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THE LEYS SCHOOL, CAMBRIDGE - WAR MEMORIAL 1914-1919

World War 1 - Detailed information
Compiled and Copyright © The Leys School and John Harding 2005
additional information and updates Martin Edwards

ADAM

Frank Dalziel
Adam was born in 1896. Son of William and Martha Adam, of Lyndholm, Kidderminster. He came to The Leys in 1910 at the age of 14 and went into North A House. He was Head Prefect, a Cadet Sergeant, the Secretary of the National History Society and won Tri-colours.

After leaving school in 1915, Adam joined the Rifle Brigade and served with distinction in France. He was killed in action on 16 July 1918 at the age of 21, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is buried at Bully-Grenay Cemetery, Pas de Calais, grave number V. F. 14.

Extract from de Ruvigny's The Roll of Honour 1914-1918 Part 5 Page 1:

ADAM, FRANK DALZIEL, Lieut., 3rd Battn. The Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort’s Own). s. of the late William Adam. J.P., by his wife, Martha (Lyndholme. Kidderminster), dau. of James Dalziel, of Walkerburn ; b. Kiddermlnster, co. Worcester, 4 Nov. 1896; ; educ. The Leys School, Cambridge; received a commission, and was gazetted 2nd Lieut. The Rifle Brigade 3 June, 1915; promoted Lieut. in 1917 served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from Christmas, 1916. and died at an Aid Post, near Béthune, 16 July, 1918, of wounds received in action the same day. Buried at Bulligrenay. A brother officer wrote He was one of the most popular officers in the battalion, and I may say I never came across an officer who took more trouble with his men. He was one of the most fearless. . . We all feel his loss both as a friend and an officer, very much.” Unm.

ADAM, MC

Peter
Adam was born in 1893. Son of Peter and Isabella Neilson Adam, of Cairndhu, Kidderminster. He came to The Leys in 1907 at the age of 14 and went into West House. He was a Cadet Corporal, a Member of the Bisley VIII and won Second Colours at Cricket and Football.

On leaving school, Adam went up to the University of Birmingham to read Civil Engineering.

At the outbreak of war, Adam enlisted in the Public Schools Battalion, becoming a Sergeant. He then gained a commission and joined the Rifle Brigade in 1916. He served with distinction in France and Belgium, winning the Military Cross (M.C.). He was killed in action on 31 July 1917 at the age of 24, having reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, panel numbers 46 to 48 and 50.

ADAM, MC

Ronald William
Adam was born in 1890 in Kidderminster. Son of the late William Adam and Martha Adam, of Lyndholm, Kidderminster. He came to The Leys in 1905 at the age of 15 and went into North A House. He was a Prefect, a Cadet Sergeant and won Tri-colours.

On leaving school, Adam went into the family business and, following his father’s death, became a partner. He was an enthusiastic member of the local church and Sunday school.

During the early stages of the war Adam drove his own motor vehicle in the service of the French Red Cross. He then joined the Royal Field Artillery and served with distinction in Mesopotamia, winning the Military Cross (M.C.). He died of disease on 11 September 1917 at the age of 27, having reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He is buried at Baghdad Cemetery, grave number IX. E. 4.

Extract from de Ruvigny's The Roll of Honour 1914-1918 Part 3 Page 1:

ADAM, RONALD WILLIAM, M.C., 2nd Lieut., R.F.A. eldest s. of the late William Adam. by his wife, Martha (Lyndholm, Kidderminster). dau. of James Dalziel, of Walkerburn : b. Kidderminster, 9 June, 1890: educ. The Leys School, Cambridge entered the business of Messrs. Tomkinson & Adam. Carpet and Rug Manufacturers, and on the death of his father in 1912, became a partner in the firm. On the outbreak of war in Aug. 1914, he served for several months in the French Ambulance Brigade, being engaged in bringing in wounded at Bruyi res in the Vosges, and at Belfort: was gazetted 2nd Lieut. R.F.A. 22 July, 1915: served in India from the following Sept.: also with the Indian Expeditionary Force in Mesopotamia from 21 June, 1916 and died at Samarrah 11 Sept. 1917, from enteritis contracted while on active service. Buried there. He was mentioned in Despatches by General Maude, and was awarded the Military Cross (London Gazette, 25 Aug. 1917), for general good service in the field; unm.

AIRTH

Rennie Alexander
Airth was born in 1893 in South Africa. Son of George Rennie Airth and Alice Pemberton Airth. He came to The Leys in 1906 at the age of 13 and went into West House. He was a Prefect and won Tri-colours.

On leaving school, Airth went to Camborne to study mining engineering.

At the outbreak of war, Airth enlisted in the Bedfordshire Regiment serving with distinction in France. Invalided home, he then joined the Royal Flying Corps and was sent back to France. He died of wounds on 29 July 1917 at the age of 23, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He was with the 7th Squadron when he died. He is buried at Dozingham Military Cemetery, West-Vlaanderen, grave number II. A. 1.

ANDERSON

Francis Brian Hallam
Anderson was born in 1898. He came to The Leys in 1914 at the age of 14 and went into North A House. He was a Prefect and won First Colours at Football and Cricket

Anderson left school in Easter 1916 and joined the Royal Flying Corps as a Second Lieutenant. He was killed during training on 8 September 1917 at the age of 19. He received his ‘wings’ on his death bed. He is buried in Kings Lynn Cemetery grave V. 296.

ATKINS

Leslie Gordon
Atkins was born in 1895. Son of Edwin and Frances Ann Atkins, of "Oaklands," Bycullah Park, Enfield, Middlesex. He came to The Leys in 1910 at the age of 14 and went into West House. He was a Sub-Prefect and won Second Colours at Football.

On leaving school, Atkins was articled to an accountant, and was an enthusiastic member of the Boys Brigade.

In 1915 Atkins enlisted in the London Regiment (Royal Fusiliers) and served with distinction in France. A committed Christian, Atkins was accepted by the Wesleyan Conference as a candidate for the ministry in July 1917 and was subsequently awarded a commission. He was killed in action on 24 May 1918 at the age of 22, having reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He is buried at Dernancourt Cemetery, Somme, grave number VIII. 1. 3.

AYRE

Bernard Pitts
Ayre was born in 1892 in Newfoundland. He came to The Leys in 1906 at the age of 14 and went into West House. He was a Prefect and won Tri-colours.

On leaving school, Ayre went up to Jesus College, University of Cambridge, to read Natural Sciences, with the intention of studying Medicine.

At the outbreak of war, Ayre joined the Norfolk Regiment and served with distinction in France. He was killed in action on 1 July 1916, the first day of the Battle of the Somme, alongside his brother, Eric and cousin, Wilfrid. He was aged 23 and had reached the rank of Captain. He is buried at Carnoy Military Cemetery, Somme, grave number D. 10.

AYRE

Eric Stanley
Ayre was born in 1888 in Newfoundland. Son of Robert Chesley Ayre and Lydia Gertrude Ayre, of St. John's. He came to The Leys in 1905 at the age of 16 and went into West House. He was a champion gymnast, twice a member of the Bisley VIII and won First Colours at Football.

On leaving school, Ayre worked in the family business in St. John's, Newfoundland, and was enthusiastic member of the local Church and Boys Brigade. Husband of Janet Ayre, of St. John's, Newfoundland.

At the outbreak of war, Ayre joined the Royal Newfoundland Regiment and served with distinction in France. He was killed in action on 1 July 1916, the first day of the Battle of the Somme, alongside his brother, Bernard and cousin, Wilfrid. He was aged 27 and had reached the rank of Captain. He is buried in Ancre British Cemetery, Beaument-Hamel, grave number II. E. 12.

AYRE

Wilfrid Douglas
Ayre was born in 1895 in Newfoundland. Son of Charles P. and Diana Ayre, of St. John's, Newfoundland. He came to The Leys in 1909 at the age of 14 and went into North A House.

On leaving school, Ayre worked in the family business in St. Johns, Newfoundland, before returning to England to study for his preliminary Chartered Accountant examinations.

At the outbreak of war, Ayre joined the Royal Newfoundland Regiment and served with distinction in France. He was killed in action on 1 July 1916, the first day of the Battle of the Somme, alongside his cousins, Bernard and Eric. He was aged 20 and had reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He is buried at Knightsbridge Cemetery, Mesnil-Martinsart, grave number B. 10.

BAINBRIDGE

Wilfrid Hudson
Bainbridge was born in 1884 at Newcastle-on-Tyne. Son of Kate and the late Thomas Hudson Bainbridge, of Eshott Hall, Felton, Northumberland. He came to The Leys in 1898 at the age of 14 and went into North B House. He was a Prefect, Cadet Lance-Sergeant and won Tri-colours.

On leaving school, Bainbridge worked for the family business in Newcastle and devoted himself to charitable works such as the Society of Home Teaching for the Blind and the Newcastle Mission.

At the outbreak of war, Bainbridge gained a commission in the Northumberland Fusiliers and served with distinction in France. He died of wounds on 15 March 1916 at the age of 32, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is buried at Etaples Military Cemetery, Pas de Calais, grave number I. A. 22.

BARRETT

Walter Ralph
Barrett was born in 1893. He came to The Leys in 1907 at the age of 14 and went into West House. He was a Cadet Corporal, a Champion Gymnast and won Second Colours at Football.

At the outbreak of war, Barrett gained a commission in the Essex Regiment. He served with distinction in the Mesopotamia but was killed during the advance on Jerusalem on 2 November 1917. He was aged 24 and had reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is commemorated on the Jerusalem Memorial, panel numbers 33 to 39.

BEALEY

Adam Compton
Bealey was born in 1873. He came to The Leys in 1887 at the age of 14 and went into School House. He was a gifted musician.

On leaving school, Bealey went up to Trinity College, University of Cambridge. Following a short stint in the family business, he joined the Lancashire Fusiliers as a Lieutenant, and subsequently served in the Boer War. He then settled in Somerset and married.

At the outbreak of war in 1914, Bealey joined the Somerset Light Infantry, serving with distinction in the Middle East. He died of wounds on 22 November 1917 at the age of 44, having reached the rank of Staff Captain. He is buried in Jerusalem War Cemetery, grave number P. 10.

BRADFIELD

Walter Lanning
Bradfield was born in 1892 at Leicester. Son of the Rev. William Bradfield (Wesleyan Minister) and Annie Mary Bradfield, of 14, Oakburn Rd., Ilkley, Yorks. He came to The Leys in 1902 at the age of 11 and as a day-boy. He was a gifted scholar and a Cadet Lance-Corporal.

On leaving school, Bradfield went up to Jesus College, University of Oxford, where he won an Exhibition in History.

At the outbreak of war, Bradfield enlisted as a Private in the West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales Own) and served with distinction in France. He was killed in action on 5 December 1916 at the age of 24. He is buried at Couin British Cemetery, Pas de Calais, grave number VC. 3.

BROOKE

Arthur Goulbourn
Brooke was born in 1892. Son of John Marsland Brooke and Jane Brooke, of Childerley Hall, Cambridge. He came to The Leys in 1808 at the age of 16 and went into West House. He won Second Colours at Football.

On leaving school, Brooke went to Canada and worked as a mechanic.

At the outbreak of war, Brooke enlisted in a Yeomanry Regiment before volunteering for the Royal Flying Corps in 1915. He was killed in an air accident on 10 December 1916 at the age of 24, having reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He is buried at Dry Drayton Churchyard, Cambridgeshire.

Second Lieutenant, Northants Yeomanry & 28 Squadron, Royal Flying Corps, aged 22. Killed in flying accident, 10 December 1916, at Gosport Hants. The aircraft, a Henri Farman, stalled and crashed from 200ft. The aircraft's other occupant, Second Lieutenant William Desmond Guthrie Lotan, from Dublin (Royal Munster Fusiliers and Royal Flying Corps) was also killed and is buried at Clare, Co.Kildare

See also Childerley and Dry Drayton .

BROWN, MC

John

Brown was born in 1888. Son of William and Florence Fannie Brown, M.B.E., of Longfield, Heaton Mersey, Manchester. He came to The Leys in 1902 at the age of 15 and went into West House. He was a Prefect, a Cadet Sergeant and won First Colours at Football and Second Colours at Lacrosse.

On leaving school, Brown worked for the family business in Manchester.

At the outbreak of war, Brown joined the Manchester Regiment. He served with distinction in France and Belgium, and won the Military Cross (M.C.) during the Battle of Passchendaele. He was killed in action on 21 March 1918 at the age of 29, having reached the rank of Captain. He is commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial, Somme, panel numbers 64 to 67.

See also Stockports Soldiers 1914-1918 for more details

BULLEN

Roy Evans

Bullen was born in 1892. He came to The Leys in 1907 at the age of 15 and went into West House. He was Head Prefect, Captain of Lacrosse and Cricket and won First Colours at Football.

On leaving school, Bullen went up to Jesus College, University of Cambridge, to read Law. He completed his degree at the Inner Temple in London.

At the outbreak of war, Bullen joined the King’s Royal Rifle Corps and served with distinction in France, being mentioned in dispatches. He was killed in action on 29 April 1916 at the age of 23, having reached the rank of Captain. He is buried at Maroc British Cemetery, Nord, grave number I. A. 2.

See also Cambridge Short Street Wesleyan Methodist

BURROUGHES

Bernard Hollis

Burroughes was born in 1879. He came to The Leys in 1892 at the age of 13 and went into West House. He won Second Colours at Lacrosse and Football.

On leaving school, Burroughes went up to University College London.

At the outbreak of war, Burroughes gained a commission in the Royal Engineers, Anti-Gas Department. He died on 11 December 1919 at the age of 40, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is buried at Ipswich Cemetery, Suffolk, grave number Q. 8. 48.

CALVERT

Lionel

Calvert was born in 1886. He came to The Leys in 1902 at the age of 16 and went into West House. He was a Cadet Sergeant, a Member of the Bisley VIII and won Tri-colours.

On leaving school, Calvert trained at the Royal School of Mines and then worked as a mining engineer in South Africa and Rhodesia.

At the outbreak of war, Calvert took a commission in the Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry, before transferring to the Royal Engineers. He served with distinction in France as one of the original members of the tunnelling section of the Engineers. He was killed in action on 30 January 1917 at the age of 30, having reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He is buried at Aveluy Cemetery, Somme, grave number K. 6.

CARMICHAEL

Douglas

Carmichael was born in 1894. Son of William and Florence Fannie Brown, M.B.E., of Longfield, Heaton Mersey, Manchester. He came to The Leys in 1905 at the age of 11 and went into North A House. He was a Prefect and a Cadet Sergeant.

On leaving school, Carmichael went up to Jesus College, University of Cambridge.

At the outbreak of war, Carmichael joined the Rifle Brigade and served with distinction in France and Belgium. He was killed in action on 25 September 1915 at the age of 21, having reached the rank of Captain. He is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, panel numbers 46-48 and 50.

