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SNAITH WESLEYAN CHAPEL WAR MEMORIAL

World War 1 & 2- Detailed Information
Compiled and copyright © Martin Edwards 2020

The memorial is to be found within the Wesleyan Methodist Church, Cowie Road, Snaith, DN14 9JF, mounted on the wall to the left of the pulpit. It takes the form of a thin, marble, plaque attached to an interal wall. There are fourteen names for World War 1 and two names for World War 2. THree brothers called WOOD were killed and are listed here.
Photographs Copyright © Kenneth Sayner 2012

TO THE GLORY OF GOD AND IN MEMORY OF

AXUP [John] William
Private 20778, 1st Battalion, King's Own (Yorkshire Light Infantry). Killed in action 8 May 1915. Aged 22. Born and enlisted Pontefract, Yorkshire. Baptised 3 September 1893 in Pontefract, Yorkshire, son of John Henry and Hannah Axup, resident Pontefract. Son of John Henry and Hannah Axup, of Gawdall Lane, Gatehouse, Snaith, Yorks. In the 1901 census he was aged 7, born Pontefrcat, Yorkshire, son of Hannah Axup, resident Lowgate, Snaith, Snaith and Cowick, Goole, Yorkshire & Yorkshire (West Riding). No known grave. Commemorated on YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 47.
CHRISTIAN Edwin

Pioneer 107091, 9th Depot Company, E.T.C. Deganwy, Royal Engineers. Died from cerebral haemorrhage in Isolation Hospital, Llandudno, 5 January 1916. Aged 30. Born Snaith, Yorkshire, resident Raweliffe Bridge, Yorkshire, enlisted Goole, Yorkshire. Son of Robert and Annie E. Christian, of 2, Clarence Grove, Rawcliffe. In the 1891 census he was aged 5, born Snaith, Yorkshire, a scholar, son of Robert and Ann E Christian, resident Gate House, Snaith, Goole, Yorkshire & Yorkshire (West Riding). In the 1901 census he was aged 15, born Snaith, Yorkshire, a Farm Labourer, son of Robert and Ann Christian, resident Mill Street, Snaith, Snaith and Cowick, Goole, Yorkshire & Yorkshire (West Riding). In the 1911 census he was aged 25, born Snaith, Yorkshire, a General Labourer at Paper Mill, unmarried, son of Robert and Annie Christian, resident Gate House, Rawcliffe Station, Rawcliffe, Yorkshire & Yorkshire (West Riding). Attested 23 October 1915 at Goole, aged 30 years 6 months, resident Gatehuse, Rawcliffe Bridge, a Labourer. single, height 5 feet 4 inches, weight 136lbs, chest 36-38 inches, son of Robert Christian, parents moved body for burial to Station Crossing House, Racliffe near Goole. Buried 8 January 1916 in RAWCLIFFE (ST. JAMES) CHURCHYARD, Yorkshire.


Extract from Northern Whig - Saturday 8 January 1916, page 10:

SAD DEATH OF A SOLDIER

Officer’s Error of Judgment

A verdict death from natural causes was returned at an inquest held Llandudno on Edwin Christian, a privatein the Royal Engineers, who died in hospital on Wednesday. The jury stated that it was their opinion that Christian should not have been removed from Doncaster to Llandudno, and the Coroner observed that an officer committed an error of judgment sanctioning the removal.

The evidence showed that Christian left Doncaster with a company of engineers for Llandudno on Monday, and before departing complained being ill. The matter was reported to a lieutenant, who ordered him to continue his jouney, with four men to look after him. On arriving his billet Christian was ordered to hospital, where he died. A post-mortem examination showed that considerable pressre on the brain had caused cerebral haemorrhage.

The Coroner also expressed the opinion that it was great pity the man had been brought from Doncaster in such a condition.


Extract from Yorkshire Evening Post - Friday 7 January 1916, page 7:

DYING SOLDIER'S LONG NIGHT JOURNEY.

RAWCLIFFE MAN'S ILLNESS.

COMRADE'S ACCOUNT OF A JOURNEY FROM DONCASTER.

Unusual evidence was given inquest, at Llandudno, on Pioneer Edwin Christian, of the 9th Depot Company of the Royal Engineers, who died on Wednesday morning at the Llandudno Isolation Hospital. Christian was thirty years of age, and, before he joined the Army, a miner. He was a native of Rawcliffe, near Goole. The case was watched by Captain George Gorange, of the Royal Engineers, on behalf the military authorities.

