Ministry of Defence
Ministry of Defence

Lest We Forget
British Legion
The Royal British Legion

EASTBOURNE, ASCHAM ST VINCENT WAR MEMORIAL

World War 1 - Roll of Honour with detailed information
Compiled and copyright © Janet Graves 2017

The The Ascham Memorial Arch, Carlyle Road, Meads, Eastbourne, Sussex, close to junction with Ascham Place, was built at the entrance of the former Ascham St. Vincent's Preparatory School, 1889 to 1939 and the Ascham College Preparatory School, 1946 to 1977. The grounds are now a housing estate, but the Arch was retained, and a fund has been set up to restore the plaques to their original condition. The memorial is a brick and stone arched gateway with the main inscription on the top of the arch. The names are inscribed on two plaques, one on each column on the inside of the memorial. A plaque on the road side of the memorial gives details of the memorials history. There are 51 names listed for World War 1 only.

Ascham St Vincents - WW1 Gate Rosalind Hodge (WMR-17004)

IN MEMORY
OF
FORTY-NINE
GALLANT MEN
WHO WERE AT SCHOOL HERE IN THEIR EARLY BOYHOOD
AND GAVE THEIR LIVES IN THE SERVICE OF THEIR COUNTRY
DURING THE GREAT WAR OF 1914 -1919.

At the going down of the sun and in the morning,
we will remember them

ASCHAM

MEMBERS OF THE OLD ASCHAMIAN SOCIETY
GRATEFULLY RECORD THAT ON THIS GROUND
THERE THRIVED FROM 1886
ST. VINCENT'S SCHOOL
AND FROM 1908 TO 1938
ASCHAM ST. VINCENT'S PREPARATORY SCHOOL AND FROM 1946 TO 1977
ASCHAM COLLEGE PREPARATORY SCHOOL.

"VIRTUTE ER VALORE"

THE ASCHAM ST. VINCENT'S WAR MEMORIAL ARCH
WAS RESTORED IN 2009
THANK TO THE INVOLVEMENT OF
DAVID STEVENS AND THE COUNCIL AND THE GENEROUS CONTRIBUTIONS OF
ENGLISH HERITAGE AND
THE WOLFSON FOUNDATION,
MANY FORMER PUPILS, STAFF AND FRIENS OF
ASCHAM SCHOOL, AND ALSO OF
RESIDENTS OF THE TOWN.

 

ALLFREY Frederick De Vere Bruce

Lieutenant, 9th (Queen’s Royal) Lancers. Born 21 September 1891, he was a regular Army Officer and in 1911 was a 2nd Lieutenant, stationed in Canterbury, Kent. The regiment’s participation in the final ‘lance on lance’ action of the First World War on 7 September 1914 at Moncel led to his death. The following newspaper extract states: ‘7th Sept 1914. Lt. Frederick de Vere Allfrey, 9th Lancers, only son of Frederick Vere Allfrey and grandson of Mrs Bruce of Arborfield Court, was killed aged 22. He was shot by a wounded German after he had dismounted to extract a lance from a wounded comrade’s leg’. Son of Frederick and Maud, of Ashridgewood, Wokingham, Berkshire. He is buried in the Fretoy Communal Cemetery, Seine-et-Marne, France. West corner of the Churchyard.

ANNESLEY Francis, 6th Earl Annesley

Sub-Lieutenant, Royal Naval Air Service. 25 February 1884 at Castlewellan, Kilmegan, County Down. He was educated at Ascham St. Vincent's Preparatory School, Eastbourne. Eton College, Windsor and Trinity College, Cambridge. He succeeded as Earl on 15 December 1908. Prior to joining 2 (Naval) Squadron, Royal Naval Air Service at Eastchurch, he distinguished himself serving with the R.N.A.S. Armoured Car ivision, with his armoured motorcar in helping to check the advance of the Germans on Brussels and in the defence of Antwerp. He was last seen alive on 6 November 1914 leaving Eastchurch, England in a Bristol T.B.8 biplane, serial 1220, flown by Flight Lieutenant C.F. Beevor, R.N.A.S., bound for France / Flanders. They were never seen again. His death was presumed on 2 December 1914 by Mr. Justice Astbury. Two German prisoners had been interrogated and it was established that the two aviators had been shot down when a German shell had hit the petrol tank of their aircraft and it had fallen in flames near Diksmuide. He was the son of Lt.-Col. Hugh Annesley, 5th Earl Annesley and Mabel Wilhelmina Frances Markham. Husband of Evelyn Hester Annesley. He is commemorated on the Chatham Naval Memorial, Medway, Kent, Plot: 8 and also on the Eton College Roll of Honour.

ANTROBUS Cecil Hugh

Captain, 6th Battalion, Oueen’s Own Cameron Highlanders. He was born on the 25th September, 1877 in Eaton Hall, Congleton, Cheshire. He was commissioned into the 3rd Battalion Cameron Highlanders in 1899, but he was seconded to the 1st Battalion with whom he served in the Second Boer War. He received the Queen’s Medal with five clasps for his service. After the Boer War, Antrobus worked for a time as a mining engineer in the copper mines of Salt Lake City, before re-joining the Cameron Highlanders at the outbreak of the Great War, as a Major attached to the 6th Battalion. He was killed in action, aged 38 years, on the 26th September, 1915 during the Battle of Loos. Son of the late John Coutts Antrobus and Mary Egidia Antrobus, of Eaton Hall, Congleton. His brother Charles Alexander Antrobus also fell. He is commemorated on the Loos Memorial, Loos-en-Gohelle Departement du Pas-de-Calais, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France, Panel 119 to 124. He is also commemorated in the Charterhouse School Memorial Chapel, Godalming, Surrey.

Extract from De Ruvigny's Roll Of Honour 1914-1918, volume 2, page 9:

ANTROBUS, CECIL HUGH, Capt., 6th Battn. The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders (T.F.), 6th s. of John Coutts Antrobus, of Eaton Hall, Congleton, J.P., and High Sheriff (1868), Hon. Lt.-Col. (ret.) of the Earl of Chester's Yeomanry Cavalry [nephew of Sir Edmund Antrobus, 2nd Bt.], and 2nd s. by his 3rd wife, Mary Egidia, yr. dau. of the late Lt.-Gen. the Hon. Sir James Lindsay, K.C.M.G. [2nd s. of James, 24th Earl of Crawford, etc.], and brother of Captain Charles Antrobus, killed in action at the Dardanelles, 25 April, 1915 (q.v.); b. Eaton Hall, Congleton, co. Chester, 25 Sept. 1877; educ. Charter-house; served in South African War 1900-1, as Capt. 3rd (Militia) Battn. Cameron Highlanders; took part in the operations in the Orange Free State, Feb. to May, 1900, including actions at Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria, and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 Nov. 1900, including actions at Wittebergen (1 to 29 July) and Ladybrand (2 to 5 Sept.); operations in the Transvaal, Jan. to April, 1901; in Orange River Colony, 30 Nov.1900, to Jan. 1901 (Queen's Medal with five clasps; Hon. Lieut. in the Army, 5 Dec. 1900). On the conclusion of the campaign he resigned his commission and went to Canada, and when the European War broke out, he enlisted in the 5th Royal Highlanders of Canada, and was given a commission as Capt. in the 6th Battn. of his old regiment, Oct. 1914; served with the Expeditionary Force in France from July, 1915, and was killed in action at Loos, Flanders, 25 Sept. following; unm.