Extract from de Ruvigny's The Roll of Honour 1914-1918 Part 2 Page 58:

CARMICHAEL, DOUGLAS, Capt., 9th (Service) Battn. The Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort’s Own), eldest s. of James Carmichael, of Redclyffe, Streatham Park, London, J.P., by his wife, Annie Reid, dau. of James Reid Ruthvin, of co. Perth; b. Wandsworth, London, S.W., 17 Jan. 1894; educ. Lys School (sic.), Cambridge, and Jesus College, Cambridge, where he graduated B.A.; volunteered his services on the outbreak of war, and was gazetted 2nd Lieut. The Rifle Brigade, 9 Sept. 1914, and promoted Lieut. 1 Oct., and Capt. 4 March, 1915; went to France in May, and was killed in action at Hooge 26 Sept. following. Lieut.-Colonel W. Villiers-Stuart wrote on 29 Aug. 1915: “I am taking the liberty of writing you to tell you about Douglas. From the very beginning he was quite exceptionally valuable, and his capacity and industry were amazing. But he has in the last month been compelled to show himself as he really is - no longer to hide his magnificent qualities under his modest demeanour. The battalion was very badly knocked about in the fighting at . . , Your son’s first act was to collect men of another Regiment, who, by his personality and fearlessness, he rallied and kept with him till long afterwards they were able to rejoin their unit. As time wore on, the incessant bombardment and continued drain in wounded officers began to affect the battalion, and so your son, who had already organized in the most excellent way everything within reach, was sent to steady two companies. Many of the N.C.O.’s and riflemen have told me that while your son was near they were perfectly happy. He carried out every kind of duty under incessant shell fire till we were relieved, and I don’t think he can have slept at all for many days. Since then I have had more opportunity than before of seeing his work, and the more I see, the more extraordinarily capable I know (not think) him to be. I have recommended him for some mark of distinction, and he thoroughly deserves such a mark. . . . I would much like you to know that I, an old soldier of many years’ service in wild and rough places, would give command of the battalion over to your son to-day, with the knowledge that he is a better and more capable soldier than any I have seen in twenty-five years’ service. His capacity you would know; his coolness is phenomenal, and his bravery quite exceptional,” and again after his death: “He was killed on 25 Sept. in action near . . - I saw him last at twelve o’clock midnight, and he was killed next morning about nine o’clock. His bravery is a byword in the division. He fought that day with infinite courage. I have no words, and no one else would have any, to express his magnificent bravery. For long he has done everything for me, and he knew be was absolutely trusted. I shall never see a soldier like him again. It Is quite impossible that anyone so fearless could ever be found. He carried four lines of trenches With his company under a moat desperate artillery and machine-gun fire, and, when muses of Germans came against him, by his wonderful personality he kept his men, now reduced to a handful, in good spirit, and led them again and again to the attack. They say it was glorious to see him throw himself on the packed masses of Germans and almost alone forced them back. He rallied the men over and over again, and they stuck to him till the end. He was wounded early in the day, about 5 am., but, just like him, made nothing of it. He was killed instantaneously by a bullet in the forehead as he was once more leading a bomb charge. We tried to bring in his body in the evening, but it had been completely destroyed by high-explosive German shells. I will try and tell you better in a few days about it all; but we are so worn out just now that words will not come. He would have earned the V.C. ten times had he lived. He was the most capable and bravest officer of the old army or the new army I have ever or shall ever see, and I can never look on his like again. It is heartrendingly sad that he had to go. Two divisions were attacking. You will know that Douglas carried more German trenches than any other officer on the whole front. Others could not carry any. He at once time carried five lines. If it is possible for you to have any consolation in losing your son, he had become well known for his devotion to duty, bravery and capacity, and I have lost my very best officer and my great friend, who I admired so greatly.” Sergt. W. Walker, Machine Gun Section, also wrote: “There was not a man in our battalion who would not have followed him anywhere. To cut a long story short, he was in command of the whole attack on the morning of the 25th, and right well did he lead us until he was hit in the leg. Then we pushed forward alone, as he refused to have any assistance; but just after I saw him hopping on one leg towards the next line of German trenches under a murderous fire. We took three lines in all, but had to retire. Your son was still in command, absolutely refusing to be taken back. On reaching the original German front line he rallied the small handful of men left, and told us to hold it at all costs, which we did against masses of Germans until almost every man was either killed or wounded. Your son was killed with a machine gun, and I was twice wounded at the same time. It was instantaneous, and his last words were: ‘For God’s sake hold them back!’ He earned the V .C. 50 times over. No officer could be loved more or held in higher esteem by his men than your gallant son. A more gallant leader or fearless man never led men on the field of battle.” Unm.

CAUDWELL

Thord

Caudwell was born in 1897 at Sheffield. Son of Lucy Caudwell, of Chyvarrian, St. Buryan, Cornwall, and the late Ben Caudwell. He came to The Leys in 1911 at the age of 14 and went into North B House. He was a Prefect, Captain of the Second XV and won the Kelvin Leaving Scholarship.

On leaving school, Caudwell won a Classical Scholarship to Christ’s College, University of Cambridge.

In 1915, Caudwell joined the Inns of Court Officer Training Corps, before gaining a commission in the London Regiment (Queen’s Westminster Rifles). He was killed in action at the Battle of Cambrai on 30 November 1917. He was aged 20 and had reached the rank of Captain. He is buried at Moeuvres Cemetery, Nord, grave number III. B. 5.

CHANDLER

Edwin Spencer

Chandler was born in 1895. Son of Maria Corderoy Chandler, of 7, Albany Rd., St. Leonards-on-Sea, Sussex, and the late George Chandler. He came to The Leys in 1909 at the age of 14 and went into North B House. A talented scholar, he was awarded the Kelvin Leaving Scholarship. He was also a Prefect and won Second Colours at Hockey.

On leaving school, Chandler was awarded an Exhibition in History to Jesus College, University of Cambridge.

At the outbreak of war, Chandler joined the Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derby Regiment) and served with distinction in Belgium. He was killed in action on 14 February 1916 at the age of 20, having reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, panel numbers 29 and 41.

CHUBB

Edward Geoffrey

Chubb was born in 1869. He came to The Leys in 1879 at the age of 11 and went into School House. He was a Prefect and on First Colours at Football

On leaving school, Chubb went up to King’s College, University of Cambridge, and read Classics and Law. He then worked as a Solicitor for the Marconi Company.

At the outbreak of war, Chubb joined The Queen’s (Royal West Surrey Regiment) and served with distinction in Belgium. He was killed in action on 16 July 1915 at the age of 46, having reached the rank of Captain. His son Francis John MacLardie Chubb also fell. He is buried at Tancrez Farm Cemetery, Comines-Warneton, grave number I. B. 23.

CLOUTMAN

Wolfred Reeve

Cloutman was born in 1890 at Wealdstone, Harrow, Middlesex. Son of Alfred B. and C. J. Cloutman, of Old Hall, 17, South Grove, Highgate, London. He came to The Leys in 1907 at the age of 17 and went into School House. A noted scholar, he catalogued the school museum.

On leaving school, Cloutman studied Mining Engineering at Imperial College, University of London, before conducting post-graduate research in Australia and Malaya.

At the outbreak of war, Cloutman gained a commission in the Royal Engineers and served with distinction in France, being mentioned in dispatches. Killed in rescuing a Sergeant whom he carried on his shoulder 45 feet up a ladder from the bottom of a mine, on 21 August 1915, at the age of 25, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. As soon as the Sergeant was lifted off, this officer, overcome with foul gas, fell to the bottom. He is buried at Norfolk Cemetery, Bercordel-Becourt, grave number I. A. 14.

COLE

Kenneth Leonard

Cole was born in 1893. Son of Thomas Cole, of 3, Endcliffe Crescent, Sheffield. He came to The Leys in 1907 at the age of 14 and went into School House. He was a Cadet Lance-Corporal and won First Colours at Football.

On leaving school, Cole worked in the family business in Sheffield, and was an enthusiastic member of his local church and Boys Brigade.

At the outbreak of war, Cole joined the York and Lancaster Regiment and served with distinction in France. He was killed in action at the Battle of Loos, on 30 September 1915 at the age of 21, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is commemorated on the Loos Memorial, Pas de Calais, panel numbers 105 and 106.

Extract from de Ruvigny's The Roll of Honour 1914-1918 Part 2 Page 74:

COLE, KENNETH LEONARD, 2nd Lieut., 3rd (Reserve), attd. 1st (65th Foot), Battn. The York and Lancaster Regt., only s. of Thomas Cole, of Hill Crest, Ranmoor, Sheffield; b. Sheffield, co. York, 19 Oct. 1893; educ. Eastbourne and Leys School, Cambridge; joined, the Sheffield Battn. York and Lancaster Regt. early in Sept. 1914; was promoted L.-Corpl. on 29 Sept., and gazetted 2nd Lieut. York and Lancaster Regt. the same day; joined the 3rd Battn. at South Shields on 6 Oct.; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from 21 April, 1915, being for some time attached to the 1st East Surrey Regt. in the Ypres salient; went, back to the 1st Battn. of his own Regiment in Aug., and was killed in action near Loos 30 Sept. following, while in command of No. 1 Platoon, A Coy. His Colonel wrote: “He was killed in a charge. He was most plucky in leading his men to the attack when he fell, and there is no doubt that he and some of his brother officers showed the utmost courage, and by their example spurred their men on to re-take a lost trench. Their object was achieved, and the Regiment was specially picked out for praise by the Divisional Commander for their splendid work. Your son had not been long with this battalion, but quite long enough for me to appreciate what a hard-working, promising officer he was.” Unm.

COLLEN

William Stewart

Collen was born in 1889. Son of Joseph and Hannah Collen, of Homestead, Dundrum. Co. Dublin. He came to The Leys in 1906 at the age of 17 and went into West House. He won Second Colours at Football.

On leaving school, Collen worked in the family business in Ireland.

At the outbreak of war, Collen gained a commission in the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers and served with distinction in the Dardanelles. He was killed during the Suvla Bay landings on 7 August 1915, aged 25, having reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He is buried at Green Hill Cemetery, Gallipoli, grave number A. 9.

CONCANON

George Lewis Blake

Concanon was born in 1881 in Brisbane, Queensalnd, Australia. Son of William Augustus Concanon and Elizabeth Lloyd Jenkins (his wife); husband of Evelyn E. Concanon, of "Maylagh," Cleveland St., Wahroonga, New South Wales. He came to The Leys in 1896 at the age of 15 and went into North A House. He was a Prefect and won First Colours at Football

On leaving school, Concanon won a History Scholarship to King’s College, University of Cambridge. After illness curtailed his studies, he travelled widely before settling in New South Wales, Australia. .

At the outbreak of war, Concanon joined the 2nd Battalion, 1st Infantry Brigade, Australian Infantry and served with distinction in the Dardanelles. He was killed in action at Gallipoli on 27 April 1915 at the age of 34, having reached the rank of Captain. He is buried at Lone Pine Memorial, Gallipoli, grave number 16.

Enlisted Wahroonga, New South Wales. Native of Brisbane. He held a commission in the Sherwood Foresters and was a Major in the Commonwealth Militia Forces

COOKE

Sydney John Snow

Cooke was born in 1878. He came to The Leys in 1891 at the age of 13 and went into West House. He won First Colours at Football and Second Colours at Lacrosse.

On leaving school, Cooke went up to St. John’s College, University of Cambridge.

Cooke served in South West Africa during the war and died on active service in 1915. The whereabouts of his burial are not known.

DAVEY

Reginald Hubert

Davey was born in 1888. Son of William J. Davey, J.P., and Mrs. Davey, of "Woodlea," Wandsworth Common, London. He came to The Leys in 1905 at the age of 17 and went into North A House.

On leaving school, Davey worked as a Civil Engineer and was an Associate Member of the Institute of Civil Engineers.

On the outbreak of war, Davey joined the Royal Guernsey Light Infantry, and served with distinction in France and Belgium. He died of illness on 28 November 1919 at the age of 31, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He was attached to C.R.E. Boulogne at the time of his death. He is buried at Terlincthun British Cemetery, Pas de Calais, grave number XIV. C. 14.

DAWE

Alfred Henry

Dawe was born in 1895. He came to The Leys in 1911 at the age of 15 and went into West House. He was a Sub-Prefect, and a noted scholar.

On leaving school, Dawe went up to Downing College, University of Cambridge, to study Natural Sciences.

Following the outbreak of war, Dawe joined the King’s Royal Rifle Corps, serving with distinction on the Somme. He was killed in action on 11 April 1917, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is commemorated on the Arras Memorial, Pas de Calais, panel number 7.

See also Cambridge Short Street Wesleyan Methodist

DODS

John Ballantyne

Dods was born in 1880. Son of Isabella G. Dods, of 7, Chalmers St., Edinburgh. He came to The Leys in 1892 at the age of 12. He won Second Colours at Football.

On leaving school, Dods worked in the jute trade in Calcutta.

In 1915, Dods joined in the Royal Scots. He served with distinction in France and was invalided back to Britain in 1916. He was subsequently killed in action on 11 April 1918 at the age of 38, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is buried at Lillers Cemetery, Pas de Calais, grave number V. E. 44.

DYSON

(Reverend) William Hubert

Dyson was born in 1892. Son of Dr. William Dyson, M.D. and Mrs. E. J. Dyson, of 35, Westbourne Rd., Sheffield. He came to The Leys in 1906 at the age of 14 and went into North B House. He was a Prefect and a respected scholar.

On leaving school, Dyson was awarded an Exhibition in History and Theology to King’s College, University of Cambridge. In 1914, he was accepted as a candidate for the Wesleyan Ministry.

At the outbreak of war, Dyson gained a commission in the London Regiment (Queen’s Westminster Rifles) and served with distinction in France. He was killed during the Battle of the Somme on 14 July 1916, at the age of 24, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is buried at Fillievres Cemetery, Pas de Calais, grave number A. 9.

See also Cambridge Short Street Wesleyan Methodist

EDWARDS

Osborne Montague

Edwards was born in 1885. Son of Edward Montague Edwards, J.P. and Alice Edwards, of "Osmont," Grove Park, Wanstead, Essex. He came to The Leys in 1901 at the age of 16 and went into North B House. He was a Sub-Prefect and won First Colours at Cricket.

On leaving school, Edwards worked as an Assistant Dock Manager at the West India Docks in London.

In 1915, Edwards joined the Inns of Court Officer Training Corps and subsequently gained a commission in the Machine Gun Corps. He was killed leading his men into action on 25 August 1918 at the age of 27, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is buried at Bocquoy Cemetery, Pas de Calais, grave number A. 9.

ELMSLIE

John Leslie

Elmslie was born in 1896. Son of Leslie Cruickshank Elmslie and Catharine Elmslie, of Eltermere, Elterwater, Ambleside, Westmorland. Son of Leslie Cruickshank Elmslie and Catharine Elmslie, of Eltermere, Elterwater, Ambleside, Westmorland. He came to The Leys in 1910 at the age of 14 as a Day-boy. He was a Prefect, Captain of Football, Editor of the ‘Fortnightly’ and Cadet Colour Sergeant.

After leaving school, Elmslie gained a commission but gave it up in order to join the Honourable Artillery Company, which offered the chance of immediate service at the front. As one of five Old Leysians in the same section, he served with distinction in Belgium. He was killed in action on 11 March 1915 at the age of 18. He is buried at Kemmel Chateau Military Cemetery, West-Vlaanderen, grave number F. 12.

EVANS

Francis Vaughan

Evans was born in 1892. Son of the late Richard Watson Evans and Catherine Anne Evans. He came to The Leys in 1907 at the age of 15 and went into North A House.

On leaving school, Evans was articled to his father’s firm of Solicitors and read Law at the University of London. He became a fully qualified Solicitor in 1914. A solicitor and a member of the firm of J. Tiekle & Co., 63, Cheapside, London.

At the outbreak of war, Evans enlisted as Private 204593 in the 3rd/4th Battalion, Queen’s Own (Royal West Kent Regiment) and served with distinction in Belgium. He was killed in action on 24 October 1917, at the age of 25. He is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, West-Vlaanderen, panel numbers 106 to 108.

EYRE

Henry Wright

Eyre was born in 1893. He came to The Leys in 1908 at the age of 15 and went into School House. He was a gifted musician.

On leaving school, Eyre worked for the family stationary firm in Bristol, and continued to indulge his love for music.

At the outbreak of war, Eyre joined the Gloucestershire Regiment and served with distinction in France. He died of his wounds on 26 July 1916 at the age of 23, having reached the rank of Captain. He is buried at Longuenesse (St. Omer) Souvenir Cemetery, Pas de Calais, grave number IV. A. 22.

FERNIE

Roy MacKenzie

Fernie was born in 1890. Son of David and Isabella Fernie, of Liverpool. He came to The Leys in 1905 at the age of 15 and went into North A House. He was a Prefect, a Member of the Bisley VIII and won First Colours at Football.

On leaving school, Fernie trained in Practical Engineering at Bedford.

At the outbreak of war, Fernie gained a commission in the Signalling Corps (6th Signal Company) of the Royal Engineers and served with distinction in Belgium. He was killed in action on 16 August 1915 at the age of 25, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is buried at Ramparts Cemetery, Ypres, grave number I. 1.

FLETT

Arthur David

Flett was born in 1880 in Edinburgh. Son of David Flett. He came to The Leys in 1894 at the age of 14 and went into North B House. He was a member of both the Prefect and Games Committees, won First Colours at Football and Cricket, and captained the Second Lacrosse XII.

On leaving school, Flett qualified as a Chartered Accountant in Edinburgh, and was the Secretary of both the Edinburgh University Athletic Club and the Scottish Football Union.

At the outbreak of war, Flett joined the Royal Scots and served with distinction in France. He was killed in action on 9 April 1917 at the age of 37, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is buried at Bailleul Road East Cemetery, Pas de Calais, grave number I. G. 1.