Frederick Pettitt, a pioneer in the same company, stated evidence that he had known the deceased man since the latter joined Royal Engineers at Doncaster.

On January 3 the witness and number of other pioneers, including Christian, were told off for removal from Doncaster to Llandudno. They paraded at seven o'clock to go the station. Christian was then rather ill and pale-looking. He complained of pain the stomach and head. After the roll was called they marched out to proceed to the station, and Christian had to be put on the car to be taken down to the station. There he was helped across to the platform, where they waited for the train.

During that time the corporal called Lieutenant Hampton's attention to the sick man. The officer looked at him and asked if he had had any drink. As a matter of fact, Christian was a very steady man, and had had no drink whatever. The officer told the corporal that man would have to forward with the company, and the corporal told off four men to travel with him in a compartment which they had to themselves.

During the journey Christian seemed in a state of collapse, but appeared a little better when they got to Manchester, and was sleeping a little. The officer came to the carriage and asked how he was going on, and they told him he seemed a little better, but during the whole of the remainder of the journey Christian was very ill. When the (sic) got to Llandudno at seven o'clock in the morning he was in a state of collapse, and was taken to his billet at Craigydon on tramcar. A doctor, who was summoned, ordered his removal the hospital.

Replying to the Coroner, the witness said that several of the men told the officer at Doncaster that they thought the man should be left behind, as he was so very ill.

Dr. Lockhart Mure, the medical man, called in to see the pioneer, said the man's temperature was between 101 and 102. and there were signs of abdominal and cerebral trouble. He therefore ordered him to be removed at once to the hospital. Some morphine was administered, and he fell asleep and never regained conaciousness.

A post-mortem examination showed that death resulted from cerebral hemorrhage. There were no marks of violence about the body or the head. Having been a miner, it was quite possible that the blood vessels of his brain were weak, and the man did not seem physically strong. He probably had a bilious attack, and the vomiting which resulted might have caused the lesion in the brain from which he ultimately died.

The jury found that death resulted from natural causes, and they added a rider to the effect that the man ought not have been removed from Doncaster without his being seen by doctor, and that a doctor ought have been called to see him at Llandudno Station before his removal to the billet. A vote of sympathy with the relatives was passed.


Extract from Manchester Guardian, 7 january 1915:

INQUEST AT LLANDUDNO

Mr. J. Pentir Williams, the Carnarvoshire coroner, conducted an inquest last evening at Llandudno on the body of Pioneer Edwin Christian, of the 9th Depot Company of the Royal Engineers, who. died on Wednesday morning at the Llandudno Isolation Hosital. Christian was 30 years of age, and, before he joined the army, a miner. He was a native of Rawcliffe, near Goole, Yorkshire. The case was watched by Captain Lloyd Gorange, of the Royal Engineers, on behalf of the military authorities.

Frederick Pettitt, a pioneer in the saame company, stated in evidence that he had known Christian since he joined the Royal Engineers at Doncaster. On January 3, the witness and a number of other pioneers were told off for removal to Doncaster to Llandudno. They paraded at seven o'clock to go to the station. Christian was then rather ill at pale-looking. He complained of pain. Aft the roll was called they' marched out to proceed to the. station, and Christian had to be put on the car to be taken down to the station. There he was helped across to the platform, where they waited for the train. .During that time the corporal called Lieutenant Hampton's attention to the sick man. The officer looked at him, 'and asked if he had had any drink. Christian was a very steady man, and had had no drink whatever. The officer told the corporal that the man would have to go forward with the comany, and the corporal told off four men to travel with him in a compartment, which they had to themselves. They started from Doncaster at half-past eight. During the journey Christian seemed in a state, of collapse, but seemed a little better when they got to Manchester, and was sleeping a little. The officer came to the carriage, and asked how he was going on, and they told him he seemed a little better. The witness obtained a cup of coffee for him, and he drank a little. When the train had been shunted at London Road Station they started for Llandudno, and during the whole of the remainder of the Journey Christian. was very ill. The pains came on again, and he was rolling and tumbling about the carriage. When they got to Llandudno, at seven o'clock in the morning, he was in a state of collapse, and was taken to his billet at Craigydon in a tramcar. The landlady made him some tea and some toast with the crust cut. off, and this he ate ravenously, but he was only half conscious at the time. Later, the witness called a doctor, and the doctor at once ordered the man to he taken to the hospital.

