowland Charles Frederick Leigh.
Effects £3643 2s. 6d. Former Grant P.R. July 1917.

LEWIS

Richard Percy

Lieutenant-Colonel, Devonshire Regiment attached Manchester Regiment. Killed in action 7th September 1917. Born 10th March 1874, Kensington, London. Educated at Winchester College and Oxford University. Matriculated 1892 University College, Oxford University. Height 5 feet 9½ inches. Served in the South African War 1901-02. Buried in YPRES RESERVOIR CEMETERY, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot I. Row A. Grave 57. See also Kennington, The Oval, Surrey CCC Memorial

See his statistics on CricInfo, extract from Wisden Cricketers' Almanack

LEWIS, LIEUT.-COL. RICHARD PERCY (Manchester Regt.), born March 10, 1874 (according to the Winchester and Oxford Registers), died of wounds, September 9. Had previously been wounded. Winchester XI, 1891, 1892; Surrey XI, 1892: Middlesex XI, 1898; Oxford University XI, 1894-5-6. Went with Priestley's team to West Indies, 1897. Played much Military cricket, for Devon Regt., King's African Rifles, Egyptian Army, etc. Lewis seemed likely at one time to be a great wicket-keeper. At Winchester he was spoken of as a coming MacGregor, but it cannot be said that he quite fulfilled his early promise. His ability was beyond question, but his hands would not stand the hard work of first-class matches, and when they went wrong he had bad days. He had no pretensions as a batsman, and in the University match in 1894 he was very pleased that he managed to stay for a couple of overs, enabling Charles Fry to add seventeen runs and complete his hundred. Served in the South African War. Member of M.C.C. since 1893.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1917:

LEWIS Richard Percy of the Manchester regiment barracks Ashton-under-Lyne Lancashire lieutenant-colonel H.M. Army died 7 September 1917 in Flanders Probate London 26 October to Evelyn Minnie Louisa Perkins (wife of Arthur Ernest John Perkins) and Francis Hare Clayton solicitor.
Effects £19526 1s.

Extract from Western Times - Thursday 20 September 1917, page 2:

Lieut.-Colonel Richard Percy Lewis, Manchester Regiment, formerly Devon Regiment, whose name appeared yesterday in the official list of casualties, died on September 9 from shell wounds received the same day. He was born in September, 1873. and was son of the late Richard Lewis, barrister-at-law, and nephew of the late Rev. F. C. Kinglake, rector of Monkton, Taunton, and of Mre. Kinglake, of Batheaston Lodge, Bath. He went with the City of London Volunteers to South Africa, and obtained a commission in the Devon Regiment. With the King's African Rifles he took part in the Nandi Expedition of 1905-6, when he was mentioned in dispatches and received the medal with clasp. Later, from August, 1908, he was employed with the Egyptian Army. He was appointed to the command of a battalion of the Manchester Regiment last May.

Note: In the following extracts from various newspapers there are some discrepancies in values.

Extract from Taunton Courier, and Western Advertiser - Wednesday 7 November 1917, page 4:

WEST MONKTON.

HANDSOME BEQUEST TO THE CHURCH.—Lieut Colonel Richard Percy Lewis, Manchester R., formerly Devon R., of the Regimental Barracks, Ashton-under-Lyne, Lancashire, who died in Flanders on September 7th from shell wounds, has left property of the value of £19,526. The testator gives £500 for a stained glass window in memory of his mother in West Monkton Church, Taunton, or, if that be impracticable, then for a stained glass window or other Memorial in Khartoum Cathedral.

Extract from Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Wednesday 31 October 1917, page 4:

AT WAGGON HILL.

Lieut-Colonel Richard Percy Lewis, Manchester Regiment, who died in Flanders from shell wounds, left £19,526. Among his bequests were £3,100 for the comfort of officers and men during the war of his battalion, and thereafter for their widows; for a bronze medal for the officers' mess depicting some act of valour, and for a painting on canvas depicting an act of valour —for example, the Devons (his former regiment) at Waggon Hill.

Extract from Globe - Tuesday 30 October 1917, page 7:

BEQUESTS TO HIS REGIMENT.