FLETT

Henry William

Flett was born in 1882. He came to The Leys in 1896 at the age of 14 and went into North A House. He was a Prefect, won Tri-colours, and was Captain of both Cricket and Football.

On leaving school, Flett worked as a Chartered Accountant in Edinburgh, before moving to Vancouver to work as a Company Secretary.

At the outbreak of war, Flett enlisted as a Private in the 47th Battalion of the Canadian Expeditionary Force, before taking a commission in the Black Watch. He served with distinction in France, winning a Military Cross. He died of wounds on 19 April 1916 at the age of 34, having reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He is buried at Aubigny Cemetery, Pas de Calais, grave number V. A. 5.

From his attestation papers:

Born 17th January 1883 in Edinburgh. Brother of R J R Flett of 5 Buckingham Pece, Edinburgh. Accountant by profession. Unmarried. Enlisted and passed fit 17th March 1915, aged 32 years 3 months. Service No. 29094. Height 6 feet, girth 40½ inches, complexion medium, eyes blue, hair fair; religion Presbyterian.

See National Archives of Canada Accession Reference: RG 150, Accession 1992-93/166, Box 3151 - 31

FLETT

John Edward

[He is listed here as John Edward FLETT but the CWGC, SDGW and de Ruvigny list him as John Edmund FLETT] Flett was born in 1877. Son of David Flett. He came to The Leys in 1890 at the age of 13 and went into North B House. He was a Prefect, and won First Colours at Football and Second Colours at Lacrosse.

On leaving school, Flett worked for Scottish Provident in Manchester.

At the outbreak of war, Flett joined the Royal Scots and served with distinction in the Dardanelles. He was killed in action on 15 November 1915 at the age of 38, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is buried at Pink Farm Cemetery, Gallipoli, grave number III. B. 9.

Extract from de Ruvigny's The Roll of Honour 1914-1918 Part 2 Page 120:

FLETT, JOHN EDMUND, Capt., 7th Battn. The Royal Soots (Lothian Regt.) (T.F.), s. of the late David Fleet, of Edinburgh, Solicitor, by his wife, Eleonara; and brother to Dr. A. B. Flett, the Scottish International, and an ex-President of the Scottish Football Union; b. Edinburgh, 19 Sept. 1877; educ. Craigmount, Edinburgh, and The Leys, Cambridge; was an Insurance Inspector in the Scottish Provident Institution; volunteered for service on the outbreak of war, and was gazetted 2nd Lieut. Royal Scots 17 Sept. 1914; served with the Expeditionary Force at Gallipoli, and was killed in action 15 Nov. 1915. Buried in the 52nd Divisional Cemetery there. Capt. Flett was mentioned in Despatches by General Sir Ian Hamilton, for gallant and distinguished service in the field. He was a well-known Rugby footballer, and at one time played for the Edinburgh Wanderers Football Club; unm.

FOULDES

John Thomas

{Listed as Thomas John FOULDES on CWGC and SDGW] Fouldes was born in 1891. Son of John and Mary Fouldes; husband of Lydia W. Fouldes, of Bencleugh, Harpenden, Herts. He came to The Leys in 1907 at the age of 16 and went into West House. He was a Sub-Prefect, and won First Colours at Football and Second Colours at Cricket.

On leaving school, Fouldes worked for the family business, and was an enthusiastic member of his local Church.

At the outbreak of war, Fouldes joined a Public Schools Battalion, before obtaining a commission in the Royal Field Artillery in 1915. He served with distinction in France and Greece, and was mentioned in dispatches. He was killed in action whie serving in "A" Battery, 114th Brigade, on 25 June 1918 at the age of 26, having reached the rank of Captain. He is buried at Karasouli Military Cemetery, Salonika, grave number A. 5.

GALLIMORE

Henry Burrows

Gallimore was born in 1885. Son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Gallimore; husband of Ethel M. B. Gallimore, of Endcliffe Vale House, Ranmoor, Sheffield. He came to The Leys in 1899 at the age of 14 and went into North A House. He was a noted scholar.

On leaving school, Gallimore went up to King’s College, University of Cambridge, to read Medieval and Modern Languages. He then worked in the family business in Sheffield.

At the outbreak of war, Gallimore gained a commission in the Royal Field Artillery and served with distinction in France. He was killed in action while serving with "D" Battery, 312th Brigade, on 26 May 1917, at the age of 21, having reached the rank of Captain. He is buried at the Honourable Artillery Company Cemetery, Pas de Calais, grave number III. G. 24.

GARDNER

Ivan George Richard

Gardner was born in 1889 in South Africa. He came to The Leys in 1905 at the age of 16 and went into West House. He was a member of the First XV and a champion gymnast.

On leaving school, Gardner studied at Potchefstroom Agricultural College and then became a farmer in the Kronstaad district.

In 1914, Gardner joined Colonel Manie Botha’s army in the campaign to put down the rebellion by pro-German South Africans. Gardner died of illness on 1 July 1915 at the age of 26, having reached the rank of Sergeant. The whereabouts of his burial are not known.

GEORGE

Edward Barcroft

George was born in 1897. Son of Edward James and Eleanor George, of The Hall, Consett, Co. Durham. He came to The Leys in 1910 at the age of 13 and went into School House. He was a Prefect, Cadet Colour-Sergeant, Editor of the ‘Fortnightly’, Secretary of the Literary Society and won First Colours at Football and Second Colours at Hockey.

Immediately on leaving school, George won a commission in the Durham Light Infantry and served with distinction in France. He was killed in action while attached to the 15th Battalion from the 4th on 16 September 1916 at the age of 19, having reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He is buried at the Australian Imperial Force Burial Ground, Somme, grave number II. A. 6.

GLENNY

Ernest Howard

Glenny was born in 1891. Son of Edward H. and Lydia Glenny, of "St. David's," Aldersbrook Rd., Manor Park, Essex. He came to The Leys in 1907 at the age of 16 and went into West House.

On leaving school, Glenny went up to the London School of Economics and later served at the Industrial Trust. He then trained as a doctor at St. Bart’s Hospital, London.

In 1917, Glenny joined the Royal Army Medical Corps and was appointed Medical Officer to the British General Hospital in Mesopotamia. He died of illness on 9 October 1918 at the age of 26, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is buried at Basra War Cemetery, grave number I. O. 22.

GOULD

Roy Ernest

Gould was born in 1895. Son of John Herbert Gould, of "Taormina," South Border, Purley, Surrey and the late Palacia C. Gould, of Ravenswood, Loughton, Essex. He came to The Leys in 1909 at the age of 14 and went into North A House. He was a Sub-Prefect, Cadet Corporal and won First Colours at Football and Second Colours at Hockey and Cricket.

On leaving school, Gould was articled to a firm of Architects and Surveyors.

At the outbreak of war, Gould enlisted in the London Regiment (Queen’s Westminster Rifles) and was invalided back to Britain in May 1915. He subsequently gained a commission in the Essex Regiment and served with distinction in Egypt and Palestine. He was killed during the Battle of Gaza on 27 March 1917. He was aged 21 and had reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He is commemorated on the Jerusalem Memorial, panel numbers 33 to 39.

GRANT

James Gibson

Grant was born in 1892. Son of Mrs. F. S. Grant, late of "Granton," Sefton Park, Liverpool, now of 21, Edge Hill, Wimbledon, London. He came to The Leys in 1908 at the age of 16 and went into North A House. He was a Prefect and won First Colours at Football and Cricket.

At the outbreak of war, Grant joined The King’s (Liverpool Regiment) and served with distinction in France and Belgium. He died of disease on 19 December 1919 at the age of 27, having reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He is buried at Toxteth Park Cemetery, Liverpool, grave number D. N. C. 218.

GRAY

William Leslie

Gray was born in 1898. Son of Charles Wesley Gray and Harriet Gray, of Linby, Notts. He came to The Leys in 1912 at the age of 14 and went into North A House.

On leaving school, Gray went up to Nottingham University College to read Engineering, before embarking on a farming career.

Gray joined the Nottingham University, and later, the Inns of Court Officer Training Corps, gaining a commission in May 1918, in the Suffolk Regiment. He was killed in action on 28 September 1918, only a few hours after arriving in the trenches. He was aged 20 and had reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He is buried at Grevillers British Cemetery, Pas de Calais, grave number XII. E. 18.

GREGORY

Stephan Barnes

[Listed as Stephen on CWGC and SDGW] Gregory was born in 1895. Only son of Alfred and Ada Gregory, of Hillside, Tiverton, Devon. He came to The Leys in 1909 at the age of 14 and went into School House. He was a Prefect, Cadet Sergeant a Member of the Bisley VIII and won Second Colours at Football. See also Cambridge Short Street Wesleyan Methodist

On leaving school, Gregory went up to Clare College, University of Cambridge to read law, and won an Exhibition. He then joined the Territorial Army and was heavily involved in Church and Sunday School work.

At the outbreak of war, Gregory sailed with the Devonshire Regiment for India, before being sent to Mesopotamia in July 1915. He was a member of the British Expeditionary Force captured by the Turks at Kut al-Amara. He died of illness on 3 June 1916 at the age of 21, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is commemorated on the Basra Memorial, panel number 11.

Extract from de Ruvigny's The Roll of Honour 1914-1918 Part 3 Page 121:

GREGORY, STEPHEN BARNES, Lieut., 4th (Territorial) Battn. The Devonshire Regt., only s. of Alfred Thomas Gregory, J.P., Mayor of Tiverton 1911 to 1917, and Proprietor and Editor of the "Tiverton Gazette." by his wife, Ada, dau. of James Barnes, J.P. ; b. Tiverton, co. Devon, 17 Feb. 1895; educ. Blundell’s School there.; The Leys School. Cambridge, and Clara College, Cambridge (Scholarship in Law, 1914); was in the O.T.C. at The Leys, and in the Shooting VIII. ; entered at Clare College in 1913 ; passed first in First Division Law Examination, May, 1914 : joined the Territorial Force as 2nd Lieut. Oct. 1913 gazetted Lieut. 4th Devonshire Regt. 12 Nov. 1914: went to India with his battalion the following Dec. thence to Mesopotamia In Aug. 1915, in command of a draft of 40 picked men to reinforce the Royal West Kent Regt. ; was with the besieged force in Kut-el-Amara 2 Dec. 1915, to 29 April. 1916, and on the surrender of the garrison became a prisoner of war, being marched to Mosul, Mesopotamia, where he died of enteritis 3 June following ; unm.

GUMMER

Stanley

Gummer was born in 1890. He came to The Leys in 1904 at the age of 14 and went into North B House. He was Captain of the Second XI, a Cadet Lance-Corporal and a noted scholar.

On leaving school, Gummer was articled to a Solicitor in Rotherham, and completed his Law degree through the University of London. He also played cricket in the Yorkshire Second XI.

At the outbreak of war, Gummer enlisted in the York and Lancaster Regiment and later gained a commission. He was killed in action during the Battle of Passchendaele, on 9 October 1917. He was aged 27 and had reached the rank of Captain. He is commemorated on Tyne Cot Memorial, West-Vlaanderen, panel numbers 125 to 128.

Extract from de Ruvigny's The Roll of Honour 1914-1918 Part 34 Page 72:

GUMMER, STANLEY, Capt., 5th (Territorial) Battn. The York and Lancaster Regt., elder s. of William Guest Gummer, of Totley Rise, Sheffield, by his wife, Gertrude, dau. of Jonathan Hemingway; b. Rotherham, co. York, 14 Feb. 1890 educ. Leys School, Cambridge; was a partner in the firm of Messrs. Gichard & Gummer, Solicitors, of Rotherham; volunteered for active service on the outbreak of war, and was gazetted 2nd Lieut. The York and Lancaster Regt. 9 Feb. 1915; promoted Lieut. 1 June, 1916, and Capt. 8 July following; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from 19 Sept. 1915, taking part in many engagements and was killed in action at Passchendaele 9 Oct. 1917. Buried there. He was a good all-round cricketer, playing with the Rotherham Town Team and the Yorkshire County Reserves, and was also a keen Rugby footballer. He m. at Rotherham Church, 24 Sept. 1913, Vera (Broom Lane, Rotherham) dau. of William Michael Gichard, and had two children: Michael Gichard, b. 7 July, 1917, and Dinah Gichard, b. 12 June, 1914.

HALL

Fred

Hall was born in 1897. Son of Mr. and Mrs. T. Davison Hall, of North Shields. He came to The Leys in 1907 at the age of 10 and went into West House. He was a Prefect, a member of the Water Polo and Football teams and the Bisley VIII.

On leaving school, Hall went to Sandhurst, enetered the Soresetshire Regiment and received a commission in the Royal Flying Corps in July 1916. He was killed in action on 22 September 1916 at the age of 19, having reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. The whereabouts of his burial are not known.

HARDING

Geoffrey Harold

Harding was born in 1894 in Plymouth. He came to The Leys in 1904 at the age of 12 and went into School House. He was a noted scholar and a Cadet Lance-Corporal.

On leaving school, Harding went up to the University of London to read Chemistry.

At the outbreak of war, Harding gained a commission in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment. He was wounded in Mesopotamia and invalided back to Britain, where he was promoted to a position on the Air Board. He was accidentally drowned in the Thames on 3 September 1917, almost at the very hour of the death his brother, Sidney. He was aged 25 and had reached the rank of Captain. He is buried at Maidenhead Cemetery, Berkshire, grave number A. 15. M.

HARDING

Sidney Allen

Harding was born in 1893 in Plymouth. Brother of Mrs. E. M. Melrose, of 8, The Crescent, Plymouth. He came to The Leys in 1904 at the age of 13 and went into School House. He was a noted scholar.

On leaving school, Harding trained as an Engineer and worked in Chicago.

In 1916, Harding returned to Britain and gained a commission in the Royal Flying Corps. He served with distinction in the skies over France, and was mentioned in dispatches. He was killed in an enemy bombing raid on 3 September 1917 almost at the very hour of the death his brother, Geoffrey. He was aged 26 and had reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is buried at Longuenesse Souvenir Cemetery, Pas de Calais, grave number IV. D. 60.

HARGREAVES

James Peter

Hargreaves was born in 1898 in Wetherby. Son of Dr. J. A. Hargreaves, of Wetherby House, Wetherby, Yorks., and the late Annie Hargreaves. He came to The Leys in 1911 at the age of 13 and went into School House. He was a Prefect, Cadet Sergeant-Major and won First Colours in Cricket and Hockey.

On leaving school in 1916, Hargreaves went to the Artillery Cadet School in Exeter and gained his commission in the Royal Field Artillery. He served with distinction in Ireland and France, and would have been recommended for a Military Cross had he lived. He was killed in action, serving with the 126th Brigade, on 9 October 1917 at the age of 19, having reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, West-Vlaanderen, panel numbers 4 to 6 and 162.

HAWKINS

Clarence Vincent Tom

Hawkins was born in 1891. He came to The Leys in 1906 at the age of 15 and went into West House. He was Head Prefect, a Cadet Sergeant, Captain of Football and won Tri-colours.

On leaving school, Hawkins worked in the family colliery in Staffordshire.

At the outbreak of war, Hawkins joined the South Staffordshire Regiment and served with distinction in Ireland and France, being mentioned in dispatches. He was killed on 26 September 1917 at the age of 26, having reached the rank of Captain. He is commemorated on the Loos Memorial, Pas de Calais, panel numbers 73 to 76.

HENDERSON

Hugo Fraser

Henderson was born in 1878. Son of John Lorenso Henderson and Elizabeth Lennox Fraser Henderson; husband of Janie F. Russell Henderson, of 24, Falkland Mansions, Glasgow. He came to The Leys in 1894 at the age of 16 and went into North B House. He won First Colours at Football.

At the outbreak of war, Henderson enlisted in the Royal Irish Rifles. He was killed in action on 15 October 1918 at the age of 40, having reached the rank of Sergeant, 9388, 2nd Battalion. He is buried at Dadizeele British Cemetery, West-Vlaanderen, II. A. 10.

HENRI

Frank

Henri was born in 1894. Son of Arthur and Margaret Ellen Henri, of 18, St. Andrew Street, Holborn Circus, London. He came to The Leys in 1909 at the age of 15 and went into School House. He was a Sub-Prefect and a noted scholar.

On leaving school, Henri went up to Trinity College, University of Cambridge.