Replying to the Coroner, the witness said that several of the men told the officer at Doncaster that they thought the man should be left behind, as he was so very ill. Christian told the witness he had eaten nothing to upset him that he knew of. He had only had a small piece of ham at a café in the town.

Doctor's Evidence.

Dr. Lockhart Mure, the medical man called in, said the man's temperature was between 101 and 102, and there were signs of abdominal and cerebral trouble. He therefore ordered him to be removed at once to the hospital. Some morphine was administered and he fell asleep, had never regained consciousness. With Dr. Travis, the witness had made a postmorten examination, which showed that death resulted from cerebral hemorrhage. There were no marks of .violence about the body or the head. Having been a miner, it was quite possible that the blood vessels of his brain were weak, and the man did not seem physically strong. He probably had a bilious attack, and the strain which resulted might have caused the lesion in the brain from which he ultimately died.

The Coroner said that undoubtedly the poor man was very ill at Doncaster, and, as the result showed, there was probably an error of judgment on the part of the officer in deciding that the man must go forward with the troops. No doubt the officer never for a moment realised the seriousness of the man's condition, and he was told when he inquired at Manchester that the man was a little better.

The jury found that death resulted from natural causes, and theyadded a rider to the effect that the man ought not to have been removed from Doncaster without his being second by a doctor, and that a. doctor ought to have been called to see him at Llandudno station before his removal to the billet. A vote of sympathy with the relatives was passed.