BERRY Reginald Douglas
Lieutenant, 12th Battalion, York and Lancaster Regiment. Born 1 June 1894. Enlisted as Private in September, 1914 and commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in November of 1914. He was promoted to Lieutenant, May 1915. He served in Egypt from December 1915 and in France from March 1916. Mentioned in Despatches. His battalion had taken over trenches near a ruined windmill on the 9th May, 1917 and spent the next few days under bombardment and causalities began to mount. Lieutenant Berry was killed on the 12th May, 1917. Son of William Henry Berry, of 6, Cavendish Road, Brincliffe, Sheffield. Buried in the Albuera Cemetery, Bailleul-Sir-Berthoult, Departement du Pas-de-Calais, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France, South C. 6.
BUTLER Charles Kingstone
Captain & Adjutant, 10th Battalion, King's Own (Yorkshire Light Infantry). Killed in action 1 July 1916. No known grave. Commemorated on Thiepval Memorial, Somme, France. Pier and Face 11 C and 12 A.
CARDEN Derrick Alfred

Lieutenant Colonel, Seaforth Highlanders attached to 7th Battalion, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. Born on 27th March 1875, he was a professional soldier in the 2nd Battalion Seaforth Highlanders who was attached to, and in command of, the 1st /7th Battalion, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders in the same brigade (10th) of the 4th Division from March 1915. He died of wounds 'received in action near Ypres, on 25th May'. Son of Sir John Carden, 4th Baronet, of Templemore, Ireland, and of the late Lady Carden, of Westown, County Kildare. Aged 40 years. He is buried in Hazebrouck Communal Cemetery, Hazebrouck Communal Cemetery, Hazebrouck Departement du Nord, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France, II. B. 10.

CASE Joseph A
Lieutenant, 5th Battalion, attached 1st Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Died of wounds on the 15th November 1918. Son of the late James and Maria Josephine Case, of Ufton, Reading. Buried in the Saint Sever Cemetery Extension, Rouen, Departement de la Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France. S. V. K. 10.
CUNLIFFE Robert Ellis

Second Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, Princess Charlotte of Wales's (Royal Berkshire Regiment). Born in 17th October, 1893, at 22 London Street, Calcutta, India. He was shown on the 1901 census as living at 14-16 Loscelles Terrace, Eastbourne, in the care of Florence Mellish, whose occupation was listed as "carer of Indian children". About 1911 he went to work for Parr’s Bank, the London Cavendish Square branch. At the outbreak of the First World War Cunliffe volunteered for the army, leaving his job at the bank and in October, 1914, he left for France with Queen's Westminsters, having previously joined the regiment as a volunteer. In March of 1915 he was gazetted as Second Lieutenant on the Special List. Cunliffe was killed in action aged 21 years on the 9th May 1915, in what was to become known as the Battle of Aubers Ridge. Son of Agnes Cunliffe, of "Corylus", Radlett, Hertfordshire, and the late Alfred Edward Cunliffe. His body was never found, and he is commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial to the Missing, Ploegsteert, Arrondissement de Mouscron, Hainaut, Belgium, Panel 7 and 8. He is remembered on the ‘RBS Remembers 1914-1918’ website, the All Saints School, Bloxham, Great War website and commemorated on a memorial in the Parish Church of All Souls, Eastbourne.

DARBY Maurice Alfred Alexander

Lieutenant, 1st Battalion, Grenadier Guards. Born on the 6th May, 1894 in Chelsea, Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, Greater London. He was Mentioned in Despatches. He was killed in action, aged 20 years at Neuve Chappelle, on the 11th March 1915. Son of Alfred E. W. and Frederica L. J. Darby, of Adcote, Little Ness, Shrewsbury. Nephew of George Arthur of Adcote Hall. He is buried in the Parish Church of St Martin’s Churchyard, Little Ness, Shropshire. South-West of Church. The inscription on his gravestone reads “In proud and loving memory of Maurice Darby, whose body having lain for four days on the battlefield of Neuve Chapelle was, after a long night search in front of the enemy lines, recovered and brought home by his uncle George Arthur to be laid to rest at this spot”. He is also commemorated on the Coalbrookdale War Memorial and the Little Ness War Memorial, both Shropshire. The Eton College War Memorial, Bournemouth St Clements and the Shrewsbury Mill Mead School Old Boys War Memorial.

DAVIS George Edward

Lieutenant, Royal Engineers. Died Between 11th October, 1915 and 13th October, 1915. Commemorated on the Loos Memorial, Loos-en-Gohelle, Departement du Pas-de-Calais, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France, Panel 4 and 5.

DAVIS Wilfred Jervis

Lieutenant, 7th Battalion, Northumberland Fusiliers. Wilfred Jervis Davis was born in Epsom, Surrey in 1891, the son of the late Dr Robert Davis and his wife Ellen, of Frinningham Lodge, Maidstone Kent; late of Darrickwood, Orpington, Kent. He had two brothers, Robert and Guy and three sisters Phyllis, Gwen and Ruth. All three brothers served in the army whilst the three girls were nurses. In 1911 Wilfred was living at Preston and was a medical student. He joined the Northumberland Fusiliers and served in France and Flanders as a lieutenant. He was acting Captain when he was killed on 30th June, 1916 in Belgium. Less than 2 years later, his brother Guy, also a Lieutenant in The Northumberland Fusiliers was killed in action in France. Wilfred is buried in the La Laiterie Military Cemetery, Ypres (Ieper), Arrondissement Ieper, West Flanders (West-Vlaanderen), Belgium, VI. A. He is commemorated on the Orpington, Kent War Memorial.

DILBEROGLUE Richard Nicholas

Lieutenant, 1st Company, 1st Battalion, Coldstream Guards. Born in Cairo on the 20th November, 1895. Educated at Ascham St. Vincent’s Preparatory School, Eastbourne, Eton College, Windsor, Christ Church, Oxford and finally in the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst. Gazetted Second Lieutenant on the 20th February, 1915 and promoted First Lieutenant on the 1st January, 1916. Served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from the 1st May, 1915. Fought at Festubert, Ypres, the Somme and was killed in action at Ginchy on the 15th September 1916. He died when a shell exploded at his feet. Son of Plato and Julia Dilberoglue, of The Lodge, 19, Southfields Road, Eastbourne. Buried in the Guards' Cemetery, Lesboeufs, Departement de la Somme Picardie, France, Special Memorial 32. Also commemorated on the Eton College Roll of Honour, the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst Chapel and on the Eastbourne War Memorial (Town Hall).

DILBEROGLUE Augustus

Lieutenant, 3rd (King's Own) Hussars. Born 13th January, 1894 in Cairo, Egypt. Educated at Ascham St. Vincent’s Preparatory School, Eastbourne, Summerfield School, Oxford, Eton College, Windsor, and Christ Church, Oxford where he was in his first year when war broke out. He obtained a commission in the Special Reserve Battalion of the Worcestershire Regiment on the 15th August, 1914. He was subsequently offered, and accepted a vacancy at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst. He passed out of Sandhurst in July, 1915 and was gazetted Second Lieutenant to the 3rd (King's Own) Hussars. He served with his regiment at Shornecliffe. Ireland and the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders. He was killed in action aged 24 years near Domart, (south east of Amiens) on the 1st April 1918. Son of Plato and Julia Dilberoglue, of The Lodge, 19, Southfields Road, Eastbourne. He is buried in the Hourges Orchard Cemetery, Domart-sur-la-Luce, Domart-sur-la-Luce, Departement de la Somme, Picardie, France, against south-east wall. Also commemorated on the Eton College Roll of Honour, the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst Chapel and on the Eastbourne War Memorial (Town Hall).