At the outbreak of war, Henri gained a commission in the Northumberland Fusiliers and served with distinction in France. After being wounded during the Battle of the Somme, he was sent to the Italian Front. He was killed in action on 15 June 1918 at the age of 24, having reached the rank of Captain. He is buried at Magnaboschi British Cemetery, grave number 3. C. 8.

HOLLOWAY

Bernard Henry

Holloway was born in January 1888. Son of Sir Henry Holloway and Lady Holloway, of Draxmont, Wimbledon Hill, London. He came to The Leys in 1899 at the age of 11 and went into North A House. He was a Senior Prefect, won Tri-colours and was Captain of Cricket.

On leaving school, Holloway went up to Jesus College, University of Cambridge, where he captained the College Cricket team and the University Lacrosse team. After University he trained as a Solicitor. He also played cricket for Sussex and went on an MCC tour to the West Indies.

At the outbreak of war, Holloway gained a commission in the Royal Sussex Regiment, and was quickly promoted to Captain. He was killed during the Battle of Loos on 27 September 1915, aged 27. He is commemorated on the Loos Memorial, Pas de Calais, panel numbers 69 to 73.

HOLMAN

Donald

Holman was born in 1895 in London. Son of Mr. E. S. Holman, of 22, Gloucester Square, Hyde Park, London. He came to The Leys in 1909 at the age of 14 and went into North A House. He was a Prefect, Cadet Sergeant and won First Colours at Football and Hockey and Second Colours at Cricket.

On leaving school, Holman embarked on business training, played football for the Old Leysians and was entered for Trinity College, University of Cambridge.

At the outbreak of war, Holman joined the Middlesex Regiment and served with distinction in Belgium and France. He was killed in action on 8 August 1918, while attached to the 7th Battalion from the 11th, at the age of 24, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is buried at Beacon Cemetery, Somme, grave number II. H. 6.

HOLMAN

Paul

Holman was born in 1893. Son of Herbert and Sophia Hawkes Holman, of 4, Whitehall Court, London, S.W. He came to The Leys in 1904 at the age of 11 and went into North A House. He was a Prefect, Captain of the Bisley VIII and won First Colours at Football.

On leaving school, Holman went up to Jesus College, University of Cambridge, before going on to study for the Bar.

At the outbreak of war, Holman enlisted in the Honourable Artillery as a Private, and quickly gained a commission. He killed in action on 13 February 1915 in the Ypres Salient. He was aged 22 and had reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He is buried at Wytschaete Cemetery, West-Vlaanderen, grave number S. W. II. E. 3.

HOSEGOOD

Henry Arnold

Hosegood was born in 1891 in Bristol. Son of Henry and Ellen Hosegood, of Castle Belle Vue, Redland, Bristol. He came to The Leys in 1906 at the age of 14 and went into West House. He was a Prefect and won First Colours at Football.

On leaving school, Hosegood worked as a merchant at the Bristol Corn Exchange and was well known for his religious and philanthropic work.

At the outbreak of war, Hosegood joined the Royal Fusiliers and served with distinction in Belgium. He was killed in action on 24 February 1915 at the age of 23, having reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He is buried at Kemmel Chateau Military Cemetery, West-Vlaanderen, grave number A. 2.

HOSEGOOD

Ralph

Hosegood was born in 1893 in Bristol. Son of Henry and Ellen Hosegood, of 19, Grove Rd., Redland, Bristol. He came to The Leys in 1908 at the age of 15 and went into West House. He won First Colours at Cricket.

On leaving school, Hosegood was articled to a Solicitor in Bristol and was well known for his commitment to the Church.

At the outbreak of war, Hosegood enlisted as a Private in the Gloucestershire Regiment and later gained a commission. He was killed in action during the Battle of the Somme on 22 July 1916. He was aged 23 and had reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He is buried at Dantzig Alley British Cemetery, Somme, grave number IX. G. 9.

HOUFTON

Charles Morley

Houfton was born in 1887. Son of John Plowright Houfton and Frances Houfton, of Park Hall, Mansfield Woodhouse, Notts. He came to The Leys in 1901 at the age of 14 and went into North B House.

On leaving school, Houfton went to the City and Guilds’ Institute and subsequently worked as an Engineer in Mansfield.

At the outbreak of war, Houfton joined the Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derby Regiment) and served with distinction in France. He was killed on 11 November 1915 at the age of 28, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is buried at Cabaret-Rouge British Cemetery, Pas de Calais, grave number XXVIII. B. 31.

ISARD

Cyril Bickford

Isard was born in 1890. Son of Arthur James and Emily Venning Isard, of "Camano," 54, Quarry Hill Rd., Tonbridge. He came to The Leys in 1906 at the age of 16 and went into North A House. He was a Cadet Lance-Corporal.

On leaving school, Isard joined the Inns of Court Officer Training Corps and trained as a Solicitor. In 1913 he received a commission in the London Regiment.

At the outbreak of war, Houfton was sent to the Dardanelles with his battalion. He was killed in action during the Suvla Bay landings on 15 August 1915. He was aged 25 and had reached the rank of Captain-Adjutant. He is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli, panel numbers 196 and 197.

JEWSON

William Henry

Jewson was born in 1876. Son of George and Mary Jewson, of Tower House, Bracondale, Norwich. He came to The Leys in 1891 at the age of 15 and went into School House.

On leaving school, Jewson worked for the family timber business in Norwich and was well known for his religious and philanthropic commitments. He founded and led a Boys Brigade Company and held a commission in the Territorial Army.

At the outbreak of war, Jewson re-joined the Norfolk Regiment, serving with distinction in the Dardanelles, Egypt and Palestine. He was killed in action during the Battle of Gaza on 19 April 1917. He was aged 42 and had reached the rank of Major. He is commemorated on the Jerusalem Memorial, panel numbers 12 to 15.

JONES

Albert Victor

Jones was born in 1887. Son of the late John Jones, J.P. and Jane Margaret Jones, J.P., of Minafon, Carnarvon. He came to The Leys in 1902 at the age of 15 and went into North B House. He was a noted scholar and won Second Colours at Lacrosse.

On leaving school, Jones went up to King’s College, University of Cambridge, to read Law. Qualifying as a Solicitor, he worked pro bono at the Wesleyan Mission in London.

At the outbreak of war, Jones immediately enlisted as a Private in the Honourable Artillery Company. He was killed on 25 November 1914 at the age of 27. He is commemorated on Ploegsteert Memorial, Hainaut, panel number 1.

KIDSTON

William Hamilton Campbell

Kidston was born in 1878. Son of William Hamilton Kidston and Jessie Cecilia Brownlie Kidston, of Rosebank, Helensburgh, Dumbartonshire. He came to The Leys in 1891 at the age of 13 and went into North A House. He won First Colours at Football and Second Colours at Cricket.

On leaving school, Kidston worked in business and was well respected for his religious and philanthropic commitments.

At the outbreak of war, Kidston gained a commission in his county reserve battalion, before joining the Sportsman’s Battalion as a Private. He subsequently gained a commission in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders and was quickly promoted to Captain. He died of wounds on 8 August 1917 at the age of 39. He is buried at Etaples Military Cemetery, Pas de Calais, grave number XVII. B. 25.

KINGSLEY

Donald Currie

Kingsley was born in 1892. Son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Kingsley; husband of Ethel R. Kingsley, of George St., Blenheim. He came to The Leys in 1907 at the age of 15 and went into School House.

On leaving school, Kingsley worked for some time in the family business in Manchester before emigrating to New Zealand to pursue a career in farming.

In 1916, Kingsley enlisted as a Private in the Canterbury Regiment, New Zealand Expeditionary Force. After distinguished service in Egypt, his battalion was sent to Belgium. He was killed in action at Messines Ridge on 7 June 1917 at the age of 24. He is commemorated at the Messines Ridge (New Zealand) Memorial, West-Vlaanderen.

KNOX

William

Knox was born in 1888. Son of Robert William Knox, of Kilbirnie, Ayrshire. He came to The Leys in 1901 at the age of 13 and went into North A House. He was a Prefect.

On leaving school, Knox went up to Clare College, University of Cambridge. He then worked as a manager of a large thread factory.

At the outbreak of war, Knox gained a commission in the Cameron Highlanders. Invalided back to Britain in 1915, he volunteered for the Royal Flying Corps. He was killed in action, while serving with 13 Squadron, on 20 February 1916 at the age of 27, having reached the rank of Captain. He is buried at Aizecourt-Le-Bas Churchyard, Somme, grave number 2.

LEACH

Robert Edward

Leach was born in 1887. Son of E H and H A Leach, of "The Chestnuts," Newmarket, Suffolk. He came to The Leys in 1901 at the age of 13 and went into West House.

On leaving school, Leach followed in his father’s footsteps and trained as a Veterinarian.

At the outbreak of war, Leach joined the Army Veterinary Corps and went, attached to the 64th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, to France in May 1915. He was killed in action during the Battle of Passchendaele on 29 November 1917. He was aged 30 and had reached the rank of Captain. He is buried at Vlamertinghe Cemetery, West-Vlaanderen, grave number IX. A. 19.

LLOYD-JONES

Ivor Thomas

Lloyd-Jones was born in 1895. Son of Annie Lloyd Jones, of Vronhaul, Llandinam, Mont., and the late Rev. David Lloyd Jones, M.A. He came to The Leys in 1908 at the age of 13 and went into West House. He was a Prefect, a Member of the Bisley VIII, a Cadet Corporal and a noted scholar.

At the outbreak of war, Lloyd-Jones gave up his place at Gonville and Caius College, University of Cambridge, and volunteered for the Welsh Fusiliers. After distinguished service in the Dardanelles, he was transferred to Egypt. He was killed in action, with "A" Company, 1st/7th Battalion, during the Battle of Gaza on 26 March 1917. He was aged 22 and had reached the rank of Captain. The whereabouts of his burial are not known

LOVATT

James Muncaster

Lovatt was born in 1881 at Didsbury, Manchester. Son of James and Mary Elizabeth Lovatt (nee Muncaster), of "The Gables," Priory Avenue, Hastings. He came to The Leys in 1896 at the age of 15 and went into North B House.

In 1899, Lovatt emigrated to Australia.

At the outbreak of war, Lovatt enlisted in the 9th Battalion, Australian Infantry at Redland Bay, Queensland. He was killed in action on 25 April 1915 at the age of 34, having reached the rank of Sergeant (Serial No. 303). He is commemorated at Lone Pine Memorial, Gallipoli, panel number 30.

LUPTON

Geoffrey Arthur

Lupton was born in 1893 in Ilkley. Son of William Arthur Lupton, of Red Gables, Ilkley, Yorks, and the late Constance Lupton. He came to The Leys in 1907 at the age of 14 and went into North A House. He was a Prefect, Honorary Scholar, the first Hockey Captain of the school, and won First Colours in Cricket and Second Colours in Football.

On leaving school, Lupton won an Entrance Foundation Scholarship to King’s College, University of Cambridge, and graduated with first class honours in Classics in 1915.

After being repeatedly turned for military service on account of his eyesight, Lupton enlisted as a Private in the Public Schools Battalion of the Royal Fusiliers. He was killed in action, with "A" Company, 23rd Battalion, on 17 February 1917 at the age of 23, having reached the rank of Lance-Corporal. He is buried at Regina Trench Cemetery, Somme, grave number IV. E. 14.

McAULAY

Francis Willmer

McAulay was born in 1891. Only son of Samuel and Maud Mary McAulay, of Aylesby, Grimsby. He came to The Leys in 1903 at the age of 12 and went into North A House. He was a noted scholar.

On leaving school, McAulay went up to St. John’s College, University of Cambridge. He then returned to Lincolnshire to work as a farmer and joined the Territorial Army.

At the outbreak of war, McAulay promoted to Captain in the Royal Field Artillery and in May 1915, was sent to France. He was killed in action, with "B" Battery, 230th Brigade, on 21 May 1916 at the age of 25. He is buried at Foncquevillers Military Cemetery, Pas de Calais, grave number I. D. 11.

MacCARTHY

Henry Harold

MacCarthy was born in 1895 in Tasmania. Son of Harold Irving MacCarthy and Margaret MacCarthy, of Mount Pleasant, Launceston, Tasmania. He came to The Leys in 1908 at the age of 13 and went into School House. He was a Cadet Corporal and a Member of the Bisley VIII.

On leaving school, MacCarthy returned to Australia to work on the family sheep farm.

At the outbreak of war, MacCarthy joined the New South Wales Light House Regiment and served with distinction in the Mediterranean. He was then granted a commission in the Australian Infantry and was sent to France. He was killed in action during the Battle of the Somme on 23 July 1916. He was aged 21 and had reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is buried at Pozieres British Cemetery, Somme, grave number III. H. 21.

Lieutenant, 4th Battalion, Australian Infantry. Son of Harold Irving MacCarthy and Margaret MacCarthy, of Mount Pleasant, Launceston, Tasmania. Enlisted Bothwell, Tasmania.

MacDONALD

John

Macdonald was born in 1878 in Glasgow. Son of the late David MacDonald, of 34, Huntly Gardens, Glasgow. He came to The Leys in 1893 at the age of 15 and went into North A House. He won First Colours at Football and Second Colours at Lacrosse.

On leaving school, Macdonald gained a commission in the Highland Light Infantry and served with distinction in the Boer War. On his return he worked as a Director in the firm of Train and McIntyre in Glasgow.

At the outbreak of war, Macdonald rejoined the Highland Light Infantry and served with distinction in the Dardanelles, being mentioned in dispatches. He was killed in action on 13 July 1915 at the age of 37, having reached the rank of Captain. He is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli, panel numbers 173 to 177.

Extract from de Ruvigny's The Roll of Honour 1914-1918 Part 2 Page 120:

MACDONALD, JOHN, Capt., 1/5th Battn. The Highland Light Infantry (T.F.), eldest s. of the late David MacDonald, of 34, Huntly Gardens, Glasgow, by his wife, Janet Richmond, dau. of John Wilson; b. Glasgow, 17 June, 1878; educ. Glasgow Academy, and Leys School. Cambridge; later becoming Managing Director of Messrs. Train & MacIntyre. Ltd.. Wine Merchants at Glasgow: joined the Glasgow Highlanders (then the 5th Vol. Battn., The Highland L.I.) as a Private in 1895; served in the South African War, 1900—1; took part in the operation’s in Orange River Colony 30 Nov. 1900 - April. 1901, and those in Cape Colony In April, 1901 (Queen’s Medal with two clasps); obtained a commission as 2nd Lieut. in the 1st Vol. (now the 5th Territorials) Battn. Highland L.I. 1902, and became Capt. 2 Aug. 1907: volunteered for Imperial Service on the outbreak of war in Aug. 1914; went to Gallipoli June, 1915, and was killed in action there 13 July following. Buried behind the trench in which he was killed. Capt. MacDonald was mentioned in Despatches (London Gazette, 28 Jan. 1916) by Sir Ian Hamilton, for gallant and distinguished service In the field; unm.

MACFARLANE

(Revered) William Barr

Macfarlane was born in 1888. Son of James and Agnes Macfarlane, of 1, Douglas Gardens, Uddingston, Lanarkshire. He came to The Leys in 1904 at the age of 16 and went into North B House.

On leaving school, Macfarlane went to the University of Glasgow to read Divinity. In 1913 he was licensed as a Minister of the Church of Scotland and became the assistant in the parish of Motherwell.

At the outbreak of war, Macfarlane volunteered 4th August, 1914 and obtained a commission in the King’s Own Scottish Borders where he served with distinction in the Dardanelles. He died of wounds on 20 July 1915 at the age of 27, having reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli, panel numbers 84 to 92.

MACK

Arthur Stanley

Mack was born in 1893 in Liverpool. Son of Isaac Alexander Mack 5nd Martha Selina Mack, of "Manhattan", Balliol Rd., Bootle, Liverpool. He came to The Leys in 1911 at the age of 17 and went into School House. He was a well respected scholar.

On leaving school, Mack went to the University of Liverpool to train as a Medical Missionary.

At the outbreak of war, Mack obtained a commission in the King’s Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment). He served with distinction in France and was invalided back to Britain twice through illness and again through a serious head wound. He was killed in action on 9 April 1917 at the age of 23, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. His brother also died during the war. He is buried at Mindel Trench Cemetery, Pas de Calais, grave number B. 2.

MACK

Isaac Alexander
Mack was born in 1892. Son of Isaac A. and Martha S. MacK, of 44, Balliol Rd., Bootle, Liverpool. He came to The Leys in 1909 at the age of 17 and went into School House. He was a Prefect, won First Colours at Football and was awarded the Kelvin Leaving Scholarship.