Lieut.-Colonel Richard Percy Lewis, Manchester Regiment, formerly Devon Regiment, who died in Flanders on September 7, leaving £19,526, gives

£2,ooo to the 2nd Battalion Manchester Regiment for the benefit and comfort of the officers and men during the war, and thereafter for the widows of the men.

£500 to the battalion for a painting on canvas depicting some act of valour, e.g., the Devons at Waggon Hill, some stirring event France.

£500 to the battalion for bronze medal for the officers’ mess depicting some act of valour.

£100 for a bronze medal for the non-commissioned officers’ mess the battalion.

The lapis lazui stone “given by the Cearewitch to his father” he left to the parents of Claud Lafone.

LODER

Robert Egerton

[Listed as LODGER on SDGW] Old Etonian. Captain (Staff - 160th Brigade), 1st/4th Battalion, Royal Sussex Regiment. 53rd Division. Died of wounds 29th March 1917. Aged 30. Born 10th March 1887, baptised 18th April 1887 at St Peter, Eaton Square, Pimlico, Middlesex, son of Edmund Giles and Marion Loder. Son of Sir Edmund and Lady Loder, of Leonardslie, Horsham, Sussex; husband of Muriel Rolls Loder, of Clock House, Cowfold, Sussex. Birth of a son to Mr and Mrs Robert Egerton Loder 1914. Resident of The Clock House, Cowfold. Educated at Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge. Left Eton College in 1906. Roll of Honour and Lower Beeding Memorial. Born in Cowfold. Wounded during the First Battle of Gaza. Mentioned in Despatches twice Egypt, Gallipoli. In the 1891 census he was aged 11, son of Edward Loder, resident Leonardslie, Highfield, Lower Beeding, Horsham, Sussex. Buried in DEIR EL BELAH WAR CEMETERY, Israel. Section C. Grave 73. See also the Cowfold War Memorial and also the Cambridge University Trinity College Memorial. Also listed on the R E Loder Memorial Window, Lower Beeding, West Sussex

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1917:

LODER Robert Egerton of The Clock House Cowfield Sussex lieutenant temporary captain H.M. Army died 29 March 1917 in Syria Probate London 10 December to Walter William Otter captain H.M. Army and Charles Williams lieutenant Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. Effects £297524 1s. 8d.

Extract from Brighton Gazette - Wednesday 24 January 1912, page 7:

Robert Egerton Loder has been gazetted Second Lieutenant (supernumeray) in the 4th Battalion, the Royal Sussex Regiment.

Extract from Northampton Mercury - Friday 15 August 1913, page 3:

MARRIAGE OF MR. R. E. LODER
A CHARMING SPECTACLE
.

The marriage took place on Saturday afternoon at St. Peter’s Church, Eaton-square, between Mr. Robert Egerton Loder, only son of Sir Edmund Giles Loder, Bart., and Lady Loder, Leonardslee, Horsham, and Miss Muriel Rolls Hoare, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Rolls Hoare, of 43, Mount-street.

The church was prettily decorated with palms and white flower's, and the officiating clergy were the Rev. F. Campion, rector of West Grinstead, and the Rev. the Hon. H. E. Lambart, cousin of the bridegroom, Mr. James Hoare gave his daughter away, and she looked very graceful in a robe of soft ivory crepe de Chine, draped with Brussels lace lent her mother, and a Court train of velvet embossed brocade was suspended from the shoulders and draped with the same lace. Over a spray of orange flowers on her hair the bride wore a thick chiffon veil, the corners embroidered with true lovers’ knots. She was attended by six little children, the three pages escorting three tiny bridesmaids, who were daintly dressed in cream net and lace mounted over pale maize silk, with mob caps of net and lace. The pages wore maize satin knickers with soft crepe de Chine shirts, and from the bride they received gold monogram cuff links.