EMANUEL Oliver

Lieutenant, 1st Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire Regiment). Born on June 29, 1897 and named as Otto Emanuel to German Jewish parents, his father Max Emanuel, was a china and glass manufacturer and importer in London from about 1886 -1914. He attended Ascham St. Vincent's Preparatory School, Eastbourne and then Eastbourne College, and finished his education in Lausanne. He changed his name to Oliver by deed poll in May, 1914. He was a member of the Cadet Corps at the College and became a Second Lieutenant in the London Regiment (Royal Fusiliers a territorial regiment) in 1913. He was serving near Southampton at the outbreak of war and was promoted to Lieutenant shortly afterwards. In the meantime, he received a cadetship at Sandhurst, resigning his commission to attend the Royal Military College, and he was gazetted Second Lieutenant to the 1st Battalion, the Duke of Edinburgh’s (Wiltshire Regiment) on March 17th, 1915 as a Gentleman Cadet from the Royal Military College. He was killed in action at Hooge, Germany on the 25th September, 1915. He was posthumously appointed Lieutenant. Son of Max and Alivina Emanuel, brother of Manfred Emanuel, 28, Belsize Park, N.W. Commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Ypres (Ieper), Arrondissement Ieper, West Flanders (West-Vlaanderen), Belgium, Panel 53. He is also commemorated on the East Ham Cemetery Roll of Honour (United Synagogue).

Note: The family placed an obituary notice in the Times every year from 1916 to 1952.

FEATHERSTONHAUGH Harry
School photograph
Captain, 8th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Born 6th June, 1879 in London. He was educated at Ascham St. Vincent’s Preparatory School, Eastbourne and Eastbourne College where he was a member of Wargrave House, 1897-98, and played for the football XI. Choosing a military career, he was gazetted Second Lieutenant in the 3rd Battalion, the Dorsetshire Regiment in October 1898. In 1900 he was transferred to the Bedfordshire Regiment and he served with them in South Africa during the Boer War, for which he was awarded the King’s South African Medal with two Clasps. In May, 1903, as a Lieutenant, he resigned his commission. Before the war he lived at 78, Warrior Square, St Leonards-on-Sea, East Sussex. He was killed in action of the 8th July, 1916 and at that time he was a temporary Captain. In his will he left £167 17s and 11d. to Georgina Featherstonhaugh. He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, Thiepval Departement de la Somme, Picardie, France, Pier and Face 8 C 9 A and 16 A.
FINNIMORE David Keith

Lieutenant, No 2 Pontoon Park Home Command, Royal Engineers. Born on the 6 Aug 1895 in Vacoas, Plaines Wilhems, Mauritius. In 1901, Keith and his family were living at 17, Albany Road, Bexhill on Sea. He was educated at Ascham St Vincent’s Preparatory School, Eastbourne, Eastbourne College, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire and the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich. He received his commission in the Royal Engineers in 1914, and was promoted Lieutenant in August 1915. He went to the Front with the Second Pontoon Park in 1915, and was mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig’s dispatch of 1 January, 1916. He died of pneumonia, contracted while on active service and died in the Aldershot Military Hospital on the 10th May 1917. Son of the Rev. Arthur Kington Finnimore (Hon. C. F.), and Mary Elizabeth Finnimore, of "Limehurst," Painswick Road, Cheltenham. He is buried in the Aldershot Military Cemetery, Aldershot, Rushmoor Borough, Hampshire. AG. 364.

FITZROY Edward Henry

Lieutenant, H.M.S. Simoom, Royal Navy. Born July 13, 1892 at Euston Hall, Brecks, East Anglia. Edward joined the Royal Navy on 1906, and was at various training establishments until as a midshipman he joined HMS Vanguard, and was with her until January 1914, being promoted to Acting Sub-Lieutenant on 15th September 1913. There is then a gap in records until he joined HMS Centurion on 6th May 1914, promoted to Sub Lieutenant on 15th June 1914 and posted to Phaeton (depot ship for TB-8) from 29th July 1914 to 10th February 1915. On 10th February 1915 he joined HMS "Dido", the depot ship for HMS "Mentor". Promoted to Acting Lieutenant on 15th May 1916, he was then posted to HMS "Simoom" and promoted Lieutenant on 15th June 1916. His records show his senior officers considered him hard working but plodding at first, going on to be slow but reliable. Still slow he was then considered to be good with the men. Eventually he was deemed to be a promising officer with considerable force of character. He was killed in action on the 23rd January 1917. HMS Simoom was sunk in an engagement between British and German destroyers in the Flanders Bight on the night of January 22nd, 1917. The ship belonged to the Harwich Force under Commander R. Y. Tyrwhitt which had put to sea on the 22nd to intercept a German flotilla, under command of Commander Max Schultz. The rival forces made contact between the North Hinder Light and the Maas at 2.45 a.m. on the 23rd. In the fight which ensued the S 50, which had lost touch at about 4 a.m. ran into a line of four British destroyers of which the Simoom was the leading ship. There was a sharp exchange of salvoes and the S 50 discharged a torpedo which struck the Simoom and exploded her magazine, causing heavy casualties. The S 50 then escaped in the darkness. The destroyer Morris took off all the Simoom´s survivors and she was then torpedoed and sunk by the Nimrod on Commander Tyrwhitt´s orders. The Simoom carried a complement of 90. Son of Reverend Lord Charles Edward FitzRoy and Ismay Mary Helen Augusta FitzRoy. Brother of Victoria Alexandrina Mabel Seymour; Violet Freddie Wilson; Charles Alfred Euston FitzRoy, 10th Duke of Grafton; Lady Anna Ismay Ethel Byron and Lord John Percy Samuel FitzRoy. He is commemorated on the Chatham Naval Memorial, Chatham, Medway, Kent. Panel 20.

FITZROY William Henry Alfred

17 (Training) Squadron, Royal Air Force, formerly Lieutenant, 5th Battalion, Coldstream Guards, formerly The Buffs (Royal East Kent Regiment). Born in London on 24th July 1884, baptised at the Parish Church of All Saints, Ennismore Gardens, Knightsbridge on the 4th November 1884. Educated at Ascham St. Vincent’s Preparatory School, Eastbourne and Harrow, London. He married Auriol Margaretta Brougam in 1913 and had three children, John Charles William Fitzroy (later 9th Duke of Grafton); Lady Margaret Jane and Lady Mary Rose. He first enlisted in The Buffs, The Royal East Kent Regiment. He was then commissioned into the Coldstream Guards, and he was in France/Flanders by the 11th November 1914 (no clasp claimed for the 1914 Star). He was wounded and eventually repatriated suffering from shell shock. Then, although over age for flying, he joined the Royal Flying Corps. Late in 1917 he had flown DH6 and RE8 on a course at Winchester. 22nd November 1917 he passed-as an Observer. On 1st February 1918 he was recorded as fit to be an Artillery Pilot. The Royal Air Force was formed on 1st April 1918 and on 20th April he was in 17 Training Squadron at RAF Yatesbury, near Calne, in Wiltshire. He was killed on the 23rd April, 1918 in a plane crash aged 33 years. Son of Alfred Henry Maitland Fitzroy, 8th Duke of Grafton and Lady Margaret Rose Fitzroy née Smith. Husband of Viscountess Ipswich, Potterspury House, Stoney Stratford, Buckinghamshire. He is buried in the Parish Church St. Genevieve Churchyard, Euston, St. Edmundsbury, Suffolk.