DARLEY John [Joseph]
Trooper 809, No. 3 Company, 1st (Household Battalion) Life Guards formerly 4080, 1st Life Guards. Killed in action 10 October 1917. Aged 22. Born and resident Snaith, enlisted Pontefract. Baptised 14 July 1895 in Goole Snaith Chapels, son of Arthur William and Margaet Ann Darley of Snaith, Yorkshire. Son of Arthur William and Margaret Ann Darley, of Beast Fair, Snaith, Yorks. In the 1901 census he was aged 5, born Snaith, Yorkshire, son of Arthur W and Margaret A Darley, resident Beast Fair, Snaith, Snaith and Cowick, Goole, Yorkshire & Yorkshire (West Riding). In the 1911 census he was aged 15, born Snaith, Yorkshire, a Grocer Apprentice, son of Arthur William and Margaret Ann Darley, resident Beast Fair, Snaith, Snaith and Cowick, Goole, Yorkshire & Yorkshire (West Riding). Buried in POELCAPELLE BRITISH CEMETERY, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot XLVI. Row A. Grave 11.
DURHAM Arthur
[Listed as 5th Reserve Battalion on memorial] Private 41317, 1st Battalion, Royal Scots Fusiliers. Wounded in action 30 May 1918, died of those wounds at 6 Casualty Clearing Station, France, 31 May 1918. Aged 28. Born and resident Snaith, Yorkshire, enlisted Goole, Yorkshire. Son of Arthur Durham and Emma Durham (formerly Ward) of Snaith, Yorkshire. Husband of Annie Durham (formerly Spivey) of East Cowick, Yorkshire. In the 1891 census he was aged 1, born Snaith, Yorkshire, son of Arthur and Emma Durham, resident Low Gate, Snaith, Goole, Yorkshire & Yorkshire (West Riding). In the 1901 census he was aged 11, born Snaith, Yorkshire, son of Arthur and Emma Durham, resident Gate House (L & Y Railway), Snaith, Snaith and Cowick, Goole, Yorkshire & Yorkshire (West Riding). In the 1911 census he was aged 21, born Snaith, Yorkshire, a Sand Quarry Labourer, son of Arthur and Emma Durham, resident East Cabin Gatehouse Snaith S O, Snaith and Cowick, Yorkshire & Yorkshire (West Riding). Enlisted 10 April 1916, aged 27 years, religious denomination Church of England. Attched to 221st Infantry battalion at Galway 23 July 1917, rejoined 5th Reserve Battalion, Highland Light Infantry, Curragh, Edinburgh 17 September 1917 transferred to Royal Scots Fusiliers 1 April 1918. Buried in PERNES BRITISH CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot II. Row E. Grave 20.
DURHAM Percy
Private 29544, 1st Battalion, King's Own (Yorkshire Light Infantry). Killed in action 3 October 1918. Born Snaith, enlisted Goole. In the 1891 census he was aged 4, born Snaith, Yorkshire, a scholar, son of Enoch and Lavinia Durham, resident George Street, Snaith, Goole, Yorkshire & Yorkshire (West Riding). In the 1901 census he was aged 17, born Snaith, Yorkshire, a Horseman On Farm, resident Mr Gogles Farm, Bankside, Thorne, Yorkshire & Yorkshire (West Riding). In the 1911 census he was aged 23, born Cowick, Yorkshire, a Horseman On Farm, resident Top House Rawcliffe Bridge, Rawcliffe, Yorkshire & Yorkshire (West Riding). Married Alice Hatfield Jackson at Rawcliffe, Yorkshire (West Riding) 17 July 1916. Buried in TEMPLEUX-LE-GUERARD BRITISH CEMETERY, Somme, France. Plot I. Row K. Grave 11.
HODGSON Charles
Trooper 3480, 2nd Life Guards. Died of wounds 15 August 1917. Aged 22. Born Snaith, Yorkshire, enlisted Wakefield, Yorkshire. Son of Charles and Jane Hodgson, of Snaith, Yorks. In the 1901 census he was aged 5, born Snaith, Yorkshire, son of Charles and Jane Hodgson, resident Church Lane, Snaith, Snaith and Cowick, Goole, Yorkshire & Yorkshire (West Riding). In the 1911 census he was aged 15, born Snaith, Yorkshire, assisting on his father's Farm, son of Charles and Jane Hodgson, resident Church Lane Snaith S O, Snaith and Cowick, Yorkshire & Yorkshire (West Riding). Buried in BRANDHOEK NEW MILITARY CEMETERY NO.3, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Plot II. Row B. Grave 6.
HODGSON Frank
Lance Corporal 1086, 10th Battalion, Lincolnshire Regiment. Killed in action 1 July 1916. Born 14 April 1892, and resident, Snaith, Yorkshire, enlisted Wakefield. Baptised 15 May 1892 in Snaith, Yorkshire, son of William (a shoe maker) and Sarah Hodgson, resident Snaith, Yorkshire. Son of William Hodgson, of Market Place, Snaith, Goole, Yorks. In the 1901 census he was aged 8, born Snaith, Yorkshire, son of William and Sarah Hodgson, resident Market Place, Snaith, Snaith and Cowick, Goole, Yorkshire & Yorkshire (West Riding). In the 1911 census he was aged 18, born Snaith, Yorkshire, a Draper Assistant, son of William Hodgson 9a widower), resident Market Place Snaith S O, Snaith and Cowick, Yorkshire & Yorkshire (West Riding). No known grave. Commmeorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 1 C.