On leaving school, Mack won an Exhibition to Jesus College, University of Cambridge, to read History. He hoped to gain entry to the Indian Civil Service.

At the outbreak of war, Mack obtained a commission in the Suffolk Regiment and served with distinction in France. He was killed on the first day of the Battle of the Somme, 1 July 1916. He was aged 24 and had reached the rank of Captain. His brother also died during the war. He is buried at Gordon Dump Cemetery, Somme, grave number VI. F. 4.

See also Cambridge Short Street Wesleyan Methodist

MACLAY

William Strang
Maclay was born in 1895. Son of the Rt. Hon. Sir Joseph Paton Maclay, 1st Bart. (now 1st Baron Maclay) and Lady Maclay, of Glasgow. He came to The Leys in 1910 at the age of 15 and went into West House. He was a Prefect, Cadet Lance-Corporal, Captain of Football and won Tri-colours.

On leaving school, Maclay worked in his father’s shipping business in Glasgow.

At the outbreak of war, Maclay gained a commission in the Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) and served with distinction in the Dardanelles. He died of wounds on 25 June 1915 at the age of 19, having reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli, panel numbers 92 to 97.

MALLINSON

Reginald Dyson

Mallinson was born in 1885. He came to The Leys in 1898 at the age of 13 and went into North B House.

On leaving school, Mallinson worked as a Cotton Broker in his native Lancashire.

At the outbreak of war, Mallinson enlisted as a Gunner in No. 2 Reserve Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, and served with distinction in France and Belgium. He was invalided back to Britain in 1918 with a severe leg wound and died on 12 June the same year. He is buried at Aughton Churchyard, Lancashire, grave number 756.

MANSFIELD

Eric Oswald

Mansfield was born in 1892 in Church Gresley, Burton-on-Trent. Son of the late Horace Rendall Mansfield, ex-M.P. for Spalding, Lincs. He came to The Leys in 1905 at the age of 12 and went into School House. He was a Prefect and won Second Colours at Lacrosse and Football.

On leaving school, Mansfield studied Civil Engineering before entering the family manufacturing business.

At the outbreak of war, Mansfield enlisted in the Public Schools Battalion, before winning a commission in the King’s Royal Rifle Corps. he was killed in action on 24 August 1918 at the age of 25, having reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He is buried at Lijssonthoek Military Cemetery, West-Vlaanderen, grave number XXV. A. 22.

MANSFIELD

Reginald Horace

Mansfield was born in 1890. Son of the late H. R. Mansfield (M.P. for Spalding); husband of Eleanor J. Mansfield, of The Croft, London Rd., Reading. He came to The Leys in 1905 at the age of 15 and went into School House. He won Second Colours at Football.

On leaving school, Mansfield studied Mining before entering the family manufacturing business.

At the outbreak of war, Mansfield enlisted in the Public Schools Battalion, before winning a commission in the Royal Field Artillery. He died of wounds on 1 October 1918 at the age of 26, having reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He is buried at Grevillers British Cemetery, Pas de Calais, grave number XV. B. 12.

MAULE

Robert

Maule was born in 1885. Son of Sir Robert Maule of Ashbrook, Edinburgh, Scotland. He came to The Leys in 1902 at the age of 17 and went into North B House. He was a Prefect, Cadet Lance-Sergeant, a Champion Gymnast and a member of the Cricket XI and Lacrosse XII.

On leaving school, Maule went up to Christ’s College, University of Cambridge. He then gained a commission in the Royal Scots (Queen’s Edinburgh Rifles) in 1911, and was promoted to Lieutenant in 1914

In May 1915, Maule was sent to Egypt, and was placed in command of a section to form part of the escort to the Commander-in-Chief of the Dardanelles Expedition, Sir Ian Hamilton. He was transferred back to his battalion on his request and was killed in action on 29 May 1915, aged 31. He is buried at Pink Farm Cemetery, Helles, grave number I. H. 3.

Extract from de Ruvigny's The Roll of Honour 1914-1918 Part 1 Page 249:

MAULE, ROBERT, Lieut., 5th, attd. 1st Battn. The Royal Scots (Lothian Regt., T.F.), only a. of Sir Robert Mauls, of Ashbrook, Edinburgh, J.P., by his wife, Janet, dau. of Robert Mcintosh, of Leith; b. at Trinity, Edinburgh; 1884; educ. Morrison’s Academy, Crieff : the Leys School, Cambridge, and Christ’s College, Cambridge (M.A. 19..); and on leaving the University joined his father’s firm, Robert Maule & Son, Princes Street, Edinburgh, and became a director in 1913. He obtained a commission as 2nd Lieut. in the 5th (Queen’s Edinburgh Rifles), Royal Scots, 24 Nov. 1912, and on the outbreak of war volunteered for foreign service; was promoted Lieut. 10 Sept. 1914, and attd. to 1st Battn.; went to Egypt with his Battn. in March, 1915, and was there nominated by his Commanding Officer, Col. J. T. A. Wilson, to command the section to form an escort to the Commander-in-Chief, Gen. Sir Ian Hamilton, but at his own request was allowed to re-join his regt.; went to the Dardanelles in May, and was killed in action there, 29 May, 1915; unm. His brother-in-law, Capt. Edgar Walker, 1st East Yorks, was also killed in action.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 2 Page 319-320:

LIEUTENANT ROBERT MAULE, 5th BATTN. QUEEN'S EDINBURGH RIFLES,) (TERRIT), ROYAL SCOTS, (LOTHIAN REGIMENT), was the only son of Sir Robert Maule, of Edinburgh and Tummelbridge, Perthshire.
He was born on the 21st January, 1885, and was educated at Morrison's Academy, Crieff, at Leys School, Cambridge, and at Christ's College, Cambridge. There he graduated M.A., and was the champion gymnast and Captain of the Lacrosse and Tennis Clubs of the College. On leaving the University he joined his father's firm, Robert Manic and Son, Prince's Street, Edinburgh, and became a partner three years ago. He joined the 5th Battalion (Queen's Edinburgh Rifles), the Royal Scots (T.F.), in November, 1912, and was promoted Lieutenant in September, 1914. On the outbreak of war he undertook Imperial Service obligations, and left for the Near East in March, 1915, and was nominated by his Company Officer, Colonel J. T. R. Wilson, to form an escort, to General Sir Ian Hamilton. Only a week before his death, Sir Robert Maule received a letter from his son saying he had asked to be restored to his Regiment in order that lie might share the risks with his men. With the War Office telegram, announcing his death, there came another letter saying his request had been granted, and that he was about to enter the trenches. Lieutenant Maule was killed on the 29th May, 1915, in Gallipoli Peninsula, being struck by shrapnel while putting his men under cover, and instantaneously killed. At the time of his death he was attached to the 1st Battalion of his Regiment.

MAUNG

Jedmadar Maung

Maung Muang was born in 1891 in Burma. He came to The Leys in 1907 at the age of 16 and went into West House.

On leaving school, Maung Maung went up to Jesus College, University of Oxford, before returning to Burma.

At the outbreak of war, Maung Maung enlisted in the London Irish Rifles. After being wounded in late 1916 he was invalided out of the Army. He later gained a commission in the Burmese Pioneers, Indian Army, as a recruiting officer. He was accidentally drowned on 5 September 1917 at the age of 26, having reached the rank of Jemadar. He is buried in Burma.

MILLER

Archibald Ingram

Miller was born in 1882. Husband of Dorothy Miller, of "Langdale," New Rd., Stourbridge. He came to The Leys in 1897 at the age of 15 and went into North B House. He was a Prefect and won First Colours at Football and Lacrosse.

On leaving school, Miller went to the University of Edinburgh, to read Medicine, before practicing in Stourbridge.

At the outbreak of war, Miller volunteered for the Royal Army Medical Corps and was sent to France in October 1916, attached to the 47th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. He was killed in action on 11 March 1917 at the age of 34, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is buried at Faubourg-d’Amiens Cemetery, Pas de Calais, grave number II. F. 5.

MOULTON

William Ralph Osborn

Moulton, grandson of the first headmaster of The Leys, was born in 1892. He came to The Leys in 1905 at the age of 13 and went into North B House. He was an excellent scholar and won the first ever ‘Moulton Scholarship’.

On leaving school, Moulton won a Foundation to King’s College, University of Cambridge. He read History and Economics and was awarded the prestigious Whewell Scholarship.

At the outbreak of war, Moulton escaped from Germany, where he had been studying, and joined the Manchester Regiment. He was killed in action on 5 August 1916 during the Battle of the Somme. He was aged 24 and had reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He is buried at Bernafay Wood British Cemetery, Somme, grave number C. 1.

See also Cambridge Short Street Wesleyan Methodist and Cambridge Perse School

MUSGRAVE

Kenneth

Musgrave was born in 1893 in Bradford. Son of Alfred Simeon Joseph Musgrave and Alice Kate Musgrave, of "Farcliffe," Manningham, Bradford, Yorks. He came to The Leys in 1905 at the age of 12 and went into School House. He was a Prefect and was particularly active in the Natural History Society.

On leaving school, Musgrave worked as a mining engineer at Altofts Colliery in West Yorkshire.

At the outbreak of war, Musgrave gained a commission in the King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry. He later transferred to the Royal Engineers for special mining operations. He was noted for his bravery and was recommended for the Distinguished Service Order for rescuing a fellow officer under heavy fire. He was killed in action on 22 March 1915 at the age of 21, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is buried at Dranouter Churchyard, West-Vlaanderen, grave number I. A. 20.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 2 Page 342:

LIEUTENANT (temp.) KENNETH MUSGRAVE, 6th (SERVICE) BATTN. THE KING'S OWN (YORKSHIRE LIGHT INFANTRY), attd. 172nd COMPANY, ROYAL ENGINEERS, younger son of Mr. and Mrs. A. S. J. Musgrave, of Hove, Sussex, was born at Bradford, Yorkshire, on the 23rd July, 1893.
He was educated at Downsend, Ashstead, Surrey, and the Leys School, Cambridge, afterwards becoming a Mining Student attached to Messrs. Briggs, Son & Co., Whitwood Collieries, Yorkshire. His recreations included singing, riding, swimming, football, tennis and motoring, and he was devoted to his dogs.
He received his commission as temporary Lieutenant in the King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry in October, 1914, and was acting as Adjutant of his Battalion, when he received urgent orders in March, 1915, to proceed to the front on important mining work with the Royal Engineers.
On the evening of the 22nd March, 1915, he was killed in action while trying to bring in a wounded man from between the two firing lines; the enemy opened a rapid fire and he was shot through the temples, never regaining consciousness; he is buried in Dranoutre Churchyard where his brother officers and men of the 172nd Company, Royal Engineers have erected a beautiful marble cross to his memory. On the 12th March, he had been mentioned to Sir Charles Fergusson, Commander of the IInd Corps, B.E.F., by the late Captain W. H. Johnston, V.C., Royal Engineers, for his gallant bearing, and the initiative and resource he displayed during the very severe fighting on that date, and also for the very gallant effort he made to save the life of Captain Cresswell of the 2nd Battalion the Buffs, in the face of heavy fire he brought in that officer who had been badly wounded, and having got him safely in the trenches stayed with him till he died.
The Lieutenant-Colonel commanding his own Battalion wrote to express the sympathy of the officers and men of the Battalion, and his own appreciation of the late officer's services.

MYLES

William Whitson

Myles was born in 1896. He came to The Leys in 1911 at the age of 15 and went into School House. He was a Prefect and excelled at Swimming.

On leaving school, Myles went up to Gonville and Caius College, University of Cambridge.

At the outbreak of war, Myles gained a commission through the University Officer Training Corps and went to France with the Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) in 1915. He died of wounds on 20 September 1916 at the age of 20, having reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He is buried at Dernancourt Cemetery, grave number II. A. 13.

NANCARROW

John Vivian

Nancarrow was born in 1885 in Middlesbrough. Son of George Bennett Nancarrow and Charlotte Alice Nancarrow, of "Ravenscroft," Grove Hill, Middlesbrough. He came to The Leys in 1898 at the age of 13 and went into North A House. He was a Prefect and a noted scholar and musician.

On leaving school, Nancarrow won an Exhibition to King’s College, University of Cambridge, to read History and Law. He then practised as a Solicitor in Middlesbrough and gained a commission in the Territorial Army.

In 1915, Nancarrow went with the Yorkshire Regiment to Belgium. Whilst serving on the Ypres Salient, he was killed in action on 25 April 1915. He was aged 30 and had reached the rank of Captain. He is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, panel number 33.

Extract from de Ruvigny's The Roll of Honour 1914-1918 Part 1 Page 266:

NANCARROW - JOHN VIVIAN, Capt 4th Battn. Yorkshire Regt., York and Durham Infantry Brigade, Northumbrian Division T. F.. eldest s. of George Bennett Nancarrow, of Ravenscroft. Grove Mill, Middlesbrough, a partner in the firm of W. B. Peat & Co., Chartered Accountants, by his wife, Charlotte Alice, dau. of Capt. Josiah Thomas ; b. Middlesbrough, 6 June, 1885; educ. Leys School and King’s College, Cambridge (MA., LL.B.); admitted a Solicitor, 1909, and became Secretary to the Middlesbrough Chamber of Commerce. He joined the 1st Vol. Battn. Durham LI. in 1907, was later attached to the Northumberland Fusiliers at Newcastle and then to the Duke of Cornwall’s LI., before settling in Middlesbrough, where he became Lieut. in the 4th Yorks, and after passing through a school of instruction, was promoted to the Captaincy in the latter part of 1913. On the outbreak of war he undertook Imperial service obligations and landed in France with his Battn. in the middle of April, 1915; they were immediately hurried up to the front in consequence of the French troops north of Ypres having been “gassed” on 22 April, and on the afternoon of the 24th were ordered to attack the German lines near the village of Fortuin, near St. Julien, a few miles north-east of Ypres. During the day, Capt. Nancarrow was seen cheering on his men, and in the advance, he stopped to bind up the wound of a Private who had fallen and then hurried forward. After making several rushes at the head of his men towards the enemy’s position, he was shot and died almost instantaneously. His Colonel wrote of him that “he behaved like a hero.” Capt. Nancarrow had taken a very active part in the Boy Scouts’ movement in connection with the settlement in Newport Road, Middlesbrough. He was engaged to be married to Miss Elsie Harkess of Stokesley.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 2 Page 343:

CAPTAIN JOHN VIVIAN NANCARROW 4th BATTN. (TERRIT.) ALEXANDRA, PRINCESS OF WALES'S OWN (YORKSHIRE REGT.), who was killed on the 24th April, 1915, at Fortuin, near St. Julien, north-east of Ypres, was the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Nancarrow, Ravens-croft, Grove Hill, Middlesbrough.
He was born on the 6th June, 1885, and was educated at Leys School, Cambridge, and King's College, Cambridge, where he took his degrees of LL.B. and M.A. He took up the profession of solicitor, passing his examinations with distinction, and became Secretary to the Middlesbrough Chamber of Commerce. He took a very active part in the Boy Scouts movement, in connection with the Settlement in Newport Road, Middlesbrough.
He joined the 1st Volunteer Battalion, Durham Light Infantry, in 1907, and was attached to the Northumberland Fusiliers at Newcastle-on-Tyne for training, and then to the Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry in Cornwall. After settling in Middlesbrough, he joined the 4th Battalion, Yorkshire Regiment, as Lieutenant, and eventually became Captain in December, 1913. He had passed through a school of instruction and was a keen and capable officer, popular with his men.
On the outbreak of the Great War, Captain Nancarrow took Imperial Service obligations. His battalion, which only landed a week before he was killed, was hurried up to the front in consequence of the French troops north of Ypres having been gassed on the 22nd April. The battalion was ordered to attack the German line near the village of Fortuin on the afternoon of the 24th April, 1915, in face of a heavy fire. During the day Captain Nancarrow was seen cheering on his men, and in the advance he stopped to bind up the wound of a Private who had fallen, and then hurried forward. After making several rushes at the head of his men towards the enemy's position he was shot, and died almost instantaneously. His Commanding Officer wrote of him that “he behaved like a hero."
At the time of his death, Captain Nancarrow was engaged to be married to Miss Elsie Harkess, of Stokesley.