Note: His cousin, Edward Henry Fitzroy, had been killed in 1917 on HMS "Simoom".

FRANKS, MC John Fergusson
Captain and Adjutant, 3rd Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Born on the 12th November, 1888 in India. He had joined the KRRC in May, 1907 and served with his Regiment in India. The Regiment returned to England November, 1914. He left England for France on 21 Dec 1914. He was then attached to the HQ staff. He was “mentioned in despatches in June 1915 under the heading "Recommended for distinguished and gallant service in the field and was decorated by the King with the Military Cross on July 12th, 1915.” The Military Cross (M.C.) was awarded for an act or acts of exemplary gallantry during active operations against the enemy. “Franks then led some men out of the trench, and proceeded almost single handed with the help of Rifleman Shee of ‘A’ Company, in capturing trenches 19A and 19, in which he took 20 prisoners of the 23rd Bavarian Regiment. It was now daylight, but Franks had the prisoners marched back to St. Eloi village. On the way, 4 of them were killed by fire of their own Regiment from the German trenches. Captain Franks was not hit." Franks was awarded a Military Cross for this action and Rifleman Shee the Distinguished Conduct Medal. He died of wounds on the 22nd September, 1915 Son of the late Captain Robert Norman Franks and of Frances M. Franks, of 16, Chelsea Court, Chelsea Embankment, London. He is buried in the Fouquescourt British Cemetery, Fouquescourt Departement de la Somme, Picardie, France, III. K. 2.
GOSSET William Beresford
Second Lieutenant, 115th Battery, Royal Field Artillery. Born in 1894 in Jamaica. He joined the Regiment in 1912. Mentioned in Despatches. Killed in action, aged 20 years on the 1st November, 1914. Son of the Hon. Beresford Smyly Gosset and Mary Jean Gosset, of Halberstadt, Bull Bay, Jamaica. Buried in the Ypres Town Cemetery, Ieper Stedelijke Begraafplaats, Ypres (Ieper), Arrondissement Ieper, West Flanders (West-Vlaanderen), Belgium, E2. 12.
HANBURY-TRACY The Hon Felix Charles Hubert
Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, Scots Guards.19 December 1914 Born 27 Jul 1882 in Buckingham Gate, Middlesex. Educated at Ascham St. Vincent’s Preparatory School, Eastbourne, Harrow, London Gazetted Second Lieutenant, Scots Guards, 8th May, 1901, and promoted Lieutenant, 16th November, 1907. Retired in 1907. He joined the Reserve of Officers. Gazetted to the 3rd Battalion of his Regiment at the outbreak of war. Left for France on the 7th November and died of wounds received in an attack on the German trenches near Fromelles on the night of 18th-19th December, 1914. He was slightly wounded at the start of the attack, but he continued to lead his men. When he was again wounded, this time fatally, his men attempted to carry him to safety, but he told them to leave him and to go on, not wishing them to risk their own lives in saving him. Shortly afterwards the Germans retook the trenches and he died in their hands a few hours later, and was buried by them. Son of 4th Baron Sudeley; husband of the Hon. Madelaine Hanbury-Tracy, of 46, Montague Square, London. His brother the Hon. Algernon Henry C. Hanbury-Tracy also fell. His son Michael David Charles Hanbury-Tracy fell in the 1939-1945 war. Commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial, Ploegsteert, Arrondissement de Mouscron, Hainaut, Belgium, Panel 1. He is also commemorated in the Parish Church of St Stephen Gloucester Road, London SW7.
HARINGTON, DSO William Guy

Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Major, Acting Lieutenant Colonel, 5th Gurkha Rifles (Frontier Force), Indian Division. Born on the 5th May, 1885 in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire. He was educated at Ascham St. Vincent’s Preparatory School, Eastbourne, and Cheltenham, Gloucestershire. He enlisted in the Regular Army in 1906. Resident at 75 Enys Road, Eastbourne. He was killed in action, aged 32 years on the 28th September, 1917 in Mesopotamia (Iraq). Son of Hastings Norman Victor and the late Anna Mary Harington, of Edgewood, Arrow Lakes, British Columbia, Canada. Buried in the Baghdad War Cemetery (North Gate), Baghdad, Iraq, II. E. 5.

Note: Whilst the current climate of political instability persists it is extremely challenging for the Commission to manage or maintain its cemeteries and memorials located within Iraq. Alternative arrangements for commemoration have therefore been implemented and a two volume Roll of Honour listing all casualties buried and commemorated in Iraq has been produced. These volumes are on display at the Commission's Head Office in Maidenhead and are available for the public to view.