The pages were Masters Guy Otter, Anthony Barron, and John Campion, and the bridesmaids Miss Peggy Borron, the bride’s niece, Aliss Barbara Otter, niece of the bridegroom, and Miss Etheldreda Burrell, cousin of the bridegroom and daughter of Sir Merrik and Lady Burrell. Mr. C. J. Williams acted as best man to the bridegroom. Mrs. Rolls Hoare afterwards welcomed her friends at 48, Mountstreet, and among those present at the ceremony and reception were Sir Edmund and Lady Loder, Sir Alerrik and Lady Burrell, the Dowager Lady Burrell. Major Eustace Loder, Mrs. Barron, Mrs. Otter, Mr. and Mrs. John Millais, Miss Lees, Miss Glubb, Miss Lyon, Colonel Hoare, Mr. and Mrs. Clive Boyd, Mrs. Arthur Boyd. Mr. L. St. George, Miss Innes, and Miss Chaplin Jones.

Later in the afternoon Mr. and Mrs. Robert Loder left for their honeymoon, which they will spend motoring in the Lake District. The bride went away in a dress of Nattier blue charmeuse with black moire embroidered sash and collar, and a black hat with panache of blue feathers.

Extract from Mid Sussex Times - Tuesday 10 April 1917, page 5:

HORSHAM

Many will deeply regret to learn that Capt. Robert Egerton Loder, Royal Sussex Regt, (staff Captain of —Infantry Brigade), died wounds on March 29. He was only son of Sir Edmund and Lady Loder, of Leonardslee. He was born in March, 1887, and was educated at Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge, graduating in 1909. He married, in 1913, Muriel Rolls,. daughter of James Rolls Hoare, of Mounts-street. Captain Loder, who had served with distinction in the war, was gazetted to the Staff in May of last year.

Extract from Mid Sussex Times - Tuesday 10 April 1917, page 5:

LODER—Killed in action, Captain Robert Egerton Loder, Royal Sussex Regiment, only son of Sir Edmund Giles Loder, Bart., of Leonardslee Park, Lower Beeding, aged 30 years .

Extract from Manchester Evening News - Thursday 13 December 1917, page 3:

Captain Robert Egerton Loder, Sussex Regiment of Cowford, Sussex, who died from wounds in Syria, only son of Sir Edmund Giles Loder, Bart, left £297,524 gross and £281,191 net.

LOGAN

Hugh

Lieutenant, Leicestershire Yeomanry. Died at Brussels of pneumonia 24th February 1919. Aged 33. Born 10th May 1885, East Langton Grange, Market Harborough, Leicestershire. Baptised 14th june 1885 in Langtons, Leicestershire, son of John William and Maud Andsall Logan. Son of Maud A. Logan and the late John W. Logan; husband of Phyllis Logan, of "Tresco", Hewlett Rd., Cheltenham, Glos. In the 1891 census he was aged 5, born East Langton, Leicestershire, son of Maud A Logan, resident Langton Grange, East Langton, Market Harborough, Leicestershire. Buried in TOURNAI COMMUNAL CEMETERY ALLIED EXTENSION, Tournai, Hainaut, Belgium. Plot IV. Row G. Grave 10.

Extract from De Ruvigny's Roll Of Honour 1914-1918, volume 5, page 107:

LOGAN, HUGH, Lieut., 1st Battn. (Prince Albert's Own) Leicestershire Yeomanry (T.F.), attd. Royal Engineers, yr. s. of John William Logan, of East Langton Grange, Market Harborough, J.P. (1891 to 1904 and 1910 to 1916), M.P. for Harborough Division of Leicestershire), by his wife, Maud Ansdall, dau. of the Rev. B. E. Watkins, Rector of Treeton, Rotherham; b. East Langton Grange, Market Harborough, co. Leicester, 10 May, 1885; educ. Westminster, and Trinity Hall, Cambridge; was a Railway Engineer gazetted 2nd Lieut. Leicestershire Yeomanry in 1915; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders; was subsequently attached to the 271st Railway Constructional Coy.. Royal Engineers, and died at a casualty clearing station 24 Feb. 1919, of pneumonia, contracted while on active service. Buried at Tournay. He m. Phyllis, dau. of C. R. Hemingway, of Doncaster, and had one child.