HOLMES Frank
Able Seaman 235293, H.M.S. Victory I, Royal Navy formerly H.M.S. King George V, Royal Navy. Invalided to Royal Hospital Haslar, Gosport, Hampshire, with Tuberculosis. Death registered in the April to June Quarter 1917 in Goole Registration District, Yorkshire. Aged 27. Born 2 July 1889 in Snaith, Yorkshire. Baptised 4 August 1889 in Snaith, Yorkshire, son of Henry and Eliza Ann Holmes, resident Snaith, Yorkshire. In the 1891 census he was aged 1, born Snaith, Yorkshire, son of Henry and Eliza A Holmes, resident Beast Fair, Snaith, Goole, Yorkshire & Yorkshire (West Riding). In the 1901 census he was aged 11, born Snaith, Yorkshire, son of Henry and Eliza A Holmes, resident Quarry House, East & West Cowick, Snaith and Cowick, Goole, Yorkshire & Yorkshire (West Riding). Enlisted in Royal Navy 2 July 1907 for 12 years. Height 5 feet 5½ inches, light brown hair, grey eyes, fresh complexion. In the 1911 census he was aged 21, born Snaith, Yorkshire, an Able Seaman, resident 172 -174 Commercial Road, Portsmouth.
HOWARD Stanley [Hardy]
Private 80932, 1st/8th Battalion, Durham Light Infantry. Killed in action 9 April 1918. Born and enlisted Doncaster, resident Snaith. In the 1901 census he was aged 1, born Doncaster, son of John and Edith G Howard, resident Mill House, Station Road, Rawcliffe, Goole, Yorkshire & Yorkshire (West Riding). In the 1911 census he was aged 11, born Doncaster, a scholar, son of John and Edith Gertrude Howard, resident Lowgate, Snaith S O, Snaith and Cowick, Yorkshire & Yorkshire (West Riding). Deemed enlisted 30 January 1917, medical examination at Doncaster 7 June 1917, called up 11 June 1917 in Doncaster, aged 18 years 1 month, unmarried, a Pork Butcher, resident Railway Street, Snaith, Yorkshire, son of John and Edith Gertrude Howard, height 5 feet 6¾ inches, weight 119lbs, chest 33½-36 inches. To France 31 March 1918. Transferred as 80932, 8th Battalion, Durham Light Infantry 2 April 1918. No known grave. Commemorated on PLOEGSTEERT MEMORIAL, Hainaut, Belgium. Panel 8 and 9.
TURNER Herbert
Private (Signaller) 202418, 2nd/4th Battalion, King's Own (Yorkshire Light Infantry). Killed in action 20 November 1917. Born Whitley Bridge, Yorkshire, enlisted Goole, Yorkshire. Buried in HERMIES HILL BRITISH CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Plot II. Row A. Grave 26.
VAUSE Tom
King's Own (Yorkshire Light Infantry) probably Tom [Walter] VAUSE, Private 203792, 1st/4th Battalion, King's Own (Yorkshire Light Infantry). Died 26 July 1917. Husband of Kate Elizabeth Vause, of West Haddlesey, nr. Selby, Yorks, married 10 June 1916 in Chapel Haddlesey, Yorkshire (West Riding). In the 1901 census he was aged 10, born Rawcliffe, Yorkshire, son of Tom and Hannah E Vause, resident Gatehouse (L & Y Railway), Snaith, Snaith and Cowick, Goole, Yorkshire & Yorkshire (West Riding). In the 1911 census he was aged 20, born Rawlcliffe, Yorkshire, a Railway Plate Layer, son of Tom and Hannah Elizabeth Vause, resident Shearburn Terrace, Snaith S O, Snaith and Cowick, Yorkshire & Yorkshire (West Riding). Buried in MONT HUON MILITARY CEMETERY, LE TREPORT, Seine-Maritime, France. Plot II. Row E. Grave 14.
WOOD Ernest
Private 35127, 14th Battalion, Northumberland Fusiliers formerly 50116, West Yorkshire Regiment. Killed in action 27 May 1918. Aged 22. Born 19 August 1895 Snaith, Yorkshire, enlisted Wakefield, Yorkshire. Baptised 15 September 1895 in Snaith, St Laurence, Yorkshire, son of William and Hannah Wood, resident Snaith. Son of William and Hannah Wood, of Market Place, Snaith Yorks; brother of Mark and Richard (below). In the 1901 census he was aged 5, born Snaith, Yorkshire, brother of Mark and Richard, son of William and Hannah Wood, resident Market Place, Snaith, Snaith and Cowick, Goole, Yorkshire & Yorkshire (West Riding). In the 1911 census he was aged 15, born Snaith, Yorkshire, a Joiner Appentice, brother of Richard, son of William and Hannah Wood, resident Market Place Snaith S O, Snaith and Cowick, Yorkshire & Yorkshire (West Riding). Transferred from 9th Battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment to 14th Battalion, Northumberland Fusiliers. Buried in HERMONVILLE MILITARY CEMETERY, Marne, France. Plot II. Row D. Grave 9.
WOOD Mark