HAWLEY Edward
Private 184236, 10th Battalion, Alberta Regiment, Canadian Infantry. Born in Darlington, Durham on the 1st February, 1893. Previously a farmer. He enlisted at Red Deer, Alberta on 29th March, 1916. He was killed in action, aged 24 years on the 9th April, 1917 at Vimy Ridge. Pas de Calais, France. Son of Melina Hawley, Pitcox, Alberta, Canada. A well-attended memorial service for Edward Hawley was held at the St. Luke's Church, Red Deer on the 25th July, 1917. He is commemorated on the Vimy Memorial, Vimy, Departement du Pas-de-Calais, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France. Final resting place unknown.
HENDERSON Noel Charles
Second Lieutenant, D Company, 2nd Battalion, Black Watch (Royal Highlanders). Born 1895 he was killed in action on either the 25th September, 1915 or 9th October 1915 (Some records state 25th September (Soldiers that Died), and some state 9th October (C.W.G.C.) all other details are the same. Son of George and Mary Allison Henderson, of 4/35, Campden House Court, Kensington, London. Buried in the Rue-David Military Cemetery, Fleurbaix, Fleurbaix, Departement du Pas-de-Calais, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France, III. B. 3.
HENRIQUES Philip Brydges Gutterez
Second Lieutenant, 8th Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps Born on the 10th November, 1894, at 33, Grosvenor Place, London, S.W. Educated at Ascham St. Vincent’s Preparatory School, Eastbourne, Eton College, Windsor and New College, Oxford. He was a member of the O.T.C. (Officer Training Corps) at both Eton and Oxford. He returned from his holiday in France at the outbreak of war and he applied for a commission, subsequently being gazetted as a 2nd Lieutenant in the K.R.R.C. on the 26th August, 1914. He left for France in May, 1915 and died of wounds, (a bullet to the head) received earlier in the day of the 24th July 1915. He was 20 years of age. Only son of Sir Philip and Lady Beatrice Henriques of 33, Grosvenor Place, London, S.W. and of Normandy Park, Guildford, Surrey. He is buried in the Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Poperinge, Arrondissement Ieper, West Flanders (West-Vlaanderen), Belgium, I. A. 1. Also commemorated on the Eton College Roll of Honour.
HUMPHREYS Richard Grain
Second Lieutenant, 13th Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Born 1897 he was educated at Ascham St Vincent’s Preparatory School, Eastbourne (1911). Gazetted to 2nd Lieutenant on the 5th November, 1915. He was killed in action, aged 20 years on the second day of the Battle of Polygon Wood on the 28th September 1917. Son of Sir Travers and Lady Humphreys, of 47, Castlebar Road, Ealing, Middlesex. Commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Zonnebeke, Arrondissement Ieper, West Flanders (West-Vlaanderen), Belgium, Panel 115 to 119 and 162A. Also commemorated on the Ealing War Memorial and the Parish Church of St Peter, Ealing, Middlesex War Memorial.
INNES-CROSS Sydney Maxwell
Second Lieutenant, 1st Battalion, Royal Irish Rifles. Born on 29th April 1894 in Newry, Ireland. He was educated at Ascham St. Vincent’s Preparatory School, Eastbourne, Eton College, Windsor, and Royal Military College, Sandhurst. He was killed in action, aged 20 years on the 27th October 1914, at Neuve Chapelle, France. Son of the late Arthur Charles Innes-Cross (1902) and the late Sarah Jane Beauchamp Cross (1911). Brother of Arthur Charles. Wolseley Innes, (he won the M.C. in 1916). of Airlour, Whanphill, Wigtownshire, South-west Scotland, and Marion Dorothea Innes-Cross. He was buried in the Rue-Petillon Military Cemetery, Fleurbaix, Departement du Pas-de-Calais, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France, II. E. 46. Also commemorated on the Eton College Roll of Honour.
LANGRISHE Hercules Ralph
Lieutenant, The Royal Flying Corps and Montgomeryshire Yeomanry. Born 1st February, 1888 at St. George Hanover Square, London. Educated at Ascham St. Vincent’s Preparatory School, Eastbourne (1898 to 1900), Eton College, Windsor and Charterhouse School, Godalming (1903–1904). He was commissioned on the 29 August 1914 into the Montgomeryshire Yeomanry. He was a cavalry officer, and he served in East Anglia until he embarked for Egypt in March 1916. Promoted to Lieutenant on the 8th June, 1916. Attached to the RFC during August 1916. He was accidentally killed, aged 29 years, while flying on the 16th February 1917 when his Avro 504 A1995, which was a 13 Reserve Squadron aircraft. He got himself into a stall and then a nose dive from only 100 feet and crashed. His aircraft then burst into flames. He was the son of Sir Hercules Langrishe, 5th Baronet, and Helen Amelrosa Hume Langrishe of Knocktopher Abbey. Hercules was buried in the Knocktopher (St. David) Church of Ireland Churchyard, County Kilkenny. The inscription on his gravestone reads ‘In proud and loving memory of Hercules Ralph Langrishe 2nd Lieutenant Montgomeryshire Yeomanry attached Royal Flying Corps, eldest son of Sir Hercules 5th Baronet, killed whilst flying on duty 16th February 1917 in the third year of the Great War aged 29’. He is commemorated on the Grangegorman Memorial, Cabra, County Dublin, Ireland, Cenotaph, Panel 3 (Screen Wall). He is also commemorated on the Charterhouse School Roll of Honour and on the Eton College Roll of Honour.
LASENBY Scarlin

Second Lieutenant, 3rd and 12th Battalion, East Surrey Regiment, attached 127th Brigade H/Q. Born in December 1896 in Thames Ditton, Surrey. Educated at Ascham St. Vincent’s Preparatory School, Eastbourne and Charterhouse School, Godalming. He was killed in action on the 20th December, 1917 aged 22220 years, at the third Battle of Ypres, the Battle of the Menin Road Ridge. Son of Alwyn Ernest and Constance Ethel Lasenby, of the Old House, Esher, Surrey. He is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Zonnebeke, Arrondissement Ieper, West Flanders (West-Vlaanderen), Belgium, Addenda Panel. He is also commemorated on the Charterhouse School Roll of Honour.

LAWTON Edward Gerald
Captain, 2nd Battalion, East Surrey Regiment. He was born on the 28 May 1889 in Bedminster. Resident of 7, Holmesdale Road, Kew, Richmond upon Thames. He died of wounds on the 12th April, 1918. Son of J H Lawton. Killed at Gnopp. Buried in the Khartoum War Cemetery, Khartoum, Al Khartoum, Sudan, 10. C. 1.
LEVITA Francis Ellison
Lieutenant, 4th (Queens Own) Hussars, Household Cavalry and Cavalry of The Line (Incl. Yeomanry and Imperial Camel Corps). Born on the 29th November, 1889 at Lincoln, Lincolnshire. Educated at Ascham St. Vincent’s Preparatory School, Eastbourne, Eton College, Windsor, and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst. He joined the Hussars in 1910. In March of 1911 he was promoted to Lieutenant and in the 1911 census he was stationed at the Royal Artillery Barracks and The Cavalry Barracks, Butt Road, Colchester, Essex. He was a skilled polo player and often represented his regiment. He was killed in action at or near Mont des Cats, France, on the 12th October, 1914. He was attempting to rescue Captain Kirwan Gatacre of the 11th Bengal Lancers (attached to the 4th Hussars). The scene of their deaths, a monastery occupied by the Germans was captured later that day, and the bodies of both men were found still lying where they had fallen. They were buried in the monastery grounds. Only child of Col. Harry P. Levita and Constance M. Levita. He is buried in the Meteren Military Cemetery, Meteren Departement du Nord, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France, II. N. 348. Also commemorated on the Eton College Roll of Honour.
LYTE Owen Neville
Lieutenant, 6th Div. Mechanical Transport Company, Army Service Corps. Born in Sparsholt, Winchester. He was educated at Ascham St. Vincent’s Preparatory School, Eastbourne, and Eastbourne College. He was at the College as a Home Boarder, 1899-1903, and played in the cricket XI. He was a bank clerk before he enlisted on the 14th January, 1916 at Eastbourne. Although frequently rejected and eventually given a certificate as being medically unfit, owing to an accident when a child, he succeeded in enlisting in the Army Service Corps in January 1916, and obtained his commission in the same year in the Horse Transport. He died of pneumonia at No 20 Casualty Clearing Station, near Cambrai, aged 33 years on the 31st October 1918. Son of Alfred Owen Lyte and Clara Lyte, of 23 Lewes Road., Eastbourne. He is buried at Premont British Cemetery, Premont, Departement de l'Aisne, Picardie, France, I. E. 10. He is also commemorated on the Eastbourne War Memorial (Town Hall).
MACFARLANE Robert Craig
Midshipman, H.M.S. Hawke, Royal Navy. Born on the 5th July, 1897 in Glendenning, Graaff Reinet, South Africa. Educated at Ascham St. Vincent’s Preparatory School, Eastbourne and the Osborne and Dartmouth Royal Naval Colleges He enlisted in June, 1914. He died, age 17 years, on the 15th October 1914, when his ship, H.M.S. Hawke, was torpedoed by a German submarine. ‘In October 1914, the 10th Cruiser Squadron was deployed in the North Sea as part of efforts to stop German warships from attacking a troop convoy from Canada. On 15 October, the squadron was on patrol off Aberdeen, deployed in line abreast at intervals of about 10 miles. Hawke stopped at 9:30 am to pick up mail from sister ship Endymion. After recovering her boat with the mail, Hawke proceeded at 13 knots (24 km/h; 15 mph) without zig-zagging to regain her station, and was out of sight of the rest of the Squadron when at 10:30 a single torpedo from the German submarine U-9 (which had sunk three British cruisers on 22 September), struck Hawke, which quickly capsized. The remainder of the squadron only realised anything was amiss, when, after a further, unsuccessful attack on Theseus, the squadron was ordered to retreat at high speed to the northwest, and no response to the order was received from Hawke. The destroyer Swift was dispatched from Scapa Flow to search for Hawke and found a raft carrying one officer and twenty-one men, while a boat with a further forty-nine survivors was rescued by a Norwegian steamer. 524 officers and men died’. Son of Robert Craig and Jessie Wardlaw Macfarlane. He is commemorated on the Chatham Naval Memorial, Chatham, Medway, Kent. He is also commemorated on his Grandmother’s gravestone, Marion Clarke Macfarlane.
MACLARAN Frank Nairne