See his statistics at CricInfo

Extract from Leicester Daily Post - Saturday 29 April 1911, page 8:

MARRIAGE OF MR. HUGH LOGAN

A wedding which aroused considerable local interest was celarated at St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, Belgrave-Square, Nottingham, on Thursday afternoon, the contracting parties being Mr. Hugh Logan, of Doncaster, second son of Mr. J. W. Logan, M.P. for the Harborough Division of Leicestershire, and Phyllis Hemingway, third daughter of Mr. Charles R. Hemingway, of The Hermitage, Leston-road, The Park, Nottingham. A large congregation assembled in the church, which was artistically decorated with choice flowers and plants. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. J. C. Grant, and the special hymns were “O, Perfect Love” and “Gracious Spirit, Holy Ghost.”

The bride, who was given away by her father, was gowned in white satin embroidered with ...[article does continue but has not been transcribed]

Extract from Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer - Saturday 1 March 1919, page 6:

THE ROLL OF HONOUR.

CAPT. HUGH LOGAN, Leicestershire Yeomanry, of the firm Messrs. Logan and Hemingwav, contractors, of Doncaster, died at Brussels, on Monday, of pneumonia. Before joining the army in the early stages of the war, lived at Hooton Levitt Hall, and previously at Doncaster. Captain Logan was the younger son Mr. John W. Logan, East Langton Grange, Market Harborough, who was for many years M.P. for Harborough Division. He married the daughter of Mr. C. R. Hemingway, and leaves a widow and a little girl.

LONG, C.M.G., D.S.O.

Walter

Brigadier-General, 2nd Dragoons (Royal Scots Greys) and General Staff, commanding 56th Infantry Brigade. Killed in action 28th January 1917. Aged 37. Son of Rt. Hon. Walter Hume Long, P.C., M.P. Secretary of State for the Colonies (afterwards 1st Viscount Long of Wraxall) and of Lady Dorothy Blanche Long (now Viscountess Long of Wraxall) daughter of 9th Earl of Cork and Orrery; husband of Hon. Mrs. Walter Long, O.B.E. (now Hon. Mrs. Ralph Glyn). Awarded Companion of the Most Distinguished Order of St. Michael and St. George (C.M.G.) and Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.). Twice Mentioned in Despatches. Order of St. Stanislas 2nd Class, with swords. Buried in COUIN BRITISH CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot VI. Row C. Grave 19.

Extract from Distinguished Service Order 1886 to 1915, volume 2, page 295, published by Naval & Military Press:

LONG, WALTER, Capt., was born 26 July, 1879, eldest son of the Right Honourable Walter Long, P.C., J.P., D.L., F.R.S., LL.D., M.P., First Lord of the Admiralty, and Lady Doreen, fourth daughter of the 9th Earl of Cork and Orrery. He was educated at Harrow (Moretens, March, 1893, to Feb. 1898); was commissioned in the Scots Greys, 20 May, 1899, from the Militia; became Lieutenant 10 July, 1900, and Captain 23 April, 1902. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, and was severely wounded after the Relief of Kimberley, having taken part in the famous ride of Sir John French; part of the time he served as A.D.C. to Sir John French. He was present during the operations in the Transvaal, May, 1901, to May, 1902; on the Zululand Frontier of Natal in Sept. and Oct. 1901, also in Cape Colony in May, 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 29 Aug. 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with two clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, Oct. 1902]: "Walter Long, Capt., 2nd Dragoons. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa." He was A.D.C. to Major-General General, 1st Cavalry Brigade, Aldershot, 1 April to 30 Sept. 1903, and 1 Oct. 1903, to 31 March. 1906; Adjutant, Scots Greys, 11 Oct. 1906, to 1909; A.D.C. to the Governor-General and Commander-in-Chief, Dominion of Canada, 6 Oct. 1911, to 5 Oct. 1913. He was for a time D.C. to Sir O'Moore Creagh, Commander-in-Chief in India; specially employed at the War Office 24 April to 31 May, 1912; Staff Captain, War Office, 1 June, 1912, to 25 Jan. 1915; D.A.A.G. 26 Jan. to 13 July, 1915 A.A.G. 14 July, 1915. He went to France in Aug. 1914, being then Captain in charge of a Squadron, and was shortly afterwards promoted Major (1 April, 1915), then Lieutenant-Colonel Commanding the 6th Battn. Wiltshire Regt. (from 14 Dec. 1915), and received the C.M.G. He was several times mentioned in Despatches, and promoted to Brigadier-General Commanding 56th Brigade, 19th Division, and made a Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel. He was killed in action when in the trenches at Hébuterne on 28 Jan. 1917.