Private 40717, "D" Company, 8th Battalion, Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment) formerly 36562, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Killed in action in the field, France, 20 September 1917. Aged 27. Born Snaith, Yorkshire, resident Sneiton, Nottinghamshire, enlisted Nottingham. Baptised 17 November 1889 in Snaith, St Laurence, son of William and Hannah, resident Snaith. Son of William and Hannah Wood, of Market Place, Snaith, Yorks.; brother of Richard (below) and Ernest (above). In the 1891 census he was aged 1, born Sniath, Yorkshire, son of William and Hannah Wood, resident Market Place, Snaith, Goole, Yorkshire & Yorkshire (West Riding). In the 1901 census he was aged 11, born Snaith, Yorkshire, brother of Richard and Ernest, son of William and Hannah Wood, resident Market Place, Snaith, Snaith and Cowick, Goole, Yorkshire & Yorkshire (West Riding). Attested 25 February 1915 in Nottingham aged 26 years 1 month as 36562, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment), resident 39, Sedgley Avenue, Sneinton, Nottingham, a Parcel Porter, single, height 5 feet 8¾ inches, weight 135 lbs, chest 35½-38 inches, blue eyes, light brown hairreligious denomination Wesleyan, son of William Wood of Market Place, Snaith, Yorkshire. Issued with spectacles 30 August 1916. Transferred to North Staffordshire Regiment 13 November 1916. Served in France from 13 November 1916. No known grave. Commemorated on TYNE COT MEMORIAL, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 124 to 125.
WOOD Richard
Serjeant 20417, 13th Battalion, Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment). Killed in action in the field, France, 15 September 1916. Aged 23. Born 14 September 1893, and resident, Snaith, Yorkshire, enlisted Edinburgh. Baptised 15 October 1893 in Snaith, son of William and Anna Wood, resident Snaith, Yorkshire. Son of William and Hannah Wood, of Market Place, Snaith, Goole, Yorks; brother of Mark and Ernest (above). In the 1901 census he was aged 7, born Snaith, Yorkshire, brother of Mark and Ernest, son of William and Hannah Wood, resident Market Place, Snaith, Snaith and Cowick, Goole, Yorkshire & Yorkshire (West Riding). In the 1911 census he was aged 17, born Snaith, Yorkshire, a Railway Parcel Porter, brother of Ernest, son of William and Hannah Wood, resident Market Place Snaith S O, Snaith and Cowick, Yorkshire & Yorkshire (West Riding). Admitted to the Amalgamated Society of Railway Servants, Railway Workers, Pontefract 1 Branch, as a Porter in 1912. Attested 19 January 1915 at aged 21 years 4 months, a Railway Porter, single, height 5 feet 9 inches, weight 159 lbs, chest 37½ to 47½ inches, religious denomination Wesleyan, complexion fresh. eyes grey, brown hair. Posted 14th Battalion, Royal Scots at Weymouth 19 January 1915, joined 14th Battalion at Weymouth 20 January 1915, appointed Lance Corporal 15 February 1915, promoted Corporal 23 June 1915, appointed Acting Sergeant 23 February 1916 and confirmed Sergeant the same day, embarked Folkestone, disembarked Boulogne 16 August 1916, posted as Sergeant to 13th Battalion 17 August 1916 and with Expeditionary Force to France the same day. Received a Railway Pass to travel from Nottingley, Yorkshire to Glencorse to enlist. No known grave. Commmeorated on THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 6 D and 7 D.
IN THE GREAT WAR 1914-1918
ALSO
1939-1945
CLAYTON Leslie
Private 4695824, Pioneer Corps. Died as a result of an accident 13 August 1945. Aged 23. Born 7 June 1921 Yorkshire, resident France. Baptised 26 June 1921 in Snaith, St Laurence, son of Lewis (a labourer) and Mabel Bertha Clayton, resident Snaith. Son of Lewis and Mabel Bertha Clayton, of Snaith, Yorkshire; husband of Gabrielle Clayton. In the 1939 Register he was a Labourer, resident with his parents at 24 George Street, Snaith, Goole R.D., Yorkshire (West Riding). Buried in MAZARGUES WAR CEMETERY, MARSEILLES, Bouches-du-Rhone, France.Plot 3. Row D. Grave 7.
FISH George [Norman Harrop]
Private 4689081, 2nd Battalion, King's Own (Yorkshire Light Infantry). Died 10 May 1942 in Burma. Aged 26. Born and resident Yorkshire. Baptised 10 September 1916 in Snaith, St Laurence, son of Rowland Harrop (a farmer) and Adeline Mary Fish, resident Snaith. Son of Rowland Harrop Fish and Adeline Mary Fish, of Snaith, Yorkshire. No known grave. Commemorated on RANGOON MEMORIAL, Myanmar (Burma). Face 16.

Last updated: 30 October, 2020

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