NASH

Gordon

Nash was born in 1896. Son of William Gardener Nash and Alice Nash, of Crayfield, St. Pauls Cray, Kent. He came to The Leys in 1910 at the age of 13 and went into School House. He was a Prefect and won First Colours at Hockey and Second Colours at Football.

On leaving school, Nash went into the family Paper Manufacturing business.

Despite being in a reserved occupation, Nash volunteered for the Royal Flying Corps in 1916 and became an instructor. He was killed in an air accident on 7 May 1918, at the age of 21, having reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He was with the 63rd Squadron at the time of his death. He is buried at Foot’s Cray Baptist Chapel, Kent.

NEAL

John Pearson

Neal was born in 1882. Husband of Mabel A. Neal, of 8, Canning St., Waterloo, Liverpool. He came to The Leys in 1898 at the age of 16 and went into West House. He was a Prefect, Cadet Colour Sergeant, Captain of both Golf and Football, and won First Colours in Football and Cricket and Second Colours in Lacrosse.

On leaving school, Neal enlisted in The King’s (Liverpool Regiment) in 1905 and soon rose to the rank of Sergeant.

Neal enlisted in the 1st City Battalion (Cotton Contingent) of The King's Liverpool Regiment (Service no. 15251) and served with distinction in Belgium and France but was killed in action on 31 August 1918, at the age of 36 serving with the 13th Battalion. He is buried at Ecoust-St. Mein British Cemetery, grave number D. 25.

NORTHCROFT

Percivale William Corderoy

Northcroft was born in 1897. Son of Ada Mary Northcroft, of 10, Sussex Place, Regent's Park, London, and the late Henry Northcroft. He came to The Leys in 1911 at the age of 13 and went into North A House. He was a Cadet Corporal and won First Colours at Football and Hockey and Second Colours at Cricket.

Immediately on reaching the age of 17, Neal gained a commission in the Rifle Brigade. Neal was later sent to France, where he served with distinction. He was killed in action on 31 July 1917 at the age of 19, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. At the time of his death he was seving with the 3rd Battalion attached from the 6th. His commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, panel numbers 46 to 48 and 50.

NUTTALL

Charles

Nuttall was born in 1889. He came to The Leys in 1904 at the age of 14 and went into West House. He was a Prefect, a Cadet Lance-Corporal and won Second Colours at Lacrosse and Hockey.

On leaving school, Nuttall joined the family business of Cotton Spinning.

At the outbreak of war, Nuttall and his two younger brothers enlisted in the Public Schools Battalion. They were sent to France in November 1915 with the Royal Fusiliers. Nuttall was killed in action during the Battle of the Somme on 20 July 1916 serving with "C" Company, 20th Battalion. He was aged 26 and had reached the rank of Lance-Corporal. He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, Somme, panel numbers 8 C 9 A and 16 A.

OGDEN

Walter Frederick

Ogden was born in 1898 in Cambridge. He came to The Leys in 1914 at the age of 16 and went into West House.

At the outbreak of war, Ogden went to France as a dispatch rider with the Royal Army Medical Corps. He then returned to Britain and joined a cadet unit, gaining a commission in the Machine Gun Corps. He was killed in action during the Battle of Cambrai on 2 December 1917. He was aged 19 and had reached the rank of Second Lieutenant in the 11th Battalion, Tank Corps. He is buried at Tincourt New British Cemetery, grave number III. E. 27.

O’HANLON, MC

Sydney Esmond

O’Hanlon was born in 1894. Son of Sydney and Isabel O'Hanlon, of Windyridge Farm, Dean Row, Wilmslow, Cheshire. Born at Hale, Cheshire. He came to The Leys in 1908 at the age of 14 and went into School House. He was a member of the Bisley VIII.

On leaving school, he studied Wireless Telegraphy and obtained a certificate of special skill.

At the outbreak of war, O’Hanlon gained a commission in the Lancashire Fusiliers, becoming battalion machine gun officer. In May 1916, he transferred to the Royal Flying Corps and served with distinction in the skies above France, winning the Military Cross. In December 1916, he returned to Britain and qualified as an Instructor. He died of injuries sustained in a mid-air collision on 3 February 1918. He was aged 23 and had reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is commemorated at Manchester Crematorium, Lancashire.

PARKE, MC

Allan

Parke was born in 1893. Son of Mr. H. T. and Mrs. M. A. Parke, of Withnell Fold, Chorley, Lancs. He came to The Leys in 1906 at the age of 13 and went into North A House. He was a Prefect, Cadet Corporal and won First Colours at Football and Second Colours at Cricket.

On leaving school, Parke went up to Jesus College, University of Cambridge, intending to join the family business after graduation.

At the outbreak of war, Parke joined up through the University Officer Training Corps and was gazetted to the Lancashire Fusiliers. He served with distinction in the Dardanelles before being invalided back to Britain. He gained his Captaincy in September 1915 and was subsequently sent to France where he won the Military Cross. He was killed in action on 27 September 1918 at the age of 25. He is buried at Ribecourt Road Cemetery, Pas de Calais, grave number II. C. 3.

PARTRIDGE, MC and Bar

Hugh Roger

Partridge was born in 1890. Son of Mr. J. H. and Mrs. M. Partridge, of Laurel Bank, Rawdon, Leeds. He came to The Leys in 1905 at the age of 14 and went into North A House. He was a Prefect, Captain of Lacrosse and won Tri-colours

On leaving school, Partridge went up to the University of Leeds to read Medicine, qualifying in 1914.

At the outbreak of war, Partridge joined the Royal Army Medical Corps and served with distinction in France, winning the Military Cross and later adding a bar. He was killed in action on 24 July 1918 at the age of 27, having reached the rank of Captain. He is buried at Hagle Dump Cemetery, West-Vlaanderen, grave number II. B. 3.

PEARSON

Neil Mathieson

Pearson was born in 1892. Born at Liverpool. Eldest son of the Rev. J. W. Pearson and Mrs. Cora Pearson; husband of Dorothy Ellen Pearson, of 27, Nightingale Rd., Clapton, London. He came to The Leys in 1906 at the age of 13 and went into School House. He was a Prefect, and a noted scholar.

On leaving school, Pearson qualified for the Levant Consular Service and worked in Germany, Switzerland, France and Italy.

At the outbreak of war, Pearson joined the War Office, but later transferred to the Royal Fusiliers. He was killed in action on 18 August 1916 at the age of 22, having reached the rank of Lieutenant-Adjutant. He is commemorated at the Thiepval Memorial, Somme, panel number 8. C. 9A and 16A.

PEARSON

Thomas Raleigh

Pearson was born in 1888. Son of Thomas Lear Pearson and Harriet Pearson, of Bristol. He came to The Leys in 1900 at the age of 12 and went into North A House. He was a Prefect, a member of the Bisley VIII and a noted scholar.

On leaving school, Pearson entered the business world and soon became the Director of a firm.

In August 1915, Pearson gained a commission in the King’s Royal Rifle Corps and served with distinction in France. He was killed in action during the Battle of the Somme on 2 July 1916. He was aged 28 and had reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He is commemorated on the Loos Memorial, Pas de Calais, panel numbers 101 and 102.

PEARSON

Wilfrid Hearne

Pearson was born in 1888 in Oxford. Son of Arthur Pearson, M.A., and Eunice Mary Pearson, of Sherwood House, 59, Banbury Rd., Oxford; husband of Daisy Beatrice Pearson. He came to The Leys in 1905 at the age of 17 and went into North B House. He won First Colours at Football.

On leaving school, Pearson qualified as a Pharmacist and by 1916, was the Managing Director of the Oxford Drug Company.

In 1917, Pearson volunteered for the Inns of Court Officer Training Corps, and after training was gazetted to the Northern Cyclists Battalion. He later transferred to the "B" Company, 57th Battalion, Machine Gun Corps and served with distinction in France. He was killed in action on 29 September 1918 at the age of 30, having reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He is buried at Anneux British Cemetery, grave number II. A. 5.

PIKE

Clifford Edric Hurstwood

Pike was born in 1896. Son of the late James and Jane A. Pike, of Bradford, Yorks. He came to The Leys in 1909 at the age of 13 and went into North A House. He was a member of the Bisley VIII.

At the outbreak of war, Pike enlisted in the London Regiment (London Rifle Brigade) as a Rifleman (Service No. 9509, "A" Company) and served with distinction in France. He died of wounds on 13 February 1915 at the age of 19. He is buried at the London Rifle Brigade Cemetery, Hainaut, grave number III. C. 7.

POSNETT

William Leonard

Posnett was born in 1891. Son of L. W. Posnett, J.P., and Mrs. E. B. Posnett, of "Westgate", Cavendish Rd., Chester. He came to The Leys in 1906 at the age of 15 and went into School House. He won an Exhibition and was a noted scholar.

On leaving school, Posnett worked for a year in a tannery in Runcorn, before joining a firm in Bermondsey.

Despite being in a reserved occupation, Posnett volunteered for the Inns of Court Officer Training Corps and gained a commission in the London Regiment. He was killed in action on 23 June 1917 at the age of 26, having reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He is commemorated on the Arras Memorial, Pas de Calais, panel numbers 9 and 10.

POTTS

Geoffrey Fildes

Potts was born in 1893. Son of William Edward and Emily A. J. Potts, of "Sannox," Poulton-le-Fylde, Preston. He came to The Leys in 1907 at the age of 14 and went into School House. He was a Prefect, champion gymnast, member of the Games Committee, member of the Bisley VIII, Captain of the Cycle Club and won First Colours at Football.

On leaving school, Potts went up to the University of Manchester to read Engineering.

At the outbreak of war, Potts gained a commission in the Manchester Regiment, going to France in November 1915. He was killed in action during the Battle of Arras on 23 April 1917. He was aged 24 and had reached the rank of Lieutenant-Quartermaster. He is buried at Wancourt British Cemetery, Pas de Calais, grave number V. H. 29.

PURVIS

John Easton

Purvis was born in 1889. Son of Charles E. Purvis, of West Acres, Alnwick, Northumberland. He came to The Leys in 1902 at the age of 13 and went into West House. He was a member of the Bisley VIII.

At the outbreak of war, Purvis joined the London Regiment (Artists Rifles) before transferring to the Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve. After distinguished service off the coast of Nova Scotia and Newfoundland, he returned to Britain to join the Dover Patrol of motor launches. He was killed in action, on board HMML No.561, on 21 October 1918 at the age of 29, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is commemorated on the Chatham Naval Memorial, panel number 31.

PYATT

Richard Godwin

Pyatt was born in 1886 in Nottingham. Son of Abraham and Ellen Pyatt, of "Eversley," Magdala Rd., Nottingham. He came to The Leys in 1902 at the age of 15 and went into North B House. He was a Prefect and won First Colours at Football.

On leaving school, Pyatt went into the lace trade in his native Nottingham, and was well-known for his religious and philanthropic commitments.

At the outbreak of war, Pyatt gained a commission in the Sherwood Foresters and served with distinction in Belgium. He was killed in action during the First Battle of Ypres on 13 October 1915. He was aged 29 and had reached the rank of Lieutenant-Adjutant. He is buried at Vermelles British Cemetery, Pas de Calais, grave number I. B. 18.

PYMAN

Alan

Pyman was born in 1894. He came to The Leys in 1909 at the age of 15 and went into School House. He was a Cadet Sergeant, Captain of the Bisley VIII and a gifted musician.

On leaving school, Pyman went up to Clare College, University of Cambridge.

At the outbreak of war, Pyman gained a commission in the Yorkshire Regiment and served with distinction as Battalion Machine Gun Officer. He was killed in action on 15 June 1915 at the age of 20, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is commemorated on Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais, panel number 12.

QUIBELL

Samuel Boyd

Quibell was born in 1890. Son of Oliver and Elisabeth Quibell, of Shalem Lodge, Newark-on-Trent. He came to The Leys in 1903 at the age of 12 and went into North B House. He was Secretary of the Games Committee, Captain of the Second Lacrosse XII, and won First Colours at Cricket and Football.

On leaving school, Quibell went into the family tanning business. He also gained a commission in the East Yorkshire Regiment (Territorials) and was gazetted Captain at the age of 22.

In 1915, Quibell was sent to Belgium in time for the Second Battle of Ypres as the youngest Major in all the Territorial forces. He died of wounds on 5 February 1916 at the age of 25. He is buried at Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, West-Vlaanderen, grave number II. A. 31.

RAIMES

(Reverend) Lancelot

Raimes was born in 1887. Son of Frederick Raimes, of Stockton-on-Tees. He came to The Leys in 1900 at the age of 13 and went into North B House. He was a Prefect, Cadet Sergeant and won First Colours at Football.

On leaving school, Raimes went up to Gonville and Caius College, University of Cambridge, to read Medieval and Modern Languages, winning the Winchester Reading Prize. In 1910 he joined the Ripon Diocese College and subsequently was ordained to a curacy in Chipping Barnet.

At the outbreak of war, Raimes joined the Durham Light Infantry as a combatant officer, serving with distinction in France. He died of wounds on 1 June 1916 at the age of 29, having reached the rank of Captain. He is buried at Bailleul Cemetery, Nord, grave number II. D. 52.

RATHBONE

Tom Ford

Rathbone was born in 1890. Son of Thomas and Amy Rathbone, of Mayfield, Little Chell, Tunstall, Stoke-on-Trent. He came to The Leys in 1907 at the age of 17 and went into West House.

On leaving school, Rathbone worked in the family business in the Potteries.

At the outbreak of war, Rathbone enlisted in the Artists’ Rifles, before gaining a commission in the North Staffordshire Regiment. He was killed in action on 27 September 1917 at the age of 27, having reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He is buried at Tyne Cot Cemetery, West-Vlaanderen, grave number III. B. 7.

REES

Andrew Montgomery

Rees was born in 1898. Son of the Rev. Robert Montgomery Rees, M.A., and Catharine M. Rees, of Latchmore, Epping, Essex. He came to The Leys in 1910 at the age of 12 and went into North B House. He was a Prefect, Cadet Sergeant and was a noted scholar.

On leaving school, Rees went up to Sidney Sussex College, University of Cambridge.

After being turned down for military service due to defective eyesight, Rees was finally commissioned in the Essex Regiment and sent to France in 1916. He was killed on 18 October 1916 at the age of 21, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, panel number 10. D.

REILLY

Percival Francis Thompson

Reilly was born in 1889 in County Cork. Son of the late Alfred Charles and Louisa Mason Reilly, of The Hill, Douglas, Co. Cork. He came to The Leys in 1907 at the age of 17 and went into North A House. He won First Colours at Football and Second Colours at Lacrosse.

On leaving school, Reilly worked for the family business and became a Director of the firm.

At the outbreak of war, Reilly joined the Public School Battalion, and went to France in 1915 with the York and Lancaster Regiment. He was noted for his bravery under fire and was recommended for a commission. However, he was killed in action on 6 July 1916 during the Battle of the Somme. He was aged 25 and had reached the rank of Lance-Corporal. He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, Somme, panel numbers 8. C. 9. A. and 16. A

ROBERTSON

John Ross

Robertson was born in 1894. Son of Sir William and Lady Robertson, of Dunfermline, Scotland. He came to The Leys in 1909 at the age of 15 and went into North A House. He was a Prefect, Captain of the Bisley VIII and First XV and won First Colours at Football, Lacrosse, Hockey and Cricket.

On leaving school, Robertson worked in the family firm in Dunfermline.

At the outbreak of war, Robertson gained a commission in the Fife and Forfar Yeomanry and served with distinction in the Dardanelles and Egypt. He then transferred to the Royal Flying Corps. He was killed in action on 12 May 1917 at the age of 23, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is buried at Quarry Cemetery, Pas de Calais, grave number F. 1.

ROBINSON, DSO, MC

Fredrick Wilfred

Robinson was born in 1891. Son of Matthias and Margaret Robinson, of Landieu, Hartburn, Stockton-on-Tees. He came to The Leys in 1907 at the age of 15 and went into West House. He was a Lawn Tennis Champion and won Second Colours at Lacrosse.

On leaving school, Robinson joined the family business in Hartlepool and was made a Director in 1913.

At the outbreak of war, Robinson joined the Public Schools Battalion and subsequently gained a commission in the Northumberland Fusiliers. He served with distinction in the Dardanelles and Egypt, transferring to the Machine Gun Corps. He then served in France being mentioned in dispatches and winning the Military Cross and Distinguished Service Order. He was killed during the Luderndorff Offensive on 28 March 1918. He was aged 27 and had reached the rank of Major. He is commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial, Somme, panel numbers 90 to 93.