His Majesty the King wrote: "The Queen and I are deeply grieved to hear that your son has been killed in action after such a distinguished career, and in the prime of youth. I regret that my Army has lost one of its promising young Generals."

H.R.H. the Duke of Connaught wrote: "In Toby the Army and the Scots Greys have lost a splendid officer, who has always set the finest example and whose name will long be remembered. His has been a glorious death, falling in action in command of his Brigade."

Field-Marshal Sir Douglas Haig wrote: "As the General under whom he was directly serving will have told you, his death deprives the Army of one of our best Brigadiers. As a soldier he was so practical, and thoroughly up to his work. I always felt he was sure to attain high rank, and, as a man, he was loved and admired by us all for his manly straightforward ways."

At a meeting held in furtherance of the War Loan in the City Town Hall, Mr. Walter Long was the chief speaker. "The Colonial Secretary, who had a very sympathetic reception, said it was no secret that an event. which had occurred this week in his domestic circle would in ordinary circumstances have led him to choose seclusion rather than appearance on a public platform; but he felt that it was his duty to come to the meeting in order to spread the lesson that they must all put their backs into the war in order to bring it to a triumphal conclusion. He had this further incentive that his wife and daughter-in-law desired him to come in order to say that their one thought was that the people of this country should not hesitate to do their duty. A still stronger incentive was the knowledge that there had come to him from the son whose loss he should deplore as long as he lived a message, silently given, that nothing should prevent him doing his duty. Until we at home realized the issue of this war, depended on ourselves and. on the sacrifices that we were prepared to make, we should not have the determination that was necessary to make our cause triumphant. It. was pitiful and almost incredible that at a time like the present men should have to be searched for and dug out in order to obtain their services. It was not because they were not patriotic or ready to serve, but because of the widespread prevalence of the idea that everything that was necessary was being done. Since he had been at the Colonial Office he had been very much struck by the liberality and spontaneity of the contributions from various parts of the Empire where money was none too plentiful. Recently separate contributions of £800, £200 and £20 had been received from three native treasury chests in Northern Nigeria, accompanied by expressions of fervent hope for our victory over Germany. With such examples before us, surely we, who had taken real liberty and real freedom into the countries over which we ruled, would give our last penny in order that these priceless assets might not only remain with us, but might be handed down unimpaired to those who came after. We were profiting by what our forefathers had done. Let us take care that our children should profit by what we were doing to-day. It was the duty of all to give to the Government every penny they could possibly spare, in order that our sailors and soldiers might have the reward they so much desired, namely, the winning of this war speedily. In talking matters over with a dear old friend, he had come to the conclusion that he might help those whom he was addressing to realize what duty really was if he referred to the example of the son whom he had lost. He was a very true Knight, sans peer et sans reproche; he lived his whole life for one thing, and one thing alone—duty—and he died as he had lived. The General Officer Commanding his son's division and written of him: And now he is gone to join that gallant band to which we have all contributed, and will contribute without fear. They are never far from us out here—the gallant dead—they watch our progress keenly and cheer us by their memory and example.' A fine thought for all of us to-day! That as the gallant, dead are not gone but are cheering on their comrades to victory, so must they be cheering us on here to still greater effort, not blaming us, not reproaching us, but telling us, in voices to which our ears cannot be deaf, that it is our bounden and sacred duty to do our utmost to help our country in her time of difficulty and trial." Lieut.-Colonel Long was Champion Light Weight Boxer, and twice won the Middle Weight, Boxing Championship of the British Army. He married, in 1910, the Hon. Sibell Johnstone, eldest daughter of Lord Derwent and Ethel (who died in 1901), eldest daughter of Capt. H. Strickland, late of the Life Guards, and there is one son.

Extract from Leeds Mercury - Friday 16 December 1910, page 8:

THE HOUSE OF LORDS.
WEDDING BELLS.