Captain, 1st Battalion, 9th Gurkha Rifles. Born on the 4th March, 1883, in India. He was at Marlborough College from January 1897 until April, 1900. In his last year he was in the School Hockey X1. He then continued his education at Royal Military College, Sandhurst. The London Gazette for the 17th January, 1902 lists his commission to the Unattached List. Then on 21 July, 1903 he is listed again as a Second Lieutenant. On 23 Sept 1904 his promotion to Lieutenant was gazetted and he is listed as '16th Rajputs (the Lucknow Regiment)'. He joined the 9th Gurkha Rifles later that year. The regiment moved to Dehra Dun, in the Doon Valley in the foothills of the Himalayas, in early 1905. During 1907-1908 he was involved with Famine Relief work in Bengal. He was promoted to Captain in 1911. From 1912 to 1914 he was Station Staff Officer, Bareilly (possibly an appointment outside his regiment). He married his wife, Grace Edith Savage in Bombay in July 1913. His only child, a son, was born in Ireland in September 1915. The ship carrying the battalion from France 'arrived at Basra on the morning of 4th January, 1916, exactly a month after they had embarked at Marseilles. Here Captain F.N Maclaran, with a draft from the Depot, joined the Battalion.' He was killed in action attacking the Turkish trenches at Beit Aiessa, on the 15th April 1916. Son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Francis Blayney Maclaran; husband of Grace Edith Maclaran, (nee Savage) now Mrs. E. R. Casement, of Rarkmoyle, Cushendall, County Antrim. He is commemorated on the Basra Memorial, AL Basrah, Basra, Iraq, Panel 51. He is also commemorated on the Marlborough College’s Roll of Honour.

Note: Whilst the current climate of political instability persists it is extremely challenging for the Commission to manage or maintain its cemeteries and memorials located within Iraq. Alternative arrangements for commemoration have therefore been implemented and a two volume Roll of Honour listing all casualties buried and commemorated in Iraq has been produced. These volumes are on display at the Commission's Head Office in Maidenhead and are available for the public to view.

MALET Hugh Arthur Grenville
Lieutenant, ‘A’ Company, 2nd Battalion,. Born on the 22nd September, 1892 at Duggirala, Kistua, India. He was educated at Ascham St. Vincent’s Preparatory School, Eastbourne, Harrow School, London and Caius College, Cambridge. He was in the Officer Training Corps at both School and College and upon entering the Inner Temple in 1913, joined the Inns of Court Squadron. He volunteered for active service on the day that war was declared he obtained a Special Reserve Commission for the 3rd Battalion, King's Own Scottish Borderers in August 1914. He was given a Commission as an University Candidate in the Connaught Rangers on 26th September, 1914 but at the special request of the Colonel of the 3rd King's Own Scottish Borderers, was transferred to them. He was promoted to Lieutenant on the 15th November, and joined the 2nd Battalion on the 26th November, 1914. He was killed in action, aged 23 years on the 18th April 1915 at Hill 60 during the second Battle of Ypres. He was buried at Hill 60. Eldest son of Allan Arthur Grenville and Elizabeth Anne Malet, of The Butts, Harrow-on-the-Hill. He is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Ypres (Ieper), Arrondissement Ieper, West Flanders (West-Vlaanderen), Belgium, Panel 22.
MAULE Edward Barry

Lieutenant, Royal Flying Corps and 18th Battalion, Highland Light Infantry. Born in 1893. Educated at Ascham St. Vncent’s Preparatory School, Eastbourne, and at Uppingham School, Rutland. In 1911, he was living in Huntingdon and he was a Solicitor Articled Clerk. He was killed, aged 24 years, on the 6th February 1917 while serving as an observer with 20 Squadron, flying with pilot, 2nd Lieutenant M. E. Woods (wounded and a P.O.W.). They were shot down by an enemy fighter south-east of Gheluvelt, while on a photographic reconnaissance. Younger son of John Percy Maule, Clerk of the Peace, Huntingdon County Council and of Mrs. Percy Maule, The Views, Huntingdon. He is buried in the Hooge Crater Cemetery, Ypres (Ieper), Arrondissement Ieper, West Flanders (West-Vlaanderen), Belgium, XV. L. 13. He is also commemorated on the Huntingdon Town Hall War Memorial and the Parish Church of All Saints War Memorial, Huntingdon, and Huntingdon St Marys.

Extract from England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1966:

MAULE Edward Barry of Huntingdon and Ripon died 6 February 1917 at Gweluvelt France Administration (with Will) London 21 November (1917) to John Percy Maule solicitor.
Effects £184 6s. 9d.