ROBINSON

Noel Stafford

Robinson was born in 1882. Husband of Mrs. M. S. Robinson, of The Boundway Farm, Sway, New Forest. He came to The Leys in 1897 at the age of 15 and went into North B House.

On leaving school, Robinson joined a Shipping Firm in Newcastle, before starting his own firm in 1906.

In May 1915, Robinson gained a commission in the Royal Field Artillery, gaining his majority in September 1916. He served with distinction in France being mentioned in dispatches and wounded severally times. He died of wounds on 2 August 1918 at the age of 35. He is buried at Montigny Cemetery, Somme, grave number A. 4.

ROWE

Percy Trevelyan

Rowe was born in 1881. He came to The Leys in 1894 at the age of 13 and went into West House.

On leaving school, Rowe worked in the family business, eventually taking charge of the Bristol branch.

At the outbreak of war, Rowe’s defective eyesight initially precluded him from securing a position in the Army. He was eventually accepted as a Trooper in the North Somerset Yeomanry and was subsequently wounded in early 1915. He then gained a commission in the Royal Field Artillery and went to France again in September 1915. He was killed in action during the Battle of Cambrai, with "B" Battery, 306th Brigade, on 30 November 1917. He was aged 36 and had reached the rank of Captain. He is buried at Orival Wood Cemetery, Nord, grave number II. C. 1.

ROWE

Thomas

Rowe was born in 1895. Son of Thomas Bradley Rowe and Mabel Ruth Rowe, of Lafrowda, Exeter, Devon. He came to The Leys in 1911 at the age of 16 and went into West House.

On leaving school, Rowe worked in Hanover.

At the outbreak of war, Rowe returned from Germany and joined the Inns of Court Officer Training Corps. He gained a commission in The King’s (Liverpool Regiment) in October 1914 and soon after went to France as the battalion signals officer. He was killed in action on 23 May 1916 at the age of 20, having reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He is buried at Douchy-Les-Agette British Cemetery, Pas de Calais, grave number III. B. 6.

RUSSELL

Hamish Galbraith

Russell was born in 1889. Son of Thomas and Ellen Galbraith Russell, of Redlands, Bearsden, Dumbartonshire. He came to The Leys in 1905 at the age of 16 and went into North A House. He won Second Colours at Football.

On leaving school, Russell became a Director in a Ship Owning firm in Glasgow and played for Glasgow Academicals Football Club.

In September 1914, Russell joined the Highland Light Infantry. In June 1915, he was sent to the Dardanelles. He died of wounds on 16 July 1915 at the age of 26, having reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He is buried at Alexandria Military and War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt, grave number Q. 481.

SCOTT

James Wood

Scott was born in 1894. Son of James and Marion Scott, of Glenarbuck, Bowling, Dumbartonshire. He came to The Leys in 1909 at the age of 15 and went into Scholar House. He was a Prefect, a noted scholar and won Second Colours at Football.

On leaving school, Scott went up to the University of Glasgow to read Naval Architecture and Engineering, and won the prestigious George Young Bursary in 1914.

At the outbreak of war, Scott gained a commission in the Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) and served with distinction in the Dardanelles. He was killed in action on 28 June 1915. He is commemorated on Helles Memorial, Gallipoli, panel numbers 92 to 97.

SCRIVEN

Henry Wilfred Ambrose

Scriven came to The Leys in 1894 and went into School House.

On leaving school, Scriven embarked on a business career.

Due to ill-health, Scriven initially found it difficult to gain a place in the armed forces, but was eventually accepted into the Inns of Court Officer Training Corps at Berkhamstead from 2nd March 1916 he was discharged under King's Regulations paragraph 392.XVI 11R on 12th April 1917 due to wounds (see British Army Medal Roll Index Cards 1914-1920 record for Henry Wilfred Ambrose Scriven). He subsequently died in the quarter April to June 1917 at the age of 37. His death is recorded on the GRO as Camberwell district, London; Volume 1d; Page 875.

SHARPLEY

Henry

Sharpley was born in 1893 in Louth. Son of May Sharpley, of Ulceby, Lincs, and the late Henry Sharpley. He came to The Leys in 1908 at the age of 14 and went into North A House. He was an excellent swimmer and also won many prizes for shooting.

On leaving school, Sharpley returned to Lincolnshire to learn farming.

In 1916, Sharpley enlisted as a Trooper in the Lincolnshire Yeomanry, before gaining a commission in the Royal Field Artillery. He served with distinction in France from March 1917. He died of wounds on 24 March 1918 at the age of 24, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He was serving with "A" Company, 66th Trench Mortar Battery. He is buried at Blargies Cemetery, Oise, grave number I. B. 7.

SMITH

Alexander Noel

Smith was born in 1895 in Berwick. He came to The Leys in 1909 at the age of 13 and went into School House. He was a noted scholar and won First Colours at Football.

On leaving school, Smith returned to Cumbria and qualified as a Solicitor.

At the outbreak of war, Smith enlisted as a Private in the Northumberland Fusiliers. He soon gained a commission and attained his Captaincy in late 1914. He died of wounds on 26 September 1916 at the age of 20. He is buried at Boulogne Eastern Cemetery, grave number VII. A. 1.

SMITH

Charles Theodore Ashley

Smith was born in 1884. He came to The Leys in 1897 at the age of 13 and went into North A House. On leaving school, Smith gained a commission in the Munster Fusiliers in 1900. He then transferred to the Dragoon Guards (Prince of Wales’ Own) and served in South Africa in 1902. Resigning his commission in 1904, he joined the British South African Police.

At the outbreak of war, Smith rejoined his old Regiment and was sent to the front in December 1914 as the battalion machine gun officer. He died of wounds on 22 May 1915 having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is buried at Boulogne Eastern Cemetery, grave number II. B. 48.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 2 Page 431:

2nd LIEUTENANT CHARLES THEODORE SMITH, attd. 3rd (PRINCE OF WALES'S) DRAGOON GUARDS, was the elder son of the late Charles Smith, of Aberdeen, and of Mrs. Smith, formerly of Ashley Lodge, Aberdeen, and of 83, Lexham Gardens, London, W.
He was born in Aberdeen on the 6th August, 1883, and was educated at the Aberdeen Grammar School, at Gordon's College, Aberdeen, and at Leys' School, Cambridge. In September, 1901, he was gazetted 2nd Lieutenant in the 5th (Volunteer) Battalion Royal Munster Fusiliers and served in Malta for a few months, and in 1902 he received a com- mission as 2nd Lieutenant in the 3rd Dragoon Guards, with which he served in South Africa. He resigned his commission in 1904, but on the outbreak of the war with Germany in September, 1914, he was gazetted temporary 2nd Lieutenant and attached to his old Regiment. He was wounded at Ypres on the 13th May, 1915, while working a machine gun, having qualified for this work at St. Omer, and died on the 22nd of that month in hospital at Boulogne, where he was buried.
2nd Lieutenant Smith married in 1904 and left one son, aged ten years.

SMITH

Leslie Morgan

Smith was born in 1881. He came to The Leys in 1895 at the age of 13 and went into School House.

On leaving school, Smith served in the Boer War with first the Royal Fusiliers and the Remounts. He then emigrated to Brazil where he owned vast tracts of the Amazon rainforest. During the revolutions that swept the country in the early Twentieth Century, Smith was instrumental in organising a makeshift force. He was subsequently made a Colonel in the Brazilian Army.

At the outbreak of war, Smith arrived in Britain with sixty-five volunteers that he had trained. He rejoined the Fusiliers and was then transferred to the Bedfordshire Regiment and received his Majority. He served with distinction in India as part of the garrison forces. He died of illness on 30 December 1917 at the age of 36. He is buried at Delhi Cemetery, grave number 8. A. 23.

SPRANG

Frederick Williamson

Sprang was born in 1892. Only son of Frederick Henry and Catherine Sprang, of New Farm, Westmoreland Rd., Bromley, Kent. He came to The Leys in 1908 at the age of 16 and went into North A House. He was a Sub-Prefect and Cadet Lance-Corporal.

On leaving school, Sprang qualified in Commercial Chemistry and in 1911, went on an around the world business tour, before joining his father’s firm.

At the outbreak of war, despite repeated medical rejections, Sprang secured a position in the Public Schools Battalion, before gaining a commission in the Dorsetshire Regiment in October 1914. He served with distinction in France from July 1915 and took part in the Battle of the Somme. He was killed in action on 13 April 1917. He was serving with "D" Company, 6th Battalion. He is buried at Feuchy Cemetery, Pas de Calais, grave number IV. C. 14.

STAFFORD

Frederic John Ewart

Stafford was born in 1897. Son of Edward and Annie Stafford, of Brighton. He came to The Leys in 1910 at the age of 13 and went into West House.

In 1916, Stafford gained a commission in the Royal Flying Corps and was sent to France in time for the Battle of Arras. On 11 April 1917 he was badly wounded during a sortie yet managed to bring his aeroplane and observer to safety, he died of wounds a few days later at the age of 19, having reached the rank of Second Lieutenant serving with the 8th Squadron. He is buried at Abbeville Cemetery, Somme, grave number 11. F. 3.

STEVENS

George Eric

Stevens was born in 1888. Son of William and Grace Stevens, of Garnalds, Cuckfield, Sussex. He came to The Leys in 1903 at the age of 15 and went into North B House. He was a Prefect and a noted scholar.

On leaving school, Stevens spent six months in France, before being articled to his father. In 1912, he qualified as a Solicitor and completed his Law degree at the University of London. He was heavily involved with the Leysian Mission.

At the outbreak of war, Stevens enlisted as a Private in the Royal Fusiliers and served with distinction in France as a stretcher bearer. He was killed on 13 March 1916 at the age of 27, attempting to rescue a wounded comrade. He was serving with "D" Company, 20th Battalion at the time of his detah. He is buried at Cambrin Churchyard, Pas de Calais, grave number L1 10D.

STEVENSON

Thomas

Stevenson was born in 1890. Son of James St. Clair Stevenson, of 49/51, Shandwick Place, Edinburgh. He came to The Leys in 1905 at the age of 14 and went into School House. He won Second Colours at Cricket.

On leaving school, Stevenson joined his father in business in Edinburgh.

At the outbreak of war, Stevenson enlisted in the Royal Scots as a Private and gained a commission in 1915. He was then sent to Ireland, before serving with distinction in France. He was killed on 1 August 1918 at the age of 27, having reached the rank of Captain (Lieutenant on CWGC). He is buried at Raperie British Cemetery, Aisne, grave number II. C. 8.

SYKES

Eric Turner

Sykes was born in 1894 in Huddersfield. Son of James and Emma Amelia Sykes, of "Dungarth," Honley, Huddersfield. He came to The Leys in 1908 at the age of 14 and went into North A House. He was a noted scholar and poet. He won the School Leaving Scholarship, which he subsequently turned down in favour of one who was less fortunate.

On leaving school, Sykes won an Exhibition to Gonville and Caius College, University of Cambridge, to read History.

In 1914, Sykes joined the University Officer Training Corps and eventually gained a commission in the Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment). After being invalided back to Britain in 1916, he returned to France in March 1917. He was killed in action during the Battle of Arras on 3 May 1917. He was aged 22 and had reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is buried at Bailleul Road East Cemetery, Pas de Calais, grave number II. D. 22.

TATAM

Leslie Charles

Tatam was born in 1894. Son of Mr. and Mrs. H. Tatam. He came to The Leys in 1908 at the age of 14 and went into School House.

On leaving school, Tatam studied Engineering with the Great Eastern Railway Company. Although his course was interrupted by a serious motor accident, in 1913 he resumed his studies with the South Coast Railway Company.

At the outbreak of war, Tatam enlisted in the Sussex Regiment and in October 1914, gained a commission in the Dorsetshire Regiment, becoming Brigade Machine Gun Officer. He was sent to France attached to the 8th Battalion, Loyal North Lancashire Regiment, where he served with distinction. He was killed in action at Vimy Ridge on 17 May 1916. He was aged 21 and had reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He is commemorated on the Arras Memorial, Pas de Calais, panel number 2.

THOMPSON

William Frank

Thompson was born in 1887. He came to The Leys in 1900 at the age of 13 and went into School House. He was Head Prefect, Cadet First Lieutenant, Captain of the Bisley VIII and won First Colours at Cricket and Lacrosse and Second Colours at Football.

On leaving school, Thompson went up to King’s College, University of Cambridge, to read Medicine and Natural Sciences. He then went to St. Bartholomew’s Hospital in London, where he qualified as a Doctor.

Thompson remained at St. Bartholomew’s until July 1915, when he joined the Royal Army Medical Corps. He died of wounds on 1 January 1916 at the age of 28, having reached the rank of Captain. He was serving with the 99th Field Ambulance at the time of his death. He is buried at Bethune Town Cemetery, Pas de Calais, grave number II. L. 9.

THORNTON

Frank

Thornton was born in 1893. Son of William and Martha Thornton, of Nuneham House, 12, South Parade, Llandudno. He came to The Leys in 1908 at the age of 15 and went into North A House. He won Second Colours at Football.

On leaving school, Thornton worked in his father’s woollen business.

At the outbreak of war, Thornton gained a commission in the East Yorkshire Regiment. He went to the front in February 1916 and served with distinction on the Ypres Salient. He was killed in action on the first day of the Battle of the Somme, 1 July 1916. He was aged 23 and had reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He was serving with "C" Company, 7th Battalion at the time of his death. He is buried at Fricourt New Military Cemetery, Somme, grave number B. 5.

TODRICK

Thomas

Todrick was born in 1881. Son of Robert Todrick, of Haddington, East Lothian; husband of Emma Brenda Todrick, of 30, Regent Terrace, Edinburgh. He came to The Leys in 1894 at the age of 13 and went into West House. He was a Prefect, a member of ‘The Fortnightly’ editorial team, and won Second Colours at Football.

On leaving school, Todrick studied law and qualified as a Solicitor in 1904. He also joined the Territorial Army and gained a commission in the Royal Scots. He was a writer to the Signet.

At the outbreak of war, Todrick immediately volunteered for overseas service and in November 1914 was sent to Belgium, serving with distinction on the Ypres Salient. He was killed in action on 15 December 1914 at the age of 33, having reached the rank of Captain. He is buried at Bois Grenier Cemetery, grave number L.1.

Extract from de Ruvigny's The Roll of Honour 1914-1918 Part 1 Page 351:

TODRICK, THOMAS, W.S. Capt., 1/8th Battn. Royal Scots (T.F.), elder s. of Robert Todrick, Agent for the Bank of Scotland at Haddington, Hon. Sheriff Substitute, by his wife, Marianne Somerville, dau. of the late Rev. John Stevenson, of Wigtown b. Haddington, 26 Dec. 1879; educ. Knox Institute; Leys School, Cambridge, and Edinburgh University, at which latter he took his law course, and was admitted, in 1904, a Writer to the Signet. Apprenticed for a time in the offices of Messrs. J. J. Turubull, W.S., Edinburgh, he afterwards started business there on his own account. He received his first commission In the 7th (Haddingtonshire) Vol. Battn. of the Royal Scots, 1900, and was appointed to the command of the Headquarters Coy, at Haddington, 1908, whIch command he held till 1913, and then joined the Reserve of Officers. Early in 1914 he accepted the offer to take command of the Dalkeith Coy., and on the outbreak of war volunteered for foreign service. It was expected that the Service Battn. of the 8th Royal Scots would be called upon to leave Britain about Christmas, but on 1 Now. they received orders to entrain the following day. Within a few days they were in France, and by the 15th of the same month in the firing line. Capt. Todrick took a prominent part in the operations, and was killed in action 15 Dec. 1914. A few nights before his death he crept from the British across to the German trenches, went under the wire entanglements and came back on that occasion in safety. A few days later the General in command asked that listening patrols should be sent out at night, and Capt. Todrick went out with three men himself. On reaching a certain point he asked them to lie in a ditch, as he thought he saw figures moving in front; he went on alone and fired his revolver. Doubtless the flash revealed him; an answering shot struck him in the neck, and his death was practically instantaneous. His men brought back his body, and he was buried in a little French cemetery while shells passed overhead. One of his brother officers wrote: “Poor Todrick has gone, best of comrades and bravest man in the battn.; no officer could have been more beloved by the others of all ranks in the battn.” Capt. Todrick was mentioned in F.M. Sir John (now Lord) French's Despatch of 31 May, 1915. He m. at Blackheath, 27 Aug. 1910, Brenda (30, Regent Terrace Edinburgh), dau. of John List, chief engineer of the Union-Castle Line, and had a son and dau.: Archibald, b. 25 April, 1912; and Elizabeth, b. 5 Feb. 1914.