Miss Sibell Johnstone, eldest daughter of the Hon. Francis Johnstone and granddaughtcr Lord Derwent, is marry Captain Walter Long, of the Scots Greys, son of Mr. Walter Long, M.P., and Doreen Long, on December 17th. Our pictures are of the bride and bridegroom. (Val L’Estrange and Mayall and Co.)

LUCAS-TOOTH

Sir Archibald Leonard, Baronet

Old Etonian. Major, 2nd/1st "B" Battery, Honourable Artillery Company (Territorial Force) attached 126th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Died of influenza in hopistal in France 12th July 1918. Aged 34. 2nd Baronet. Son of Sir Robert Lucas Lucas-Tooth and Helen, Lady Lucas-Tooth; husband of Rosa Mary, Lady Lucas-Tooth, of 30, Princes Gardens, London. In the 1911 census he was aged 26, born Sydney, New South Wales, single, a Clerk Merchant. son of Robert Lucas and Helen Lucas-Tooth, resident 1, Queens Gate, Kensington, London & Middlesex. Buried in AUBIGNY COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Pas de Calais, France. Plot V. Row B. Grave 4.

Extract from The Tatler - Wednesday 24 July 1918, page 8:

LYNCH, D.S.O.

Colmer William Donald

Old Etonian. Lieutenant-Colonel, 9th Battalion, King's Own (Yorkshire Light Infantry). Killed in action 2nd July 1916. Aged 35. Baptism 5th July 1881 in Portsea, St Michael, Hampshire, son of William Wiltshire an Mary Florence Lynch. Son of Mrs. M. Florence Lynch, of "Pareora," Stoke, Guildford, and the late Maj. Gen. William Wiltshire Lynch. Awarded the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.). Buried in NORFOLK CEMETERY, BECORDEL-BECOURT, Somme, France. Plot I. Row B. Grave 87.

Extract from The Distinguished Service Order 1916-1923 published by Naval & Military Press

LYNCH, C.W.D. (D.S.O. L.G. 3.6.16), T/Lt.-Col., The King's Own (Yorks. L.I.). He was killed in action 2.7.1916.

Extracts from London Gazette, 3 June 1916.-

"War Office, 3 June 1916. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the undermentioned rewards for Distinguished Service in the field, dated 3 June 1916. Awarded the Distinguished Service Order."

LYNCH, COLMER WILLIAM DONALD, Capt. (Temporary Lieut.-Colonel), Reserve of Officers, Commanding Service Battn. Yorkshire Light Infantry.

LYON, C.B.

Herbert

Commodore - Admiral (Retired), Royal Navy. Died 15th March 1919. Aged 49. Companion of the Order of Bath (C.B.). 3rd Class Order of Merit (Spain); 2nd and 3rd Class Orders of the Nichau-Imtiaz (Turkey); Collar Order of Commander of the Order of Redeemer (Greece). Son of A. W. Lyon, J.P., of Abbotsclownholme, Rocester, Stafford; husband of Frances Violet Lyon (nee Inglis), of Stoke Cottage, Stoke, Devonport. Educated at Windlesham House, Brighton and the Rev. H. Burney's, Royal Academy, Gosport. Served in Charybdis in the Lingi and Lukut River Expeditions, Straits of Malacca and Perak; in Zulu War; as Captain of Retribution, at the blockade of Venezuela, and as Commodore at Hong Kong. Returned to active service afloat during the Great War 16 November 1914 as Captain, R.N.R., H.M. Yacht Safa el Bahr, on Patrol duty in the Mediterranean and later as Commodore, R.N.R., of Patrols at Malta, November 1918. His son, Lieut. Comdr. Herbert Inglis Nigel Lyon, R.N., also fell in the Great War. In the 1881 census he was a Lieutenant on the books of H.M.S. President while studying at Royal Naval College, Greenwich. In the 1891 census he was aged 34, a Lieutenant R.N., married to Frances V Lyon with one son, resident Penlee Villas, Molesworth Road, Devonport, Stoke Damerel, Devon.

Extract from England & Wales Government Probate Death Index 1919:

LYON Herbert of Stoke Cottage Devonport Plymouth died 1 March 1919 at Malta Probate London 5 July to Frances Violet Lyon widow. Effects £2272 4s. 8d.

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