MILTON John Munro
Second Lieutenant, 13th Battalion, Northumberland Fusiliers. Born in 1893 in Cairo, Egypt. In 1911 he was a student at Wellington College Berkshire. Gazetted temporary Second Lieutenant on the 3rd December, 1914. Killed in action, aged 22 years, on the 25th September, 1915 at the Battle of Loos. Son of the late Dr. Herbert Milton and Charlotte Jeanette Milton, of Cairo, Egypt. He is commemorated on the Loos Memorial, Loos-en-Gohelle, Departement du Pas-de-Calais, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France, Panel 20 to 22.
MOLINEUX George King
Captain, 2nd Battalion, Northumberland Fusiliers. He was born on the 15th April, 1887 in Isfield, Sussex. He was educated at Ascham St. Vincent’s Preparatory School, Eastbourne, Winchester College and Magdalen College, Oxford. At Winchester College in 1906 and was also Captain of Commoner Football. He gained his Harlequin colours at Oxford and played in several matches for the University and also Gentlemen of England against the University and for the M.C.C. He was a first-class cricketer, shot, horseman, fisherman, and a good naturalist. He served two years with the 3rd Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment and in December, 1909 he was gazetted Second Lieutenant from the Special Reserve List to the Northumberland Fusiliers and he served in England until in September, 1913 he accompanied his Battalion to India. On 1st November of that year he was promoted to Lieutenant. On 15th January, 1915 he was promoted to Captain. He was appointed Aide-de-Camp to Lord Hastings of Penshurst, then Viceroy of India in August of 1914. He resigned this position in November, 1914 so that he could accompany his Regiment to France on active service, and they landed in France in January, 1915. He was engaged in transport duties for a while before going to the trenches in the Ypres district. On the 5th May, 1915, Captain Molineux was last seen wounded and unconscious in his trench by the survivors of an exceptionally severe bombardment by the Germans. Eldest son of Major Harold Parminter Molineux and Rose Eugenie K. Molineux (nee King), of Isfield Place, Sussex. Commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Ypres (Ieper) Arrondissement Ieper,West Flanders (West-Vlaanderen), Belgium, Panel 8 and 12.
MORRISON Gerrard Humphrey
Captain, 5th Battalion, London Rifle Brigade. Born on the 16th March, 1889 in London. He was educated at Ascham St. Vincent’s Preparatory School, Eastbourne, Harrow School, London and Magdalen College, Oxford. While at Harrow he was head of his house, and in the football Xl. At Oxford he took his degree in law, with honours, and he was made president of the I.C.R. He was in the Officer Training Corps at Oxford. He received his commission on leaving Oxford and on the 18th September, 1913 he was promoted to Lieutenant. He volunteered for foreign service at the outbreak of war and went to France in the October of 1914. He was promoted to Captain on the 25th February, 1915, and killed in action, aged 26 years, near Armentieres on the 31st March, 1915. Son of Muriel A. Morrison, of 86, Knightsbridge, London, and the late John Hebb Morrison. Buried in the Rifle House Cemetery,Comines-Warneton, Arrondissement de Mouscron, Hainaut, Belgium, IV. L. 1.
MUNDEY Lionel Clement

Second Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Born on the 10th March, 1893, in Chelsea, London. Educated at Ascham St. Vincent’s Preparatory School, Eastbourne, and Eton College, Windsor. At his preparatory school he was a member of both the football team and cricket Xl. He also won prizes for billiards, chess and draughts. At Eton he won his House Colours for cricket and football. In India he also had many successes in Brigade sports, winning the inter-regimental Sabre v. Sabre at Jubbulpore in 1913. With his brother he won the open doubles rackets, also in 1913. He was second in Poona at the Hurst Point-to-point, won the Calcutta Light Horse Sports tent pegging, and the Golf Silver Challenge Bowl. He returned to England with his battalion in 1915, moving onto Dardanelles as part of the 29th Division, landing at Gallipoli Peninsula on the 25th April, 1915. He was Signalling Officer for the battalion and after the first week of landing he became acting Adjutant until the 6th June, 1915, when he was reported missing. After a year it was presumed that he had been killed in action on that date. Youngest son of Major Stanley Mundey and Gwendolyn Beresford Mundey (nee O'Reilly). He is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli, Canakkale, Turkey. Also commemorated on the Eton College Roll of Honour.

Note: An account of Mundey’s gallantry can be found in the ‘Twenty-Ninth Division in Gallipoli’ by the Rev. O Creighton C.F.

OSBORNE Derrick

Lieutenant, 3rd Battalion attached to the 2nd Battalion, Durham Light Infantry, 6th Division. Born in Folkestone, Kent on 9 December 1897. Killed in action, aged 21 years, during the March Retreat on the 21st March, 1918. Son of Sir Francis Osborne, 15th Bart., and Lady Osborne, of Framfield Grange, Uckfield, Sussex. Commemorated on the Arras Memorial, Arras, Departement du Pas-de-Calais, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France, Bay 8. He is also commemorated on the Framfield, Sussex War Memorial.

Note: The ‘March Retreat’ of 1918 is remembered as one of the worst defeats in the history of the British army. ‘It was still dark on the morning of March 21st [1918] when a terrific German bombardment began – “the most terrific roar of guns we have ever heard” … The great push had started and along the whole of our front gas and high-explosive shells from every variety of gun and trench mortars were being hurled over. Everyone [in 54th Brigade] realized that the great ordeal for which they had been training and planning for weeks was upon them.’

PHILLIPPS Reginald William
Lieutenant, King's Company, 1st Battalion, Grenadier Guards. Educated at Ascham, St. Vincent’s, Eastbourne. Eton College, Windsor and Magdalen College, Cambridge. 6th November, 1914, gazetted as a temporary Second Lieutenant. Killed in action, aged 19 years on 26th October 1915 at Hulluch, Pas-de-Calais, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France (Battle of Loos). Son of Mr. W. W. G. and Mrs. F. M. Phillipps, of Berwick House, Berwick, Shrewsbury. Buried in the Vermelles British Cemetery, Vermelles, Departement du Pas-de-Calais, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France, I. J. 3. Also commemorated on the Eton College Roll of Honour.
PLEYDELL-BOUVERIE Jacob Edward
Details Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. Born on the 12 July 1887. Educated at Evelyns, Uxbridge, Ascham St. Vincent’s Preparatory School, Eastbourne, Eton College, Windsor, and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst. Gazetted Second Lieutenant, 4th Battalion, King’s Royal Rifles on the 8th Febuary, 1908. He joined his battalion at Colchester anad left with them for India in 1909. He was promoted to Lieutenant on the 23rd January, 1911, returning to England the same year. At the outbreak of the war he went with a draft on the 30th August, and arriving at St. Nazaire on the 1st September, 1914. He left there to join the 2nd Battalion in billets at Paynon, and was posted to D Company, taking command of 13 and 14 platoons. The battalion remained at or near Paynon till the 18th October, when they returned to billets in Ypres. On the 27th October they went into reserve trenches in a wood just east of Hooge, and on the 29th they advanced to reinforce the the 3rd Brigade at Gheluvelt. Lieutenant Pleydell-Bouverie was hit on the 31st October while ordering a counter attack and was carried to the rear under fire by Riflemen Taylor, Scott, Alcott and Quick. From the field hospital he was sent by train to Boulogne. He died from his wounds early in the morning of the 1st November, 1914 in No. 13 stationary hospital where he had been admitted a few hours before and he was buried in the English cemetery there. Only son of the late Hon. Duncombe and Mrs. Pleydell- Bouverie, of Coleshill House, Highworth, Wiltshire. He is buried in the Boulogne Eastern Cemetery, Boulogne-sur-Mer Departement du Pas-de-Calais, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France, I. B. 2. He is also commemorated on the Eton College Roll of Honour.
SCHALL Henry Frederick
Second Lieutenant, 150th Rotherham Heavy Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery. Born the 1st July, 1891 in North Walsham, Norfolk. He died of wounds aged 25 years, on the 24th September 1916. Son of the late Mr. C.F. Schall and of Mrs. M.F. Schall, of 1 De Walden Court, Eastbourne. Native of Somerford, Keynes, Gloucestershire. Heilly Station Cemetery, Heilly, Departement de la Somme, Picardie, France, IV. G. 29. He is also commemorated on the Somerford Keynes, Wiltshire War Memorial.
SPICER Graham Prockter