Extract from The Bond of Sacrifice Volume 1 Page 399:

CAPTAIN THOMAS TODRICK, 8th BATTN. (TERRITORIAL) ROYAL SCOTS (LOTHIAN REGIMENT), who was killed in action in France on the 15th December, 1914, was born at Haddington on the 26th December, 1879, the elder son of Mr. Robert Todrick, Hon. Sheriff - Substitute and Agent for the Haddington branch of the Bank of Scotland.
He was educated at the Knox Institute, Haddington, and Leys School, Cambridge. He took his law course at Edinburgh University, and in 1904 was admitted as a Writer to the Signet. In 1900 he received a commission in the (then) 7th (late Haddingtonshire) Volunteer Battalion of the Royal Scots, and in 1908 was appointed to command the Headquarters Company at Haddington, a position he held for some years. He was then, on his own initiative, transferred to the Territorial Force Reserve, and early in 1914 was given the command of the Dalkeith Company. After mobilisation for the war, officers and men of the Territorials were asked to volunteer for service abroad, and Captain Todrick at once answered the call, and left for the front with the 8th Royal Scots on the 2nd November, 1914, reaching France in a day or two, and being in the firing line by the 15th of the month.
Captain Todrick was the first member of the Incorporation of Writers to the Signet to fall in the war. He was mentioned in Sir John French's Despatch of 31st May, 1915.
Captain Todrick, who was well known and respected in civil as in military life, practised as a lawyer in Edinburgh. He married Brenda, daughter of Mr. John List, head of the engineering department of the Union Castle Line, and is survived by his wife and two young children—a son and a daughter.

VICK

Arnold Oughtred

Vick was born in March 1890 in West Hartlepool. Son of Richard William Vick, J.P.; husband of Christine Vick, of Harlow, Reigate. He came to The Leys in 1905 at the age of 15 and went into West House. He was a noted scholar.

On leaving school, Vick studied Chartered Accountancy and qualified in 1914.

At the outbreak of war, Vick gained a commission in the Yorkshire Regiment and served with distinction in the Dardanelles and Egypt. In 1916 he was sent to France where he was wounded twice. He was killed in action on 27 September 1918 at the age of 29, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is buried at Naves Cemetery, Nord, grave number I. E. 13.

Extract from de Ruvigny's The Roll of Honour 1914-1918 Part 5 Page 165:

VICK, ARNOLD OUGHTRED, Lieut., 6th (attd. 2nd) Battn. Alexandra. Princess of Wales’s Own (Yorkshire Regt.), 5th s. of Richard WilIiam Vick, of Highnam, West Hartlepool, J.P., Director of Messrs. Farness, Witley & Co. Ltd., by his wife, Emily, dau. of William Oughtred; b. Stockton-on-Tees, co. Durham, 29 March, 1890; educ. The Leys School, Cambridge; was a Chartered Accountant volunteered for active service soon after the outbreak of war, and was gazetted 2nd Lieut. The Yorkshire Regt. 11 Nov. 1914: was promoted Lieut. was ordered to join his Regiment in Galllpoli, but owing to the evacuation went to Mudros, and subsequently to Egypt; proceeded to France, and served with the Expeditionary Force there and in Flanders from Aug. 1910; was wounded in the following Sept., and remaining at duty, was wounded again at Mouquet Farm, a few days later, and invalided home; rejoined his battalion in France in Dec., 1917, and was killed in action during the successful attack on Epinoy 27 Sept. 1918. Buried at Epinoy, near Cambrai. His Commanding Officer wrote : " He did his work gallantly, and I am proud of him," and an N.C.O.: “He knew no fear, and the men would follow him anywhere. His total disregard of danger was most inspiring.” He m. at Reigate, 24 Aug. 1918, Amy Christine Gladys, only dau. of H. Wilmot Uloth, of Great Tylers, Reigate; s.p.

VICKERS

Arthur de Muschamp Westrop

Vickers was born in 1872. He came to The Leys in 1885 at the age of 13 and went into North A House.

On leaving school, Vickers gained a commission in the Durham Light Infantry (Militia) and served in the Matabele War of 1896. He then joined the British South African Company as a Mining Engineer.

At the outbreak of war, Vickers joined the City of London Yeomanry. He was killed in 1918 when the ship he was travelling on was torpedoed. He was aged 46 and had reached the rank of Lieutenant. The whereabouts of his burial are not known.

WAKERLEY

Arthur John

Wakerley was born in October 1893 in Cambridge. Son of Arthur and Bertha Elizabeth Wakerley, of Crown Hill, Leicester. He came to The Leys in 1908 at the age of 15 and went into North B House. He was a noted scholar and won Second Colours at Football.

On leaving school, Wakerley joined his father’s firm of architects, before going up to Peterhouse College, University of Cambridge to prepare for the Ministry.

In May 1915, Wakerley gained a commission in the Leicestershire Regiment and served with distinction in France from late 1915 onwards. He was killed in action on 8 June 1917 at the age of 23, having reached the rank of Captain. He was seving with "D" Company, 1st/4th Battalion at the time of his death. He is buried at Loos British Cemetery, Pas de Calais, grave number XIX. C. 23.

See also Cambridge Short Street Wesleyan Methodist

WARREN

Archibald Alexander

Warren was born in 1896. Son of Timothy and Mary Don Warren, of 10, Westbourne Terrace, Kelvinside, Glasgow. Born at Hamilton, Lanarkshire. He came to The Leys in 1911 at the age of 15 and went into North A House. He was a Prefect and won First Colours at Football.

On leaving school, Warren studied Chartered Accountancy in Glasgow.

At the outbreak of war, Warren gained a commission in the Border Regiment and served with distinction in France from September 1915 onwards. He was killed in action on 10 March 1916 at the age of 19, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is buried at Cabaret-Rouge British Cemetery, Pas de Calais, grave number XXI. C. 21.

WARRINGTON

Frank Arnold

Warrington was born in 1879. Son of Mrs. Warrington, of 39, Parkfield Rd., Princes Park, Liverpool, and the late Mr. J. T. Warrington. He came to The Leys in 1893 at the age of 14 and went into North B House.

On leaving school, Warrington went into business, spending sometime in Canada, before returning to Britain to trade on the Liverpool Stock Exchange.

At the outbreak of war, Warrington joined the Liverpool ‘Pals’ and in January 1915 gained a commission to the County Palatine Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, serving with distinction in France. He was killed in action on 7 October 1916 at the age of 43, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is buried at Guards’ Cemetery, Somme, grave number IX. L. 6.

WARRINGTON

Harold Gordon

Warrington was born in 1884. Son of Mr. J. T. and Margaret E. Warrington, of Liverpool. He came to The Leys in 1900 at the age of 16 and went into North B House.

On leaving school, Warrington worked as a Lumber Merchant in Liverpool, before moving to Vancouver where he established a business.

At the outbreak of war, Warrington enlisted in the King Edward’s Horse and was subsequently wounded in France in 1915. He then gained a commission in the Anti-Aircraft Royal Field Artillery and served with distinction in France and Italy. He was killed in action on 6 December 1917 at the age of 33, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is buried at Giavera Cemetery, Treviso, grave number 1. G. 9.

WATSON

Donald James

Watson was born in 1887. Son of Thomas Crowther Watson and Rachel Watson, of Milton House, Morley, Leeds; husband of Clarice Senior Watson, of "Oakroyd," Grosvenor Rd., Batley, Yorks. He came to The Leys in 1902 at the age of 15 and went into School House. He won Second Colours at Football.

On leaving school, Watson entered the woollen trade, eventually becoming a Director of a large firm.

In 1915, Watson enlisted as a Private in The Kings’ (Liverpool Regiment) and served with distinction in France and Belgium. He was killed in action near Passchendaele on 3 January 1918, aged 30. He is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, West-Vlaanderen, panel numbers 31 to 34.

WHEAWILL

Edward Kilner

Wheawill was born in 1896. Son of Charles and Emily Wheawill, of 104, Birkby Hall Rd., Huddersfield. He came to The Leys in 1911 at the age of 14 and went into west House.

On leaving school, Wheawill was articled to a chartered accountant.

In 1916, Wheawill enlisted as a Private in the London Regiment (Artists’ Rifles). He was killed in action during the Battle of Passchendaele on 30 October 1917, aged 21. He is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, West-Vlaanderen, panel number 153.

WHITE

Harold Edward

White was born in September 1894. Son of Sydney and Mary White, of Fern Lodge, North Side, Streatham Common, London. He came to The Leys in 1909 at the age of 14 and went into School House.

At the outbreak of war, White postponed his plans to study Engineering and joined the University and Public Schools Battalion. In April 1915, he gained a commission in the Manchester Regiment. In January 1916, he was sent to Mesopotamia to take part in the relief of Kut al-Amara. He was killed in action on 21 April 1916 at the age of 22, having reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He is commemorated on the Basra Memorial, panel numbers 31 and 64.

WIGLEY

Herbert Henry

Wigley was born in 1880. Son of Laura Wigley, of Winslow, Bucks; brother of Sidney Prudden Wigley, of "The Moat," Steeple Claydon, Bucks. He came to The Leys in 1892 at the age of 12 and went into West House. He was a Prefect and won First Colours at Football.

On leaving school, Wigley trained as a Surveyor and joined the family firm.

At the outbreak of war, Wigley enlisted as a Private and was soon selected for training as a Cadet. After gaining a commission in the Kings’ Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment), he was sent to France where he was severely wounded. After a period of convalescence, he returned to the front and was killed in action on 31 July 1917. He was aged 37 and had reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is buried at Voormezeele Enclosure Number 3, West-Vlaanderen, grave number XVI. H. 6.

WILKS

Percy Walter

Wilks was born in 1877. Son of Ezra T. and Emma Wilks, husband of Edith Catherine Wilks. He came to The Leys in 1891 at the age of 14 and went into West House.

On leaving school, Wilks joined the Artists’ Rifles and was the Captain of Cadets. He also led a Boys’ Club and was a steward in the Wesleyan Church. At the same time he worked in his father’s coal business, eventually becoming a partner.

In February 1917, Wilks gained a commission in the Army Service Corps and served with distinction in Ireland. On 10 October 1918, Wilks and his wife were drowned when their ship, the Leinster, was torpedoed in the Irish Sea. He was 41 and had reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He is buried at Grangegorman Military Cemetery, County Dublin, grave number 22.

WILLEY

Rupert Harold Duncan

Willey was born in 1886. Son of Joseph and Lydia Willey, of 9, Dennington Park Mansions, West End Lane, West Hampstead, London. He came to The Leys in 1904 at the age of 17 and went into North A House. He was a noted scholar.

On leaving school, Willey went up to Gonville and Caius College, University of Cambridge, to read Theology. He was a Foundation Scholar and won many Greek Testament and Hebrew Prizes and Scholarships at University. He then went on a Research Scholarship to Germany, before gaining the Ouseley Scholarship in Arabic at the University of London. He took part in the British Egyptian School of Archaeology’s discovery of jewels in 1913.

At the outbreak of war, Willey joined the army but was soon transferred at the request of the India Office to diplomatic service in Mesopotamia. He was killed in action near Amadia on 21 July 1919 while attached to the Inland Water Transport, Royyal Engineers. He was aged 33 and had reached the rank of Captain. He is commemorated on the Basra Memorial, panel number 43.

WILLIAMSON

John Maurice

Williamson was born in 1890 in Banstead. Son of Mr. C. H. Williamson, of Basing House, Banstead, Surrey. He came to The Leys in 1901 at the age of 11 and went into North B House. He was a Prefect, a Cadet Corporal and won First Colours at Cricket, Hockey and Lacrosse.

On leaving school, Williamson went up to Gonville and Caius College, university of Cambridge to read History and Law. He won First Colours at Cricket and Tennis and was Captain of the University Lacrosse XII. He was then articled to a firm of solicitors in London and qualified in July 1914.

At the outbreak of war, Williams enlisted in the Artists’ Rifles as a Private and was sent to the front. In March 1915, he gained a commission in the Gordon Highlanders and served with distinction in France. He was killed in action near Festubert on 16 May 1915 at the age of 25, having reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He is buried at Guards’ Cemetery, Pas de Calais, grave number III. T. 26.

WINNICOTT, MC

Russell

Winnicott was born in 1898. Son of Richard and Annie Winnicott, of Plymouth. He came to The Leys in 1913 at the age of 15 and went into North B House.

Immediately on leaving school in 1915, Winnicott secured a commission in the Devonshire Regiment, before volunteering for the Royal Flying Corps. He served with distinction in the skies above France, shooting down twice as many enemy planes as anybody else in his squadron (41st), and in 1917, his bravery was recognised with the award of the Military Cross. He was killed in action on 6 December 1917 at the age of 19, having reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is buried at Varennes Military Cemetery, grave number I. K. 32.

Extract from de Ruvigny's The Roll of Honour 1914-1918 Part 5 Page 173:

WINNICOTT, RUSSELL, M.C., Lieut., 5th (Territorial) Battn. The Devonshire Regt., attd. Royal Flying Corps, s. of Alderman Richard Weeks Winnicott, of Hyperion, Mannamead, Plymouth, J.P., by his wife, Annie, dau. of Thomas Proud, of Birmingham; b. 24 May. 1898; educ. Plymouth College, and The Leys, Cambridge gazetted 2nd Lieut. 5th Devonshire Regt. in Oct. 1915; promoted Lieut, 1 July, 1917 ; transferred to the Royal Flying Corps in Aug. 1918; obtained his Wings in Nov.; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from May, 1917, taking part in over 50 aerial combats, and bringing down 15 enemy machines, and was killed in aerial action near Cambrai 6 Dec. 1917. Buried in the British Military Cemetery there, north-west of Albert. His Commanding Officer wrote: “Your son was one of the bravest pilots I have had in my squadron, and his death has robbed me of one who was more than a friend,” and the Padre: “Everybody loved him for his courage and cheeriness; as a Pilot he had a great reputation, not only in his own squadron, but throughout the Wing; we were all awfully glad when he got his MC., which he most thoroughly deserved.” He was awarded the MC. 8 Oct. 1917 [London Gazette, 21 March, 1918], for conspicuous bravery in the field ; unm.

WOOD

Peter Norris

Wood was born in 1880 in Kent. Son of Peter Frederick Wood, of Camden Lodge, Chislehurst, Kent; husband of Kathleen Mildred Wood, of Rose Bank, Malvern Wells, Worcs. He came to The Leys in 1897 at the age of 17 and went into School House.

On leaving school, Wood joined a firm of Underwriters at Lloyds. He was also well known for his commitment as a Sunday School teacher.

At the outbreak of war, Wood joined the Inns of Court Officer Training Corps, and was eventually gazetted to the King’s Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment). In 1916, he was sent to Mesopotamia, where he served with great distinction. He died of injuries on 19 January 1917 at the age of 36, having reached the rank of Second Lieutenant. He is buried at Amara War Cemetery, grave number XXVII. G. 6.

YEWDALL

Mark

Yewdall was born in 1881. He came to The Leys in 1896 at the age of 15 and went into West House.

At the outbreak of war, Yewdall enlisted in the London Regiment (Artists’ Rifles) as a Private. He died of wounds on 13 November 1918. He is buried at Etaples Military Cemetery, Pas de Calais, grave number L. B. 13.

YOUNG

William

Young was born in 1893. Son of William Young, M.P., of 4, Albamarle St. London, W.1. He came to The Leys in 1911 at the age of 18 and went into North A House. He won First Colours at Football.

On leaving school, Young went into business with a South American financial house in London.

At the outbreak of war, Young joined the London Scottish as a Private going overseas in September 1914 and served with distinction at Messines, Ypres, Neuve Chapelle and La Bassée. In May 1915, he gained a commission in the Cameron Highlanders and served in Salonika and Macedonia, where he was severely wounded (1916). He was killed in action during the Battle of Passchendaele on 22 August 1917 while attached to the 7th Battalion from the 2nd. He was aged 24 and had reached the rank of Lieutenant. He is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, West-Vlaanderen, panel numbers 135 to 138.

Last updated 23 October, 2014

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