Ministry of Munitions. Born in London in 1881, his name at that time was Graham Prockter Smith. After his father died when he was three years old and Graham and his mother went to live with his uncle, William Gage Spicer in Chistlehurst, Kent. He was educated at the Ascham St. Vincent’s Preparatory School, Eastbourne. In May, 1897 The Times newspaper reported that Graham Prockter Smith-Spicer had passed his preliminary exams for the Law Society. He must have changed his mind because in 1901 he is employed as a paper maker in Carlton Hill, London. He drops the Smith part of his name and joins the Spicer Brothers (Ltd.), and moves to Malden. He is involved in collecting money for the British and Foreign Bible Society and was a long-standing committee member of the London City Mission. In 1912 he became Managing Director of the Spicer Brothers. He was elected to the local council in 1913, and in 1914 he was adopted as the Liberal candidate for the Epsom district. (He was also adopted as Liberal candidate for Enfield in 1917). As he was rejected for active service (due to an injury) he took up a post in the Ministry of Munitions as liaison officer to the Belgium Government. He was also on a committee that decided on what sort of work conscientious objectors should undertake. He had the idea of getting Belgians, especially men rendered unfit for active service, to work in munitions, and this idea resulted in three thousand Belgians coming to the UK in order to make shells, cartridge cases etc at Birtley, near Newcastle upon Tyne. They called the village Elizabethville. In the time the men worked in munitions, they did much more than they were expected to: at the production rate set by the British government they would have made just over 1 million shells by the end of the war, but instead turned out 2¾ million … and this from a workforce comprising 85% 'war-wounded'. For his work in the construction and maintenance of the village, he was awarded the Belgium Crown, and he received the notification two days before his death. He died of complications of influenza on the 3rd November, 1918.

Note: The Graham Spicer Institute (GSI) is a Charitable Trust based in New Malden, Surrey, providing local people with excellent sporting facilities & venue hire which includes hall hire & function room hire for meetings

STOCKS Michael George
Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, Grenadier Guards. Born on the 24th November, 1892 at St George Hanover Square, London. Served with the Expeditionary Forces in France and Flanders, and he was killed in action, in or near Ypres, aged 21 years on the 10th November, 1914. Eldest son of Michael and Charlotte Stocks, of Woodhall, Downham Market. Buried in the Zillebeke Churchyard, Ypres (Ieper), Arrondissement Ieper, West Flanders (West-Vlaanderen), Belgium.
TOLLEMACHE John Eadred
Lieutenant, 6th Battalion, Queen's (Royal West Surreys) Regiment. Born 28th July, 1892 in Eastbourne. . Educated at Ascham St. Vincent’s Preparatory School, Eastbourne, Eastbourne College and Magdelene College, Cambridge. Where he graduated with a B.A. He applied for a commission on the outbreak of war, enlisting on the 3rd September, 1914 when he was gazetted as a Second Lieutenant in the 6th Battalion, Royal West Surreys. On the 13th October, 1916 he was promoted to Lieutenant, antedated to the 16th July. He was transferred to the 8th Battalion. On the 21st August 1916 aged 24 years, he was killed in action, while leading a bombing party. He was killed instantly while in the act of throwing a bomb at the enemy. Son of Sir Lyonel Felix Carteret Eugene Tollemache, 4th Baronet and Hersilia Henrietta Diana Tollemache. Buried in the Citadel New Military Cemetery, Fricourt, Departement de la Somme, Picardie, France, II. C 16. Also commemorated on the Eastbourne War Memorial (Town Hall), Eastbourne College Roll of Honour and also Cambridge University Magdalene College.
TRUMBLE Frederick Hugh Geoffrey
Lieutenant, H.M.S. Warwick, Royal Navy. Born on 9th October, 1893 in Brading, Isle of Wight. He was a right-hand bat and in 1914 he played cricket for the Royal Navy. He was killed in action, aged 24th years on the 10th May, 1918, during the second raid on Ostende. H.M.S. Warwick was heavily damaged by a mine. Son of Ada Catherine Trumble, and the late Frederick Trumble of The Old House, Haywards Heath, Sussex. Formerly of Tunbridge Wells. Buried in St James Cemetery, Dover, Kent, L. V. 9. He is also commemorated on the Haywards Heath War Memorial, and the Eastbourne War Memorial (Town Hall).
TWISS Guy Kemble

Lieutenant, H.M.S. Tartar, Dover Destroyer Flotilla, Royal Navy. Born on the 4th September, 1888 in Lindfield, Sussex. Educated at Ascham St. Vincent’s Preparatory School, Eastbourne, Eastbourne College and Britannia College, Dartmouth. On 15th September, 1905 he was appointed a Midshipman; 1909 a Sub Lieutenant; 1911 a Lieutenant his promotion being on the last day of the year. Twiss was appointed in command of the Tribal Class destroyer Tartar on 4 June, 1917. He was killed, aged 28 years, along with forty-two other men, when Tartar struck a mine in the Channel on the 17th June, 1917. Son of Vice-Admiral Guy Ouchterlony Twiss and Margaret Louisa Twiss. He was buried privately at the Walstead Cemetery, Lindfield, West Sussex, 1633. Also commemorated on the Lindfield, Sussex War Memorial.

WILKINSON Geoffrey Miles

Second Lieutenant, 56 Squadron, Royal Flying Corps and Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry. Born on the 21 Jun 1898. Killed in action whilst flying over enemy lines on the 10th October, 1917, aged 19 years. Wilkinson's inscription says no more than his parents knew about his death; it repeats the official information they received. No one knew exactly what happened to him. However, the fact that he was originally buried by the Germans indicates that he was probably shot down by German artillery. Pilots on both sides did their best to identify the planes they brought down in order that they could claim them as victories - even making contact with the enemy squadron for confirmation. No one claimed Wilkinson as a victory so presumably he wasn't brought down by a plane. He was gazetted second lieutenant in April 1917, reported to have been wounded in June 1917, obviously recovered, and died in unknown circumstances on 10TH October, 1917. Wilkinson originally served with the Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry and at the time of his death was attached to the Royal Flying Corps, Son of Henry Wall Wilkinson and Ada Eliza Wilkinson, of 14 Creffield Road, Ealing, London. Buried in the Pont-du-Hem Military Cemetery, La Gorgue, Departement du Nord, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France, IV. H. 29.

Note: His brother John also fell (see below). His elder brother, Alan Machin Wilkinson, was a Royal Flying Corps ace with 19 victories to his credit. He finished the war as a Group Captain with a DSO and bar - he was 27 years of age.

WILKINSON John Graham

Lieutenant, 1st/4th Battalion, Hampshire Regiment attached to Dunsterforce. Born 1995 in Eastbourne, Sussex. Wilkinson, a Lieutenant in the Hampshire Regiment, was a member of Dunsterforce. This early special forces unit hoped to organise local resistance to Ottoman advances into the Caucasus and Central Asia. The region was a powder keg of competing Bolshevik, nationalist, Ottoman and British interests. Wilkinson was killed when Jangalis, Iranian nationalists, attacked a small detachment of British forces in the town of Rasht on the 20th July, 1918.. He was 23 years of age. Son of Henry Wall Wilkinson and Ada Eliza Wilkinson, of 14 Creffield Road, Ealing, London. Originally buried in Rasht Armenian Cemetery, his name is now commemorated on the Tehran War Memorial, Tehran, Iran, Panel 3. Column 1.

Note: His brother Geoffrey also fell (see above). His elder brother, Alan Machin Wilkinson, was a Royal Flying Corps ace with 19 victories to his credit. He finished the war as a Group Captain with a DSO and bar - he was 27 years of age.

Last update 30 August, 2022

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